Khapra Beetle; New Regulated Countries and Regulated Articles, 43009-43011 [2015-17842]

Download as PDF Federal Register / Vol. 80, No. 139 / Tuesday, July 21, 2015 / Rules and Regulations Wyandotte County. The entire county. Kentucky The entire State. Maryland Allegany County. The entire county. Anne Arundel County. The entire county. Baltimore City. The entire city. Baltimore County. The entire county. Calvert County. The entire county. Carroll County. The entire county. * * * * * Fredrick County. The entire county. Garrett County. The entire county. Harford County. The entire county. Howard County. The entire county. Montgomery County. The entire county. * * * * * Saint Mary’s County. The entire county. Washington County. The entire county. Massachusetts * The entire State. * * * * Minnesota Dakota County. The entire county. * * * * * Olmsted County. The entire county. * * * * * Winona County. The entire county. The entire State. The entire State. * * * Hillsborough County. The entire county. Merrimack County. The entire county. Rockingham County. The entire county. New York The entire State. North Carolina Granville County. The entire county. Person County. The entire county. Vance County. The entire county. Warren County. The entire county. * * * * * Pennsylvania The entire State. Tennessee Anderson County. The entire county. Blount County. The entire county. Bradley County. The entire county. Campbell County. The entire county. Carter County. The entire county. Claiborne County. The entire county. Clay County. The entire county. 16:53 Jul 20, 2015 Jkt 235001 Adams County. The entire county. * * * * Buffalo County. The entire county. Calumet County. The entire county. Columbia County. The entire county. * * * * * Dane County. The entire county. Dodge County. The entire county. Door County. The entire county. Douglas County. The entire county. * * * * * Grant County. The entire county. Iowa County. The entire county. Jackson County. The entire county. Juneau County. The entire county. * * * * * Kewaunee County. The entire county. La Crosse County. The entire county. Lafayette County. The entire county. Manitowoc County. The entire county. * * * * * Monroe County. The entire county. Oneida County. The entire county. Oneida Indian Reservation. The entire reservation. * * * * * Richland County. The entire county. Rock County. The entire county. * * * * * PO 00000 Frm 00003 Done in Washington, DC, this 15th day of July 2015. Kevin Shea, Administrator, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service. [FR Doc. 2015–17847 Filed 7–20–15; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 3410–34–P DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service 7 CFR Part 319 [Docket No. APHIS–2013–0079] Khapra Beetle; New Regulated Countries and Regulated Articles Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, USDA. AGENCY: Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 Final rule. We are adopting as a final rule, with changes, an interim rule that amended the khapra beetle regulations by adding additional regulated articles and regulated countries, updating the regulations to reflect changes in industry practices and country names that have changed since the regulations were originally published, and removing the list of countries where khapra beetle is known to occur from the regulations and moving it to the Plant Protection and Quarantine Web site. These actions were necessary to prevent the introduction of khapra beetle from infested countries on commodities that have been determined to be hosts for the pest, reflect current industry practices, and make it easier to make timely changes to the list of regulated countries. SUMMARY: * * New Hampshire asabaliauskas on DSK5VPTVN1PROD with RULES * Trempealeau County. The entire county. * * * * * Walworth County. The entire county. * * * * * Winnebago County. The entire county. ACTION: Virginia Wisconsin Missouri VerDate Sep<11>2014 Cocke County. The entire county. Davidson County. The entire county. Fentress County. The entire county. Grainger County. The entire county. Greene County. The entire county. Hamblen County. The entire county. Hamilton County. The entire county. Hancock County. The entire county. Hawkins County. The entire county. Jackson County. The entire county. Jefferson County. The entire county. Johnson County. The entire county. Knox County. The entire county. Loudon County. The entire county. Macon County. The entire county. McMinn County. The entire county. Meigs County. The entire county. Monroe County. The entire county. Morgan County. The entire county. Overton County. The entire county. Pickett County. The entire county. Polk County. The entire county. Putnam County. The entire county. Rhea County. The entire county. Roane County. The entire county. Scott County. The entire county. Sevier County. The entire county. Smith County. The entire county. Sullivan County. The entire county. Unicoi County. The entire county. Union County. The entire county. Washington County. The entire county. 43009 This final rule is effective July 21, 2015. DATES: Mr. George Apgar Balady, Senior Regulatory Policy Specialist, Regulatory Coordination and Compliance, PPQ, APHIS, 4700 River Road Unit 133, Riverdale, MD 20737–1236; (301) 851– 2240. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: E:\FR\FM\21JYR1.SGM 21JYR1 43010 Federal Register / Vol. 80, No. 139 / Tuesday, July 21, 2015 / Rules and Regulations asabaliauskas on DSK5VPTVN1PROD with RULES Background In an interim rule 1 effective and published in the Federal Register on December 29, 2014 (79 FR 77839–77841, Docket No. APHIS–2013–0079), we amended the khapra beetle regulations in 7 CFR part 319 by adding rice (Oryza sativa), chick peas (Cicer spp.), safflower seeds (Carthamus tinctorius), and soybeans (Glycine max) to the list of regulated articles in § 319.75–2 and prohibiting their entry into the United States unless accompanied by a phytosanitary certificate with an additional declaration stating that the articles in the consignment were inspected and found free of khapra beetle in accordance with § 319.75–9. We also added bulk, unpackaged seeds to the list of regulated articles due to their potential for infestation by khapra beetle. In addition, we updated the list of regulated countries in § 319.75–2(b) and moved that list to the Plant Protection and Quarantine (PPQ) Web site at http://www.aphis.usda.gov/ import_export/plants/manuals/ports/ downloads/kb.pdf. Countries will be added to the list of regulated areas when we receive official notification from the country that it is infested or when we intercept the pest in a commercial shipment from that country. Any future additions to the list of regulated areas will be conveyed through publication of a notice in the Federal Register. Finally, we updated the regulations for certain commodities due to changes in industry practices that have affected the risk of khapra beetle being introduced into the United States. These actions were necessary to prevent the introduction of khapra beetle from infested countries on commodities that have been determined to be hosts for the pest, reflect current industry practices, and make it easier to make timely changes to the list of regulated countries. We solicited comments concerning the interim rule for 60 days ending February 27, 2015. We received one comment by that date from a private citizen. The commenter discussed the rule in general terms without supporting or opposing any of its provisions. Miscellaneous Currently, the regulations state that plant gums and seeds shipped as bulk cargo in an unpackaged state are regulated articles. We are making a minor change to clarify that the seeds in this case are plant gum seeds and not all plant seeds. In addition, we are making 1 To view the interim rule and the comments we received, go to http://www.regulations.gov/ #!docketDetail;D=APHIS-2013-0079. VerDate Sep<11>2014 16:53 Jul 20, 2015 Jkt 235001 corrections to the names of several taxa that were misspelled in § 319.75–2, footnote 2. In the preamble of the interim rule, we stated that we were codifying the requirements of two Federal Orders that, among other things, prohibited the entry into the United States of rice, chick peas, safflower seeds, and soybeans in passenger baggage and personal effects. However, we inadvertently omitted that requirement from the regulations in § 319.75–2. We are correcting that omission in this final rule. Therefore, for the reasons given in the interim rule and in this document, we are adopting the interim rule as a final rule, with the changes discussed in this document. This final rule also affirms the information contained in the interim rule concerning Executive Order 12988 and the Paperwork Reduction Act. Further, for this action, the Office of Management and Budget has waived its review under Executive Order 12866. Regulatory Flexibility Act This final rule follows an interim rule that amended the khapra beetle regulations by adding additional regulated articles and regulated countries, updating the regulations to reflect changes in industry practices and country names that have changed since the regulations were originally published, and removing the list of countries where khapra beetle is known to occur from the regulations and moving it to the Plant Protection and Quarantine Web site. The U.S. entities that may be impacted by the rule are likely to be those involved in importing, handling, moving, processing, or selling regulated articles. The 2012 County Business Patterns (North American Industry Classification System) statistics corresponding to the Small Business Administration small-entity standards indicate that between 93 and 100 percent of these entities can be considered small. However, impacts of the rule are expected to be limited; the khapra beetle restrictions on rice imports have been in place since July 2012 and on the latter three crops since December 2011. In addition, none of the newly regulated areas (Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, the United Arab Emirates, and South Sudan, and the Palestinian Authority—West Bank) is an important source for the United States of major commodities known to host khapra beetle. Under these circumstances, the Administrator of the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service has determined that this action will not PO 00000 Frm 00004 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 have a significant economic impact on a substantial number of small entities. List of Subjects in 7 CFR Part 319 Coffee, Cotton, Fruits, Imports, Logs, Nursery stock, Plant diseases and pests, Quarantine, Reporting and recordkeeping requirements, Rice, Vegetables. Accordingly, the interim rule amending 7 CFR part 319 that was published at 79 FR 77839–77841 on December 29, 2014, is adopted as a final rule with the following changes: PART 319—FOREIGN QUARANTINE NOTICES 1. The authority citation for part 319 continues to read as follows: ■ Authority: 7 U.S.C. 450 and 7701–7772 and 7781–7786; 21 U.S.C. 136 and 136a; 7 CFR 2.22, 2.80, and 371.3. 2. Section 319.75–2 is amended as follows: ■ a. By revising paragraph (a)(1). ■ b. In paragraph (a)(3), by adding the words ‘‘plant gum’’ before the word ‘‘seeds’’. ■ c. By revising the introductory text of paragraph (b). The revisions read as follows: ■ § 319.75–2 Regulated articles.1 (a) * * * (1) Seeds of the plant family Cucurbitaceae 2 if in shipments greater than 2 ounces, if not for propagation; * * * * * (b) The following articles are regulated articles from all countries designated in accordance with paragraph (c) of this section as infested with khapra beetle or that have the potential to be infested with khapra beetle and are prohibited entry into the United States in passenger baggage and personal effects. Commercial shipments must be accompanied by a phytosanitary certificate issued in accordance with § 319.75–9 and containing an additional declaration stating: ‘‘The shipment was inspected and found free of khapra beetle (Trogoderma granarium).’’ * * * * * 1 The importation of regulated articles may be subject to prohibitions or additional restrictions under other provisions of 7 CFR part 319, such as Subpart—Foreign Cotton and Covers (see § 319.8) and Subpart—Fruits and Vegetables (see § 319.56). 2 Seeds of the plant family Cucurbitaceae include but are not limited to: Benincasa hispida (wax gourd), Citrullus lanatus (watermelon), Cucumis melo (muskmelon, cantaloupe, honeydew), Cucumis sativus (cucumber), Cucurbita pepo (pumpkin, squashes, vegetable marrow), Lagenaria siceraria (calabash, gourd), Luffa cylindrica (dishcloth gourd), Mormordica charantia (bitter melon), and Sechium edule (chayote). E:\FR\FM\21JYR1.SGM 21JYR1 Federal Register / Vol. 80, No. 139 / Tuesday, July 21, 2015 / Rules and Regulations Done in Washington, DC, this 15th day of July 2015. Kevin Shea, Administrator, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service. [FR Doc. 2015–17842 Filed 7–20–15; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 3410–34–P DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 39 [Docket No. FAA–2014–1127; Directorate Identifier 2014–NE–16–AD; Amendment 39– 18203; AD 2015–14–05] RIN 2120–AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney Turbofan Engines Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule. AGENCY: We are adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) for all Pratt & Whitney (PW) JT8D–217C and JT8D– 219 turbofan engines. This AD was prompted by reports of cracking in the low-pressure turbine (LPT) shaft. This AD requires removing affected LPT shafts from service using a drawdown plan. We are issuing this AD to prevent failure of the LPT shaft, which could lead to an uncontained engine failure and damage to the airplane. DATES: This AD is effective August 25, 2015. ADDRESSES: For service information identified in this AD, contact Pratt & Whitney, 400 Main St., East Hartford, CT 06108; phone: 860–565–8770; fax: 860–565–4503. You may view this service information at the FAA, Engine & Propeller Directorate, 12 New England Executive Park, Burlington, MA. For information on the availability of this material at the FAA, call 781–238–7125. SUMMARY: asabaliauskas on DSK5VPTVN1PROD with RULES Examining the AD Docket You may examine the AD docket on the Internet at http:// www.regulations.gov by searching for and locating Docket No. FAA–2014– 1127; or in person at the Docket Management Facility between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, except Federal holidays. The AD docket contains this AD, the regulatory evaluation, any comments received, and other information. The address for the Docket Office (phone: 800–647–5527) is Document Management Facility, U.S. Department of Transportation, Docket Operations, M–30, West Building Ground Floor, Room W12–140, 1200 VerDate Sep<11>2014 16:53 Jul 20, 2015 Jkt 235001 New Jersey Avenue SE., Washington, DC 20590. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: JoAnn Theriault, Aerospace Engineer, Engine Certification Office, FAA, Engine & Propeller Directorate, 12 New England Executive Park, Burlington, MA 01803; phone: 781–238–7105; fax: 781–238– 7199; email: jo-ann.theriault@faa.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Discussion We issued a notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM) to amend 14 CFR part 39 by adding an AD that would apply to all PW JT8D–217C and JT8D– 219 turbofan engines. The NPRM published in the Federal Register on March 2, 2015 (80 FR 11140). The NPRM was prompted by in-shop findings of fatigue cracks on the No. 4.5 bearing thread undercut adjacent to the oil feed holes. The cracks were discovered during routine fluorescent penetrant inspections (FPIs). Both shafts had oil feed hole enlargement rework accomplished. The root cause is increased stress on the fillet of the thread undercut region in front of the oil feed holes caused by oil feed hole rework. The increased stress reduces the low cycle fatigue life of the shaft. The NPRM proposed to require removing affected LPT shafts from service using a drawdown plan. We are issuing this AD to prevent failure of the LPT shaft, which could lead to an uncontained engine failure and damage to the airplane. Related Service Information We reviewed PW Service Bulletin (SB) No. JT8D 6504, dated November 5, 2014. The SB contains additional information regarding removal of the LPT shaft. Comments We gave the public the opportunity to participate in developing this AD. The following presents the comments received on the NPRM (80 FR 11140, March 2, 2015) and the FAA’s response to each comment. Request To Withdraw the NPRM Delta Air Lines (DAL) and Allegiant Air requested that the current LPT shaft life limit of 25,000 cycles-since-new (CSN) be retained rather than removing the LPT shaft from service at 20,000 CSN as proposed in the NPRM. The commenters stated that reducing the life limit is unjustified because there has not been an in-service LPT shaft failure of the type addressed. We do not agree. We determined that an acceptable level of safety would not be maintained if LPT shafts are allowed PO 00000 Frm 00005 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 43011 to remain in service until accumulating 25,000 CSN. We reduced the life of the LPT shaft to 20,000 CSN to minimize the risk of LPT shaft failure. We did not change this AD. Proposal To Increase Repetitive Inspections DAL and Allegiant Air proposed increasing the occurrence of FPIs to increase the opportunity of identifying LPT shaft cracks. The commenters stated that routine FPIs have been successful in detecting LPT shaft cracks in the past. We do not agree. Recurring inspections are not adequate as a final corrective action. Relying on recurring FPIs to detect cracks, rather than shaft removal at 20,000 CSN, would likely result in an increased number of LPT shafts cracking in service, a greater risk of undetected cracked shafts being returned to service, and an unacceptable risk of shaft failure. We determined that long-term continued operational safety is enhanced by a terminating action that removes affected shafts from service rather than by increasing the occurrence of repetitive inspections. We did not change this AD. Request To Reduce Costs DAL and Allegiant Air requested retaining the existing life limit or increasing the occurrence of inspections. The commenters stated that the life reduction in the NPRM places an undue economic burden on the U.S. fleet by forcing early engine removals. We do not agree. We mitigated the operational and financial impacts by providing a drawdown plan rather than requiring removal before further flight, while providing an acceptable level of safety. We did not change this AD. Conclusion We reviewed the relevant data, considered the comments received, and determined that air safety and the public interest require adopting this AD as proposed. Costs of Compliance We estimate that this AD will affect about 744 engines installed on airplanes of U.S. registry. The average labor rate is $85 per hour. We estimate the prorated replacement cost would be $28,230. We also estimate that shaft replacement would be accomplished during an engine shop visit at no additional labor cost. Based on these figures, we estimate the cost of the proposed AD on U.S. operators to be $21,003,120. E:\FR\FM\21JYR1.SGM 21JYR1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 80, Number 139 (Tuesday, July 21, 2015)]
[Rules and Regulations]
[Pages 43009-43011]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2015-17842]


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DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service

7 CFR Part 319

[Docket No. APHIS-2013-0079]


Khapra Beetle; New Regulated Countries and Regulated Articles

AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, USDA.

ACTION: Final rule.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: We are adopting as a final rule, with changes, an interim rule 
that amended the khapra beetle regulations by adding additional 
regulated articles and regulated countries, updating the regulations to 
reflect changes in industry practices and country names that have 
changed since the regulations were originally published, and removing 
the list of countries where khapra beetle is known to occur from the 
regulations and moving it to the Plant Protection and Quarantine Web 
site. These actions were necessary to prevent the introduction of 
khapra beetle from infested countries on commodities that have been 
determined to be hosts for the pest, reflect current industry 
practices, and make it easier to make timely changes to the list of 
regulated countries.

DATES: This final rule is effective July 21, 2015.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Mr. George Apgar Balady, Senior 
Regulatory Policy Specialist, Regulatory Coordination and Compliance, 
PPQ, APHIS, 4700 River Road Unit 133, Riverdale, MD 20737-1236; (301) 
851-2240.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:

[[Page 43010]]

Background

    In an interim rule \1\ effective and published in the Federal 
Register on December 29, 2014 (79 FR 77839-77841, Docket No. APHIS-
2013-0079), we amended the khapra beetle regulations in 7 CFR part 319 
by adding rice (Oryza sativa), chick peas (Cicer spp.), safflower seeds 
(Carthamus tinctorius), and soybeans (Glycine max) to the list of 
regulated articles in Sec.  319.75-2 and prohibiting their entry into 
the United States unless accompanied by a phytosanitary certificate 
with an additional declaration stating that the articles in the 
consignment were inspected and found free of khapra beetle in 
accordance with Sec.  319.75-9. We also added bulk, unpackaged seeds to 
the list of regulated articles due to their potential for infestation 
by khapra beetle. In addition, we updated the list of regulated 
countries in Sec.  319.75-2(b) and moved that list to the Plant 
Protection and Quarantine (PPQ) Web site at http://www.aphis.usda.gov/import_export/plants/manuals/ports/downloads/kb.pdf. Countries will be 
added to the list of regulated areas when we receive official 
notification from the country that it is infested or when we intercept 
the pest in a commercial shipment from that country. Any future 
additions to the list of regulated areas will be conveyed through 
publication of a notice in the Federal Register.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \1\ To view the interim rule and the comments we received, go to 
http://www.regulations.gov/#!docketDetail;D=APHIS-2013-0079.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Finally, we updated the regulations for certain commodities due to 
changes in industry practices that have affected the risk of khapra 
beetle being introduced into the United States. These actions were 
necessary to prevent the introduction of khapra beetle from infested 
countries on commodities that have been determined to be hosts for the 
pest, reflect current industry practices, and make it easier to make 
timely changes to the list of regulated countries.
    We solicited comments concerning the interim rule for 60 days 
ending February 27, 2015. We received one comment by that date from a 
private citizen. The commenter discussed the rule in general terms 
without supporting or opposing any of its provisions.

Miscellaneous

    Currently, the regulations state that plant gums and seeds shipped 
as bulk cargo in an unpackaged state are regulated articles. We are 
making a minor change to clarify that the seeds in this case are plant 
gum seeds and not all plant seeds. In addition, we are making 
corrections to the names of several taxa that were misspelled in Sec.  
319.75-2, footnote 2.
    In the preamble of the interim rule, we stated that we were 
codifying the requirements of two Federal Orders that, among other 
things, prohibited the entry into the United States of rice, chick 
peas, safflower seeds, and soybeans in passenger baggage and personal 
effects. However, we inadvertently omitted that requirement from the 
regulations in Sec.  319.75-2. We are correcting that omission in this 
final rule.
    Therefore, for the reasons given in the interim rule and in this 
document, we are adopting the interim rule as a final rule, with the 
changes discussed in this document.
    This final rule also affirms the information contained in the 
interim rule concerning Executive Order 12988 and the Paperwork 
Reduction Act.
    Further, for this action, the Office of Management and Budget has 
waived its review under Executive Order 12866.

Regulatory Flexibility Act

    This final rule follows an interim rule that amended the khapra 
beetle regulations by adding additional regulated articles and 
regulated countries, updating the regulations to reflect changes in 
industry practices and country names that have changed since the 
regulations were originally published, and removing the list of 
countries where khapra beetle is known to occur from the regulations 
and moving it to the Plant Protection and Quarantine Web site.
    The U.S. entities that may be impacted by the rule are likely to be 
those involved in importing, handling, moving, processing, or selling 
regulated articles. The 2012 County Business Patterns (North American 
Industry Classification System) statistics corresponding to the Small 
Business Administration small-entity standards indicate that between 93 
and 100 percent of these entities can be considered small. However, 
impacts of the rule are expected to be limited; the khapra beetle 
restrictions on rice imports have been in place since July 2012 and on 
the latter three crops since December 2011. In addition, none of the 
newly regulated areas (Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, the United Arab Emirates, 
and South Sudan, and the Palestinian Authority--West Bank) is an 
important source for the United States of major commodities known to 
host khapra beetle.
    Under these circumstances, the Administrator of the Animal and 
Plant Health Inspection Service has determined that this action will 
not have a significant economic impact on a substantial number of small 
entities.

List of Subjects in 7 CFR Part 319

    Coffee, Cotton, Fruits, Imports, Logs, Nursery stock, Plant 
diseases and pests, Quarantine, Reporting and recordkeeping 
requirements, Rice, Vegetables.

    Accordingly, the interim rule amending 7 CFR part 319 that was 
published at 79 FR 77839-77841 on December 29, 2014, is adopted as a 
final rule with the following changes:

PART 319--FOREIGN QUARANTINE NOTICES

0
1. The authority citation for part 319 continues to read as follows:

    Authority: 7 U.S.C. 450 and 7701-7772 and 7781-7786; 21 U.S.C. 
136 and 136a; 7 CFR 2.22, 2.80, and 371.3.


0
2. Section 319.75-2 is amended as follows:
0
a. By revising paragraph (a)(1).
0
b. In paragraph (a)(3), by adding the words ``plant gum'' before the 
word ``seeds''.
0
c. By revising the introductory text of paragraph (b).
    The revisions read as follows:


Sec.  319.75-2  Regulated articles.\1\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \1\ The importation of regulated articles may be subject to 
prohibitions or additional restrictions under other provisions of 7 
CFR part 319, such as Subpart--Foreign Cotton and Covers (see Sec.  
319.8) and Subpart--Fruits and Vegetables (see Sec.  319.56).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    (a) * * *
    (1) Seeds of the plant family Cucurbitaceae \2\ if in shipments 
greater than 2 ounces, if not for propagation;
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \2\ Seeds of the plant family Cucurbitaceae include but are not 
limited to: Benincasa hispida (wax gourd), Citrullus lanatus 
(watermelon), Cucumis melo (muskmelon, cantaloupe, honeydew), 
Cucumis sativus (cucumber), Cucurbita pepo (pumpkin, squashes, 
vegetable marrow), Lagenaria siceraria (calabash, gourd), Luffa 
cylindrica (dishcloth gourd), Mormordica charantia (bitter melon), 
and Sechium edule (chayote).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

* * * * *
    (b) The following articles are regulated articles from all 
countries designated in accordance with paragraph (c) of this section 
as infested with khapra beetle or that have the potential to be 
infested with khapra beetle and are prohibited entry into the United 
States in passenger baggage and personal effects. Commercial shipments 
must be accompanied by a phytosanitary certificate issued in accordance 
with Sec.  319.75-9 and containing an additional declaration stating: 
``The shipment was inspected and found free of khapra beetle 
(Trogoderma granarium).''
* * * * *


[[Page 43011]]


    Done in Washington, DC, this 15th day of July 2015.
Kevin Shea,
Administrator, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.
[FR Doc. 2015-17842 Filed 7-20-15; 8:45 am]
 BILLING CODE 3410-34-P