Availability of an Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact for the Biological Control of Cape-Ivy, 45451 [2016-16624]

Download as PDF Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 135 / Thursday, July 14, 2016 / Notices Estimated annual number of respondents: 7,200. Estimated annual number of responses per respondent: 1.5. Estimated annual number of responses: 10,800. Estimated total annual burden on respondents: 4,618 hours. (Due to averaging, the total annual burden hours may not equal the product of the annual number of responses multiplied by the reporting burden per response.) All responses to this notice will be summarized and included in the request for OMB approval. All comments will also become a matter of public record. Done in Washington, DC, this 8th day of July 2016. Kevin Shea, Administrator, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service. [FR Doc. 2016–16612 Filed 7–13–16; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 3410–34–P DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service [Docket No. APHIS–2015–0099] Availability of an Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact for the Biological Control of Cape-Ivy Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice. AGENCY: We are advising the public that the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service has prepared a final environmental assessment and finding of no significant impact relative to the field release of a gall-forming fly, Parafreutreta regalis, into the continental United States for the use as a biological control agent to reduce the severity of Cape-ivy, Delairea odorata. Based on the finding of no significant impact, we have determined that an environmental impact statement need not be prepared. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Mr. Robert Tichenor, Plant Health Programs, PPQ, APHIS, 4700 River Road Unit 133, Riverdale, MD 20737–1231; (301) 851– 2198. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Cape-ivy (Delairea odorata), a native of South Africa, has become one of the most pervasive non-native plants to invade the coastal west region of the United States, particularly in California and Oregon. Cape-ivy is a weedy vine that prefers moist, partly-shaded environments along the Pacific coast; asabaliauskas on DSK3SPTVN1PROD with NOTICES SUMMARY: VerDate Sep<11>2014 19:33 Jul 13, 2016 Jkt 238001 however, there are reports of infestations at inland riparian locations. Fragments of the plant easily root, which facilitates the spread of this invasive plant. Overgrowth of Cape-ivy, a climbing vine, causes native plants to die. The Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) is proposing to issue permits for the field release of a gall-forming fly, Parafreutreta regalis, into the continental United States to reduce the severity of Cape-ivy infestations. On March 24, 2016, we published in the Federal Register (81 FR 15679– 15680, Docket No. APHIS–2015–0099) a notice 1 in which we announced the availability, for public review and comment, of an environmental assessment (EA) that examined the potential environmental impacts associated with the proposed release of P. regalis into the continental United States. We solicited comments on the EA for 30 days ending April 25, 2016. We received 23 comments by that date. The comments were from a State native plant society, plant preservation entities, State departments of agriculture, an organization of State plant regulatory agencies, and private citizens. Twenty-two commenters supported this action. One commenter raised a concern about the possibility of P. regalis being introduced to Hawaii by airplanes commuting from California to Hawaii and asked whether we considered the biological risks associated with the release of P. regalis in Hawaii. We have prepared a response to this specific concern in an appendix to the final EA. In this document, we are advising the public of our finding of no significant impact (FONSI) regarding the release of P. regalis into the continental United States for use as a biological control agent for Cape-ivy. The finding, which is based on the final EA, reflects our determination that release of this biological control agent will not have a significant impact on the quality of the human environment. The final EA and FONSI may be viewed on Regulations.gov Web site (see footnote 1). Copies of the EA and FONSI are also available for public inspection at USDA, Room 1141, South Building, 14th Street and Independence Avenue SW., Washington, DC, between 8 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday, except holidays. Persons wishing to inspect copies are requested to call 1 To view the notice, the comments we received, the final EA, and the FONSI, go to http:// www.regulations.gov/#!docketDetail;D=APHIS2015-0099. PO 00000 Frm 00003 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 45451 ahead to (202) 799–7039 to facilitate entry into the reading room. In addition, copies may be obtained by calling or writing to the individual listed under FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT. The EA and FONSI have been prepared in accordance with: (1) The National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), as amended (42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.); (2) regulations of the Council on Environmental Quality for implementing the procedural provisions of NEPA (40 CFR parts 1500–1508); (3) USDA regulations implementing NEPA (7 CFR part 1b); and (4) APHIS’ NEPA Implementing Procedures (7 CFR part 372). Done in Washington, DC, this 8th day of July 2016. Kevin Shea, Administrator, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service. [FR Doc. 2016–16624 Filed 7–13–16; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 3410–34–P DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Food Safety and Inspection Service [Docket No. FSIS–2014–0032] Establishment-Specific Data Release Strategic Plan Food Safety and Inspection Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice; response to comments. AGENCY: The Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) is announcing the availability of its final Establishment-Specific Data Release Strategic Plan (the Plan) for sharing data on federally inspected meat and poultry establishments with the public. FSIS is also responding to comments received on a draft version of the Plan that FSIS posted on its Web site and announced in January 2015 in the Federal Register. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Dr. Daniel L. Engeljohn, Assistant Administrator, Office of Policy and Program Development; Telephone: (202) 205–0495. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: SUMMARY: Background The Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) administers a regulatory program under the Federal Meat Inspection Act (FMIA) (21 U.S.C. 601 et seq.), the Poultry Products Inspection Act (PPIA) (21 U.S.C. 451 et seq.), and the Egg Products Inspection Act (EPIA) (21 U.S.C. 1031 et seq.) to protect the health and welfare of consumers. The Agency is responsible for ensuring that the nation’s commercial supply of meat, E:\FR\FM\14JYN1.SGM 14JYN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 81, Number 135 (Thursday, July 14, 2016)]
[Notices]
[Page 45451]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2016-16624]


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DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service

[Docket No. APHIS-2015-0099]


Availability of an Environmental Assessment and Finding of No 
Significant Impact for the Biological Control of Cape-Ivy

AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, USDA.

ACTION: Notice.

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SUMMARY: We are advising the public that the Animal and Plant Health 
Inspection Service has prepared a final environmental assessment and 
finding of no significant impact relative to the field release of a 
gall-forming fly, Parafreutreta regalis, into the continental United 
States for the use as a biological control agent to reduce the severity 
of Cape-ivy, Delairea odorata. Based on the finding of no significant 
impact, we have determined that an environmental impact statement need 
not be prepared.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Mr. Robert Tichenor, Plant Health 
Programs, PPQ, APHIS, 4700 River Road Unit 133, Riverdale, MD 20737-
1231; (301) 851-2198.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:  Cape-ivy (Delairea odorata), a native of 
South Africa, has become one of the most pervasive non-native plants to 
invade the coastal west region of the United States, particularly in 
California and Oregon. Cape-ivy is a weedy vine that prefers moist, 
partly-shaded environments along the Pacific coast; however, there are 
reports of infestations at inland riparian locations. Fragments of the 
plant easily root, which facilitates the spread of this invasive plant. 
Overgrowth of Cape-ivy, a climbing vine, causes native plants to die. 
The Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) is proposing to 
issue permits for the field release of a gall-forming fly, 
Parafreutreta regalis, into the continental United States to reduce the 
severity of Cape-ivy infestations.
    On March 24, 2016, we published in the Federal Register (81 FR 
15679-15680, Docket No. APHIS-2015-0099) a notice \1\ in which we 
announced the availability, for public review and comment, of an 
environmental assessment (EA) that examined the potential environmental 
impacts associated with the proposed release of P. regalis into the 
continental United States.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \1\ To view the notice, the comments we received, the final EA, 
and the FONSI, go to http://www.regulations.gov/#!docketDetail;D=APHIS-2015-0099.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    We solicited comments on the EA for 30 days ending April 25, 2016. 
We received 23 comments by that date. The comments were from a State 
native plant society, plant preservation entities, State departments of 
agriculture, an organization of State plant regulatory agencies, and 
private citizens. Twenty-two commenters supported this action.
    One commenter raised a concern about the possibility of P. regalis 
being introduced to Hawaii by airplanes commuting from California to 
Hawaii and asked whether we considered the biological risks associated 
with the release of P. regalis in Hawaii. We have prepared a response 
to this specific concern in an appendix to the final EA.
    In this document, we are advising the public of our finding of no 
significant impact (FONSI) regarding the release of P. regalis into the 
continental United States for use as a biological control agent for 
Cape-ivy. The finding, which is based on the final EA, reflects our 
determination that release of this biological control agent will not 
have a significant impact on the quality of the human environment.
    The final EA and FONSI may be viewed on Regulations.gov Web site 
(see footnote 1). Copies of the EA and FONSI are also available for 
public inspection at USDA, Room 1141, South Building, 14th Street and 
Independence Avenue SW., Washington, DC, between 8 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., 
Monday through Friday, except holidays. Persons wishing to inspect 
copies are requested to call ahead to (202) 799-7039 to facilitate 
entry into the reading room. In addition, copies may be obtained by 
calling or writing to the individual listed under FOR FURTHER 
INFORMATION CONTACT.
    The EA and FONSI have been prepared in accordance with: (1) The 
National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), as amended (42 U.S.C. 
4321 et seq.); (2) regulations of the Council on Environmental Quality 
for implementing the procedural provisions of NEPA (40 CFR parts 1500-
1508); (3) USDA regulations implementing NEPA (7 CFR part 1b); and (4) 
APHIS' NEPA Implementing Procedures (7 CFR part 372).

    Done in Washington, DC, this 8th day of July 2016.
Kevin Shea,
Administrator, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.
[FR Doc. 2016-16624 Filed 7-13-16; 8:45 am]
 BILLING CODE 3410-34-P