Federal Aviation Administration December 30, 2016 – Federal Register Recent Federal Regulation Documents

Airworthiness Directives; Safran Helicopter Engines, S.A. (Formerly Turbomeca S.A.) Turboshaft Engines
Document Number: 2016-31695
Type: Rule
Date: 2016-12-30
Agency: Federal Aviation Administration, Department of Transportation
We are superseding airworthiness directive (AD) 2016-04-12, that applies to certain Safran Helicopter Engines, S.A. (formerly Turbomeca S.A.) Arriel 2B, 2B1, 2C, 2C1, 2C2, 2D, 2E, 2S1, and 2S2 turboshaft engines. AD 2016-04-12 required spectrometric oil analysis (SOA) inspection of the engine accessory gearbox (AGB), and, depending on the results, removal of the engine AGB. This AD requires initial and repetitive wear inspections of the engine AGB cover. This AD was prompted by a report of an uncommanded in-flight shutdown (IFSD) of an Arriel 2S2 engine caused by rupture of the 41-tooth gear, which forms part of the bevel gear in the engine AGB. We are issuing this AD to correct the unsafe condition on these products.
Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Airplanes
Document Number: 2016-31693
Type: Rule
Date: 2016-12-30
Agency: Federal Aviation Administration, Department of Transportation
The FAA is correcting an airworthiness directive (AD) that published in the Federal Register. That AD applies to certain The Boeing Company Model 787-8 airplanes. As published, the amendment number specified in the preamble and regulatory text is incorrect. This document corrects that error. In all other respects, the original document remains the same.
Revision of Airworthiness Standards for Normal, Utility, Acrobatic, and Commuter Category Airplanes
Document Number: 2016-30246
Type: Rule
Date: 2016-12-30
Agency: Federal Aviation Administration, Department of Transportation
The FAA amends its airworthiness standards for normal, utility, acrobatic, and commuter category airplanes by replacing current prescriptive design requirements with performance-based airworthiness standards. These standards also replace the current weight and propulsion divisions in small airplane regulations with performance- and risk-based divisions for airplanes with a maximum seating capacity of 19 passengers or less and a maximum takeoff weight of 19,000 pounds or less. These airworthiness standards are based on, and will maintain, the level of safety of the current small airplane regulations, except for areas addressing loss of control and icing, for which the safety level has been increased. The FAA adopts additional airworthiness standards to address certification for flight in icing conditions, enhanced stall characteristics, and minimum control speed to prevent departure from controlled flight for multiengine airplanes. This rulemaking is in response to the Congressional mandate set forth in the Small Airplane Revitalization Act of 2013.