International Trade Administration September 29, 2005 – Federal Register Recent Federal Regulation Documents

Continuation of Antidumping Duty Order: Petroleum Wax Candles from the People's Republic of China (“PRC”)
Document Number: 05-19508
Type: Notice
Date: 2005-09-29
Agency: Department of Commerce, International Trade Administration
As a result of the determinations by the Department of Commerce (``the Department'') and the International Trade Commission (``ITC'') that revocation of the antidumping duty order on petroleum wax candles (``candles'') from the PRC would likely lead to continuation or recurrence of dumping and material injury to an industry in the United States, the Department is publishing notice of the continuation of this antidumping duty order.
Notice of Decision of the Court of International Trade: Certain Cased Pencils from the People's Republic of China
Document Number: 05-19506
Type: Notice
Date: 2005-09-29
Agency: Department of Commerce, International Trade Administration
On August 23, 2005, the Court of International Trade (CIT) sustained the Department of Commerce's (the Department's) redetermination regarding the 1999-2000 antidumping duty administrative review of certain cased pencils (pencils) from the People's Republic of China (PRC). Pursuant to the Court's remand order, in its redetermination the Department assigned Guangdong Provincial Stationery & Sporting Goods Import & Export Corp. (Guangdong) a cash deposit rate of 13.91 percent, rather than the PRC-wide rate assigned to the company in the contested administrative review. Consistent with the decision of the United States Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit (Federal Circuit) in The Timken Company v. United States and China National Machinery and Equipment Import and Export Corporation, 893 F. 2d 337 (Fed. Cir. 1990) (Timken), the Department is publishing this notice of the CIT's decision which is not in harmony with the Department's determination in the 1999-2000 antidumping duty administrative review of pencils from the PRC.