U.S. Customs and Border Protection August 1, 2012 – Federal Register Recent Federal Regulation Documents

Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker Licenses Due to Death of the License Holder
Document Number: 2012-18740
Type: Notice
Date: 2012-08-01
Agency: Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Customs and Border Protection
Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to Title 19 of the Code of Federal Regulations at section 111.51(a), the following individual Customs broker licenses and any and all permits have been cancelled due to the death of the broker:
Notice of Cancellation of Customs Broker Licenses
Document Number: 2012-18739
Type: Notice
Date: 2012-08-01
Agency: Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Customs and Border Protection
Pursuant to section 641 of the Tariff Act of 1930, as amended, (19 USC 1641) and the U.S. Customs and Border Protection regulations (19 CFR 111.51), the following Customs broker licenses and all associated permits are cancelled without prejudice.
Extension of Import Restrictions on Archaeological Objects and Ecclesiastical and Ritual Ethnological Materials From Cyprus; Correction
Document Number: 2012-18670
Type: Rule
Date: 2012-08-01
Agency: Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of the Treasury
On July 13, 2012, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) published in the Federal Register a final rule reflecting an extension of import restrictions on certain archaeological and ethnological materials from Cyprus and announcing that the Designated List of materials covered by the restrictions has been revised. The Designated List and the regulatory text in that document contain language which is inadvertently not consistent with the rest of the document as to the historical period that the import restrictions cover for ecclesiastical and ritual ethnological materials from Cyprus. This document corrects the inconsistent language to clarify that ecclesiastical and ritual ethnological materials from Cyprus representing the Byzantine and Post Byzantine periods, dating from approximately the 4th century A.D. to 1850 A.D., are subject to the import restrictions.