Agency Information Collection Activities: Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request, 2885-2887 [2022-00861]

Download as PDF 2885 Federal Register / Vol. 87, No. 12 / Wednesday, January 19, 2022 / Notices requirements of Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act to permit accessibility to people with disabilities. From February 2022 to April 2022, the Organizer Survey—Initial will be completed by an estimated 500 Communities Talk activity organizers and will require only one response per respondent. It will take an average of 10 minutes (0.167 hours) to review the instructions and complete the survey. Similarly, from February 2023 to April 2023, the Organizer Survey—Follow-up will be completed by an estimated 500 Communities Talk activity organizers and will require only one response per respondent. It will take an average of 10 minutes (0.167 hours) to review the instructions and complete the survey. This burden estimate is based on comments from three 2019 Communities Talk activity organizers who reviewed the survey and provided comments on how long it would take them to complete it. ESTIMATED ANNUALIZED BURDEN TABLE Number of respondents Form name Total responses Hours per response Total hour burden Organizer Survey—Initial ..................................................... Organizer Survey—Follow-Up ............................................. 500 500 1 1 500 500 0.167 0.167 83.50 83.50 Total .............................................................................. 500 ........................ 1,000 ........................ 167.00 Send comments to Carlos Graham, SAMHSA Reports Clearance Officer, 5600 Fisher Lane, Room 15E57–A, Rockville, MD 20852 OR email him a copy at carlos.graham@samhsa.hhs.gov. Written comments should be received by March 21, 2022. Carlos Graham, Reports Clearance Officer. [FR Doc. 2022–00860 Filed 1–18–22; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4162–20–P DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration Agency Information Collection Activities: Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request jspears on DSK121TN23PROD with NOTICES1 Responses per respondent In compliance with Section 3506(c)(2)(A) of the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 concerning opportunity for public comment on proposed collections of information, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) will publish periodic summaries of proposed projects. To request more information on the proposed projects or to obtain a copy of the information collection plans, call the SAMHSA Reports Clearance Officer at (240) 276– 0361. Comments are invited on: (a) Whether the proposed collection of information is necessary for the proper performance of the functions of the agency, including whether the information will have practical utility; (b) the accuracy of the agency’s estimate of the burden of the proposed collection of information; (c) ways to enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the information to be collected; and (d) ways to minimize the VerDate Sep<11>2014 16:58 Jan 18, 2022 Jkt 256001 burden of the collection of information on respondents, including through the use of automated collection techniques or other forms of information technology. Project: Mental and Substance Use Disorders Prevalence Study (MDPS) Grant Funded by SAMHSA, Grant Number H79FG000030 SAMHSA is requesting from the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) approval to conduct recruitment activities and clinical interviews with household respondents and nonhousehold facilities and respondents as part of the Mental and Substance Use Disorders Prevalence Study (MDPS) pilot program. Activities conducted will include: A household rostering and mental health screening of household participants and a clinical interview of both household and non-household participants. The information gathered by the clinical interview will be used to determine prevalence estimates of schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder; bipolar I disorder; major depressive disorder; generalized anxiety disorder; posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD); obsessive-compulsive disorder; anorexia nervosa; and alcohol, benzodiazepine, opioid, stimulant, and cannabis use disorders among U.S. adults ages 18 to 65 years. Household Rostering The household rostering includes inquiries about all adults ages 18 and older residing in the household, to assess eligibility for inclusion in the study, and then selecting up to two adults for the household mental health screening. The total number of household members and numbers of adults and children are first asked, followed by the first name, age and sex of all adult household members, as well PO 00000 Frm 00140 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 as whether any adult in the household has had a serious medical condition. The best time to be interviewed is collected as well. The computerized roster can be completed online, by phone, on paper, or in-person. The target population is adults ages 18–65 residing in U.S. households; it is estimated that 45,000 household rosters will be completed. The primary objective of the household roster is to select up to two age-eligible participants for the mental health screening interview. Household Mental Health Screening The household mental health screening interview utilizes the Computerized Adaptive Testing for Mental Health Disorders (CAT–MH) or the World Health Organization’s Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI) instruments to assess symptoms related to the mental health and substance use disorders of interest, including schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder; bipolar I disorder; major depressive disorder; generalized anxiety disorder; posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD); obsessive-compulsive disorder; anorexia nervosa; and alcohol, benzodiazepine, opioid, stimulant, and cannabis use. The screening instrument also includes questions on treatment, receipt of Social Security Disability Income (SSDI), military experience, and exposure to and impact of COVID–19. The computerized mental health screening can be completed online, by phone, on paper or in-person. The primary objectives of the household mental health screening interview are to assess the symptoms endorsed and determine eligibility and selection for the MDPS pilot program clinical interview. E:\FR\FM\19JAN1.SGM 19JAN1 2886 Federal Register / Vol. 87, No. 12 / Wednesday, January 19, 2022 / Notices Clinical Interview The MDPS pilot program clinical interview includes questions that assess the mental health and substance use disorders using the NetSCID, a computerized version of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM–V (SCID). This instrument includes questions on symptoms and their duration and frequency for the disorders of interest. Also collected from respondents is demographic information, including sex, gender, age, education and employment status. Hospitalization and treatment history are asked as well as questions to assess exposure to COVID– 19 of self or other close family members and the impact on mental health. Up to two adults per household will be selected to complete the clinical interview. Participants from the prisons, jails, homeless shelters and state psychiatric hospitals will complete the clinical interview as well. The computer-assisted personal interview (CAPI) is administered by a trained clinical interviewer, and can be conducted by video conference, such as Zoom or WebEx, phone or in person. Approximately 7,200 clinical interviews will be conducted as part of the MDPS pilot program. The primary objective of the clinical interview is to estimate the prevalence of the disorders of interest, including schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder; bipolar I disorder; major depressive disorder; generalized anxiety disorder; posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD); obsessive-compulsive disorder; anorexia nervosa; and alcohol, benzodiazepine, opioid, stimulant, and cannabis use, as well as unmet treatment needs. Jail Mental Health Screening The jail mental health screening interview utilizes the CIDI screening instruments to assess symptoms related to the primary mental health and substance use disorders of interest including schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder; bipolar I disorder; major depressive disorder; generalized anxiety disorder; posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD); obsessive-compulsive disorder; anorexia nervosa; and alcohol, benzodiazepine, opioid, stimulant, and cannabis use. The screening instrument also includes questions on treatment, receipt of Social Security Disability Income (SSDI), military experience, and exposure to and impact of COVID–19. The computerized mental health screening will be completed in person or by phone. The target population is a convenience sample of incarcerated 18– 65-year-old adults, in up to six jails identified by the MDPS co-investigator team. Up to 208 mental health screening interviews will be conducted among incarcerated respondents. Respondents will be provided with a card that includes contact information and asked to contact the project personnel when they are released for inclusion in the household clinical interview sample. The primary objective of the jail mental health screening interview is to determine the feasibility of conducting mental health screening interviews within a jail population, as well as whether they would have been included in the household sample during the data collection period should they not have been incarcerated. Facility Recruitment Information packets will be sent to all selected prisons, state psychiatric hospitals, homeless shelters and jails including a letter of invitation, letters of support, an overview of the project and an overview of the data collection process in the facility. Facilities will be contacted by telephone, to answer any questions and provide additional information regarding the MDPS pilot program. Once approval is obtained, a logistics manager will contact the facility to provide instructions on the rostering and selection processes, to schedule the data collection visit, and to determine the appropriate space to conduct the interviews and the number of days and hours per day for data collection. Facilities will be asked to provide a roster (deidentified or identified) of eligible residents within one week of scheduling the data collection visit and again one-to-two weeks prior to the actual data collection visit (note: Data collection can be scheduled up to 4 months in advance). At the time of data collection, facility staff will assist with data collection activities including escorting selected inmates to and from the data collection area. The primary objective of the MDPS pilot program is to examine methods to estimate the prevalence of specific mental illnesses, particularly adults with psychotic disorders and serious functional impairment, and treatment in both populations to answer two core research questions: • What is the prevalence of schizophrenia/schizoaffective disorder (lifetime and past year), bipolar I disorder (past year), major depressive disorder (past year), generalized anxiety disorder (past year), posttraumatic stress disorder (past year), obsessivecompulsive disorder (past year), anorexia nervosa (past year), and alcohol, benzodiazepine, opioid, stimulant, and cannabis use disorders (past year) among adults, ages 18–65, in the United States? • What proportion of adults in the United States with these disorders received treatment in the past year? In addition to these research questions, the MDPS pilot program will allow for procedural evaluation to: D Identify which set of screening instruments might be best to accurately identify mental and substance use disorders within the U.S. household population; D Understand the best approaches to conducting data collection within nonhousehold settings, to gather information on mental illness and treatment; D Design protocols for collecting clinical interviews from proxy respondents; and D Establish a protocol that can be used at a larger scale to understand the prevalence and burden of specific mental disorders in both non-household and household populations across the United States. EXHIBIT 1—TOTAL ESTIMATED ANNUALIZED RESPONDENT BURDEN BY INSTRUMENT AND FACILITY RECRUITMENT Total number of respondents jspears on DSK121TN23PROD with NOTICES1 Activity Instrument: Household Rostering ......................................................... Household contact attempts* ............................................. Household Screening ......................................................... Screening contact attempts* .............................................. Clinical Interview (household and non-household) ............ Clinical Interview contact attempts* ................................... Jail Screening Interview ..................................................... VerDate Sep<11>2014 16:58 Jan 18, 2022 Jkt 256001 PO 00000 Number of responses per respondent 45,000 45,000 45,000 45,000 7,200 7,200 208 Frm 00141 Fmt 4703 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 Sfmt 4703 Total number of responses 45,000 45,000 45,000 45,000 7,200 7,200 208 Average hours per response Average burden hours 0.13 0.17 0.25 0.17 1.40 0.25 0.33 E:\FR\FM\19JAN1.SGM 19JAN1 5,850 7,650 11,250 7,650 10,080 1,800 69 Average hourly wage ** $19.83 19.83 19.83 19.83 19.83 19.83 19.83 Total cost $116,006 151,700 223,088 151,700 199,886 35,694 1,369 2887 Federal Register / Vol. 87, No. 12 / Wednesday, January 19, 2022 / Notices EXHIBIT 1—TOTAL ESTIMATED ANNUALIZED RESPONDENT BURDEN BY INSTRUMENT AND FACILITY RECRUITMENT— Continued Total number of respondents Activity Number of responses per respondent Total number of responses Average hours per response Average burden hours Average hourly wage ** Total cost Jail Clinical Interview ......................................................... 63 1 63 1.40 88 19.83 1749 Sub-total Interviewing Estimates ................................ .................... .................... .................... .................... 44,437 .................... 881,192 58 58 1 1 58 58 0.75 1 43.5 58 25.09 25.09 1,091 1,455 58 58 1 4 58 232 2 2 116 464 25.09 25.09 2,910 11,642 58 4 232 2 464 25.09 11,642 Sub-total Facility Recruitment Estimates .................... .................... .................... .................... .................... 1,145.5 .................... 28,740 Total ..................................................................... .................... .................... .................... .................... 45,582.5 .................... 909,932 Facility Recruitment Information package review for facility administrators ...... Initial call with facility staff ................................................. Telephone call with facility staff to explain roster file process .................................................................................. Facility staff provides roster ............................................... Facility staff coordinates time and location for clinical interview administration .................................................. *Contact attempts include the time spent reviewing all follow-up letters and study materials, including the respondent website, interactions with field and telephone interviewers, the consent process including asking questions regarding rights as a participant and receiving responses, and all other exchanges during the recruitment and interviewing processes. **To compute total estimated annual cost for Interviewing, the total burden hours were multiplied by the average hourly wage for each adult participant, according to a Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) chart called ‘‘Median usual weekly earnings of full-time wage and salary workers by educational attainment.’’ (Median usual weekly earnings of full-time wage and salary workers by educational attainment (bls.gov)). We used the median salary for full-time employees over the age of 25 who are high school graduates with no college experience in the 2nd quarter of 2021 ($19.83 per hour). * For the Facility Recruitment, the total average burden assumes an average hourly rate of $25.09 for Community and Social Service Managers, given in the Bureau of Labor Statistic’s Occupational Employment Statistics, May 2020. Send comments to Carlos Graham, SAMHSA Reports Clearance Officer, 5600 Fishers Lane, Room 15E57–A, Rockville, Maryland 20857, OR email a copy to Carlos.Graham@ samhsa.hhs.gov. Written comments should be received by March 21, 2022. Carlos Graham, Reports Clearance Officer. [FR Doc. 2022–00861 Filed 1–18–22; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4162–20–P DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration Agency Information Collection Activities: Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request jspears on DSK121TN23PROD with NOTICES1 Periodically, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) will publish a summary of information collection requests under OMB review, in compliance with the Paperwork Reduction Act (44 U.S.C. Chapter 35). To request a copy of these documents, call the SAMHSA Reports Clearance Officer on (240) 276–0361. Project: Government Performance and Results Act (GPRA) Client/Participant Outcomes Measure—(OMB No. 0930– 0208)—Revision SAMHSA is requesting approval to modify its existing CSAT Client-level GPRA instrument by removing 48 questions and adding 42 questions for a VerDate Sep<11>2014 16:58 Jan 18, 2022 Jkt 256001 net decrease of six questions. In revising the CSAT–GPRA tool, we sought to improve functionality while also eliciting programmatic information that demonstrates impact at the client level. In this way, data from the revised GPRA tool can be used to assess resource allocation and to delineate who we serve, how we serve them, and how the program impacts clients from entry to discharge. Beyond this, much of the tool has been restructured to make its administration flow with greater ease, while also eliciting information that speaks to a client’s experience with substance misuse, the concurrent use of substances and mental health. This is most apparent in Section B (Substance Use and Planned Services), where questions have been updated and restructured to elicit important aspects of a client’s use of substances, namely the frequency of use and combinations of misused substances. This speaks to an emerging and urgent need to appropriately manage polysubstance misuse,1 and the questions allow for evidence of change as the tool is readministered at different intervals. These questions do not rely on ICD–10 codes, so as to create a dialogue between the client and the individual administering the tool. Restructuring the tool has also included: 1 Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA): Treating Concurrent Substance Use Among Adults. SAMHSA Publication No. PEP21–06–02–002. Rockville, MD: National Mental Health and Substance Use Policy Laboratory. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 2021. PO 00000 Frm 00142 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 • Placing many questions from the general GPRA Tool, that have previously been viewed as being specific to patient populations or grants, in the menu items found in Section H. This section allows Program Officers the opportunity to introduce grant specific questions as needed; • Removing or substantially altering existing questions viewed as being potentially traumatizing or incentive to clients; • Removing questions that have not been used in program evaluation at the federal level; and • Incorporating evidence-based questions from tools such as the Addiction Severity Index to better address program performance. Currently, the information collected from this instrument is entered and stored in SAMHSA’s Performance Accountability and Reporting System, which is a real-time, performance management system that captures information on the substance abuse treatment and mental health services delivered in the United States. Continued approval of this information collection will allow SAMHSA to continue to meet Government Performance and Results Modernization Act of 2010 reporting requirements that quantify the effects and accomplishments of its discretionary grant programs, which are consistent with OMB guidance. SAMHSA will use the data for annual reporting required by GPRA and comparing baseline with discharge and follow-up data. GPRA requires that E:\FR\FM\19JAN1.SGM 19JAN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 87, Number 12 (Wednesday, January 19, 2022)]
[Notices]
[Pages 2885-2887]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2022-00861]


-----------------------------------------------------------------------

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration


Agency Information Collection Activities: Submission for OMB 
Review; Comment Request

    In compliance with Section 3506(c)(2)(A) of the Paperwork Reduction 
Act of 1995 concerning opportunity for public comment on proposed 
collections of information, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health 
Services Administration (SAMHSA) will publish periodic summaries of 
proposed projects. To request more information on the proposed projects 
or to obtain a copy of the information collection plans, call the 
SAMHSA Reports Clearance Officer at (240) 276-0361.
    Comments are invited on: (a) Whether the proposed collection of 
information is necessary for the proper performance of the functions of 
the agency, including whether the information will have practical 
utility; (b) the accuracy of the agency's estimate of the burden of the 
proposed collection of information; (c) ways to enhance the quality, 
utility, and clarity of the information to be collected; and (d) ways 
to minimize the burden of the collection of information on respondents, 
including through the use of automated collection techniques or other 
forms of information technology.

Project: Mental and Substance Use Disorders Prevalence Study (MDPS) 
Grant Funded by SAMHSA, Grant Number H79FG000030

    SAMHSA is requesting from the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) 
approval to conduct recruitment activities and clinical interviews with 
household respondents and non-household facilities and respondents as 
part of the Mental and Substance Use Disorders Prevalence Study (MDPS) 
pilot program. Activities conducted will include: A household rostering 
and mental health screening of household participants and a clinical 
interview of both household and non-household participants. The 
information gathered by the clinical interview will be used to 
determine prevalence estimates of schizophrenia or schizoaffective 
disorder; bipolar I disorder; major depressive disorder; generalized 
anxiety disorder; posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD); obsessive-
compulsive disorder; anorexia nervosa; and alcohol, benzodiazepine, 
opioid, stimulant, and cannabis use disorders among U.S. adults ages 18 
to 65 years.

Household Rostering

    The household rostering includes inquiries about all adults ages 18 
and older residing in the household, to assess eligibility for 
inclusion in the study, and then selecting up to two adults for the 
household mental health screening. The total number of household 
members and numbers of adults and children are first asked, followed by 
the first name, age and sex of all adult household members, as well as 
whether any adult in the household has had a serious medical condition. 
The best time to be interviewed is collected as well. The computerized 
roster can be completed online, by phone, on paper, or in-person. The 
target population is adults ages 18-65 residing in U.S. households; it 
is estimated that 45,000 household rosters will be completed. The 
primary objective of the household roster is to select up to two age-
eligible participants for the mental health screening interview.

Household Mental Health Screening

    The household mental health screening interview utilizes the 
Computerized Adaptive Testing for Mental Health Disorders (CAT-MH) or 
the World Health Organization's Composite International Diagnostic 
Interview (CIDI) instruments to assess symptoms related to the mental 
health and substance use disorders of interest, including schizophrenia 
or schizoaffective disorder; bipolar I disorder; major depressive 
disorder; generalized anxiety disorder; posttraumatic stress disorder 
(PTSD); obsessive-compulsive disorder; anorexia nervosa; and alcohol, 
benzodiazepine, opioid, stimulant, and cannabis use. The screening 
instrument also includes questions on treatment, receipt of Social 
Security Disability Income (SSDI), military experience, and exposure to 
and impact of COVID-19. The computerized mental health screening can be 
completed online, by phone, on paper or in-person. The primary 
objectives of the household mental health screening interview are to 
assess the symptoms endorsed and determine eligibility and selection 
for the MDPS pilot program clinical interview.

[[Page 2886]]

Clinical Interview

    The MDPS pilot program clinical interview includes questions that 
assess the mental health and substance use disorders using the NetSCID, 
a computerized version of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-V 
(SCID). This instrument includes questions on symptoms and their 
duration and frequency for the disorders of interest. Also collected 
from respondents is demographic information, including sex, gender, 
age, education and employment status. Hospitalization and treatment 
history are asked as well as questions to assess exposure to COVID-19 
of self or other close family members and the impact on mental health. 
Up to two adults per household will be selected to complete the 
clinical interview. Participants from the prisons, jails, homeless 
shelters and state psychiatric hospitals will complete the clinical 
interview as well. The computer-assisted personal interview (CAPI) is 
administered by a trained clinical interviewer, and can be conducted by 
video conference, such as Zoom or WebEx, phone or in person. 
Approximately 7,200 clinical interviews will be conducted as part of 
the MDPS pilot program. The primary objective of the clinical interview 
is to estimate the prevalence of the disorders of interest, including 
schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder; bipolar I disorder; major 
depressive disorder; generalized anxiety disorder; posttraumatic stress 
disorder (PTSD); obsessive-compulsive disorder; anorexia nervosa; and 
alcohol, benzodiazepine, opioid, stimulant, and cannabis use, as well 
as unmet treatment needs.

Jail Mental Health Screening

    The jail mental health screening interview utilizes the CIDI 
screening instruments to assess symptoms related to the primary mental 
health and substance use disorders of interest including schizophrenia 
or schizoaffective disorder; bipolar I disorder; major depressive 
disorder; generalized anxiety disorder; posttraumatic stress disorder 
(PTSD); obsessive-compulsive disorder; anorexia nervosa; and alcohol, 
benzodiazepine, opioid, stimulant, and cannabis use. The screening 
instrument also includes questions on treatment, receipt of Social 
Security Disability Income (SSDI), military experience, and exposure to 
and impact of COVID-19. The computerized mental health screening will 
be completed in person or by phone. The target population is a 
convenience sample of incarcerated 18-65-year-old adults, in up to six 
jails identified by the MDPS co-investigator team. Up to 208 mental 
health screening interviews will be conducted among incarcerated 
respondents. Respondents will be provided with a card that includes 
contact information and asked to contact the project personnel when 
they are released for inclusion in the household clinical interview 
sample. The primary objective of the jail mental health screening 
interview is to determine the feasibility of conducting mental health 
screening interviews within a jail population, as well as whether they 
would have been included in the household sample during the data 
collection period should they not have been incarcerated.

Facility Recruitment

    Information packets will be sent to all selected prisons, state 
psychiatric hospitals, homeless shelters and jails including a letter 
of invitation, letters of support, an overview of the project and an 
overview of the data collection process in the facility. Facilities 
will be contacted by telephone, to answer any questions and provide 
additional information regarding the MDPS pilot program. Once approval 
is obtained, a logistics manager will contact the facility to provide 
instructions on the rostering and selection processes, to schedule the 
data collection visit, and to determine the appropriate space to 
conduct the interviews and the number of days and hours per day for 
data collection. Facilities will be asked to provide a roster 
(deidentified or identified) of eligible residents within one week of 
scheduling the data collection visit and again one-to-two weeks prior 
to the actual data collection visit (note: Data collection can be 
scheduled up to 4 months in advance). At the time of data collection, 
facility staff will assist with data collection activities including 
escorting selected inmates to and from the data collection area.
    The primary objective of the MDPS pilot program is to examine 
methods to estimate the prevalence of specific mental illnesses, 
particularly adults with psychotic disorders and serious functional 
impairment, and treatment in both populations to answer two core 
research questions:
     What is the prevalence of schizophrenia/schizoaffective 
disorder (lifetime and past year), bipolar I disorder (past year), 
major depressive disorder (past year), generalized anxiety disorder 
(past year), posttraumatic stress disorder (past year), obsessive-
compulsive disorder (past year), anorexia nervosa (past year), and 
alcohol, benzodiazepine, opioid, stimulant, and cannabis use disorders 
(past year) among adults, ages 18-65, in the United States?
     What proportion of adults in the United States with these 
disorders received treatment in the past year?
    In addition to these research questions, the MDPS pilot program 
will allow for procedural evaluation to:
    [ssquf] Identify which set of screening instruments might be best 
to accurately identify mental and substance use disorders within the 
U.S. household population;
    [ssquf] Understand the best approaches to conducting data 
collection within non-household settings, to gather information on 
mental illness and treatment;
    [ssquf] Design protocols for collecting clinical interviews from 
proxy respondents; and
    [ssquf] Establish a protocol that can be used at a larger scale to 
understand the prevalence and burden of specific mental disorders in 
both non-household and household populations across the United States.

                             Exhibit 1--Total Estimated Annualized Respondent Burden by Instrument and Facility Recruitment
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                             Number of
                                                                  Total      responses      Total       Average      Average      Average
                           Activity                             number of       per       number of    hours per      burden       hourly     Total cost
                                                               respondents   respondent   responses     response      hours       wage **
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Instrument:
    Household Rostering......................................       45,000            1       45,000         0.13        5,850       $19.83     $116,006
    Household contact attempts*..............................       45,000            1       45,000         0.17        7,650        19.83      151,700
    Household Screening......................................       45,000            1       45,000         0.25       11,250        19.83      223,088
    Screening contact attempts*..............................       45,000            1       45,000         0.17        7,650        19.83      151,700
    Clinical Interview (household and non-household).........        7,200            1        7,200         1.40       10,080        19.83      199,886
    Clinical Interview contact attempts*.....................        7,200            1        7,200         0.25        1,800        19.83       35,694
    Jail Screening Interview.................................          208            1          208         0.33           69        19.83        1,369

[[Page 2887]]

 
    Jail Clinical Interview..................................           63            1           63         1.40           88        19.83         1749
                                                              ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Sub-total Interviewing Estimates.....................  ...........  ...........  ...........  ...........       44,437  ...........      881,192
                                                              ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Facility Recruitment
    Information package review for facility administrators...           58            1           58         0.75         43.5        25.09        1,091
    Initial call with facility staff.........................           58            1           58            1           58        25.09        1,455
    Telephone call with facility staff to explain roster file           58            1           58            2          116        25.09        2,910
     process.................................................
    Facility staff provides roster...........................           58            4          232            2          464        25.09       11,642
    Facility staff coordinates time and location for clinical           58            4          232            2          464        25.09       11,642
     interview administration................................
                                                              ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Sub-total Facility Recruitment Estimates.............  ...........  ...........  ...........  ...........      1,145.5  ...........       28,740
                                                              ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
            Total............................................  ...........  ...........  ...........  ...........     45,582.5  ...........      909,932
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
*Contact attempts include the time spent reviewing all follow-up letters and study materials, including the respondent website, interactions with field
  and telephone interviewers, the consent process including asking questions regarding rights as a participant and receiving responses, and all other
  exchanges during the recruitment and interviewing processes.
**To compute total estimated annual cost for Interviewing, the total burden hours were multiplied by the average hourly wage for each adult participant,
  according to a Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) chart called ``Median usual weekly earnings of full-time wage and salary workers by educational
  attainment.'' (Median usual weekly earnings of full-time wage and salary workers by educational attainment (bls.gov)). We used the median salary for
  full-time employees over the age of 25 who are high school graduates with no college experience in the 2nd quarter of 2021 ($19.83 per hour). * For
  the Facility Recruitment, the total average burden assumes an average hourly rate of $25.09 for Community and Social Service Managers, given in the
  Bureau of Labor Statistic's Occupational Employment Statistics, May 2020.

    Send comments to Carlos Graham, SAMHSA Reports Clearance Officer, 
5600 Fishers Lane, Room 15E57-A, Rockville, Maryland 20857, OR email a 
copy to [email protected]. Written comments should be 
received by March 21, 2022.

Carlos Graham,
Reports Clearance Officer.
[FR Doc. 2022-00861 Filed 1-18-22; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4162-20-P