Agency Information Collection Activities; Notice and Request for Comment; Investigation-Based Crash Data Studies, 4099-4103 [2022-01436]

Download as PDF 4099 Federal Register / Vol. 87, No. 17 / Wednesday, January 26, 2022 / Notices changes to the seafaring manpower base. The mariner survey is an integral part of the Breakout Exercise. This survey will be used to measure mariner availability, training, and experience. Respondents: Merchant Mariners. Affected Public: Individuals and/or Households. Estimated Number of Respondents: 150. Total Estimated Number of Responses: 150. Frequency of Collection: Annually. Estimated Times per Respondent: Once. Total Estimated Number of Annual Burden Hours: 7.5. Public Comments Invited: Comments are invited on: Whether the proposed collection of information is necessary for the proper performance of the functions of the Department, including whether the information will have practical utility; the accuracy of the Department’s estimate of the burden of the proposed information collection; ways to enhance the quality, utility and clarity of the information to be collected; and ways to minimize the burden of the collection of information on respondents, including the use of automated collection techniques or other forms of information technology. (Authority: The Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995; 44 U.S.C. Chapter 35, as amended; and 49 CFR 1.93) * * * * * By Order of the Acting Maritime Administrator. T. Mitchell Hudson, Jr., Secretary, Maritime Administration. [FR Doc. 2022–01512 Filed 1–25–22; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4910–81–P DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Maritime Administration [Docket No. MARAD–2022–0035] Agency Request for Approval of a New Information Collection: Mariner Survey Pre-Test Maritime Administration, Department of Transportation. ACTION: Notice and request for comments. AGENCY: In compliance with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, this notice announces that the Information Collection Request (ICR) abstracted below is being forwarded to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for review and approval. A Federal Register Notice with a 60-day comment period soliciting comments on the following khammond on DSKJM1Z7X2PROD with NOTICES SUMMARY: VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:34 Jan 25, 2022 Jkt 256001 information collection was published on September 14, 2021. Only one supportive comment was received. DATES: Comments must be submitted on or before February 25, 2022. ADDRESSES: Written comments and recommendations for the proposed information collection should be sent within 30 days of publication of this notice to www.reginfo.gov/public/do/ PRAMain. Find this particular information collection by selecting ‘‘Currently under 30-day Review—Open for Public Comments’’ or by using the search function. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: You may contact Matthew Mueller, Maritime Administration, at (202) 366–7173 or by electronic mail at matthew.mueller@ dot.gov. You may send mail to Matthew Mueller at Office of Maritime Labor and Training, Maritime Administration, U.S. Department of Transportation, 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE, Washington, DC, 20590. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Mariner Survey Pre-Test. OMB Control Number: 2133–NEW. Type of Request: New information collection request. Abstract: The Maritime Administration intends to conduct a Pre-Test for a survey of individuals who hold appropriate merchant mariner credentials issued by the U.S. Coast Guard. This voluntary Mariner Survey Pre-Test information collection is limited to cognitive interviews and a pilot survey of a sample of credentialed U.S. merchant mariners to validate and improve the design of a questionnaire and other components for a subsequent full Mariner Survey. Cognitive interviews will be conducted either online or over telephone; pilot survey responses will be primarily conducted online, with a mail survey option. Upon completion of this Pre-Test collection and analysis, MARAD intends to request separate approval for the full biennial Mariner Survey of all appropriately credentialed U.S. merchant mariners to determine the number of qualified mariners who are available and willing to serve on short notice on U.S. government-owned sealift ships or commercial ships during a period of national need. The most recent survey of this scope was completed in 2002. The availability of a reliable, current estimate on the number of mariners willing to serve in times of war, armed conflict, or national emergency is critical to the U.S. national security. Respondents: Individuals who hold appropriate merchant mariner PO 00000 Frm 00136 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 credentials issued by the U.S. Coast Guard. Affected Public: Individuals or Households. Total Estimated Number of Respondents: 690 (40 cognitive interviews; 650 pilot survey respondents). Frequency of Collection: One-time. Estimated Times per Respondent: 45 minutes for cognitive interviews; 20 minutes for pilot survey. Total Estimated Number of Annual Burden Hours: 247. Public Comments Invited: Comments are invited on: Whether the proposed collection of information is necessary for the proper performance of the functions of the Department, including whether the information will have practical utility; the accuracy of the Department’s estimate of the burden of the proposed information collection; ways to enhance the quality, utility and clarity of the information to be collected; and ways to minimize the burden of the collection of information on respondents, including the use of automated collection techniques or other forms of information technology. A comment to OMB is best assured of having its full effect if OMB receives it within 30 days of publication. (Authority: The Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995; 44 U.S.C. chapter 35, as amended; and 49 CFR 1.93) * * * * * By Order of the Acting Maritime Administrator. T. Mitchell Hudson, Jr., Secretary, Maritime Administration. [FR Doc. 2022–01513 Filed 1–25–22; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4910–81–P DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION National Highway Traffic Safety Administration [Docket No. NHTSA–2021–0086] Agency Information Collection Activities; Notice and Request for Comment; Investigation-Based Crash Data Studies National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), Department of Transportation (DOT). ACTION: Notice and request for comments on an extension with modification of a currently approved information collection. AGENCY: The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) invites public comments about our intention to request approval from the Office of SUMMARY: E:\FR\FM\26JAN1.SGM 26JAN1 khammond on DSKJM1Z7X2PROD with NOTICES 4100 Federal Register / Vol. 87, No. 17 / Wednesday, January 26, 2022 / Notices Management and Budget (OMB) for extension with modification of a currently approved information collection. Before a Federal agency can collect certain information from the public, it must receive approval from OMB. Under procedures established by the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, before seeking OMB approval, Federal agencies must solicit public comment on proposed collections of information, including extensions and reinstatement of previously approved collections. This document describes a collection of information for which NHTSA intends to seek OMB approval on NHTSA’s Investigation-Based Crash Data Studies: Crash Investigation Sampling System (CISS), Special Crash Investigation (SCI) and Special Study Data Collection. DATES: Comments must be submitted on or before March 28, 2022. ADDRESSES: You may submit comments identified by the Docket No. NHTSA– 2021–0086 through any of the following methods: • Electronic Submissions: Go to the Federal eRulemaking Portal at https:// www.regulations.gov. Follow the online instructions for submitting comments. • Fax: (202) 493–2251. • Mail or Hand Delivery: Docket Management, U.S. Department of Transportation, 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE, West Building, Room W12– 140, Washington, DC 20590, between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, except on Federal holidays. To be sure someone is there to help you, please call (202) 366–9322 before coming. Instructions: All submissions must include the agency name and docket number for this notice. Note that all comments received will be posted without change to http:// www.regulations.gov, including any personal information provided. Please see the Privacy Act heading below. Privacy Act: Anyone is able to search the electronic form of all comments received into any of our dockets by the name of the individual submitting the comment (or signing the comment, if submitted on behalf of an association, business, labor union, etc.). You may review DOT’s complete Privacy Act Statement in the Federal Register published on April 11, 2000 (65 FR 19477–78) or you may visit https:// www.transportation.gov/privacy. Docket: For access to the docket to read background documents or comments received, go to http:// www.regulations.gov or the street address listed above. Follow the online instructions for accessing the dockets via internet. VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:34 Jan 25, 2022 Jkt 256001 For additional information or access to background documents, contact Dinesh Sharma, Crash Investigation Division (NSA–110), (202) 366–2333, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, W53–493, U.S. Department of Transportation, 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE, Washington, DC 20590. Please identify the relevant collection of information by referring to its OMB Control Number. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Under the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (44 U.S.C. 3501 et seq.), before an agency submits a proposed collection of information to OMB for approval, it must first publish a document in the Federal Register providing a 60-day comment period and otherwise consult with members of the public and affected agencies concerning each proposed collection of information. The OMB has promulgated regulations describing what must be included in such a document. Under OMB’s regulation (at 5 CFR 1320.8(d)), an agency must ask for public comment on the following: (a) Whether the proposed collection of information is necessary for the proper performance of the functions of the agency, including whether the information will have practical utility; (b) the accuracy of the agency’s estimate of the burden of the proposed collection of information, including the validity of the methodology and assumptions used; (c) how to enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the information to be collected; and (d) how to minimize the burden of the collection of information on those who are to respond, including the use of appropriate automated, electronic, mechanical, or other technological collection techniques or other forms of information technology, e.g., permitting electronic submission of responses. In compliance with these requirements, NHTSA asks for public comments on the following proposed collection of information for which the agency is seeking approval from OMB. Title: Investigation-Based Crash Data Studies. OMB Control Number: 2127–0706. Form Number(s): Form 1278 and 1280. Type of Request: Request for extension with modification of a currently approved information collection. Type of Review Requested: Regular. Requested Expiration Date of Approval: 3 years from date of approval. Summary of the Collection of Information: NHTSA is authorized, under 49 U.S.C. 30182 and 23 U.S.C. 403 to FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: PO 00000 Frm 00137 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 collect data on motor vehicle traffic crashes to aid in the identification of issues and the development, implementation, and evaluation of motor vehicle and highway safety countermeasures. For decades, NHTSA has been investigating crashes and collecting crash data through its Investigation-Based Crash Data Studies, namely the Crash Investigation Sampling System (CISS), Special Crash Investigation (SCI), and specific issuebased Special Study data collection studies. Although each of these systems satisfy different purposes and collect data in different manners, they all utilize the same core variables (e.g., forms), procedures and protocols for data collection. NHTSA is seeking approval to modify the existing information collection to: (a) Increase the number of crashes investigated by the crash technicians for 2021 and future years, (b) add Special Study cases into this package, and (c) add Special Crash Investigation cases into this package. NHTSA has also adjusted estimates to include the burden incurred by tow yards, hospitals, and law enforcement agencies in responding to the collections. The combined impact is a increase of 1,407 burden hours to NHTSA’s overall total. The CISS is a nationally representative sample of passenger vehicle crashes which focus on detailed investigation of passenger vehicle crashes. It provides nationally representative data on fatal and nonfatal motor vehicle crashes for use in developing and evaluating federal motor vehicle safety standards and other safety countermeasures. The CISS began implementation in 2015 and by 2018 was collecting crash data from thirtytwo (32) fully operational sites. The CISS collects data at both the crash level through scene analysis and vehicle level through vehicle damage assessment together with injury source evidence and standardized coding. The SCI Program is used to provide NHTSA with the most in-depth and detailed level of crash investigation data collected by the Agency. Generally, SCI investigations are conducted for crashes of special interest, such as those involving new or emerging safety technologies (e.g., those involving vehicles equipped with crash avoidance technologies or Automated Driving Systems (ADS)), school buses, motorcoaches, alternative fuel and hybrid vehicles, adaptive control equipped vehicles, fires, child restraints, and those relevant to safety defect investigations. The crash investigations are conducted to document crash circumstances, identify E:\FR\FM\26JAN1.SGM 26JAN1 khammond on DSKJM1Z7X2PROD with NOTICES Federal Register / Vol. 87, No. 17 / Wednesday, January 26, 2022 / Notices injury sources, evaluate safety countermeasure effectiveness and support Agency rulemaking actions. Investigations are also conducted to provide early detection of alleged or potential vehicle safety defects. Reports are generated from investigations and all are made available to the public. The crashes chosen for SCI investigation may be chosen throughout the year as they arise, or be part of a planned effort to look into a particular type of crash (such as crashes involving air bag deployment-related fatalities and injuries). In addition to the above-referenced CISS and SCI data collections, NHTSA also conducts investigation-based special studies using the CISS and SCI infrastructure to answer questions on a specific topical aspect of vehicle and highway safety. In the special study cases, data is typically gathered remotely where documents and investigation details are requested from investigating agencies and the data is compiled, coded, and reported on collectively in a summary report detailing the issue. These special studies will utilize the same infrastructure CISS and SCI, as well as the same core variables (e.g., forms) and procedures and protocols. The cases may be selected from an agency’s data set (i.e., CISS, SCI, or Fatality Analysis Reporting System (FARS)) or through other means (i.e., internet searches, news articles, and public notification). The cases may or may not be selected to provide a nationally-representative sample of crashes. In the past, using the National Automotive Sampling SystemCrashworthiness Data System (NASS– CDS) infrastructure, NHTSA conducted several investigation-based special studies, including studies on child occupant protection, air bag effectiveness, and pedestrian safety among others. NASS–CDS, operated from 1979 through 2015, and was the predecessor to CISS. Three currentlyplanned special studies will collect information on crashes that involve medium-duty trucks (trucks between 10,001 and 26,000 lbs.), pedestrians or pedalcyclists, and first responders or construction or maintenance workers struck while performing official duties on the road. NHTSA will also use the information collected through the CISS infrastructure to support NHTSA’s NonTraffic Surveillance (NTS). CISS Technicians review over a hundred and fifty thousand crash reports each year, and some of these reports are not applicable to the CISS program, but they may be applicable to the NTS data collection. NTS is a virtual data VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:34 Jan 25, 2022 Jkt 256001 collection system designed to provide counts and details regarding fatalities and injuries that occur in non-traffic crashes and in non-crash incidents. Non-traffic motor vehicle crashes are a class of crashes that occur off the public trafficways. These crashes, subsequently referred to as ‘‘non-traffic crashes,’’ are mostly single-vehicle crashes on private roads, two vehicle crashes in parking facilities, or collisions with pedestrians in driveways. In addition, there are nontraffic incidents such as a vehicle falling on a person underneath or an unintentional carbon monoxide poisoning inside the vehicle. Non-traffic crash data is obtained through NHTSA’s CISS, SCI, Crash Reporting Sampling System (CRSS), and FARS. For the standard investigation-based crash data studies acquisition process, once a crash has been selected for investigation, crash technicians locate, visit, measure, and photograph the crash scene; locate, visit, inspect, and photograph involved vehicle(s); conduct a telephone or personal interview with the involved individuals or a surrogate (another person who can provide occupant or crash information, such as parents for a minor or parent or spouse for a deceased individual); and obtain and record crash injury information received from various medical data sources. These data are used to describe and analyze circumstances, mechanisms, and consequences of a cross section of towed, light passenger motor vehicle crashes in the United States. The collection of interview data aids in this effort. For the special studies, the data is typically gathered following similar procedures, but is targeted to a specific issue (e.g., child occupant protection, crash causation factors) as opposed to an entire investigation. Special Studies investigations also typically only involve obtaining information from law enforcement, who provide access to and a copy of the crash report where the data is not electronic. They do not involve interviewing people involved in crashes, obtaining medical records or inspecting the vehicles. Each special study has specific requirements (i.e., types of crashes and/or data collected); however, the gathering of crash reports for these studies is similar to the gathering of crash reports in the CISS and SCI programs. Description of the Need for the Information and Proposed Use of the Information NHTSA investigates real-world crashes and collects detailed crash data through CISS, SCI, and Special Studies data collection programs to identify the PO 00000 Frm 00138 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 4101 primary factors related to the source of crashes and their injury outcomes. These detailed factors are utilized to develop and evaluate effective safety countermeasures including the establishment and enforcement of motor vehicle regulations that reduce the severity of injury and property damage caused by motor vehicle crashes. The data collected also give motor vehicle researchers an opportunity to specify areas in which improvements may be possible, design countermeasure programs, and evaluate the effects of existing and proposed safety measures. Burden to Respondents NHTSA has provided a description of the affected public, estimated number of respondents, description of frequency, and estimates of the total burden hours and costs for each of the three Investigation-Based Crash Data Acquisition Systems (CISS, SCI, and Special Studies) below. In aggregate, NHTSA estimates that the total annual burden is 7,012 hours and $0. Program: CISS Affected Public: People involved in select motor vehicle crashes, law enforcement jurisdictions that provide access to and a copy of the crash report where the data is not electronic; hospitals that provide a copy of the injured occupant’s medical treatment of injuries; and tow or salvage lot facilities that provide access to the storage facility to inspect the vehicle. Estimated Number of Respondents: 13,841. Frequency: On Occasion. Estimated Total Annual Burden Hours: 6,736 hours (3,975 + 471 + 170 + 1,590 + 530). The CISS crash data acquisition system includes 5 information collections. The first information collection covers the collection of information from individuals involved in crashes via interview. The estimated number of interview respondents is obtained by multiplying the approximate number of crashes investigated each year by the average number of interviews per crash. Based on existing data, each CISS crash involves an average of approximately 2.25 individuals. NHTSA estimates that CISS conducts investigations on 5,300 crashes per year. Therefore, NHTSA estimates that there will be 11,925 respondents per year (5,300 crashes × 2.25 respondents per crash). The respondents are contacted only once; however, in rare circumstances follow-up questions may be needed to clarify data. The interview requires approximately 20 minutes of a E:\FR\FM\26JAN1.SGM 26JAN1 khammond on DSKJM1Z7X2PROD with NOTICES 4102 Federal Register / Vol. 87, No. 17 / Wednesday, January 26, 2022 / Notices respondent’s time on average. CISS conducts interviews for approximately 5,300 crashes per year, which NHTSA estimates takes about 45 minutes per crash (2.25 respondents × 20 minutes). Therefore, the estimated total annual burden hours for the collection of information from individuals involved in crashes for CISS is 3,975 hours ((5,300 crashes × 45 minutes) ÷ 60 minutes/hour). In addition to interviews, crash technicians and investigators must obtain official records to initiate and complete the cases. These records include police crash reports and medical records. The second information collection under CISS is for the collection of crash records from sampled police jurisdictions. NHTSA estimates that there are 181 sample police jurisdictions annually. To estimate the burden to sampled police jurisdictions, NHTSA multiplied the average number of visits per year by the average burden per visit and the number of police jurisdictions. On average, each of the 181 sampled police jurisdictions are queried weekly (or 52 times per year) and each query is estimated to take 3 minutes. Accordingly, NHTSA estimates the total annual burden for sampled police jurisdictions to be 2.6 hours per respondent (3 minutes × 52 visits) and 471 hours for all respondents (2.6 hours × 181 police jurisdictions = 470.6 hours). The third information collection under CISS is for the collection of crash records from non-sampled police jurisdictions. Based on existing CISS data, there are 340 non-sampled jurisdictions annually. To estimate the burden to non-sample police jurisdictions, NHTSA multiplied the average number of visits per year by the average burden per visit and the number of non-sampled police jurisdictions. On average, each of the 340 non-sampled police jurisdictions are visited twice annually and each query is estimated to take 15 minutes. Accordingly, NHTSA estimates the total burden for nonsampled police jurisdictions to be 30 minutes per respondent (15 minutes × 2 visits) and 170 hours for all respondents ((30 minutes × 340 non-sampled police jurisdictions) ÷ 60 minutes/hour) = 170 hours). The fourth information collection under CISS is for the collection of medical records from hospitals. Based on existing data, CISS collects an average of 9,540 records each year from an average of 275 hospitals. NHTSA estimates that a hospital spends 10 minutes for each record requested. Accordingly, NHTSA estimates the total annual burden to be 1,590 hours ((9,540 VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:34 Jan 25, 2022 Jkt 256001 records × 10 minutes) ÷ 60 minutes/ hour) and estimates that each hospital will, on average, spend 5.78 hours providing the requested information each year (1,590 hours ÷ 275 hospitals). The fifth information collection under CISS is for the collection from tow yards necessary to gain access to and locate a vehicle that was involved in a crash. Typically, a tow facility operator just needs to give the crash technician permission to enter the yard to inspect the vehicle and involves approximately 5 minutes of staff time. CISS data shows an average of 6,360 visits to tow facilities per year, and NHTSA estimates 1,120 tow facilities will be visited annually. Accordingly, NHTSA estimates the total annual burden to be 530 hours ((6,360 visits × 5 minutes) ÷ 60 minutes/hour) and estimates that each tow facility will, on average, spend 28.39 minutes providing the requested information each year ((530 hours × 60 minutes) ÷ 1,120 facilities). Accordingly, NHTSA estimates that the total burden associated with the CISS data acquisition system is 6,736 hours (3,975 + 471 + 170 + 1,590 + 530). Estimated Total Annual Burden Cost: $0. There are no capital, start-up, or annual operation and maintenance costs involved in this collection of information. The respondents would not incur any reporting costs from the information collection beyond the opportunity or labor costs associated with the burden hours. The respondents also would not incur any recordkeeping burden or recordkeeping costs from the information collection. Program: Special Crash Investigation (SCI) Affected Public: People involved in select motor vehicle crashes, law enforcement jurisdictions that provide access to and a copy of the crash report where the data is not electronic; hospitals that provide a copy of the injured occupant’s medical treatment of injuries; and tow or salvage lot facilities that provide access to the storage facility to inspect the vehicle. Estimated Number of Respondents: 500. Frequency: On occasion (typically once per year). Estimated Total Annual Burden Hours: 109 hours (67 + 17 + 17 + 8). The SCI crash data acquisition system includes 4 information collections. The first information collection covers the collection of information from individuals involved in crashes via interview. The estimated number of interview respondents is obtained by multiplying the approximate number of PO 00000 Frm 00139 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 crashes investigated each year by the average number of interviews per crash. Based on existing data, each SCI crash involves an average of approximately 2 individuals. NHTSA estimates that SCI conducts investigations on approximately 100 crashes per year. Therefore, NHTSA estimates that there will be 200 respondents per year (100 crashes × 2 respondents per crash). The respondents are contacted only once; however, in rare circumstances follow-up questions may be needed to clarify data. The interview requires approximately 20 minutes of a respondent’s time on average. SCI conducts interviews for approximately 100 crashes per year, which NHTSA estimates takes about 40 minutes per crash (2 respondents × 20 minutes). Therefore, the estimated total annual burden hours for the collection of information from individuals involved in crashes for SCI is approximately 67 hours ((100 crashes × 40 minutes) ÷ 60 minutes/hour = 66.67). In addition to interviews, crash technicians and investigators must obtain official records to initiate and complete the cases. These records include police crash reports and medical records. The second information collection under SCI is for the collection of crash records from police jurisdictions. The SCI investigators contact an estimated 100 police jurisdictions once per year and require approximately 10 minutes of staff time per police jurisdiction. To estimate the burden to these police jurisdictions, NHTSA multiplied the average number of visits per year by the average burden per visit and the number of police jurisdictions. Accordingly, NHTSA estimates the total annual burden for police jurisdictions to be 10 minutes per respondent (10 minutes × 1 query per year) and 17 hours for all respondents ((10 minutes × 100 police jurisdictions) ÷ 60 minutes/hour = 16.67 hours). The third information collection under SCI is for the collection of medical records from hospitals. Based on existing data, SCI collects an average of 100 records each year from 100 hospitals (1 request per hospital per year). NHTSA estimates that a hospital spends 10 minutes for each record requested. Accordingly, NHTSA estimates the total annual burden to be 17 hours ((100 records × 10 minutes) ÷ 60 minutes/hour = 16.67 hours) and estimates that each hospital will, on average, spend 10 minutes providing the requested information each year (10 minutes × 1 record request per year). The fourth information collection under SCI is for the collection from tow E:\FR\FM\26JAN1.SGM 26JAN1 4103 Federal Register / Vol. 87, No. 17 / Wednesday, January 26, 2022 / Notices yards necessary to gain access to and locate a vehicle that was involved in a crash. Typically, a tow facility operator just needs to give the crash technician permission to enter the yard to inspect the vehicle and involves approximately 5 minutes of staff time. SCI conducts approximately 100 visits to tow facilities per year, and NHTSA estimates that 100 tow facilities will be visited annually (1 request per facility per year). Accordingly, NHTSA estimates the total annual burden to be 8 hours ((100 visits × 5 minutes) ÷ 60 minutes/ hour = 8.33 hours) and estimates that each tow facility will, on average, spend 5 minutes providing the requested information each year. Accordingly, NHTSA estimates that the total burden associated with the SCI data acquisition system is 109 hours (67 + 17 + 17 + 8). Estimated Total Annual Burden Cost: $0. There are no capital, start-up, or annual operation and maintenance costs involved in this collection of information. The respondents would not incur any reporting costs from the information collection beyond the opportunity or labor costs associated with the burden hours. The respondents also would not incur any recordkeeping burden or recordkeeping costs from the information collection. Special Studies Affected Public: Law enforcement jurisdictions that provide access to and a copy of the crash report where the data is not electronic. Estimated Number of Respondents: 1,000. Frequency: On occasion (typically once per year). Estimated Total Annual Burden Hours: 167 hours. There is only one information collection for Special Studies in this ICR. This ICR only covers special studies involving remote-level investigations.1 Accordingly, these remote-level investigations do not involve interviews of individuals involved in crashes, collection of medical records from hospitals, or visits to tow facilities. Instead, these special studies only involve the collection of information from police jurisdictions. NHTSA estimates that the special studies will involve, on average, 1,000 police jurisdictions each year and require approximately 10 minutes of staff time per police jurisdiction. The total annual hour burden on jurisdictions for special studies information is estimated to be 167 hours (1 visit × 10 minutes × 1,000 jurisdictions ÷ 60 minutes/hour = 166.67). Estimated Total Annual Burden Cost: $0. There are no capital, start-up, or annual operation and maintenance costs involved in this collection of information. The respondents would not incur any reporting costs from the information collection beyond the labor costs associated with the burden hours. The respondents also would not incur any recordkeeping burden or recordkeeping costs from the information collection. Estimated Total Annual Burden Hours All Programs: 7,012 hours. The total estimated annual burden hours to all respondents for this ICR is 7,012 hours. The table below provides a summary of the estimated annual burden hours. TABLE 2—SUMMARY OF BURDEN HOUR ESTIMATES Number of respondents Number of responses (per respondent) Burden per response Burden per respondent CISS: Interviews with Individuals Involved in Crashes CISS: Collection of Police Records from Sampled Jurisdictions. CISS: Collection of Police Records from Non-Sampled Jurisdictions. CISS: Collection of Medical Records ........................... CISS: Access to Tow Yards ......................................... SCI: Interviews with Individuals Involved in Crashes ... SCI: Collection of Police Records ................................ SCI: Collection of Medical Records .............................. SCI: Access to Tow Yards ............................................ Special Studies: Collection of Police Records ............. 11,925 181 11,925 (1) 9,412 (52) 20 minutes ............... 3 minutes ................. 20 minutes ........................ 156 minutes (2.6 hours) ... 340 680 (2) 15 minutes ............... 30 minutes ........................ 3,975 hours. 470.6 hours. 471 hours. 170 hours. 275 1,120 200 100 100 100 1,000 9,540 (34.69) 6,360 (5.68) 200 (1) 100 (1) 100 (1) 100 (1) 1,000 (1) 10 minutes ............... 5 minutes ................. 20 minutes ............... 10 minutes ............... 10 minutes ............... 5 minutes ................. 10 minutes ............... 5.78 hours ......................... 28.39 minutes ................... 20 minutes ........................ 10 minutes ........................ 10 minutes ........................ 5 minutes .......................... 10 minutes ........................ 1,590 hours. 530 hours. 67 hours. 17 hours. 17 hours. 8 hours. 167 hours. Total ....................................................................... .................... ............................ .................................. ........................................... 7,012 khammond on DSKJM1Z7X2PROD with NOTICES Information collection title Estimated Total Annual Burden Cost All Programs: $0 Public Comments Invited: You are asked to comment on any aspects of this information collection, including (a) whether the proposed collection of information is necessary for the proper performance of the functions of the Department, including whether the information will have practical utility; (b) the accuracy of the Department’s estimate of the burden of the proposed information collection; (c) ways to enhance the quality, utility and clarity of the information to be collected; and (d) ways to minimize the burden of the collection of information on respondents, including the use of automated collection techniques or other forms of information technology. Authority: The Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995; 44 U.S.C. Chapter 35, as amended; 49 CFR 1.49; and DOT Order 1351.29. Issued on January 20, 2022. Chou Lin Chen, Associate Administrator, National Center for Statistics and Analysis. [FR Doc. 2022–01436 Filed 1–25–22; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4910–59–P DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Office of Foreign Assets Control Notice of OFAC Sanctions Action Office of Foreign Assets Control, Treasury. ACTION: Notice. AGENCY: The U.S. Department of the Treasury’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) is publishing the names of three individuals and one entity that have been placed on OFAC’s Specially Designated Nationals and Blocked Persons List (SDN List) based on SUMMARY: 1 If NHTSA intends to conduct a special study that is not remote, it will seek separate clearance. VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:34 Jan 25, 2022 Jkt 256001 PO 00000 Frm 00140 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 Total burden E:\FR\FM\26JAN1.SGM 26JAN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 87, Number 17 (Wednesday, January 26, 2022)]
[Notices]
[Pages 4099-4103]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2022-01436]


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DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION

National Highway Traffic Safety Administration

[Docket No. NHTSA-2021-0086]


Agency Information Collection Activities; Notice and Request for 
Comment; Investigation-Based Crash Data Studies

AGENCY: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), 
Department of Transportation (DOT).

ACTION: Notice and request for comments on an extension with 
modification of a currently approved information collection.

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SUMMARY: The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) 
invites public comments about our intention to request approval from 
the Office of

[[Page 4100]]

Management and Budget (OMB) for extension with modification of a 
currently approved information collection. Before a Federal agency can 
collect certain information from the public, it must receive approval 
from OMB. Under procedures established by the Paperwork Reduction Act 
of 1995, before seeking OMB approval, Federal agencies must solicit 
public comment on proposed collections of information, including 
extensions and reinstatement of previously approved collections. This 
document describes a collection of information for which NHTSA intends 
to seek OMB approval on NHTSA's Investigation-Based Crash Data Studies: 
Crash Investigation Sampling System (CISS), Special Crash Investigation 
(SCI) and Special Study Data Collection.

DATES: Comments must be submitted on or before March 28, 2022.

ADDRESSES: You may submit comments identified by the Docket No. NHTSA-
2021-0086 through any of the following methods:
     Electronic Submissions: Go to the Federal eRulemaking 
Portal at https://www.regulations.gov. Follow the online instructions 
for submitting comments.
     Fax: (202) 493-2251.
     Mail or Hand Delivery: Docket Management, U.S. Department 
of Transportation, 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE, West Building, Room W12-
140, Washington, DC 20590, between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday through 
Friday, except on Federal holidays. To be sure someone is there to help 
you, please call (202) 366-9322 before coming.
    Instructions: All submissions must include the agency name and 
docket number for this notice. Note that all comments received will be 
posted without change to http://www.regulations.gov, including any 
personal information provided. Please see the Privacy Act heading 
below.
    Privacy Act: Anyone is able to search the electronic form of all 
comments received into any of our dockets by the name of the individual 
submitting the comment (or signing the comment, if submitted on behalf 
of an association, business, labor union, etc.). You may review DOT's 
complete Privacy Act Statement in the Federal Register published on 
April 11, 2000 (65 FR 19477-78) or you may visit https://www.transportation.gov/privacy.
    Docket: For access to the docket to read background documents or 
comments received, go to http://www.regulations.gov or the street 
address listed above. Follow the online instructions for accessing the 
dockets via internet.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: For additional information or access 
to background documents, contact Dinesh Sharma, Crash Investigation 
Division (NSA-110), (202) 366-2333, National Highway Traffic Safety 
Administration, W53-493, U.S. Department of Transportation, 1200 New 
Jersey Avenue SE, Washington, DC 20590. Please identify the relevant 
collection of information by referring to its OMB Control Number.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Under the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 
(44 U.S.C. 3501 et seq.), before an agency submits a proposed 
collection of information to OMB for approval, it must first publish a 
document in the Federal Register providing a 60-day comment period and 
otherwise consult with members of the public and affected agencies 
concerning each proposed collection of information. The OMB has 
promulgated regulations describing what must be included in such a 
document. Under OMB's regulation (at 5 CFR 1320.8(d)), an agency must 
ask for public comment on the following: (a) Whether the proposed 
collection of information is necessary for the proper performance of 
the functions of the agency, including whether the information will 
have practical utility; (b) the accuracy of the agency's estimate of 
the burden of the proposed collection of information, including the 
validity of the methodology and assumptions used; (c) how to enhance 
the quality, utility, and clarity of the information to be collected; 
and (d) how to minimize the burden of the collection of information on 
those who are to respond, including the use of appropriate automated, 
electronic, mechanical, or other technological collection techniques or 
other forms of information technology, e.g., permitting electronic 
submission of responses. In compliance with these requirements, NHTSA 
asks for public comments on the following proposed collection of 
information for which the agency is seeking approval from OMB.
    Title: Investigation-Based Crash Data Studies.
    OMB Control Number: 2127-0706.
    Form Number(s): Form 1278 and 1280.
    Type of Request: Request for extension with modification of a 
currently approved information collection.
    Type of Review Requested: Regular.
    Requested Expiration Date of Approval: 3 years from date of 
approval.
    Summary of the Collection of Information:
    NHTSA is authorized, under 49 U.S.C. 30182 and 23 U.S.C. 403 to 
collect data on motor vehicle traffic crashes to aid in the 
identification of issues and the development, implementation, and 
evaluation of motor vehicle and highway safety countermeasures. For 
decades, NHTSA has been investigating crashes and collecting crash data 
through its Investigation-Based Crash Data Studies, namely the Crash 
Investigation Sampling System (CISS), Special Crash Investigation 
(SCI), and specific issue-based Special Study data collection studies. 
Although each of these systems satisfy different purposes and collect 
data in different manners, they all utilize the same core variables 
(e.g., forms), procedures and protocols for data collection.
    NHTSA is seeking approval to modify the existing information 
collection to: (a) Increase the number of crashes investigated by the 
crash technicians for 2021 and future years, (b) add Special Study 
cases into this package, and (c) add Special Crash Investigation cases 
into this package. NHTSA has also adjusted estimates to include the 
burden incurred by tow yards, hospitals, and law enforcement agencies 
in responding to the collections. The combined impact is a increase of 
1,407 burden hours to NHTSA's overall total.
    The CISS is a nationally representative sample of passenger vehicle 
crashes which focus on detailed investigation of passenger vehicle 
crashes. It provides nationally representative data on fatal and 
nonfatal motor vehicle crashes for use in developing and evaluating 
federal motor vehicle safety standards and other safety 
countermeasures. The CISS began implementation in 2015 and by 2018 was 
collecting crash data from thirty-two (32) fully operational sites. The 
CISS collects data at both the crash level through scene analysis and 
vehicle level through vehicle damage assessment together with injury 
source evidence and standardized coding.
    The SCI Program is used to provide NHTSA with the most in-depth and 
detailed level of crash investigation data collected by the Agency. 
Generally, SCI investigations are conducted for crashes of special 
interest, such as those involving new or emerging safety technologies 
(e.g., those involving vehicles equipped with crash avoidance 
technologies or Automated Driving Systems (ADS)), school buses, 
motorcoaches, alternative fuel and hybrid vehicles, adaptive control 
equipped vehicles, fires, child restraints, and those relevant to 
safety defect investigations. The crash investigations are conducted to 
document crash circumstances, identify

[[Page 4101]]

injury sources, evaluate safety countermeasure effectiveness and 
support Agency rulemaking actions. Investigations are also conducted to 
provide early detection of alleged or potential vehicle safety defects. 
Reports are generated from investigations and all are made available to 
the public. The crashes chosen for SCI investigation may be chosen 
throughout the year as they arise, or be part of a planned effort to 
look into a particular type of crash (such as crashes involving air bag 
deployment-related fatalities and injuries).
    In addition to the above-referenced CISS and SCI data collections, 
NHTSA also conducts investigation-based special studies using the CISS 
and SCI infrastructure to answer questions on a specific topical aspect 
of vehicle and highway safety. In the special study cases, data is 
typically gathered remotely where documents and investigation details 
are requested from investigating agencies and the data is compiled, 
coded, and reported on collectively in a summary report detailing the 
issue. These special studies will utilize the same infrastructure CISS 
and SCI, as well as the same core variables (e.g., forms) and 
procedures and protocols. The cases may be selected from an agency's 
data set (i.e., CISS, SCI, or Fatality Analysis Reporting System 
(FARS)) or through other means (i.e., internet searches, news articles, 
and public notification). The cases may or may not be selected to 
provide a nationally-representative sample of crashes. In the past, 
using the National Automotive Sampling System-Crashworthiness Data 
System (NASS-CDS) infrastructure, NHTSA conducted several 
investigation-based special studies, including studies on child 
occupant protection, air bag effectiveness, and pedestrian safety among 
others. NASS-CDS, operated from 1979 through 2015, and was the 
predecessor to CISS. Three currently-planned special studies will 
collect information on crashes that involve medium-duty trucks (trucks 
between 10,001 and 26,000 lbs.), pedestrians or pedalcyclists, and 
first responders or construction or maintenance workers struck while 
performing official duties on the road.
    NHTSA will also use the information collected through the CISS 
infrastructure to support NHTSA's Non-Traffic Surveillance (NTS). CISS 
Technicians review over a hundred and fifty thousand crash reports each 
year, and some of these reports are not applicable to the CISS program, 
but they may be applicable to the NTS data collection. NTS is a virtual 
data collection system designed to provide counts and details regarding 
fatalities and injuries that occur in non-traffic crashes and in non-
crash incidents. Non-traffic motor vehicle crashes are a class of 
crashes that occur off the public trafficways. These crashes, 
subsequently referred to as ``non-traffic crashes,'' are mostly single-
vehicle crashes on private roads, two vehicle crashes in parking 
facilities, or collisions with pedestrians in driveways. In addition, 
there are non-traffic incidents such as a vehicle falling on a person 
underneath or an unintentional carbon monoxide poisoning inside the 
vehicle. Non-traffic crash data is obtained through NHTSA's CISS, SCI, 
Crash Reporting Sampling System (CRSS), and FARS.
    For the standard investigation-based crash data studies acquisition 
process, once a crash has been selected for investigation, crash 
technicians locate, visit, measure, and photograph the crash scene; 
locate, visit, inspect, and photograph involved vehicle(s); conduct a 
telephone or personal interview with the involved individuals or a 
surrogate (another person who can provide occupant or crash 
information, such as parents for a minor or parent or spouse for a 
deceased individual); and obtain and record crash injury information 
received from various medical data sources. These data are used to 
describe and analyze circumstances, mechanisms, and consequences of a 
cross section of towed, light passenger motor vehicle crashes in the 
United States. The collection of interview data aids in this effort.
    For the special studies, the data is typically gathered following 
similar procedures, but is targeted to a specific issue (e.g., child 
occupant protection, crash causation factors) as opposed to an entire 
investigation. Special Studies investigations also typically only 
involve obtaining information from law enforcement, who provide access 
to and a copy of the crash report where the data is not electronic. 
They do not involve interviewing people involved in crashes, obtaining 
medical records or inspecting the vehicles. Each special study has 
specific requirements (i.e., types of crashes and/or data collected); 
however, the gathering of crash reports for these studies is similar to 
the gathering of crash reports in the CISS and SCI programs.

Description of the Need for the Information and Proposed Use of the 
Information

    NHTSA investigates real-world crashes and collects detailed crash 
data through CISS, SCI, and Special Studies data collection programs to 
identify the primary factors related to the source of crashes and their 
injury outcomes. These detailed factors are utilized to develop and 
evaluate effective safety countermeasures including the establishment 
and enforcement of motor vehicle regulations that reduce the severity 
of injury and property damage caused by motor vehicle crashes. The data 
collected also give motor vehicle researchers an opportunity to specify 
areas in which improvements may be possible, design countermeasure 
programs, and evaluate the effects of existing and proposed safety 
measures.

Burden to Respondents

    NHTSA has provided a description of the affected public, estimated 
number of respondents, description of frequency, and estimates of the 
total burden hours and costs for each of the three Investigation-Based 
Crash Data Acquisition Systems (CISS, SCI, and Special Studies) below. 
In aggregate, NHTSA estimates that the total annual burden is 7,012 
hours and $0.

Program: CISS

    Affected Public: People involved in select motor vehicle crashes, 
law enforcement jurisdictions that provide access to and a copy of the 
crash report where the data is not electronic; hospitals that provide a 
copy of the injured occupant's medical treatment of injuries; and tow 
or salvage lot facilities that provide access to the storage facility 
to inspect the vehicle.
    Estimated Number of Respondents: 13,841.
    Frequency: On Occasion.
    Estimated Total Annual Burden Hours: 6,736 hours (3,975 + 471 + 170 
+ 1,590 + 530).
    The CISS crash data acquisition system includes 5 information 
collections. The first information collection covers the collection of 
information from individuals involved in crashes via interview. The 
estimated number of interview respondents is obtained by multiplying 
the approximate number of crashes investigated each year by the average 
number of interviews per crash. Based on existing data, each CISS crash 
involves an average of approximately 2.25 individuals. NHTSA estimates 
that CISS conducts investigations on 5,300 crashes per year. Therefore, 
NHTSA estimates that there will be 11,925 respondents per year (5,300 
crashes x 2.25 respondents per crash).
    The respondents are contacted only once; however, in rare 
circumstances follow-up questions may be needed to clarify data. The 
interview requires approximately 20 minutes of a

[[Page 4102]]

respondent's time on average. CISS conducts interviews for 
approximately 5,300 crashes per year, which NHTSA estimates takes about 
45 minutes per crash (2.25 respondents x 20 minutes). Therefore, the 
estimated total annual burden hours for the collection of information 
from individuals involved in crashes for CISS is 3,975 hours ((5,300 
crashes x 45 minutes) / 60 minutes/hour).
    In addition to interviews, crash technicians and investigators must 
obtain official records to initiate and complete the cases. These 
records include police crash reports and medical records. The second 
information collection under CISS is for the collection of crash 
records from sampled police jurisdictions. NHTSA estimates that there 
are 181 sample police jurisdictions annually. To estimate the burden to 
sampled police jurisdictions, NHTSA multiplied the average number of 
visits per year by the average burden per visit and the number of 
police jurisdictions. On average, each of the 181 sampled police 
jurisdictions are queried weekly (or 52 times per year) and each query 
is estimated to take 3 minutes. Accordingly, NHTSA estimates the total 
annual burden for sampled police jurisdictions to be 2.6 hours per 
respondent (3 minutes x 52 visits) and 471 hours for all respondents 
(2.6 hours x 181 police jurisdictions = 470.6 hours).
    The third information collection under CISS is for the collection 
of crash records from non-sampled police jurisdictions. Based on 
existing CISS data, there are 340 non-sampled jurisdictions annually. 
To estimate the burden to non-sample police jurisdictions, NHTSA 
multiplied the average number of visits per year by the average burden 
per visit and the number of non-sampled police jurisdictions. On 
average, each of the 340 non-sampled police jurisdictions are visited 
twice annually and each query is estimated to take 15 minutes. 
Accordingly, NHTSA estimates the total burden for non-sampled police 
jurisdictions to be 30 minutes per respondent (15 minutes x 2 visits) 
and 170 hours for all respondents ((30 minutes x 340 non-sampled police 
jurisdictions) / 60 minutes/hour) = 170 hours).
    The fourth information collection under CISS is for the collection 
of medical records from hospitals. Based on existing data, CISS 
collects an average of 9,540 records each year from an average of 275 
hospitals. NHTSA estimates that a hospital spends 10 minutes for each 
record requested. Accordingly, NHTSA estimates the total annual burden 
to be 1,590 hours ((9,540 records x 10 minutes) / 60 minutes/hour) and 
estimates that each hospital will, on average, spend 5.78 hours 
providing the requested information each year (1,590 hours / 275 
hospitals).
    The fifth information collection under CISS is for the collection 
from tow yards necessary to gain access to and locate a vehicle that 
was involved in a crash. Typically, a tow facility operator just needs 
to give the crash technician permission to enter the yard to inspect 
the vehicle and involves approximately 5 minutes of staff time. CISS 
data shows an average of 6,360 visits to tow facilities per year, and 
NHTSA estimates 1,120 tow facilities will be visited annually. 
Accordingly, NHTSA estimates the total annual burden to be 530 hours 
((6,360 visits x 5 minutes) / 60 minutes/hour) and estimates that each 
tow facility will, on average, spend 28.39 minutes providing the 
requested information each year ((530 hours x 60 minutes) / 1,120 
facilities).
    Accordingly, NHTSA estimates that the total burden associated with 
the CISS data acquisition system is 6,736 hours (3,975 + 471 + 170 + 
1,590 + 530).
    Estimated Total Annual Burden Cost: $0.
    There are no capital, start-up, or annual operation and maintenance 
costs involved in this collection of information. The respondents would 
not incur any reporting costs from the information collection beyond 
the opportunity or labor costs associated with the burden hours. The 
respondents also would not incur any recordkeeping burden or 
recordkeeping costs from the information collection.

Program: Special Crash Investigation (SCI)

    Affected Public: People involved in select motor vehicle crashes, 
law enforcement jurisdictions that provide access to and a copy of the 
crash report where the data is not electronic; hospitals that provide a 
copy of the injured occupant's medical treatment of injuries; and tow 
or salvage lot facilities that provide access to the storage facility 
to inspect the vehicle.
    Estimated Number of Respondents: 500.
    Frequency: On occasion (typically once per year).
    Estimated Total Annual Burden Hours: 109 hours (67 + 17 + 17 + 8).
    The SCI crash data acquisition system includes 4 information 
collections. The first information collection covers the collection of 
information from individuals involved in crashes via interview. The 
estimated number of interview respondents is obtained by multiplying 
the approximate number of crashes investigated each year by the average 
number of interviews per crash. Based on existing data, each SCI crash 
involves an average of approximately 2 individuals. NHTSA estimates 
that SCI conducts investigations on approximately 100 crashes per year. 
Therefore, NHTSA estimates that there will be 200 respondents per year 
(100 crashes x 2 respondents per crash).
    The respondents are contacted only once; however, in rare 
circumstances follow-up questions may be needed to clarify data. The 
interview requires approximately 20 minutes of a respondent's time on 
average. SCI conducts interviews for approximately 100 crashes per 
year, which NHTSA estimates takes about 40 minutes per crash (2 
respondents x 20 minutes). Therefore, the estimated total annual burden 
hours for the collection of information from individuals involved in 
crashes for SCI is approximately 67 hours ((100 crashes x 40 minutes) / 
60 minutes/hour = 66.67).
    In addition to interviews, crash technicians and investigators must 
obtain official records to initiate and complete the cases. These 
records include police crash reports and medical records. The second 
information collection under SCI is for the collection of crash records 
from police jurisdictions. The SCI investigators contact an estimated 
100 police jurisdictions once per year and require approximately 10 
minutes of staff time per police jurisdiction. To estimate the burden 
to these police jurisdictions, NHTSA multiplied the average number of 
visits per year by the average burden per visit and the number of 
police jurisdictions. Accordingly, NHTSA estimates the total annual 
burden for police jurisdictions to be 10 minutes per respondent (10 
minutes x 1 query per year) and 17 hours for all respondents ((10 
minutes x 100 police jurisdictions) / 60 minutes/hour = 16.67 hours).
    The third information collection under SCI is for the collection of 
medical records from hospitals. Based on existing data, SCI collects an 
average of 100 records each year from 100 hospitals (1 request per 
hospital per year). NHTSA estimates that a hospital spends 10 minutes 
for each record requested. Accordingly, NHTSA estimates the total 
annual burden to be 17 hours ((100 records x 10 minutes) / 60 minutes/
hour = 16.67 hours) and estimates that each hospital will, on average, 
spend 10 minutes providing the requested information each year (10 
minutes x 1 record request per year).
    The fourth information collection under SCI is for the collection 
from tow

[[Page 4103]]

yards necessary to gain access to and locate a vehicle that was 
involved in a crash. Typically, a tow facility operator just needs to 
give the crash technician permission to enter the yard to inspect the 
vehicle and involves approximately 5 minutes of staff time. SCI 
conducts approximately 100 visits to tow facilities per year, and NHTSA 
estimates that 100 tow facilities will be visited annually (1 request 
per facility per year). Accordingly, NHTSA estimates the total annual 
burden to be 8 hours ((100 visits x 5 minutes) / 60 minutes/hour = 8.33 
hours) and estimates that each tow facility will, on average, spend 5 
minutes providing the requested information each year.
    Accordingly, NHTSA estimates that the total burden associated with 
the SCI data acquisition system is 109 hours (67 + 17 + 17 + 8).
    Estimated Total Annual Burden Cost: $0.
    There are no capital, start-up, or annual operation and maintenance 
costs involved in this collection of information. The respondents would 
not incur any reporting costs from the information collection beyond 
the opportunity or labor costs associated with the burden hours. The 
respondents also would not incur any recordkeeping burden or 
recordkeeping costs from the information collection.

Special Studies

    Affected Public: Law enforcement jurisdictions that provide access 
to and a copy of the crash report where the data is not electronic.
    Estimated Number of Respondents: 1,000.
    Frequency: On occasion (typically once per year).
    Estimated Total Annual Burden Hours: 167 hours.
    There is only one information collection for Special Studies in 
this ICR. This ICR only covers special studies involving remote-level 
investigations.\1\ Accordingly, these remote-level investigations do 
not involve interviews of individuals involved in crashes, collection 
of medical records from hospitals, or visits to tow facilities. 
Instead, these special studies only involve the collection of 
information from police jurisdictions.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \1\ If NHTSA intends to conduct a special study that is not 
remote, it will seek separate clearance.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    NHTSA estimates that the special studies will involve, on average, 
1,000 police jurisdictions each year and require approximately 10 
minutes of staff time per police jurisdiction. The total annual hour 
burden on jurisdictions for special studies information is estimated to 
be 167 hours (1 visit x 10 minutes x 1,000 jurisdictions / 60 minutes/
hour = 166.67).
    Estimated Total Annual Burden Cost: $0.
    There are no capital, start-up, or annual operation and maintenance 
costs involved in this collection of information. The respondents would 
not incur any reporting costs from the information collection beyond 
the labor costs associated with the burden hours. The respondents also 
would not incur any recordkeeping burden or recordkeeping costs from 
the information collection.
    Estimated Total Annual Burden Hours All Programs: 7,012 hours.
    The total estimated annual burden hours to all respondents for this 
ICR is 7,012 hours. The table below provides a summary of the estimated 
annual burden hours.

                                    Table 2--Summary of Burden Hour Estimates
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                Number of
 Information collection title   Number of    responses (per      Burden per        Burden per      Total burden
                               respondents     respondent)        response         respondent
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
CISS: Interviews with               11,925        11,925 (1)  20 minutes......  20 minutes.....  3,975 hours.
 Individuals Involved in
 Crashes.
CISS: Collection of Police             181        9,412 (52)  3 minutes.......  156 minutes      470.6 hours.
 Records from Sampled                                                            (2.6 hours).    471 hours.
 Jurisdictions.
CISS: Collection of Police             340           680 (2)  15 minutes......  30 minutes.....  170 hours.
 Records from Non-Sampled
 Jurisdictions.
CISS: Collection of Medical            275     9,540 (34.69)  10 minutes......  5.78 hours.....  1,590 hours.
 Records.
CISS: Access to Tow Yards....        1,120      6,360 (5.68)  5 minutes.......  28.39 minutes..  530 hours.
SCI: Interviews with                   200           200 (1)  20 minutes......  20 minutes.....  67 hours.
 Individuals Involved in
 Crashes.
SCI: Collection of Police              100           100 (1)  10 minutes......  10 minutes.....  17 hours.
 Records.
SCI: Collection of Medical             100           100 (1)  10 minutes......  10 minutes.....  17 hours.
 Records.
SCI: Access to Tow Yards.....          100           100 (1)  5 minutes.......  5 minutes......  8 hours.
Special Studies: Collection          1,000         1,000 (1)  10 minutes......  10 minutes.....  167 hours.
 of Police Records.
                              ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total....................  ...........  ................  ................  ...............  7,012
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Estimated Total Annual Burden Cost All Programs: $0
    Public Comments Invited: You are asked to comment on any aspects of 
this information collection, including (a) whether the proposed 
collection of information is necessary for the proper performance of 
the functions of the Department, including whether the information will 
have practical utility; (b) the accuracy of the Department's estimate 
of the burden of the proposed information collection; (c) ways to 
enhance the quality, utility and clarity of the information to be 
collected; and (d) ways to minimize the burden of the collection of 
information on respondents, including the use of automated collection 
techniques or other forms of information technology.
    Authority: The Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995; 44 U.S.C. Chapter 
35, as amended; 49 CFR 1.49; and DOT Order 1351.29.

    Issued on January 20, 2022.
Chou Lin Chen,
Associate Administrator, National Center for Statistics and Analysis.
[FR Doc. 2022-01436 Filed 1-25-22; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4910-59-P