Environmental Protection Agency January 9, 2008 – Federal Register Recent Federal Regulation Documents

Poly(hexamethylenebiguanide) hydrochloride (PHMB); Exemption from the Requirement of a Tolerance
Document Number: E8-189
Type: Rule
Date: 2008-01-09
Agency: Environmental Protection Agency
This regulation establishes an exemption from the requirement of a tolerance for residues of the insecticide, Poly(hexamethylenebiguanide) hydrochloride (PHMB) on all food when residues are the result of lawful application of a food contact surface sanitizer containing PHMB as a sanitizer solution in food handling establishments when applied as a sanitizer. Arch Chemicals Inc. submitted a petition to EPA under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FFDCA), as amended by the Food Quality Protection Act of 1996 (FQPA), requesting an exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. This regulation eliminates the need to establish a maximum permissible level for residues of PHMB.
Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Michigan; PSD Regulations
Document Number: E8-186
Type: Proposed Rule
Date: 2008-01-09
Agency: Environmental Protection Agency
EPA is proposing to conditionally approve revisions to Michigan's State Implementation plan (SIP) to add the prevention of significant deterioration (PSD) construction permit program under the Federal Clean Air Act (CAA). This program affects major stationary sources in Michigan that are subject to or potentially subject to the PSD construction permit program.
Issuance of an Experimental Use Permit
Document Number: E8-185
Type: Notice
Date: 2008-01-09
Agency: Environmental Protection Agency
EPA has granted an experimental use permit (EUP) to the following pesticide applicant. An EUP permits use of a pesticide for experimental or research purposes only in accordance with the limitations in the permit.
Mesotrione; Pesticide Tolerance
Document Number: E8-181
Type: Rule
Date: 2008-01-09
Agency: Environmental Protection Agency
This regulation establishes tolerances for residues of mesotrione in or on berry, group 13; flax, seed; cranberry; lingonberry; millet, grain; millet, forage; millet, hay; and millet, straw. Syngenta Crop Protection requested this tolerance under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FFDCA).
Difenoconazole; Pesticide Tolerance
Document Number: E8-15
Type: Rule
Date: 2008-01-09
Agency: Environmental Protection Agency
This regulation establishes, increases, and removes tolerances for residues of difenoconazole and also establishes tolerances for combined residues of difenoconazole and its metabolite, CGA-205375, in or on various commodities. In addition, this regulation revokes tolerances for secondary residues in poultry, fat, meat, and meat byproducts. Syngenta Crop Protection, Inc., requested these tolerances under the Federal, Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FFDCA).
Zeta-cypermethrin; Pesticide Tolerance
Document Number: E7-25392
Type: Rule
Date: 2008-01-09
Agency: Environmental Protection Agency
This regulation establishes tolerances for combined residues of zeta-cypermethrin and its inactive R-isomers in or on Citrus (dried pulp, fruit and oil); oilseed commodities (seeds of borage, castor oil plant, Chinese tallow tree, crambe, cuphea, echium, euphorbia, evening primrose, flax, gold of pleasure, hare's-ear mustard, jojoba, lesquerella, lunaria, meadowfoam, milkweed, mustard, niger seed, oil radish, poppy, rose hip, sesame, Stokes aster, sweet rocket, tallowwood, tea oil plant, and vernonia); oilseed, refined oils (refined oils of castor oil plant, Chinese tallowtree, euphorbia, evening primrose, jojoba, niger seed, rose hip, stokes aster, tallowwood, tea oil plant and vernonia); okra; rice, wild; and safflower, seed. Interregional Research Project Number 4 (IR-4) requested these tolerances under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FFDCA). This regulation also deletes time-limited flax seed tolerances which are made redundant and unnecessary by establishment of the permanent tolerance on flax seed.
National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants: Paint Stripping and Miscellaneous Surface Coating Operations at Area Sources
Document Number: E7-24718
Type: Rule
Date: 2008-01-09
Agency: Environmental Protection Agency
This action promulgates national emission standards for hazardous air pollutants (NESHAP) for area sources engaged in paint stripping, surface coating of motor vehicles and mobile equipment, and miscellaneous surface coating operations. EPA has listed ``Paint Stripping,'' ``Plastic Parts and Products (Surface Coating),'' and ``Autobody Refinishing Paint Shops'' as area sources of hazardous air pollutants (HAP) that contribute to the risk to public health in urban areas under the Integrated Urban Air Toxics Strategy. This final rule includes emissions standards that reflect the generally available control technology or management practices in each of these area source categories. ``Plastic Parts and Products (Surface Coating)'' has been renamed ``Miscellaneous Surface Coating,'' and ``Autobody Refinishing Paint Shops'' has been renamed ``Motor Vehicle and Mobile Equipment Surface Coating'' to more accurately reflect the scope of these source categories.
Interpretation of the National Ambient Air Quality Standards for PM2.5
Document Number: 07-5954
Type: Rule
Date: 2008-01-09
Agency: Environmental Protection Agency
The EPA recently finalized changes to the data handling conventions and computations necessary for determining when the annual and 24-hour national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS) for fine particles (generally referring to particles less than or equal to 2.5 micrometers ([mu]m) in diameter, PM2.5) are met. These changes were made in support of revisions to the NAAQS for particulate matter (PM) that were finalized in the same rulemaking. After publication, EPA discovered an inadvertent omission in the rule text explaining the procedures for calculating the key statistic (98th percentile) involved with determining compliance with the 24-hour PM2.5 standard in locations where extra samples of PM2.5 in ambient air were taken above the specified sampling frequency. If the error in the regulatory text is left unchanged, the resulting statistic for calculating compliance with the 24-hour PM2.5 standard would be biased low at some samplers, leading to potentially incorrect determinations that an area was attaining the NAAQS. In this direct final action, EPA is correcting this error. The correction involves the replacement of the currently used statistical formula and instructions with a simpler look-up table approach which is easier for readers to understand and which retains the intended numerical consistency with EPA's historic practice.
Interpretation of the National Ambient Air Quality Standards for PM2.5
Document Number: 07-5953
Type: Proposed Rule
Date: 2008-01-09
Agency: Environmental Protection Agency
The EPA recently finalized changes to the data handling conventions and computations necessary for determining when the annual and 24-hour national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS) for fine particles (generally referring to particles less than or equal to 2.5 micrometers ([mu]m) in diameter, PM2.5) are met. These changes were made in support of revisions to the NAAQS for particulate matter (PM) that were finalized in the same rulemaking. Following the publication of this rule, an omission was discovered in the rule text explaining the procedures for calculating the key statistic (98th percentile) involved with determining compliance with the 24-hour PM2.5 standard in locations where extra samples of PM2.5 in ambient air were taken above the intended sampling frequency. If the error in the regulatory text is left unchanged, the resulting statistic for calculating compliance with the 24-hour PM2.5 standard would be biased low at some samplers, leading to potentially incorrect determinations that an area was attaining the NAAQS. The EPA is proposing to correct this error. The proposed correction involves the replacement of the currently used statistical formula and instructions with a simpler look-up table approach which is easier for readers to understand and which retains the originally intended numerical consistency with EPA's historical practice.