Environmental Protection Agency June 21, 2005 – Federal Register Recent Federal Regulation Documents

Lead-Based Paint Activities; State of Washington Lead-Based Paint Program
Document Number: 05-12202
Type: Notice
Date: 2005-06-21
Agency: Environmental Protection Agency
On June 18, 2004, EPA received an application from the State of Washington requesting authorization to administer a Program in accordance with section 402 of the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA). Included in the application was a letter signed June 10, 2004, by the Governor of Washington, stating that the State's Lead-Based Paint Abatement Program is at least as protective of human health and the environment as the Federal program under TSCA section 402. Also, included was a letter from the Attorney General of Washington, certifying that the laws and regulations of the State provided adequate legal authority to administer and enforce TSCA section 402. Washington certifies that its program meets the requirements for approval of a State program under section 404 of TSCA and that Washington has the legal authority and ability to implement the appropriate elements necessary to enforce the program. Therefore, pursuant to section 404, the program is deemed authorized as of the date of submission. Today's notice announces the authorization of the State of Washington Lead- Based Paint Activities Program to apply in the State of Washington effective June 10, 2004.
TSCA Section 21 Petition; Notice of Receipt
Document Number: 05-12195
Type: Notice
Date: 2005-06-21
Agency: Environmental Protection Agency
This notice announces receipt of a petition submitted by the Ecology Center, of Ann Arbor, Michigan, under section 21 of the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), and requests comments on issues raised by the petition. The petitioner requests EPA to establish regulations to prohibit the manufacture, processing, distribution in commerce, use and improper disposal of lead used in wheel balancing weights. Under TSCA section 21, the Agency must either grant or deny the petition within 90 days. The Agency will therefore respond to the petition by August 10, 2005.
Approval and Promulgation of State Implementation Plans and Designation of Areas for Air Quality Planning Purposes in Ohio; Redesignation of Cincinnati to Attainment of the 1-Hour Ozone Standard and Approval of Ozone Maintenance Plan; Approval of Volatile Organic Compound Emissions Control Regulations; and Approval of Motor Vehicle Emissions Budgets
Document Number: 05-12016
Type: Rule
Date: 2005-06-21
Agency: Environmental Protection Agency
EPA is approving a request from the State of Ohio, submitted in draft on March 10, 2005 and in final on May 20, 2005, to redesignate the Cincinnati area (Butler, Clermont, Hamilton, and Warren Counties) from nonattainment to attainment for the 1-hour ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS). In conjunction with this approval, EPA is approving the State's plan for maintaining the 1-hour ozone NAAQS in the Cincinnati area through 2015 as a revision to the Ohio State Implementation Plan (SIP). EPA is approving Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) emission control regulations for various source categories, thus completing Ohio's obligation to adopt Reasonably Available Control Technology (RACT) regulations for the Cincinnati area. EPA is approving periodic VOC and Oxides of Nitrogen (NOx) emission inventories for the Cincinnati area. EPA finds as adequate and is approving the 2015 VOC and NOx Motor Vehicle Emission Budgets (MVEBs) for the Cincinnati area as contained in the Cincinnati area ozone maintenance plan. EPA is not, at this time, taking action on Ohio's demonstrations that termination of the vehicle Inspection and Maintenance (I/M) programs in the Cincinnati and Dayton areas will not interfere with the attainment and maintenance of the 1-hour ozone NAAQS in these areas, and is not taking action on the State's requests for conversion of the vehicle I/M programs in these areas to contingency measures in the 1- hour ozone maintenance plans. The State did not submit a demonstration of non-interference with the 8-hour ozone or fine particulate (PM2.5) standards, or with any other applicable requirements of the Clean Air Act (CAA). Such actions, however, may be considered in subsequent rulemakings.