Commission Decision To Institute a Rescission Proceeding; Permanent Rescission of a Limited Exclusion Order and Cease and Desist Orders; Termination of the Rescission Proceeding; Certain Lithium Ion Batteries, Battery Cells, Battery Modules, Battery Packs, Components Thereof, and Processes Therefor, 33737-33738 [2021-13574]

Download as PDF Federal Register / Vol. 86, No. 120 / Friday, June 25, 2021 / Notices lotter on DSK11XQN23PROD with NOTICES1 Yavapai County, AZ. The 17 unassociated funerary objects are 13 bowls, one pendent, one cup, one necklace, and one awl. Between 1933–1934, 7,171 cultural items were removed from Tuzigoot Pueblo in Yavapai County, AZ. The 7,171 unassociated funerary objects are one bow, two basketry fragments, one spindle whorl, two axes, one crystal, one prayer stick, 19 dendrochronology samples, 13 jars, 84 bowls, four miniature bowls, four pitchers, four ladles, one miniature jar, 6,969 beads, 12 pendants, 19 bracelets, three unworked shells, eight projectile points, six necklaces, five rings, four worked shells, one worked sherd, two worked bones, two drills, two unworked bones, and one pigment. Between 1933–1934, 896 cultural items were removed from Tuzigoot Extension Pueblo in Yavapai County, AZ. The 896 unassociated funerary objects are 19 bowls, one jar, one miniature jar, one ladle, one whistle, one bracelet, one ring, 844 beads, six pendants, 14 projectile points, one crystal, two ground stone artifacts, two knives, and two drills. Tuzigoot Pueblo is a large pueblo with more than 100 rooms, which is classified by archeologists as Southern Sinagua, Honanki and Tuzigoot phases. Occupation dates range from A.D. 1125– 1425. Tuzigoot Extension Pueblo and Hatalacva Pueblo are multi-room pueblos near Tuzigoot National Monument, also classified as Southern Sinagua, Honanki, and Tuzigoot phases. The Hopi Tribe of Arizona considers all of Arizona to be within traditional Hopi lands or within areas where Hopi clans migrated in the past. Evidence demonstrating continuity between the people that lived at Tuzigoot, Tuzigoot Extension, and Hatalacva and the Hopi Tribe of Arizona includes archeological, anthropological, linguistic, folkloric, and oral traditions. Ceramic vessels made only on the Hopi mesas as well as coiled basketry demonstrate continuity between Tuzigoot Pueblo, Tuzigoot Extension Pueblo, and Hatalacva Pueblo, and the Hopi people. During consultation, Hopi clan members also identified ancestral names and traditional stories about specific events and ancestral people in the Verde Valley. Determinations Made by the U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Tuzigoot National Monument Officials of the U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Tuzigoot National Monument have determined that: VerDate Sep<11>2014 18:38 Jun 24, 2021 Jkt 253001 • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(B), the 8,084 cultural items described above are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony and are believed, by a preponderance of the evidence, to have been removed from a specific burial site of a Native American individual. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the 8,084 unassociated funerary objects and the Hopi Tribe of Arizona. Additional Requestors and Disposition Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to claim these cultural items should submit a written request with information in support of the claim to Lloyd Masayumptewa, Acting Superintendent, Tuzigoot National Monument, P.O. Box 219, Camp Verde, AZ 86322, telephone (928) 567–5276, email Lloyd_Masayumptewa@nps.gov, by July 26, 2021. After that date, if no additional claimants have come forward, transfer of control of the unassociated funerary objects to the Hopi Tribe of Arizona may proceed. The U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Tuzigoot National Monument is responsible for notifying the Ak-Chin Indian Community [previously listed as the Ak Chin Indian Community of the Maricopa (Ak Chin) Indian Reservation, Arizona]; Fort McDowell Yavapai Nation, Arizona; Gila River Indian Community of the Gila River Indian Reservation, Arizona; Hopi Tribe of Arizona; Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community of the Salt River Reservation, Arizona; Tohono O’odham Nation of Arizona; Yavapai-Apache Nation of the Camp Verde Indian Reservation, Arizona; Yavapai-Prescott Indian Tribe [previously listed as Yavapai-Prescott Tribe of the Yavapai Reservation, Arizona]; and the Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico that this notice has been published. Dated: June 9, 2021. Melanie O’Brien, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2021–13509 Filed 6–24–21; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–52–P PO 00000 Frm 00105 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 33737 INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Investigation No. 337–TA–1159 (Rescission)] Commission Decision To Institute a Rescission Proceeding; Permanent Rescission of a Limited Exclusion Order and Cease and Desist Orders; Termination of the Rescission Proceeding; Certain Lithium Ion Batteries, Battery Cells, Battery Modules, Battery Packs, Components Thereof, and Processes Therefor U.S. International Trade Commission. ACTION: Notice. AGENCY: Notice is hereby given that the U.S. International Trade Commission has determined to institute a proceeding to determine whether to permanently rescind the Commission’s limited exclusion order (‘‘LEO’’) and cease and desist orders (‘‘CDOs’’) issued on February 10, 2021. The Commission has determined to permanently rescind the LEO and CDOs. The rescission proceeding is terminated. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Sidney A. Rosenzweig, Office of the General Counsel, U.S. International Trade Commission, 500 E Street SW, Washington, DC 20436, telephone (202) 708–2532. Copies of non-confidential documents filed in connection with this investigation may be viewed on the Commission’s electronic docket (EDIS) at https://edis.usitc.gov. For help accessing EDIS, please email EDIS3Help@usitc.gov. General information concerning the Commission may also be obtained by accessing its internet server at https://www.usitc.gov. Hearing-impaired persons are advised that information on this matter can be obtained by contacting the Commission’s TDD terminal on (202) 205–1810. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Commission instituted this investigation on June 4, 2019, based on a complaint filed on behalf of LG Chem, Ltd. of Seoul, Republic of Korea and LG Chem Michigan, Inc. of Holland, Michigan. 84 FR 25858 (June 4, 2019). As a result of a corporate reorganization, the complainants are now LG Chem, Ltd. of Seoul, Republic of Korea, LG Energy Solution, Ltd. of Seoul, Republic of Korea, and LG Energy Solution Michigan, Inc. (collectively, ‘‘complainants’’ or ‘‘LG’’). The complaint, as supplemented, alleges violations of section 337 of the Tariff Act of 1930, as amended, 19 U.S.C. 1337, in the importation and sale of SUMMARY: E:\FR\FM\25JNN1.SGM 25JNN1 lotter on DSK11XQN23PROD with NOTICES1 33738 Federal Register / Vol. 86, No. 120 / Friday, June 25, 2021 / Notices certain lithium ion batteries, battery cells, battery modules, battery packs, components thereof, and processes therefor by reason of misappropriation of trade secrets, the threat or effect of which is to destroy or substantially injure an industry in the United States, under subsection (a)(1)(A) of section 337. The complaint, as supplemented, names SK Innovation Co., Ltd. of Seoul, Republic of Korea and SK Battery America, Inc. of Atlanta, Georgia as the respondents (collectively, ‘‘respondents’’ or ‘‘SK’’). The Office of Unfair Import Investigations (‘‘OUII’’) was also named as a party in this investigation. On February 14, 2020, the administrative law judge issued an initial determination (‘‘ID’’) (Order No. 34) finding that the respondents spoliated evidence, and that the appropriate remedy is to find the respondents in default. On April 17, 2020, the Commission determined to review the ID in its entirety. 85 FR 22,753 (Apr. 23, 2020) (‘‘Notice of Review’’). The Notice of Review requested that the parties brief certain issues and sought briefing from the parties, interested government agencies, and any other interested parties on remedy, the public interest, and bonding. On February 10, 2021, the Commission affirmed the ID’s finding of default, thus finding a violation of section 337. The Commission issued an LEO and two CDOs, all of which were tailored to accommodate public interest considerations raised by the parties to the investigation and by non-parties. On May 24, 2021, SK filed a petition to rescind the LEO and CDOs on the basis of settlement. LG did not oppose the petition, and on June 3, 2021, OUII filed a response in support of the petition. Also, on June 3, 2021, SK filed a supplemental submission that provided a modified public version of the settlement agreement. The Commission has determined that the petition, as supplemented, complies with Commission rules, see 19 CFR 210.76(a)(3), and that there are no extraordinary reasons to deny rescission of the remedial orders. Accordingly, the Commission has determined to institute a rescission proceeding and to permanently rescind the LEO and the CDOs. The rescission proceeding is hereby terminated. The Commission’s vote on this determination took place on June 21, 2021. The LEO and CDOs are permanently rescinded. The authority for the Commission’s determination is contained in section 337 of the Tariff Act of 1930, as VerDate Sep<11>2014 18:38 Jun 24, 2021 Jkt 253001 amended (19 U.S.C. 1337), and in part 210 of the Commission’s Rules of Practice and Procedure (19 CFR part 210). By order of the Commission. Issued: June 22, 2021. Lisa Barton, Secretary to the Commission. INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Investigation Nos. 731–TA–753, 754, and 756 (Fourth Review)] Cut-to-Length Carbon Steel Plate From China, Russia, and Ukraine Determinations On the basis of the record 1 developed in the subject five-year reviews, the United States International Trade Commission (‘‘Commission’’) determines, pursuant to the Tariff Act of 1930 (‘‘the Act’’), that revocation of the antidumping duty order on cut-to-length carbon steel plate from China and the termination of the suspended investigations on cut-to-length carbon steel plate from Russia and Ukraine would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of material injury to an industry in the United States within a reasonably foreseeable time. Background The Commission instituted these reviews on November 2, 2020 (85 FR 69362) and determined on February 5, 2021 that it would conduct expedited reviews (86 FR 26067, May 12, 2021). The Commission made these determinations pursuant to section 751(c) of the Act (19 U.S.C. 1675(c)). It completed and filed its determinations in these reviews on June 21, 2021. The views of the Commission are contained in USITC Publication 5205 (June 2021), entitled Cut-to-Length Carbon Steel Plate from China, Russia, and Ukraine: Investigation Nos. 731–TA–753, 754, and 756 (Fourth Review). By order of the Commission. Issued: June 21, 2021. Lisa Barton, Secretary to the Commission. [FR Doc. 2021–13523 Filed 6–24–21; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 7020–02–P 1 The record is defined in § 207.2(f) of the Commission’s Rules of Practice and Procedure (19 CFR 207.2(f)). Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 [Docket No. 19–18] I. Procedural History BILLING CODE 7020–02–P Frm 00106 Drug Enforcement Administration Robert Wayne Locklear, M.D.; Decision and Order [FR Doc. 2021–13574 Filed 6–24–21; 8:45 am] PO 00000 DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE On March 26, 2019, the Assistant Administrator, Diversion Control Division, Drug Enforcement Administration (hereinafter, DEA or Government), issued an Order to Show Cause (hereinafter, OSC) to Robert Wayne Locklear, M.D., (hereinafter, Respondent) of Johnson City, Tennessee. Administrative Law Judge (hereinafter, ALJ) Exhibit (hereinafter, ALJX) 1 (OSC), at 1. The OSC proposed the denial of Respondent’s application for a DEA Certificate of Registration, Application Control No. W18124612C, ‘‘pursuant to 21 U.S.C. 824(a)(2) & (a)(5), because [Respondent has] been convicted of a felony related to controlled substances and because [he has] been excluded from participation in a program pursuant to section 1320a– 7(a) of Title 42.’’ Id. Specifically, the OSC alleged that, on October 8, 2014, Judgment was entered against Respondent in the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Tennessee (hereinafter, E.D. Tenn.) ‘‘after [Respondent] pled guilty to: one count of ‘Conspiracy to Distribute a Quantity of Cocaine Base,’ in violation of 21 U.S.C. 846 & 841(b)(1)(C); and one count of ‘Conspiracy to Defraud a Health Care Benefit Program,’ in violation of 18 U.S.C. 1347 & 1349.’’ Id. at 2 (citing U.S. v. Robert Wayne Locklear, No. 2:14–CR–38 (E.D. Tenn. Oct. 8, 2014)). The OSC alleged that Respondent’s conviction of a felony related to controlled substances warrants the denial of Respondent’s application pursuant to 21 U.S.C. 824(a)(2). The OSC further alleged that ‘‘based on [such] conviction, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Inspector General (‘HHS/OIG’) mandatorily excluded [Respondent] from participation in Medicare, Medicaid, and all Federal health care programs pursuant to 42 U.S.C. 1320a–7(a).’’ Id. The OSC stated that this exclusion took effect on June 18, 2015, and ‘‘runs for a period of ten years,’’ and that such exclusion ‘‘warrants denial of [Respondent’s] application for DEA registration pursuant to 21 U.S.C. 824(a)(5).’’ Id. The Order to Show Cause notified Respondent of the right to request a hearing on the allegations or to submit E:\FR\FM\25JNN1.SGM 25JNN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 86, Number 120 (Friday, June 25, 2021)]
[Notices]
[Pages 33737-33738]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2021-13574]


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INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION

[Investigation No. 337-TA-1159 (Rescission)]


Commission Decision To Institute a Rescission Proceeding; 
Permanent Rescission of a Limited Exclusion Order and Cease and Desist 
Orders; Termination of the Rescission Proceeding; Certain Lithium Ion 
Batteries, Battery Cells, Battery Modules, Battery Packs, Components 
Thereof, and Processes Therefor

AGENCY: U.S. International Trade Commission.

ACTION: Notice.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that the U.S. International Trade 
Commission has determined to institute a proceeding to determine 
whether to permanently rescind the Commission's limited exclusion order 
(``LEO'') and cease and desist orders (``CDOs'') issued on February 10, 
2021. The Commission has determined to permanently rescind the LEO and 
CDOs. The rescission proceeding is terminated.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Sidney A. Rosenzweig, Office of the 
General Counsel, U.S. International Trade Commission, 500 E Street SW, 
Washington, DC 20436, telephone (202) 708-2532. Copies of non-
confidential documents filed in connection with this investigation may 
be viewed on the Commission's electronic docket (EDIS) at https://edis.usitc.gov. For help accessing EDIS, please email 
[email protected]. General information concerning the Commission may 
also be obtained by accessing its internet server at https://www.usitc.gov. Hearing-impaired persons are advised that information on 
this matter can be obtained by contacting the Commission's TDD terminal 
on (202) 205-1810.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Commission instituted this investigation 
on June 4, 2019, based on a complaint filed on behalf of LG Chem, Ltd. 
of Seoul, Republic of Korea and LG Chem Michigan, Inc. of Holland, 
Michigan. 84 FR 25858 (June 4, 2019). As a result of a corporate 
reorganization, the complainants are now LG Chem, Ltd. of Seoul, 
Republic of Korea, LG Energy Solution, Ltd. of Seoul, Republic of 
Korea, and LG Energy Solution Michigan, Inc. (collectively, 
``complainants'' or ``LG''). The complaint, as supplemented, alleges 
violations of section 337 of the Tariff Act of 1930, as amended, 19 
U.S.C. 1337, in the importation and sale of

[[Page 33738]]

certain lithium ion batteries, battery cells, battery modules, battery 
packs, components thereof, and processes therefor by reason of 
misappropriation of trade secrets, the threat or effect of which is to 
destroy or substantially injure an industry in the United States, under 
subsection (a)(1)(A) of section 337. The complaint, as supplemented, 
names SK Innovation Co., Ltd. of Seoul, Republic of Korea and SK 
Battery America, Inc. of Atlanta, Georgia as the respondents 
(collectively, ``respondents'' or ``SK''). The Office of Unfair Import 
Investigations (``OUII'') was also named as a party in this 
investigation.
    On February 14, 2020, the administrative law judge issued an 
initial determination (``ID'') (Order No. 34) finding that the 
respondents spoliated evidence, and that the appropriate remedy is to 
find the respondents in default.
    On April 17, 2020, the Commission determined to review the ID in 
its entirety. 85 FR 22,753 (Apr. 23, 2020) (``Notice of Review''). The 
Notice of Review requested that the parties brief certain issues and 
sought briefing from the parties, interested government agencies, and 
any other interested parties on remedy, the public interest, and 
bonding.
    On February 10, 2021, the Commission affirmed the ID's finding of 
default, thus finding a violation of section 337. The Commission issued 
an LEO and two CDOs, all of which were tailored to accommodate public 
interest considerations raised by the parties to the investigation and 
by non-parties.
    On May 24, 2021, SK filed a petition to rescind the LEO and CDOs on 
the basis of settlement. LG did not oppose the petition, and on June 3, 
2021, OUII filed a response in support of the petition. Also, on June 
3, 2021, SK filed a supplemental submission that provided a modified 
public version of the settlement agreement.
    The Commission has determined that the petition, as supplemented, 
complies with Commission rules, see 19 CFR 210.76(a)(3), and that there 
are no extraordinary reasons to deny rescission of the remedial orders. 
Accordingly, the Commission has determined to institute a rescission 
proceeding and to permanently rescind the LEO and the CDOs. The 
rescission proceeding is hereby terminated.
    The Commission's vote on this determination took place on June 21, 
2021. The LEO and CDOs are permanently rescinded.
    The authority for the Commission's determination is contained in 
section 337 of the Tariff Act of 1930, as amended (19 U.S.C. 1337), and 
in part 210 of the Commission's Rules of Practice and Procedure (19 CFR 
part 210).

    By order of the Commission.

    Issued: June 22, 2021.
Lisa Barton,
Secretary to the Commission.
[FR Doc. 2021-13574 Filed 6-24-21; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 7020-02-P