Applications for New Awards; Teacher Quality Partnership Grant Program, 29691-29704 [2020-10509]

Download as PDF Federal Register / Vol. 85, No. 96 / Monday, May 18, 2020 / Notices Research and Development Center, Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory. Additional cited literature: Lichvar R.W., N.C. Melvin, M.L. Butterwick, and W.N. Kirchner. 2012. National Wetland Plant List Indicator Rating Definitions. ERDC/CRREL TN–12–1. Hanover, NH: U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory Lichvar R. and W. Fertig. Epiphytes and the National Wetland Plant List. Phytoneuron 2011–17:1–31 Environmental Documentation A decision document has been prepared for this action after all comments received were evaluated. The decision document is available through Headquarters, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Operations and Regulatory Community of Practice, 441 G Street NW, Washington, DC 20314–1000. Authority The NWPL is utilized in conducting wetland determinations under the authority of the Food Security Act of 1985 (16 U.S.C. 3801 et seq.) and wetland delineations under the authority of Section 404 of the Clean Water Act (33 U.S.C. 1344) and Section 10 of the Rivers and Harbors Act of 1899 (33 U.S.C. 401 et seq.). The Corps has responsibility for issuing this update pursuant to the 2006 MOA. R.D. James, Assistant Secretary of the Army (Civil Works). [FR Doc. 2020–10630 Filed 5–15–20; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 3720–58–P DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION [Docket No.: ED–2020–SCC–0041] Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission to the Office of Management and Budget for Review and Approval; Comment Request; RSA–509, Annual Protection and Advocacy of Individual Rights Program Performance Report Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services (OSERS), Department of Education (ED). ACTION: Notice. AGENCY: In accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, ED is proposing an extension of an existing information collection. DATES: Interested persons are invited to submit comments on or before June 17, 2025. ADDRESSES: Written comments and recommendations for proposed jbell on DSKJLSW7X2PROD with NOTICES SUMMARY: VerDate Sep<11>2014 18:03 May 15, 2020 Jkt 250001 information collection requests should be sent within 30 days of publication of this notice to www.reginfo.gov/public/ do/PRAMain. Find this particular information collection request by selecting ‘‘Department of Education’’ under ‘‘Currently Under Review,’’ then check ‘‘Only Show ICR for Public Comment’’ checkbox. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: For specific questions related to collection activities, please contact Samuel Pierre, 202–245–6488. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Department of Education (ED), in accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (PRA) (44 U.S.C. 3506(c)(2)(A)), provides the general public and Federal agencies with an opportunity to comment on proposed, revised, and continuing collections of information. This helps the Department assess the impact of its information collection requirements and minimize the public’s reporting burden. It also helps the public understand the Department’s information collection requirements and provide the requested data in the desired format. ED is soliciting comments on the proposed information collection request (ICR) that is described below. The Department of Education is especially interested in public comment addressing the following issues: (1) Is this collection necessary to the proper functions of the Department; (2) will this information be processed and used in a timely manner; (3) is the estimate of burden accurate; (4) how might the Department enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the information to be collected; and (5) how might the Department minimize the burden of this collection on the respondents, including through the use of information technology. Please note that written comments received in response to this notice will be considered public records. Title of Collection: RSA–509, Annual Protection and Advocacy of Individual Rights Program Performance Report. OMB Control Number: 1820–0627. Type of Review: An extension of an existing information collection. Respondents/Affected Public: State, Local, and Tribal Governments. Total Estimated Number of Annual Responses: 57. Total Estimated Number of Annual Burden Hours: 912. Abstract: The Annual Protection and Advocacy of Individual Rights (PAIR) Program Performance Report (Form RSA–509) will be used to analyze and evaluate the PAIR Program administered by eligible systems in states. These systems provide services to eligible PO 00000 Frm 00013 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 29691 individuals with disabilities to protect their legal and human rights. RSA uses the form to meet specific data collection requirements of Section 509 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended (the Act), and its implementing federal regulations at 34 CFR part 381. PAIR programs must report annually using the RSA–509, which is due on or before December 30 each year. The collection of information through Form RSA–509 has enabled RSA to furnish the President and Congress with data on the provision of protection and advocacy services and has helped to establish a sound basis for future funding requests. Data from the form have been used to evaluate the effectiveness of eligible systems within individual states in meeting annual priorities and objectives. These data also have been used to indicate trends in the provision of services from year-to-year. The respondents to the RSA–509 is the protection and advocacy system in each state. These organizations are private not-for-profit organizations. RSA included the respondents and the national organization that represents them (National Disability Rights Network (NDRN)) in the initial development of this collection of information in an effort to ensure that the information requested could be provided with minimal burden to the respondents. Dated: May 13, 2020. Kate Mullan, PRA Coordinator, Strategic Collections and Clearance Governance and Strategy Division, Office of Chief Data Officer. [FR Doc. 2020–10607 Filed 5–15–20; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4000–01–P DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Applications for New Awards; Teacher Quality Partnership Grant Program Office of Elementary and Secondary Education, Department of Education. ACTION: Notice. AGENCY: The Department of Education is issuing a notice inviting applications for fiscal year (FY) 2020 for the Teacher Quality Partnership Grant (TQP) program, Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance (CFDA) number 84.336S. This notice relates to the approved information collection under OMB control number 1894–0006. DATES: Applications Available: May 18, 2020. Pre-Application Webinars: The Office of Elementary and Secondary Education intends to post pre-recorded SUMMARY: E:\FR\FM\18MYN1.SGM 18MYN1 29692 Federal Register / Vol. 85, No. 96 / Monday, May 18, 2020 / Notices informational webinars designed to provide technical assistance to interested applicants for grants under the TQP program. These informational webinars will be available on the TQP web page shortly after this notice is published in the Federal Register at https://oese.ed.gov/offices/office-ofdiscretionary-grants-support-services/ effective-educator-developmentprograms/teacher-quality-partnership/ applicant-info-and-eligibility/. A TQP Frequently Asked Questions document will also be published on the TQP program web page as soon as it is available at https://oese.ed.gov/offices/ office-of-discretionary-grants-supportservices/effective-educatordevelopment-programs/teacher-qualitypartnership/. Deadline for Notice of Intent to Apply: Applicants are strongly encouraged, but not required, to submit a notice of intent to apply by June 17, 2020. Deadline for Transmittal of Applications: July 2, 2020. Deadline for Intergovernmental Review: September 15, 2020. ADDRESSES: For the addresses for obtaining and submitting an application, please refer to our Common Instructions for Applicants to Department of Education Discretionary Grant Programs, published in the Federal Register on February 13, 2019 (84 FR 3768), and available at www.govinfo.gov/content/pkg/FR-201902-13/pdf/2019-02206.pdf. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Mia Howerton, U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue SW, Room 3C152, Washington, DC 20202– 5960. Telephone: (202) 205–0147. Email: Mia.Howerton@ed.gov or TQPartnership@ed.gov. If you use a telecommunications device for the deaf (TDD) or a text telephone (TTY), call the Federal Relay Service (FRS), toll free, at 1–800–877– 8339. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: jbell on DSKJLSW7X2PROD with NOTICES Full Text of Announcement I. Funding Opportunity Description Purpose of Program: The purposes of the TQP program are to improve student achievement; improve the quality of prospective and new teachers by improving the preparation of prospective teachers and enhancing professional development activities for new teachers; hold teacher preparation programs at institutions of higher education (IHEs) accountable for preparing teachers who meet applicable State certification and licensure requirements; and recruit highly qualified individuals, including VerDate Sep<11>2014 18:03 May 15, 2020 Jkt 250001 minorities and individuals from other occupations, into the teaching force. Background: The TQP program supports eligible partnerships that must include a high-need local educational agency (LEA), a high-need school served by the LEA, or a high-need early childhood education (ECE) program; a partner institution; a school, department, or program of education within such partner institution; and a school or department of arts and sciences within such partner institution. It may also include certain other entities. Under section 202(d) and (e) of the Higher Education Act of 1965, as amended (HEA), these partnerships must implement either (a) teacher preparation programs at the prebaccalaureate or ‘‘fifth-year’’ level that include specific reforms in IHEs’ existing teacher preparation programs; or (b) teacher residency programs for individuals who are recent graduates with strong academic backgrounds or are mid-career professionals from outside the field of education. In the FY 2020 TQP competition, we will only support projects that prepare teachers through the implementation of teacher residency programs. The requirements for such a teacher residency program are further explained in this notice in the Absolute Priority section. We also include two competitive preference priorities: One for projects that propose to provide services in areas that overlap with a Qualified Opportunity Zone and another for applications from new potential grantees. Competitive Preference Priority 1, Spurring Investment in Qualified Opportunity Zones, is aligned with the Department’s mission to promote equity and excellence in education by giving competitive preference to projects providing services to educators serving students and schools located in distressed communities, known as Qualified Opportunity Zones (QOZs). Public law (Pub. L.) 115–97, colloquially known as the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, authorized the designation of QOZs to promote economic development and job creation in distressed communities through preferential tax treatment for investors. A list of QOZs is available at www.cdfifund.gov/Pages/OpportunityZones.aspx; applicants may also determine whether a particular area overlaps with a QOZ using the National Center of Education Statistics’ map located at https://nces.ed.gov/programs/ maped/LocaleLookup/. Finally, in seeking an array of potentially new ideas and perspectives, Competitive Preference Priority 2 PO 00000 Frm 00014 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 encourages eligible partnerships that have not previously received grants under the TQP program to apply. Priorities: This notice contains one absolute priority and two competitive preference priorities. In accordance with 34 CFR 75.105(b)(2)(iv), the absolute priority is from section 202(e) of the HEA. Competitive Preference Priority 1 is from the notice of final priority published in the Federal Register on November 27, 2019 (84 FR 65300) (Opportunity Zones NFP). Competitive Preference Priority 2 is from the notice of final priorities published in the Federal Register on March 9, 2020 (85 FR 13640) (Administrative Priorities). Absolute Priority: For FY 2020 and any subsequent year in which we make awards from the list of unfunded applications from this competition, this priority is an absolute priority. Under 34 CFR 75.105(c)(3), we consider only applications that meet this priority. This priority is: Partnership Grants for the Establishment of Effective Teaching Residency Programs. I. In general. Under this priority, an eligible partnership must carry out an effective teaching residency program that includes all of the following activities: (a) Supporting a teaching residency program described in paragraph II for high-need subjects and areas, as determined by the needs of the highneed local educational agency (LEA) in the partnership. (b) Placing graduates of the teaching residency program in cohorts that facilitate professional collaboration, both among graduates of the teaching residency program and between such graduates and mentor teachers in the receiving school. (c) Ensuring that teaching residents who participate in the teaching residency program receive— (1) Effective pre-service preparation as described in paragraph II; (2) Teacher mentoring; (3) Support required through the induction program as the teaching residents enter the classroom as new teachers; and (4) The preparation described below: (i) Incorporate year-long opportunities for enrichment, including— (A) Clinical learning in classrooms in high-need schools served by the highneed LEA in the eligible partnership, and identified by the eligible partnership; and (B) Closely supervised interaction between prospective teachers and faculty, experienced teachers, principals, other administrators, and school leaders at early childhood E:\FR\FM\18MYN1.SGM 18MYN1 jbell on DSKJLSW7X2PROD with NOTICES Federal Register / Vol. 85, No. 96 / Monday, May 18, 2020 / Notices education programs (as applicable), elementary schools, or secondary schools, and providing support for such interaction. (ii) Integrate pedagogy and classroom practice and promote effective teaching skills in academic content areas. (iii) Provide high-quality teacher mentoring. II. Teaching Residency Programs. (a) Establishment and design. A teaching residency program under this priority is a program based upon models of successful teaching residencies that serves as a mechanism to prepare teachers for success in the high-need schools in the eligible partnership, and must be designed to include the following characteristics of successful programs: (1) The integration of pedagogy, classroom practice, and teacher mentoring. (2) Engagement of teaching residents in rigorous graduate-level course work leading to a master’s degree while undertaking a guided teaching apprenticeship. (3) Experience and learning opportunities alongside a trained and experienced mentor teacher— (i) Whose teaching must complement the residency program so that classroom clinical practice is tightly aligned with coursework; (ii) Who must have extra responsibilities as a teacher leader of the teaching residency program, as a mentor for residents, and as a teacher coach during the induction program for new teachers; and for establishing, within the program, a learning community in which all individuals are expected to continually improve their capacity to advance student learning; and (iii) Who may be relieved from teaching duties as a result of such additional responsibilities. (4) The establishment of clear criteria for the selection of mentor teachers based on measures of teacher effectiveness and the appropriate subject area knowledge. Evaluation of teacher effectiveness must be based on, but not limited to, observations of the following— (i) Planning and preparation, including demonstrated knowledge of content, pedagogy, and assessment, including the use of formative and diagnostic assessments to improve student learning. (ii) Appropriate instruction that engages students with different learning styles. (iii) Collaboration with colleagues to improve instruction. (iv) Analysis of gains in student learning, based on multiple measures VerDate Sep<11>2014 18:03 May 15, 2020 Jkt 250001 that are valid and reliable and that, when feasible, may include valid, reliable, and objective measures of the influence of teachers on the rate of student academic progress. (v) In the case of mentor candidates who will be mentoring new or prospective literacy and mathematics coaches or instructors, appropriate skills in the essential components of reading instruction, teacher training in literacy instructional strategies across core subject areas, and teacher training in mathematics instructional strategies, as appropriate. (5) Grouping of teaching residents in cohorts to facilitate professional collaboration among such residents. (6) The development of admissions goals and priorities— (i) That are aligned with the hiring objectives of the LEA partnering with the program, as well as the instructional initiatives and curriculum of such agency, in exchange for a commitment by such agency to hire qualified graduates from the teaching residency program; and (ii) Which may include consideration of applicants who reflect the communities in which they will teach as well as consideration of individuals from underrepresented populations in the teaching profession. (7) Support for residents, once the teaching residents are hired as teachers of record, through an induction program, professional development, and networking opportunities to support the residents through not less than the residents’ first two years of teaching. (b) Selection of individuals as teacher residents. (1) Eligible individual. In order to be eligible to be a teacher resident in a teaching residency program under this priority, an individual must— (i) Be a recent graduate of a four-year IHE or a mid-career professional from outside the field of education possessing strong content knowledge or a record of professional accomplishment; and (ii) Submit an application to the teaching residency program. (2) Selection criteria for teaching residency program. An eligible partnership carrying out a teaching residency program under this priority must establish criteria for the selection of eligible individuals to participate in the teaching residency program based on the following characteristics— (i) Strong content knowledge or record of accomplishment in the field or subject area to be taught. (ii) Strong verbal and written communication skills, which may be demonstrated by performance on appropriate tests. PO 00000 Frm 00015 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 29693 (iii) Other attributes linked to effective teaching, which may be determined by interviews or performance assessments, as specified by the eligible partnership. (c) Stipends or salaries; applications; agreements; repayments. (1) Stipends or salaries. A teaching residency program under this priority must provide a one-year living stipend or salary to teaching residents during the teaching residency program. (2) Applications for stipends or salaries. Each teacher residency candidate desiring a stipend or salary during the period of residency must submit an application to the eligible partnership at such time, and containing such information and assurances, as the eligible partnership may require. (3) Agreements to serve. Each application submitted under paragraph II–(c)(2) of this priority must contain or be accompanied by an agreement that the applicant will— (i) Serve as a full-time teacher for a total of not less than three academic years immediately after successfully completing the teaching residency program; (ii) Fulfill the requirement under paragraph II–(c)(3)(i) of this priority by teaching in a high-need school served by the high-need LEA in the eligible partnership and teach a subject or area that is designated as high need by the partnership; (iii) Provide to the eligible partnership a certificate, from the chief administrative officer of the LEA in which the resident is employed, of the employment required under paragraph II–(c)(3)(i) and (ii) of this priority at the beginning of, and upon completion of, each year or partial year of service; (iv) Meet the applicable State certification and licensure requirements, including any requirements for certification obtained through alternative routes to certification, or, with regard to special education teachers, the qualifications described in section 612(a)(14)(C) of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), when the applicant begins to fulfill the service obligation under this clause; and (v) Comply with the requirements set by the eligible partnership under paragraph II–(d) of this priority if the applicant is unable or unwilling to complete the service obligation required by paragraph II–(c)(3). (d) Repayments. (1) In general. A grantee carrying out a teaching residency program under this priority must require a recipient of a stipend or salary under paragraph II– (c)(1) of this priority who does not complete, or who notifies the E:\FR\FM\18MYN1.SGM 18MYN1 jbell on DSKJLSW7X2PROD with NOTICES 29694 Federal Register / Vol. 85, No. 96 / Monday, May 18, 2020 / Notices partnership that the recipient intends not to complete, the service obligation required by paragraph II–(c)(3) of this priority to repay such stipend or salary to the eligible partnership, together with interest, at a rate specified by the partnership in the agreement, and in accordance with such other terms and conditions specified by the eligible partnership, as necessary. (2) Other terms and conditions. Any other terms and conditions specified by the eligible partnership may include reasonable provisions for pro-rata repayment of the stipend or salary described in paragraph II–(c)(1) of this priority or for deferral of a teaching resident’s service obligation required by paragraph II–(c)(3) of this priority, on grounds of health, incapacitation, inability to secure employment in a school served by the eligible partnership, being called to active duty in the Armed Forces of the United States, or other extraordinary circumstances. (3) Use of repayments. An eligible partnership must use any repayment received under this paragraph (d) to carry out additional activities that are consistent with the purpose of this priority. Competitive Preference Priorities: For FY 2020 and any subsequent year in which we make awards from the list of unfunded applications from this competition, these priorities are competitive preference priorities. Under 34 CFR 75.105(c)(2)(i), we will award up to an additional three points to an application depending on how well the application Competitive Preference Priority 1, and we award an additional three points to an application that meets Competitive Preference Priority 2, for a maximum of six additional points. If an applicant chooses to address one or both of the competitive preference priorities, the project narrative section of its application must identify its response to the competitive preference priorities it chooses to address. We will only review for the competitive preference priorities those applications which, after review and scoring for the absolute priority and selection criteria, are within potential funding range. These priorities are: Competitive Preference Priority 1— Spurring Investment in Qualified Opportunity Zones (Up to 3 points). Under this priority, an applicant must demonstrate that the area in which the applicant proposes to provide services overlaps with a QOZ, as designated by the Secretary of the Treasury under section 1400Z–1 of the Internal Revenue Code. An applicant must— VerDate Sep<11>2014 18:03 May 15, 2020 Jkt 250001 (a) Provide the census tract number of the QOZ(s) in which it proposes to provide services; and (b) Describe how the applicant will provide services in the QOZ(s). Note: To receive competitive preference points under this priority, applicants must provide the Department with the census tract number of the Qualified Opportunity Zone(s) they plan to serve and describe the services they will provide. For the purposes of this TQP competition, applicants should consider the area where the partner LEA(s) serves to be the area that must overlap with a QOZ; an LEA may be considered to overlap with a QOZ even if only one high-need school included in the project in the proposed TQP grant application is located in a QOZ. Competitive Preference Priority 2— Applications from New Potential Grantees (0 or 3 points). Under this priority, an applicant must demonstrate that it has never received a grant, including through membership in a group application submitted in accordance with 34 CFR 75.127–75.129, under the program from which it seeks funds. Definitions: The definitions for ‘‘Arts and sciences,’’ ‘‘Core academic subjects,’’ ‘‘Early childhood educator,’’ ‘‘Essential components of reading instruction,’’ ‘‘Exemplary teacher,’’ ‘‘High-need early childhood education (ECE) program,’’ ‘‘High-need local educational agency (LEA),’’ ‘‘High-need school,’’ ‘‘Highly competent,’’ ‘‘Induction program,’’ ‘‘Partner institution,’’ ‘‘Principles of scientific research,’’ ‘‘Scientifically valid research,’’ ‘‘Teacher mentoring,’’ ‘‘Teaching residency program,’’ and ‘‘Teaching skills’’ are from section 200 of the HEA. The definition of ‘‘children from low-income families’’ is from section 1124(c)(1)(A) of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965, as amended (ESEA). The definition of ‘‘Charter school’’ is from section 4310(2) of the ESEA. The definitions of ‘‘Educational service agency,’’ ‘‘Limited English proficient,’’ ‘‘Parent,’’ and ‘‘Professional development’’ are from section 8101 of the ESEA. The definitions for ‘‘Demonstrates a rationale,’’ ‘‘Evidence-based,’’ ‘‘Experimental study,’’ ‘‘Logic model,’’ ‘‘Moderate evidence,’’ ‘‘Project component,’’ ‘‘Promising evidence,’’ ‘‘Quasi-experimental design study,’’ ‘‘Relevant outcome,’’ ‘‘Strong evidence,’’ and ‘‘What Works Clearinghouse Handbook (WWC Handbook)’’ are from 34 CFR 77.1. Arts and sciences means— (a) When referring to an organizational unit of an IHE, any academic unit that offers one or more academic majors in disciplines or PO 00000 Frm 00016 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 content areas corresponding to the academic subject matter areas in which teachers provide instruction; and (b) When referring to a specific academic subject area, the disciplines or content areas in which academic majors are offered by the arts and sciences organizational unit. Core academic subjects means English, reading or language arts, mathematics, science, foreign languages, civics and government, economics, arts, history, and geography. Charter school means a public school that(a) In accordance with a specific State statute authorizing the granting of charters to schools, is exempt from significant State or local rules that inhibit the flexible operation and management of public schools, but not from any rules relating to the other requirements of this paragraph; (b) Is created by a developer as a public school, or is adapted by a developer from an existing public school, and is operated under public supervision and direction; (c) Operates in pursuit of a specific set of educational objectives determined by the school’s developer and agreed to by the authorized public chartering agency; (d) Provides a program of elementary or secondary education, or both; (e) Is nonsectarian in its programs, admissions policies, employment practices, and all other operations, and is not affiliated with a sectarian school or religious institution; (f) Does not charge tuition; (g) Complies with the Age Discrimination Act of 1975 (42 U.S.C. 6101 et seq.), title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (42 U.S.C. 2000d et seq.), title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 (20 U.S.C. 1681 et seq.), section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (29 U.S.C. 794), the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.), 20 U.S.C. 1232g (commonly referred to as the ‘‘Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974’’), and part B of the IDEA (20 U.S.C. 1411 et seq.); (h) Is a school to which parents choose to send their children, and that— (1) Admits students on the basis of a lottery, consistent with 20 U.S.C. 7221b(c)(3)(A) if more students apply for admission than can be accommodated; or (2) In the case of a school that has an affiliated charter school (such as a school that is part of the same network of schools), automatically enrolls students who are enrolled in the immediate prior grade level of the affiliated charter school and, for any E:\FR\FM\18MYN1.SGM 18MYN1 jbell on DSKJLSW7X2PROD with NOTICES Federal Register / Vol. 85, No. 96 / Monday, May 18, 2020 / Notices additional student openings or student openings created through regular attrition in student enrollment in the affiliated charter school and the enrolling school, admits students on the basis of a lottery as described in clause (1); (i) Agrees to comply with the same Federal and State audit requirements as do other elementary schools and secondary schools in the State, unless such State audit requirements are waived by the State; (j) Meets all applicable Federal, State, and local health and safety requirements; (k) Operates in accordance with State law; (l) Has a written performance contract with the authorized public chartering agency in the State that includes a description of how student performance will be measured in charter schools pursuant to State assessments that are required of other schools and pursuant to any other assessments mutually agreeable to the authorized public chartering agency and the charter school; and (m) May serve students in early childhood education programs or postsecondary students. Children from low-income families means children as described in section 1124(c)(1)(A) of the ESEA. Demonstrates a rationale means a key project component included in the project’s logic model is informed by research or evaluation findings that suggest the project component is likely to improve relevant outcomes. Early childhood educator means an individual with primary responsibility for the education of children in an ECE program. Educational service agency means a regional public multiservice agency authorized by State statute to develop, manage, and provide services or programs to LEAs. Essential components of reading instruction means explicit and systematic instruction in— (a) Phonemic awareness; (b) Phonics; (c) Vocabulary development; (d) Reading fluency, including oral reading skills; and (e) Reading comprehension strategies. Evidence-based means the proposed project component is supported by one or more of strong evidence, moderate evidence, promising evidence, or evidence that demonstrates a rationale. Exemplary teacher means a teacher who— (a) Is a highly qualified teacher such as a master teacher; VerDate Sep<11>2014 18:03 May 15, 2020 Jkt 250001 (b) Has been teaching for at least five years in a public or private school or IHE; (c) Is recommended to be an exemplary teacher by administrators and other teachers who are knowledgeable about the individual’s performance; (d) Is currently teaching and based in a public school; and (e) Assists other teachers in improving instructional strategies, improves the skills of other teachers, performs teacher mentoring, develops curricula, and offers other professional development. Experimental study means a study that is designed to compare outcomes between two groups of individuals (such as students) that are otherwise equivalent except for their assignment to either a treatment group receiving a project component or a control group that does not. Randomized controlled trials, regression discontinuity design studies, and single-case design studies are the specific types of experimental studies that, depending on their design and implementation (e.g., sample attrition in randomized controlled trials and regression discontinuity design studies), can meet What Works Clearinghouse (WWC) standards without reservations as described in the WWC Handbook: (a) A randomized controlled trial employs random assignment of, for example, students, teachers, classrooms, or schools to receive the project component being evaluated (the treatment group) or not to receive the project component (the control group). (b) A regression discontinuity design study assigns the project component being evaluated using a measured variable (e.g., assigning students reading below a cutoff score to tutoring or developmental education classes) and controls for that variable in the analysis of outcomes. (c) A single-case design study uses observations of a single case (e.g., a student eligible for a behavioral intervention) over time in the absence and presence of a controlled treatment manipulation to determine whether the outcome is systematically related to the treatment. High-need early childhood education (ECE) program means an ECE program serving children from low-income families that is located within the geographic area served by a high-need LEA. High-need local educational agency (LEA) means an LEA(a)(1) For which not less than 20 percent of the children served by the agency are children from low-income families; PO 00000 Frm 00017 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 29695 (2) That serves not fewer than 10,000 children from low-income families; (3) That meets the eligibility requirements for funding under the Small, Rural School Achievement (SRSA) program under section 5211(b) of the ESEA; or (4) That meets eligibility requirements for funding under the Rural and LowIncome School (RLIS) program under section 5221(b) of the ESEA; and— (b)(1) For which there is a high percentage of teachers not teaching in the academic subject areas or grade levels in which the teachers were trained to teach; or (2) For which there is a high teacher turnover rate or a high percentage of teachers with emergency, provisional, or temporary certification or licensure. Note: Information on how an applicant may demonstrate that a partner LEA meets this definition is included in the application package. High-need school means a school that, based on the most recent data available, meets one or both of the following: (a) The school is in the highest quartile of schools in a ranking of all schools served by an LEA, ranked in descending order by percentage of students from low-income families enrolled in such schools, as determined by the LEA based on one of the following measures of poverty: (1) The percentage of students aged 5 through 17 in poverty counted in the most recent census data approved by the Secretary. (2) The percentage of students eligible for a free or reduced-price school lunch under the Richard B. Russell National School Lunch Act. (3) The percentage of students in families receiving assistance under the State program funded under part A of title IV of the Social Security Act. (4) The percentage of students eligible to receive medical assistance under the Medicaid program. (5) A composite of two or more of the measures described in paragraphs (1) through (4). (b) In the case of— (1) An elementary school, the school serves students not less than 60 percent of whom are eligible for a free or reduced-price school lunch under the Richard B. Russell National School Lunch Act; or (2) Any other school that is not an elementary school, the other school serves students not less than 45 percent of whom are eligible for a free or reduced-price school lunch under the Richard B. Russell National School Lunch Act. (c) The Secretary may, upon approval of an application submitted by an E:\FR\FM\18MYN1.SGM 18MYN1 29696 Federal Register / Vol. 85, No. 96 / Monday, May 18, 2020 / Notices eligible partnership seeking a grant under title II of the HEA, designate a school that does not qualify as a highneed school under this definition, as a high-need school for the purpose of this competition. The Secretary must base the approval of an application for designation of a school under this clause on a consideration of the information required under section 200(11)(B)(ii) of the HEA and may also take into account other information submitted by the eligible partnership. jbell on DSKJLSW7X2PROD with NOTICES Note: Information on how an applicant may demonstrate that a partner school meets this definition is included in the application package. Highly competent, when used with respect to an early childhood educator, means an educator— (a) With specialized education and training in development and education of young children from birth until entry into kindergarten; (b) With— (i) A baccalaureate degree in an academic major in the arts and sciences; or (ii) An associate’s degree in a related educational area; and (c) Who has demonstrated a high level of knowledge and use of content and pedagogy in the relevant areas associated with quality early childhood education. Induction program means a formalized program for new teachers during not less than the teachers’ first two years of teaching that is designed to provide support for, and improve the professional performance and advance the retention in the teaching field of, beginning teachers. Such program must promote effective teaching skills and must include the following components: (a) High-quality teacher mentoring. (b) Periodic, structured time for collaboration with teachers in the same department or field, including mentor teachers, as well as time for information-sharing among teachers, principals, administrators, other appropriate instructional staff, and participating faculty in the partner institution. (c) The application of empiricallybased practice and scientifically valid research on instructional practices. (d) Opportunities for new teachers to draw directly on the expertise of teacher mentors, faculty, and researchers to support the integration of empiricallybased practice and scientifically valid research with practice. (e) The development of skills in instructional and behavioral interventions derived from empiricallybased practice and, where applicable, scientifically valid research. VerDate Sep<11>2014 18:03 May 15, 2020 Jkt 250001 (f) Faculty who— (1) Model the integration of research and practice in the classroom; and (2) Assist new teachers with the effective use and integration of technology in the classroom. (g) Interdisciplinary collaboration among exemplary teachers, faculty, researchers, and other staff who prepare new teachers with respect to the learning process and the assessment of learning. (h) Assistance with the understanding of data, particularly student achievement data, and the applicability of such data in classroom instruction. (i) Regular and structured observation and evaluation of new teachers by multiple evaluators, using valid and reliable measures of teaching skills. Limited English proficient,1 when used with respect to an individual, means an individual— (a) Who is aged 3 through 21; (b) Who is enrolled or preparing to enroll in an elementary school or secondary school; (c)(1) Who was not born in the United States or whose native language is a language other than English; (2)(i) Who is a Native American or Alaska Native, or a native resident of the outlying areas; and (ii) Who comes from an environment where a language other than English has had a significant impact on the individual’s level of English language proficiency; or (3) Who is migratory, whose native language is a language other than English, and who comes from an environment where a language other than English is dominant; and (d) Whose difficulties in speaking, reading, writing, or understanding the English language may be sufficient to deny the individual— (1) The ability to meet the challenging State academic standards; (2) The ability to successfully achieve in classrooms where the language of instruction is English; or (3) The opportunity to participate fully in society. Logic model (also referred to as a theory of action) means a framework that identifies key project components of the proposed project (i.e., the active ‘‘ingredients’’ that are hypothesized to be critical to achieving the relevant outcomes) and describes the theoretical and operational relationships among the key project components and relevant outcomes. Moderate evidence means that there is evidence of effectiveness of a key 1 ESEA uses the term ‘‘English learner’’; however, the term cross-referenced from the HEA is ‘‘limited English proficient.’’ PO 00000 Frm 00018 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 project component in improving a relevant outcome for a sample that overlaps with the populations or settings proposed to receive that component, based on a relevant finding from one of the following: (a) A practice guide prepared by the WWC using version 2.1 or 3.0 of the WWC Handbook reporting a ‘‘strong evidence base’’ or ‘‘moderate evidence base’’ for the corresponding practice guide recommendation; (b) An intervention report prepared by the WWC using version 2.1 or 3.0 of the WWC Handbook reporting a ‘‘positive effect’’ or ‘‘potentially positive effect’’ on a relevant outcome based on a ‘‘medium to large’’ extent of evidence, with no reporting of a ‘‘negative effect’’ or ‘‘potentially negative effect’’ on a relevant outcome; or (c) A single experimental study or quasi-experimental design study reviewed and reported by the WWC using version 2.1 or 3.0 of the WWC Handbook, or otherwise assessed by the Department using version 3.0 of the WWC Handbook, as appropriate, and that— (1) Meets WWC standards with or without reservations; (2) Includes at least one statistically significant and positive (i.e., favorable) effect on a relevant outcome; (3) Includes no overriding statistically significant and negative effects on relevant outcomes reported in the study or in a corresponding WWC intervention report prepared under version 2.1 or 3.0 of the WWC Handbook; and (4) Is based on a sample from more than one site (e.g., State, county, city, school district, or postsecondary campus) and includes at least 350 students or other individuals across sites. Multiple studies of the same project component that each meet requirements in paragraphs (c)(1), (2), and (3) of this definition may together satisfy this requirement. Parent includes a legal guardian or other person standing in loco parentis (such as a grandparent or stepparent with whom the child lives, or a person who is legally responsible for the child’s welfare). Partner institution means an IHE, which may include a two-year IHE offering a dual program with a four-year IHE, participating in an eligible partnership that has a teacher preparation program— (a) Whose graduates exhibit strong performance on State-determined qualifying assessments for new teachers through— (1) Demonstrating that 80 percent or more of the graduates of the program E:\FR\FM\18MYN1.SGM 18MYN1 jbell on DSKJLSW7X2PROD with NOTICES Federal Register / Vol. 85, No. 96 / Monday, May 18, 2020 / Notices who intend to enter the field of teaching have passed all of the applicable State qualification assessments for new teachers, which must include an assessment of each prospective teacher’s subject matter knowledge in the content area in which the teacher intends to teach; or (2) Being ranked among the highestperforming teacher preparation programs in the State as determined by the State— (i) Using criteria consistent with the requirements for the State report card under section 205(b) of the HEA before the first publication of the report card; and (ii) Using the State report card on teacher preparation required under section 205(b), after the first publication of such report card and for every year thereafter; and (b) That requires— (1) Each student in the program to meet high academic standards or demonstrate a record of success, as determined by the institution (including prior to entering and being accepted into a program), and participate in intensive clinical experience; (2) Each student in the program preparing to become a teacher who meets the applicable State certification and licensure requirements, including any requirements for certification obtained through alternative routes to certification, or, with regard to special education teachers, the qualifications described in section 612(a)(14)(C) of the IDEA; and (3) Each student in the program preparing to become an early childhood educator to meet degree requirements, as established by the State, and become highly competent. Principles of scientific research means principles of research that— (a) Apply rigorous, systematic, and objective methodology to obtain reliable and valid knowledge relevant to education activities and programs; (b) Present findings and make claims that are appropriate to, and supported by, the methods that have been employed; and (c) Include, appropriate to the research being conducted— (i) Use of systematic, empirical methods that draw on observation or experiment; (ii) Use of data analyses that are adequate to support the general findings; (iii) Reliance on measurements or observational methods that provide reliable and generalizable findings; (iv) Strong claims of causal relationships, only with research designs that eliminate plausible VerDate Sep<11>2014 18:03 May 15, 2020 Jkt 250001 competing explanations for observed results, such as, but not limited to, random-assignment experiments; (v) Presentation of studies and methods in sufficient detail and clarity to allow for replication or, at a minimum, to offer the opportunity to build systematically on the findings of the research; (vi) Acceptance by a peer-reviewed journal or critique by a panel of independent experts through a comparably rigorous, objective, and scientific review; and (vii) Consistency of findings across multiple studies or sites to support the generality of results and conclusions. Professional development means activities that— (a) Are an integral part of school and LEA strategies for providing educators (including teachers, principals, other school leaders, specialized instructional support personnel, paraprofessionals, and, as applicable, early childhood educators) with the knowledge and skills necessary to enable students to succeed in a well-rounded education and to meet the challenging State academic standards; and (b) Are sustained (not stand-alone, one-day, or short term workshops), intensive, collaborative, job-embedded, data-driven, and classroom-focused, and may include activities that— (1) Improve and increase teachers’— (i) Knowledge of the academic subjects the teachers teach; (ii) Understanding of how students learn; and (iii) Ability to analyze student work and achievement from multiple sources, including how to adjust instructional strategies, assessments, and materials based on such analysis; (2) Are an integral part of broad schoolwide and districtwide educational improvement plans; (3) Allow personalized plans for each educator to address the educator’s specific needs identified in observation or other feedback; (4) Improve classroom management skills; (5) Support the recruitment, hiring, and training of effective teachers, including teachers who became certified through State and local alternative routes to certification; (6) Advance teacher understanding of— (i) Effective instructional strategies that are evidence-based; and (ii) Strategies for improving student academic achievement or substantially increasing the knowledge and teaching skills of teachers; (7) Are aligned with, and directly related to, academic goals of the school or LEA; PO 00000 Frm 00019 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 29697 (8) Are developed with extensive participation of teachers, principals, other school leaders, parents, representatives of Indian Tribes (as applicable), and administrators of schools to be served under the ESEA; (9) Are designed to give teachers of English learners, and other teachers and instructional staff, the knowledge and skills to provide instruction and appropriate language and academic support services to those children, including the appropriate use of curricula and assessments; (10) To the extent appropriate, provide training for teachers, principals, and other school leaders in the use of technology (including education about the harms of copyright piracy), so that technology and technology applications are effectively used in the classroom to improve teaching and learning in the curricula and academic subjects in which the teachers teach; (11) As a whole, are regularly evaluated for their impact on increased teacher effectiveness and improved student academic achievement, with the findings of the evaluations used to improve the quality of professional development; (12) Are designed to give teachers of children with disabilities or children with developmental delays, and other teachers and instructional staff, the knowledge and skills to provide instruction and academic support services, to those children, including positive behavioral interventions and supports, multi-tier system of supports, and use of accommodations; (13) Include instruction in the use of data and assessments to inform and instruct classroom practice; (14) Include instruction in ways that teachers, principals, other school leaders, specialized instructional support personnel, and school administrators may work more effectively with parents and families; (15) Involve the forming of partnerships with IHEs, including, as applicable, Tribal Colleges and Universities as defined in section 316(b) of the HEA (20 U.S.C. 1059c(b)), to establish school-based teacher, principal, and other school leader training programs that provide prospective teachers, novice teachers, principals, and other school leaders with an opportunity to work under the guidance of experienced teachers, principals, other school leaders, and faculty of such institutions; (16) Create programs to enable paraprofessionals (assisting teachers employed by an LEA receiving assistance under part A of title I of the ESEA) to obtain the education necessary E:\FR\FM\18MYN1.SGM 18MYN1 jbell on DSKJLSW7X2PROD with NOTICES 29698 Federal Register / Vol. 85, No. 96 / Monday, May 18, 2020 / Notices for those paraprofessionals to become certified and licensed teachers; (17) Provide follow-up training to teachers who have participated in activities described in this paragraph that are designed to ensure that the knowledge and skills learned by the teachers are implemented in the classroom; and (18) Where practicable, provide jointly for school staff and other ECE program providers, to address the transition to elementary school, including issues related to school readiness. Project component means an activity, strategy, intervention, process, product, practice, or policy included in a project. Evidence may pertain to an individual project component or to a combination of project components (e.g., training teachers on instructional practices for English learners and follow-on coaching for these teachers). Promising evidence means that there is evidence of the effectiveness of a key project component in improving a relevant outcome, based on a relevant finding from one of the following: (a) A practice guide prepared by WWC reporting a ‘‘strong evidence base’’ or ‘‘moderate evidence base’’ for the corresponding practice guide recommendation; (b) An intervention report prepared by the WWC reporting a ‘‘positive effect’’ or ‘‘potentially positive effect’’ on a relevant outcome with no reporting of a ‘‘negative effect’’ or ‘‘potentially negative effect’’ on a relevant outcome; or (c) A single study assessed by the Department, as appropriate, that— (1) Is an experimental study, a quasiexperimental design study, or a welldesigned and well-implemented correlational study with statistical controls for selection bias (e.g., a study using regression methods to account for differences between a treatment group and a comparison group); and (2) Includes at least one statistically significant and positive (i.e., favorable) effect on a relevant outcome. Quasi-experimental design study means a study using a design that attempts to approximate an experimental study by identifying a comparison group that is similar to the treatment group in important respects. This type of study, depending on design and implementation (e.g., establishment of baseline equivalence of the groups being compared), can meet WWC standards with reservations, but cannot meet WWC standards without reservations, as described in the WWC Handbook. VerDate Sep<11>2014 18:03 May 15, 2020 Jkt 250001 Relevant outcome means the student outcome(s) or other outcome(s) the key project component is designed to improve, consistent with the specific goals of the program. Scientifically valid research means applied research, basic research, and field-initiated research in which the rationale, design, and interpretation are soundly developed in accordance with principles of scientific research. Strong evidence means that there is evidence of the effectiveness of a key project component in improving a relevant outcome for a sample that overlaps with the populations and settings proposed to receive that component, based on a relevant finding from one of the following: (a) A practice guide prepared by the WWC using version 2.1 or 3.0 of the WWC Handbook reporting a ‘‘strong evidence base’’ for the corresponding practice guide recommendation; (b) An intervention report prepared by the WWC using version 2.1 or 3.0 of the WWC Handbook reporting a ‘‘positive effect’’ on a relevant outcome based on a ‘‘medium to large’’ extent of evidence, with no reporting of a ‘‘negative effect’’ or ‘‘potentially negative effect’’ on a relevant outcome; or (c) A single experimental study reviewed and reported by the WWC using version 2.1 or 3.0 of the WWC Handbook, or otherwise assessed by the Department using version 3.0 of the WWC Handbook, as appropriate, and that— (1) Meets WWC standards without reservations; (2) Includes at least one statistically significant and positive (i.e., favorable) effect on a relevant outcome; (3) Includes no overriding statistically significant and negative effects on relevant outcomes reported in the study or in a corresponding WWC intervention report prepared under version 2.1 or 3.0 of the WWC Handbook; and (4) Is based on a sample from more than one site (e.g., State, county, city, school district, or postsecondary campus) and includes at least 350 students or other individuals across sites. Multiple studies of the same project component that each meet requirements in paragraphs (c)(1), (2), and (3) of this definition may together satisfy this requirement. Teacher mentoring means the mentoring of new or prospective teachers through a program that— (a) Includes clear criteria for the selection of teacher mentors who will provide role model relationships for mentees, which criteria must be developed by the eligible partnership PO 00000 Frm 00020 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 and based on measures of teacher effectiveness; (b) Provides high-quality training for such mentors, including instructional strategies for literacy instruction and classroom management (including approaches that improve the schoolwide climate for learning, which may include positive behavioral interventions and supports); (c) Provides regular and ongoing opportunities for mentors and mentees to observe each other’s teaching methods in classroom settings during the day in a high-need school in the high-need LEA in the eligible partnership; (d) Provides paid release time for mentors, as applicable; (e) Provides mentoring to each mentee by a colleague who teaches in the same field, grade, or subject as the mentee; (f) Promotes empirically-based practice of, and scientifically valid research on, where applicable— (1) Teaching and learning; (2) Assessment of student learning; (3) The development of teaching skills through the use of instructional and behavioral interventions; and (4) The improvement of the mentees’ capacity to measurably advance student learning; and (g) Includes— (1) Common planning time or regularly scheduled collaboration for the mentor and mentee; and (2) Joint professional development opportunities. Teaching residency program means a school-based teacher preparation program in which a prospective teacher— (a) For one academic year, teaches alongside a mentor teacher, who is the teacher of record; (b) Receives concurrent instruction during the year described in paragraph (a) from the partner institution, which courses may be taught by LEA personnel or residency program faculty, in the teaching of the content area in which the teacher will become certified or licensed; (c) Acquires effective teaching skills; and (d) Prior to completion of the program— (i) Attains full State certification or licensure and, with respect to special education teachers, meets the qualifications described in section 612(a)(14)(C) of the IDEA; and (ii) Acquires a master’s degree not later than 18 months after beginning the program. Teaching skills means skills that enable a teacher to— E:\FR\FM\18MYN1.SGM 18MYN1 Federal Register / Vol. 85, No. 96 / Monday, May 18, 2020 / Notices jbell on DSKJLSW7X2PROD with NOTICES (a) Increase student learning, achievement, and the ability to apply knowledge; (b) Effectively convey and explain academic subject matter; (c) Effectively teach higher-order analytical, evaluation, problem-solving, and communication skills; (d) Employ strategies grounded in the disciplines of teaching and learning that— (i) Are based on empirically-based practice and scientifically valid research, where applicable, related to teaching and learning; (ii) Are specific to academic subject matter; and (iii) Focus on the identification of students’ specific learning needs, particularly students with disabilities, students who are limited English proficient, students who are gifted and talented, and students with low literacy levels, and the tailoring of academic instruction to such needs; (e) Conduct an ongoing assessment of student learning, which may include the use of formative assessments, performance-based assessments, projectbased assessments, or portfolio assessments, that measures higher-order thinking skills (including application, analysis, synthesis, and evaluation); (f) Effectively manage a classroom, including the ability to implement positive behavioral interventions and support strategies; (g) Communicate and work with parents, and involve parents in their children’s education; and (h) Use, in the case of an early childhood educator, age-appropriate and developmentally appropriate strategies and practices for children in early childhood education programs. What Works Clearinghouse Handbook (WWC Handbook) means the standards and procedures set forth in the WWC Procedures and Standards Handbook, Version 3.0 or Version 2.1 (incorporated by reference, see 34 CFR 77.2). Study findings eligible for review under WWC standards can meet WWC standards without reservations, meet WWC standards with reservations, or not meet WWC standards. WWC practice guides and intervention reports include findings from systematic reviews of evidence as described in the Handbook documentation. Note: The What Works Clearinghouse Procedures and Standards Handbook (Version 3.0), as well as the more recent What Works Clearinghouse Handbooks released in October 2017 (Version 4.0) and January 2020 (Version 4.1), are available at https://ies.ed.gov/ncee/wwc/Handbooks. Program Authority: 20 U.S.C. 1021– 1022c. VerDate Sep<11>2014 18:03 May 15, 2020 Jkt 250001 Applicable Regulations: (a) The Education Department General Administrative Regulations in 34 CFR parts 75, 77, 79, 82, 84, 86, 97, 98, and 99. (b) The Office of Management and Budget Guidelines to Agencies on Governmentwide Debarment and Suspension (Nonprocurement) in 2 CFR part 180, as adopted and amended as regulations of the Department in 2 CFR part 3485. (c) The Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles, and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards in 2 CFR part 200, as adopted and amended as regulations of the Department in 2 CFR part 3474 (Uniform Guidance). (d) The Opportunity Zones NFP. (e) The Administrative Priorities. Note: The regulations in 34 CFR part 86 apply to IHEs only. II. Award Information Type of Award: Discretionary grants. Estimated Available Funds: $9,000,000. Contingent upon the availability of funds and the quality of applications, we may make additional awards in subsequent years from the list of unfunded applications from this competition. Estimated Range of Awards: $500,000–$1,500,000. Estimated Average Size of Awards: $750,000 for the first year of the project. Funding for the second, third, fourth, and fifth years is subject to the availability of funds and the approval of continuation awards (see 34 CFR 75.253). Maximum Award: We will not make an award exceeding $1,500,000 to any applicant per 12-month budget period. Estimated Number of Awards: 10–15. Note: The Department is not bound by any estimates in this notice. Project Period: 60 months. 29699 outcomes within a four-year IHE that provides intensive and sustained collaboration between faculty and LEAs consistent with the requirements of title II of the HEA; and (v) A school or department of arts and sciences within such partner institution; and (2) May include any of the following: (i) The Governor of the State. (ii) The State educational agency. (iii) The State board of education. (iv) The State agency for higher education. (v) A business. (vi) A public or private nonprofit educational organization. (vii) An educational service agency. (viii) A teacher organization. (ix) A high-performing LEA, or a consortium of such LEAs, that can serve as a resource to the partnership. (x) A charter school. (xi) A school or department within the partner institution that focuses on psychology and human development. (xii) A school or department within the partner institution with comparable expertise in the disciplines of teaching, learning, and child and adolescent development. (xiii) An entity operating a program that provides alternative routes to State certification of teachers. Note: So that the Department can confirm the eligibility of the LEA(s) that an applicant proposes to serve, applicants must include information in their applications that demonstrates that each LEA to potentially be served by the project is a ‘‘high-need LEA’’ (as defined in this notice). Applicants should review the application package for additional information on determining whether an LEA meets the definition of ‘‘high-need LEA.’’ Note: An LEA includes a public charter school that operates as an LEA. III. Eligibility Information Note: As required by HEA section 203(a)(2), an eligible partnership may not receive more than one grant during a fiveyear period. 1. Eligible Applicants: An eligible applicant must be an ‘‘eligible partnership’’ as defined in section 200(6) of the HEA. The term ‘‘eligible partnership’’ means an entity that— (1) Must include— (i) A high-need LEA; (ii) (A) A high-need school or a consortium of high-need schools served by the high-need LEA; or (B) As applicable, a high-need ECE program; (iii) A partner institution; (iv) A school, department, or program of education within such partner institution, which may include an existing teacher professional development program with proven More information on eligible partnerships can be found in the TQP FAQ document on the program website at https://oese.ed.gov/offices/office-ofdiscretionary-grants-support-services/ effective-educator-developmentprograms/teacher-quality-partnership/ applicant-info-and-eligibility/. 2. a. Cost Sharing or Matching: Under section 203(c) of the HEA (20 U.S.C. 1022b(c)), each grant recipient must provide, from non-Federal sources, an amount equal to 100 percent of the amount of the grant, which may be provided in cash or in-kind, to carry out the activities supported by the grant. Applicants should budget their cost share or matching contributions on an PO 00000 Frm 00021 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 E:\FR\FM\18MYN1.SGM 18MYN1 29700 Federal Register / Vol. 85, No. 96 / Monday, May 18, 2020 / Notices jbell on DSKJLSW7X2PROD with NOTICES annual basis for the entire five-year project period. Applicants must use the TQP Budget Worksheet to provide evidence of how they propose to meet their cost share or matching contributions for the entire five-year project period. Consistent with 2 CFR 200.306(b) of the Uniform Guidance, any cost share or matching funds must be an allowable use of funds consistent with the cost principles detailed in Subpart E of the Uniform Guidance, and not included as a contribution for any other Federal award. Section 203(c) of the HEA authorizes the Secretary to waive this cost share or matching requirement for any fiscal year for an eligible partnership if the Secretary determines that applying the cost share or matching requirement to the eligible partnership would result in serious hardship or an inability to carry out authorized TQP program activities. The Secretary does not, as a general matter, anticipate waiving this requirement in the future. Furthermore, given the importance of cost share or matching funds to the long-term success of the project, eligible entities must identify appropriate cost share or matching funds for the proposed fiveyear project period. Finally, the selection criteria include factors such as ‘‘the adequacy of support, including facilities, equipment, supplies, and other resources, from the applicant organization or the lead applicant organization’’ and ‘‘the extent to which the applicant demonstrates that it has the resources to operate the project beyond the length of the grant, including a multi-year financial and operating model and accompanying plan; the demonstrated commitment of any partners; evidence of broad support from stakeholders (e.g., State educational agencies, teachers’ unions) critical to the project’s long term success; or more than one of these types of evidence’’ which may include a consideration of demonstrated cost share or matching support. Note: The combination of Federal and nonFederal funds should equal the total cost of the project. Therefore, grantees are required to support no less than 50 percent of the total cost of the project with non-Federal funds. Grantees are strongly encouraged to take this requirement into account when requesting Federal funds. Grantees must budget their requests accordingly and must verify that their budgets reflect the costs allocations appropriately. (Cost Share or Matching Formula: Total Project Cost divided by two equals Federal Award Amount). b. Supplement-Not-Supplant: This program involves supplement-notsupplant funding requirements. In VerDate Sep<11>2014 18:03 May 15, 2020 Jkt 250001 accordance with section 202(k) of the HEA (20 U.S.C. 1022a(k)), funds made available under this program must be used to supplement, and not supplant, other Federal, State, and local funds that would otherwise be expended to carry out activities under this program. Additionally, the supplement-notsupplant requirement applies to all cost share or matching funds under the program. c. Indirect Cost Rate: This program uses a training indirect cost rate. This limits indirect cost reimbursement to an entity’s actual indirect costs, as determined in its negotiated indirect cost rate agreement, or eight percent of a modified total direct cost base, whichever amount is less. For more information regarding training indirect cost rates, see 34 CFR 75.562. For more information regarding indirect costs, or to obtain a negotiated indirect cost rate, please see https://www2.ed.gov/about/ offices/list/ocfo/intro.html. 3. Subgrantees: Under 34 CFR 75.708(b) and (c), a grantee under this competition may award subgrants to directly carry out project activities described in its application to the following types of entities: LEAs, SEAs, nonprofit organizations, or a business. The grantee may award subgrants to entities it has identified in an approved application. 4. Other: a. Limitation on Administrative Expenses: Under HEA section 203(d) (20 U.S.C. 1022b(d)), an eligible partnership that receives a grant under this program may not use more than two percent of the funds provided to administer the grant. b. General Application Requirements: All applicants must meet the following general application requirements in order to be considered for funding. Except as specifically noted, the general application requirements are from HEA section 202(b) (20 U.S.C. 1022a(b)). Each eligible partnership desiring a grant under this program must submit an application that contains— (a) A needs assessment of the partners in the eligible partnership with respect to the preparation, ongoing training, professional development, and retention of general education and special education teachers, principals, and, as applicable, early childhood educators; (b) A description of the extent to which the program to be carried out with grant funds, as described in the absolute priority in this notice, will prepare prospective and new teachers with strong teaching skills; (c) A description of how such a program will prepare prospective and PO 00000 Frm 00022 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 new teachers to understand and use research and data to modify and improve classroom instruction; (d) A description of— (1) How the eligible partnership will coordinate strategies and activities assisted under the grant with other teacher preparation or professional development programs, including programs funded under the ESEA and the IDEA, and through the National Science Foundation; and (2) How the activities of the partnership will be consistent with State, local, and other education reform activities that promote teacher quality and student academic achievement; (e) An assessment that describes the resources available to the eligible partnership, including— (1) The integration of funds from other related sources; (2) The intended use of the grant funds; and (3) The commitment of the resources of the partnership to the activities assisted under this program, including financial support, faculty participation, and time commitments, and to the continuation of the activities when the grant ends; (f) A description of— (1) How the eligible partnership will meet the purposes of the TQP program as specified in section 201 of the HEA; (2) How the partnership will carry out the activities required under the absolute priority, as described in this notice, based on the needs identified in paragraph (a), with the goal of improving student academic achievement; (3) If the partnership chooses to use funds under this section for a project or activities under section 202(f) of the HEA, how the partnership will carry out such project or required activities based on the needs identified in paragraph (a), with the goal of improving student academic achievement; (4) The partnership’s evaluation plan under section 204(a) of the HEA; (5) How the partnership will align the teacher preparation program with the— (i) State early learning standards for ECE programs, as appropriate, and with the relevant domains of early childhood development; and (ii) Challenging State academic standards under section 1111(b)(1) of the ESEA, established by the State in which the partnership is located; (6) How the partnership will prepare general education teachers to teach students with disabilities, including training related to participation as a member of individualized education program teams, as defined in section 614(d)(1)(B) of the IDEA; E:\FR\FM\18MYN1.SGM 18MYN1 jbell on DSKJLSW7X2PROD with NOTICES Federal Register / Vol. 85, No. 96 / Monday, May 18, 2020 / Notices (7) How the partnership will prepare general education and special education teachers to teach students who are limited English proficient; (8) How faculty at the partner institution will work during the term of the grant, with teachers who meet the applicable State certification and licensure requirements, including any requirements for certification obtained through alternative routes to certification, or, with regard to special education teachers, the qualifications described in section 612(a)(14)(C) of the IDEA, in the classrooms of high-need schools served by the high-need LEA in the partnership to— (i) Provide high-quality professional development activities to strengthen the content knowledge and teaching skills of elementary school and secondary school teachers; and (ii) Train other classroom teachers to implement literacy programs that incorporate the essential components of reading instruction; (9) How the partnership will design, implement, or enhance a year-long and rigorous teaching preservice clinical program component; (10) How the partnership will support in-service professional development strategies and activities; and (11) How the partnership will collect, analyze, and use data on the retention of all teachers and early childhood educators in schools and ECE programs located in the geographic area served by the partnership to evaluate the effectiveness of the partnership’s teacher and educator support system; and (g) With respect to the induction program required as part of the activities carried out under the absolute priority— (1) A demonstration that the schools and departments within the IHE that are part of the induction program will effectively prepare teachers, including providing content expertise and expertise in teaching, as appropriate; (2) A demonstration of the eligible partnership’s capability and commitment to, and the accessibility to and involvement of faculty in, the use of empirically based practice and scientifically valid research on teaching and learning; (3) A description of how the teacher preparation program will design and implement an induction program to support, though not less than the first two years of teaching, all new teachers who are prepared by the teacher preparation program in the partnership and who teach in the high-need LEA in the partnership, and, to the extent practicable, all new teachers who teach in such high-need LEA, in the further VerDate Sep<11>2014 18:03 May 15, 2020 Jkt 250001 development of the new teachers’ teaching skills, including the use of mentors who are trained and compensated by such program for the mentors’ work with new teachers; and (4) A description of how faculty involved in the induction program will be able to substantially participate in an ECE program or elementary school or secondary school classroom setting, as applicable, including release time and receiving workload credit for such participation. IV. Application and Submission Information 1. Application Submission Instructions: Applicants are required to follow the Common Instructions for Applicants to Department of Education Discretionary Grant Programs, published in the Federal Register on February 13, 2019 (84 FR 3768) and available at www.govinfo.gov/content/ pkg/FR-2019-02-13/pdf/2019-02206.pdf, which contain requirements and information on how to submit an application. Grants.gov has relaxed the requirement for applicants to have an active registration in the System for Award Management (SAM) in order to apply for funding during the COVID–19 pandemic. An applicant that does not have an active SAM registration can still register with Grants.gov, but must contact the Grants.gov Support Desk, toll-free, at 1–800–518–4726, in order to take advantage of this flexibility. Note: The Department has submitted to the Office of Management and Budget for its approval an Information Collection package that will require all TQP applicants to complete and submit all TQP program checklists at the time of application. This information collection also includes a required budget worksheet that will document applicants’ requested Federal funds as well as their non-Federal cost share and matching funds. Applications that do not include the TQP program checklists will be considered incomplete and may not be reviewed. 2. Submission of Proprietary Information: Given the types of projects that may be proposed in applications for the TQP program, your application may include business information that you consider proprietary. In 34 CFR 5.11, we define ‘‘business information’’ and describe the process we use in determining whether any of that information is proprietary and, thus, protected from disclosure under Exemption 4 of the Freedom of Information Act (5 U.S.C. 552, as amended). Because we plan to make successful applications available to the public, you may wish to request confidentiality of business information. PO 00000 Frm 00023 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 29701 Consistent with Executive Order 12600, please designate in your application any information that you believe is exempt from disclosure under Exemption 4. In the appropriate Appendix section of your application, under ‘‘Other Attachments Form,’’ please list the page number or numbers on which we can find this information. For additional information please see 34 CFR 5.11(c). 3. Intergovernmental Review: This program is subject to Executive Order 12372 and the regulations in 34 CFR part 79. Information about Intergovernmental Review of Federal Programs under Executive Order 12372 is in the application package for this competition. 4. Funding Restrictions: We specify unallowable costs in 2 CFR 200, subpart E. We reference additional regulations outlining funding restrictions in the Applicable Regulations section of this notice. Note: Tuition is not an allowable use of funds under this program. 5. Recommended Page Limit: The application narrative is where you, the applicant, address the selection criteria that reviewers use to evaluate your application. We recommend that you (1) limit the application narrative to no more than 50 pages and (2) use the following standards: • A ‘‘page’’ is 8.5″ × 11″, on one side only, with 1″ margins at the top, bottom, and both sides. • Double space (no more than three lines per vertical inch) all text in the application narrative, including titles, headings, footnotes, quotations, references, and captions, as well as all text in charts, tables, figures, and graphs. • Use a font that is either 12 point or larger or no smaller than 10 pitch (characters per inch). • Use one of the following fonts: Times New Roman, Courier, Courier New, or Arial. Furthermore, applicants are strongly encouraged to include a table of contents that specifies where each required part of the application is located. 6. Notice of Intent To Apply: The Department will be able to develop a more efficient process for reviewing grant applications if it has a better understanding of the number of entities that intend to apply for funding under this competition. Therefore, the Secretary strongly encourages each potential applicant to notify the Department of its intent to submit an application for funding by sending an email to TQPartnership@ed.gov with FY E:\FR\FM\18MYN1.SGM 18MYN1 29702 Federal Register / Vol. 85, No. 96 / Monday, May 18, 2020 / Notices jbell on DSKJLSW7X2PROD with NOTICES 2020 TQP Intent to Apply in the subject line. Applicants that do not send a notice of intent to apply may still apply for funding. V. Application Review Information 1. Selection Criteria: The selection criteria for this competition are from 34 CFR 75.210. An applicant may earn up to a total of 100 points based on the selection criteria. The maximum score for each criterion is indicated in parentheses. Each criterion also includes the sub-factors that the reviewers will consider in determining how well an application meets the criterion. The criteria are as follows: (a) Quality of the project design (up to 30 points). The Secretary considers the quality of the design of the proposed project. In determining the quality of the design of the proposed project, the Secretary considers the following factors: (i) The extent to which the proposed project demonstrates a rationale. (ii) The extent to which the goals, objectives, and outcomes to be achieved by the proposed project are clearly specified and measurable. (iii) The extent to which the proposed project represents an exceptional approach for meeting statutory purposes and requirements. (iv) The extent to which the proposed project is part of a comprehensive effort to improve teaching and learning and support rigorous academic standards for students. (b) Quality of the project evaluation (up to 20 points). The Secretary considers the quality of the evaluation to be conducted of the proposed project. In determining the quality of the evaluation, the Secretary considers the following factors: (i) The extent to which the methods of evaluation will provide valid and reliable performance data on relevant outcomes. (ii) The extent to which the methods of evaluation are thorough, feasible, and appropriate to the goals, objectives, and outcomes of the proposed project. (c) Adequacy of resources (up to 30 points). The Secretary considers the adequacy of resources for the proposed project. In determining the adequacy of resources for the proposed project, the Secretary considers the following factors: (i) The adequacy of support, including facilities, equipment, supplies, and other resources, from the applicant organization or the lead applicant organization. (ii) The extent to which the budget is adequate to support the proposed project. VerDate Sep<11>2014 18:03 May 15, 2020 Jkt 250001 (iii) The extent to which costs are reasonable in relation to the objectives, design, and potential significance of the proposed project. (iv) The extent to which the applicant demonstrates that it has the resources to operate the project beyond the length of the grant, including a multi-year financial and operating model and accompanying plan; the demonstrated commitment of any partners; evidence of broad support from stakeholders (e.g., State educational agencies, teachers’ unions) critical to the project’s longterm success; or more than one of these types of evidence. (d) Quality of the management plan (up to 20 points). The Secretary considers the quality of the management plan for the proposed project. In determining the quality of the management plan for the proposed project, the Secretary considers the following factors: (i) The adequacy of the management plan to achieve the objectives of the proposed project on time and within budget, including clearly defined responsibilities, timelines, and milestones for accomplishing project tasks. (ii) The relevance and demonstrated commitment of each partner in the proposed project to the implementation and success of the project. 2. Review and Selection Process: We remind potential applicants that in reviewing applications in any discretionary grant competition, the Secretary may consider, under 34 CFR 75.217(d)(3), the past performance of the applicant in carrying out a previous award, such as the applicant’s use of funds, achievement of project objectives, and compliance with grant conditions. The Secretary may also consider whether the applicant failed to submit a timely performance report or submitted a report of unacceptable quality. In addition, in making a competitive grant award, the Secretary requires various assurances, including those applicable to Federal civil rights laws that prohibit discrimination in programs or activities receiving Federal financial assistance from the Department (34 CFR 100.4, 104.5, 106.4, 108.8, and 110.23). 3. Risk Assessment and Specific Conditions: Consistent with 2 CFR 200.205, before awarding grants under this competition the Department conducts a review of the risks posed by applicants. Under 2 CFR 3474.10, the Secretary may impose specific conditions and, in appropriate circumstances, high-risk conditions on a grant if the applicant or grantee is not financially stable; has a history of PO 00000 Frm 00024 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 unsatisfactory performance; has a financial or other management system that does not meet the standards in 2 CFR part 200, subpart D; has not fulfilled the conditions of a prior grant; or is otherwise not responsible. 4. Integrity and Performance System: If you are selected under this competition to receive an award that over the course of the project period may exceed the simplified acquisition threshold (currently $250,000), under 2 CFR 200.205(a)(2) we must make a judgment about your integrity, business ethics, and record of performance under Federal awards—that is, the risk posed by you as an applicant—before we make an award. In doing so, we must consider any information about you that is in the integrity and performance system (currently referred to as the Federal Awardee Performance and Integrity Information System (FAPIIS)), accessible through the System for Award Management. You may review and comment on any information about yourself that a Federal agency previously entered and that is currently in FAPIIS. Please note that, if the total value of your currently active grants, cooperative agreements, and procurement contracts from the Federal government exceeds $10,000,000, the reporting requirements in 2 CFR part 200, Appendix XII, require you to report certain integrity information to FAPIIS semiannually. Please review the requirements in 2 CFR part 200, Appendix XII, if this grant plus all the other Federal funds you receive exceed $10,000,000. VI. Award Administration Information 1. Award Notices: If your application is successful, we notify your U.S. Representative and U.S. Senators and send you a Grant Award Notification (GAN); or we may send you an email containing a link to access an electronic version of your GAN. We may notify you informally, also. If your application is not evaluated or not selected for funding, we notify you. 2. Administrative and National Policy Requirements: We identify administrative and national policy requirements in the application package and reference these and other requirements in the Applicable Regulations section of this notice. We reference the regulations outlining the terms and conditions of an award in the Applicable Regulations section of this notice and include these and other specific conditions in the GAN. The GAN also incorporates your approved application as part of your binding commitments under the grant. E:\FR\FM\18MYN1.SGM 18MYN1 jbell on DSKJLSW7X2PROD with NOTICES Federal Register / Vol. 85, No. 96 / Monday, May 18, 2020 / Notices 3. Open Licensing Requirements: Unless an exception applies, if you are awarded a grant under this competition, you will be required to openly license to the public grant deliverables created in whole, or in part, with Department grant funds. When the deliverable consists of modifications to pre-existing works, the license must extend only to those modifications that can be separately identified and only to the extent that open licensing is permitted under the terms of any licenses or other legal restrictions on the use of preexisting works. Additionally, a grantee or subgrantee that is awarded competitive grant funds must have a plan to disseminate these public grant deliverables. This dissemination plan can be developed and submitted after your application has been reviewed and selected for funding. For additional information on the open licensing requirements please refer to 2 CFR 3474.20. 4. Reporting: (a) If you apply for a grant under this competition, you must ensure that you have in place the necessary processes and systems to comply with the reporting requirements in 2 CFR part 170 should you receive funding under the competition. This does not apply if you have an exception under 2 CFR 170.110(b). (b) At the end of your project period, you must submit a final performance report, including financial information, as directed by the Secretary. If you receive a multiyear award, you must submit an annual performance report that provides the most current performance and financial expenditure information as directed by the Secretary under 34 CFR 75.118. The Secretary may also require more frequent performance reports under 34 CFR 75.720(c). For specific requirements on reporting, please go to www.ed.gov/ fund/grant/apply/appforms/ appforms.html. (c) Under 34 CFR 75.250(b), the Secretary may provide a grantee with additional funding for data collection analysis and reporting. In this case the Secretary establishes a data collection period. 5. Performance Measures: The goal of the TQP program is to increase student achievement in K–12 schools by developing teachers who meet applicable State certification, including any requirements for certification obtained through alternative routes to certification, and licensure requirements. Under the Government Performance and Results Act of 1993 (GPRA), the following measures will be used by the Department to evaluate the overall VerDate Sep<11>2014 18:03 May 15, 2020 Jkt 250001 effectiveness of the grantee’s project, as well as the TQP program as a whole: (a) Performance Measure 1: Certification/Licensure. The percentage of program graduates who have attained initial State certification/licensure by passing all necessary licensure/ certification assessments within one year of program completion. (b) Performance Measure 2: STEM Graduation. The percentage of math/ science program graduates that attain initial certification/licensure by passing all necessary licensure/certification assessments within one year of program completion, if applicable to the applicant or grantee’s project. (c) Performance Measure 3: One-Year Persistence. The percentage of program participants who were enrolled in the postsecondary program in the previous grant reporting period, did not graduate, and persisted in the postsecondary program in the current grant reporting period. (d) Performance Measure 4: One-Year Employment Retention. The percentage of program completers who were employed for the first time as teachers of record in the preceding year by the partner high-need LEA or ECE program and were retained for the current school year. (e) Performance Measure 5: ThreeYear Employment Retention. The percentage of program completers who were employed by the partner high-need LEA or ECE program for three consecutive years after initial employment. (f) Performance Measure 6: Student Learning. The percentage of grantees that report improved aggregate learning outcomes of students taught by new teachers. These data can be calculated using student growth, a teacher evaluation measure, or both. (This measure is optional and not required as part of GPRA reporting.) (g) Efficiency Measure: The Federal cost per program completer. (This data will not be available until the final year of the project period.) Note: If funded, grantees will be asked to collect and report data on these measures in their project’s annual performance reports (34 CFR 75.590). Applicants are also advised to consider these measures in conceptualizing the design, implementation, and evaluation of their proposed projects because of their importance in the application review process. Collection of data on these measures should be a part of the evaluation plan, along with measures of progress on goals and objectives that are specific to your project. All grantees will be expected to submit an annual performance report documenting their success in addressing these performance measures. PO 00000 Frm 00025 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 29703 Applicants must also address the evaluation requirements in section 204(a) of the HEA (20 U.S.C. 1022c(a)). This section asks applicants to develop objectives and measures for increasing— (1) Achievement for all prospective and new teachers, as measured by the eligible partnership; (2) Teacher retention in the first three years of a teacher’s career; (3) Improvement in the pass rates and scaled scores for initial State certification or licensure of teachers; and (4) The percentage of teachers who meet the applicable State certification and licensure requirements, including any requirements for certification obtained through alternative routes to certification, or, with regard to special education teachers, the qualifications described in section 612(a)(14)(C) of the IDEA (20 U.S.C. 1412(a)(14)(C)), hired by the high-need LEA participating in the eligible partnership; (5) The percentage of teachers who meet the applicable State certification and licensure requirements, including any requirements for certification obtained through alternative routes to certification, or, with regard to special education teachers, the qualifications described in section 612(a)(14)(C) of the IDEA (20 U.S.C. 1412(a)(14)(C)), hired by the high-need LEA who are members of underrepresented groups; (6) The percentage of teachers who meet the applicable State certification and licensure requirements, including any requirements for certification obtained through alternative routes to certification, or, with regard to special education teachers, the qualifications described in section 612(a)(14)(C) of the IDEA (20 U.S.C. 1412(a)(14)(C)), hired by the high-need LEA who teach highneed academic subject areas (such as reading, mathematics, science, and foreign language, including less commonly taught languages and critical foreign languages); (7) The percentage of teachers who meet the applicable State certification and licensure requirements, including any requirements for certification obtained through alternative routes to certification, or, with regard to special education teachers, the qualifications described in section 612(a)(14)(C) of the IDEA (20 U.S.C. 1412(a)(14)(C)), hired by the high-need LEA who teach in high-need areas (including special education, language instruction educational programs for limited English proficient students, and early childhood education); (8) The percentage of teachers who meet the applicable State certification and licensure requirements, including E:\FR\FM\18MYN1.SGM 18MYN1 29704 Federal Register / Vol. 85, No. 96 / Monday, May 18, 2020 / Notices jbell on DSKJLSW7X2PROD with NOTICES any requirements for certification obtained through alternative routes to certification, or, with regard to special education teachers, the qualifications described in section 612(a)(14)(C) of the IDEA (20 U.S.C. 1412(a)(14)(C)), hired by the high-need LEA who teach in high-need schools, disaggregated by the elementary school and secondary school levels; (9) As applicable, the percentage of ECE program classes in the geographic area served by the eligible partnership taught by early childhood educators who are highly competent; and (10) As applicable, the percentage of teachers trained— (i) To integrate technology effectively into curricula and instruction, including technology consistent with the principles of universal design for learning; and (ii) To use technology effectively to collect, manage, and analyze data to improve teaching and learning for the purpose of improving student academic achievement. 6. Continuation Awards: In making a continuation award under 34 CFR 75.253, the Secretary considers, among other things: Whether a grantee has made substantial progress in achieving the goals and objectives of the project; whether the grantee has expended funds in a manner that is consistent with its approved application and budget; whether the grantee has met the required non-Federal cost share or matching requirement; and, if the Secretary has established performance measurement requirements, the performance targets in the grantee’s approved application. In making a continuation award, the Secretary also considers whether the grantee is operating in compliance with the assurances in its approved application, including those applicable to Federal civil rights laws that prohibit discrimination in programs or activities receiving Federal financial assistance from the Department (34 CFR 100.4, 104.5, 106.4, 108.8, and 110.23). VII. Other Information Accessible Format: Individuals with disabilities can obtain this document and a copy of the application package in an accessible format (e.g., braille, large print, audiotape, or compact disc) on request to the program contact person listed under FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT. Electronic Access to This Document: The official version of this document is the document published in the Federal Register. You may access the official edition of the Federal Register and the Code of Federal Regulations at: VerDate Sep<11>2014 18:03 May 15, 2020 Jkt 250001 www.govinfo.gov. At this site you can view this document, as well as all other documents of this Department published in the Federal Register, in text or Portable Document Format (PDF). To use PDF you must have Adobe Acrobat Reader, which is available free at the site. You may also access documents of the Department published in the Federal Register by using the article search feature at: www.federalregister.gov. Specifically, through the advanced search feature at this site, you can limit your search to documents published by the Department. Frank T. Brogan, Assistant Secretary for Elementary and Secondary Education. [FR Doc. 2020–10509 Filed 5–15–20; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4000–01–P DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Notice of Waivers Granted Under Section 3511 of the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act Office of Elementary and Secondary Education, Department of Education. ACTION: Notice. AGENCY: In this notice, we announce waivers that the U.S. Department of Education (Department) granted, within the last 30 days, under the CARES Act. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Patrick Rooney, U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue SW, Room 3W202, Washington, DC 20202. Telephone: (202) 453–5514. Email: Patrick.Rooney@ed.gov. If you use a telecommunications device for the deaf (TDD) or a text telephone (TTY), call the Federal Relay Service (FRS), toll free, at 1–800–877– 8339. SUMMARY: Section 3511(d)(3) of the CARES Act requires the Secretary to publish, in the Federal Register and on the Department’s website, a notice of the Secretary’s decision to grant a waiver under that section. The Secretary must publish this notice no later than 30 days after granting the waiver and the notice must include which waiver was granted and the reason for granting the waiver. This notice fulfills the Department’s obligation under section 3511(d)(3). SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Waiver Data As described in more detail below, the Department waived, for State educational agencies (SEAs) from each PO 00000 Frm 00026 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 of the 50 States, Puerto Rico, and the District of Columbia, and for the Bureau of Indian Education (BIE), some or all of the following requirements: • Section 1127(b) of Title I, Part A of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965, as amended (ESEA), so that an SEA may waive, more than once every three years, if necessary, the 15 percent carryover limitation in ESEA section 1127(a) for fiscal year (FY) 2019 Title I, Part A funds. • Section 421(b) of the General Education Provisions Act (GEPA) to extend the period of availability of FY 2018 funds for programs in which an SEA participates under its approved consolidated State plan until September 30, 2021. The programs include: Æ Title I, Part A of the ESEA (Improving Basic Programs Operated by LEAs), including the portions of an SEA’s Title I, Part A award used to carry out section 1003 school improvement, section 1003A direct student services, if applicable, and Title I, Part D, Subpart 2. Æ Title I, Part B of the ESEA (State Assessment Formula Grants). Æ Title I, Part C of the ESEA (Education of Migratory Children). Æ Title I, Part D, Subpart 1 of the ESEA (Prevention and Intervention Programs for Children and Youth Who Are Neglected, Delinquent, or At Risk). Æ Title II, Part A of the ESEA (Supporting Effective Instruction). Æ Title III, Part A of the ESEA (English Language Acquisition, Language Enhancement, and Academic Achievement). Æ Title IV, Part A of the ESEA (Student Support and Academic Enrichment Grants). Æ Title IV, Part B of the ESEA (21st Century Community Learning Centers). Æ Title V, Part B, Subpart 2 of the ESEA (Rural and Low-Income School Program). Æ McKinney-Vento Education for Homeless Children and Youth Program. • Section 4106(d) of Title IV, Part A of the ESEA related to local educational agency (LEA) needs assessments for the 2019–2020 school year. • Section 4106(e)(2)(C), (D), and (E) of Title IV, Part A of the ESEA with respect to content-area spending requirements for FYs 2018 and 2019 Title IV, Part A funds. • Section 4109(b) of Title IV, Part A of the ESEA with respect to the spending limitation for technology infrastructure for FYs 2018 and 2019 Title IV, Part A funds. • Section 8101(42) of the ESEA, which defines ‘‘professional development,’’ for activities funded for the 2019–2020 school year. E:\FR\FM\18MYN1.SGM 18MYN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 85, Number 96 (Monday, May 18, 2020)]
[Notices]
[Pages 29691-29704]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2020-10509]


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DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION


Applications for New Awards; Teacher Quality Partnership Grant 
Program

AGENCY: Office of Elementary and Secondary Education, Department of 
Education.

ACTION: Notice.

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SUMMARY: The Department of Education is issuing a notice inviting 
applications for fiscal year (FY) 2020 for the Teacher Quality 
Partnership Grant (TQP) program, Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance 
(CFDA) number 84.336S. This notice relates to the approved information 
collection under OMB control number 1894-0006.

DATES: 
    Applications Available: May 18, 2020.
    Pre-Application Webinars: The Office of Elementary and Secondary 
Education intends to post pre-recorded

[[Page 29692]]

informational webinars designed to provide technical assistance to 
interested applicants for grants under the TQP program. These 
informational webinars will be available on the TQP web page shortly 
after this notice is published in the Federal Register at https://oese.ed.gov/offices/office-of-discretionary-grants-support-services/effective-educator-development-programs/teacher-quality-partnership/applicant-info-and-eligibility/. A TQP Frequently Asked Questions 
document will also be published on the TQP program web page as soon as 
it is available at https://oese.ed.gov/offices/office-of-discretionary-grants-support-services/effective-educator-development-programs/teacher-quality-partnership/.
    Deadline for Notice of Intent to Apply: Applicants are strongly 
encouraged, but not required, to submit a notice of intent to apply by 
June 17, 2020.
    Deadline for Transmittal of Applications: July 2, 2020.
    Deadline for Intergovernmental Review: September 15, 2020.

ADDRESSES: For the addresses for obtaining and submitting an 
application, please refer to our Common Instructions for Applicants to 
Department of Education Discretionary Grant Programs, published in the 
Federal Register on February 13, 2019 (84 FR 3768), and available at 
www.govinfo.gov/content/pkg/FR-2019-02-13/pdf/2019-02206.pdf.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Mia Howerton, U.S. Department of 
Education, 400 Maryland Avenue SW, Room 3C152, Washington, DC 20202-
5960. Telephone: (202) 205-0147. Email: [email protected] or 
[email protected].
    If you use a telecommunications device for the deaf (TDD) or a text 
telephone (TTY), call the Federal Relay Service (FRS), toll free, at 1-
800-877-8339.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:

Full Text of Announcement

I. Funding Opportunity Description

    Purpose of Program: The purposes of the TQP program are to improve 
student achievement; improve the quality of prospective and new 
teachers by improving the preparation of prospective teachers and 
enhancing professional development activities for new teachers; hold 
teacher preparation programs at institutions of higher education (IHEs) 
accountable for preparing teachers who meet applicable State 
certification and licensure requirements; and recruit highly qualified 
individuals, including minorities and individuals from other 
occupations, into the teaching force.
    Background: The TQP program supports eligible partnerships that 
must include a high-need local educational agency (LEA), a high-need 
school served by the LEA, or a high-need early childhood education 
(ECE) program; a partner institution; a school, department, or program 
of education within such partner institution; and a school or 
department of arts and sciences within such partner institution. It may 
also include certain other entities. Under section 202(d) and (e) of 
the Higher Education Act of 1965, as amended (HEA), these partnerships 
must implement either (a) teacher preparation programs at the pre-
baccalaureate or ``fifth-year'' level that include specific reforms in 
IHEs' existing teacher preparation programs; or (b) teacher residency 
programs for individuals who are recent graduates with strong academic 
backgrounds or are mid-career professionals from outside the field of 
education.
    In the FY 2020 TQP competition, we will only support projects that 
prepare teachers through the implementation of teacher residency 
programs. The requirements for such a teacher residency program are 
further explained in this notice in the Absolute Priority section. We 
also include two competitive preference priorities: One for projects 
that propose to provide services in areas that overlap with a Qualified 
Opportunity Zone and another for applications from new potential 
grantees.
    Competitive Preference Priority 1, Spurring Investment in Qualified 
Opportunity Zones, is aligned with the Department's mission to promote 
equity and excellence in education by giving competitive preference to 
projects providing services to educators serving students and schools 
located in distressed communities, known as Qualified Opportunity Zones 
(QOZs). Public law (Pub. L.) 115-97, colloquially known as the Tax Cuts 
and Jobs Act, authorized the designation of QOZs to promote economic 
development and job creation in distressed communities through 
preferential tax treatment for investors. A list of QOZs is available 
at www.cdfifund.gov/Pages/Opportunity-Zones.aspx; applicants may also 
determine whether a particular area overlaps with a QOZ using the 
National Center of Education Statistics' map located at https://nces.ed.gov/programs/maped/LocaleLookup/.
    Finally, in seeking an array of potentially new ideas and 
perspectives, Competitive Preference Priority 2 encourages eligible 
partnerships that have not previously received grants under the TQP 
program to apply.
    Priorities: This notice contains one absolute priority and two 
competitive preference priorities. In accordance with 34 CFR 
75.105(b)(2)(iv), the absolute priority is from section 202(e) of the 
HEA. Competitive Preference Priority 1 is from the notice of final 
priority published in the Federal Register on November 27, 2019 (84 FR 
65300) (Opportunity Zones NFP). Competitive Preference Priority 2 is 
from the notice of final priorities published in the Federal Register 
on March 9, 2020 (85 FR 13640) (Administrative Priorities).
    Absolute Priority: For FY 2020 and any subsequent year in which we 
make awards from the list of unfunded applications from this 
competition, this priority is an absolute priority. Under 34 CFR 
75.105(c)(3), we consider only applications that meet this priority.
    This priority is:
    Partnership Grants for the Establishment of Effective Teaching 
Residency Programs.
    I. In general. Under this priority, an eligible partnership must 
carry out an effective teaching residency program that includes all of 
the following activities:
    (a) Supporting a teaching residency program described in paragraph 
II for high-need subjects and areas, as determined by the needs of the 
high-need local educational agency (LEA) in the partnership.
    (b) Placing graduates of the teaching residency program in cohorts 
that facilitate professional collaboration, both among graduates of the 
teaching residency program and between such graduates and mentor 
teachers in the receiving school.
    (c) Ensuring that teaching residents who participate in the 
teaching residency program receive--
    (1) Effective pre-service preparation as described in paragraph II;
    (2) Teacher mentoring;
    (3) Support required through the induction program as the teaching 
residents enter the classroom as new teachers; and
    (4) The preparation described below:
    (i) Incorporate year-long opportunities for enrichment, including--
    (A) Clinical learning in classrooms in high-need schools served by 
the high-need LEA in the eligible partnership, and identified by the 
eligible partnership; and
    (B) Closely supervised interaction between prospective teachers and 
faculty, experienced teachers, principals, other administrators, and 
school leaders at early childhood

[[Page 29693]]

education programs (as applicable), elementary schools, or secondary 
schools, and providing support for such interaction.
    (ii) Integrate pedagogy and classroom practice and promote 
effective teaching skills in academic content areas.
    (iii) Provide high-quality teacher mentoring.
    II. Teaching Residency Programs.
    (a) Establishment and design. A teaching residency program under 
this priority is a program based upon models of successful teaching 
residencies that serves as a mechanism to prepare teachers for success 
in the high-need schools in the eligible partnership, and must be 
designed to include the following characteristics of successful 
programs:
    (1) The integration of pedagogy, classroom practice, and teacher 
mentoring.
    (2) Engagement of teaching residents in rigorous graduate-level 
course work leading to a master's degree while undertaking a guided 
teaching apprenticeship.
    (3) Experience and learning opportunities alongside a trained and 
experienced mentor teacher--
    (i) Whose teaching must complement the residency program so that 
classroom clinical practice is tightly aligned with coursework;
    (ii) Who must have extra responsibilities as a teacher leader of 
the teaching residency program, as a mentor for residents, and as a 
teacher coach during the induction program for new teachers; and for 
establishing, within the program, a learning community in which all 
individuals are expected to continually improve their capacity to 
advance student learning; and
    (iii) Who may be relieved from teaching duties as a result of such 
additional responsibilities.
    (4) The establishment of clear criteria for the selection of mentor 
teachers based on measures of teacher effectiveness and the appropriate 
subject area knowledge. Evaluation of teacher effectiveness must be 
based on, but not limited to, observations of the following--
    (i) Planning and preparation, including demonstrated knowledge of 
content, pedagogy, and assessment, including the use of formative and 
diagnostic assessments to improve student learning.
    (ii) Appropriate instruction that engages students with different 
learning styles.
    (iii) Collaboration with colleagues to improve instruction.
    (iv) Analysis of gains in student learning, based on multiple 
measures that are valid and reliable and that, when feasible, may 
include valid, reliable, and objective measures of the influence of 
teachers on the rate of student academic progress.
    (v) In the case of mentor candidates who will be mentoring new or 
prospective literacy and mathematics coaches or instructors, 
appropriate skills in the essential components of reading instruction, 
teacher training in literacy instructional strategies across core 
subject areas, and teacher training in mathematics instructional 
strategies, as appropriate.
    (5) Grouping of teaching residents in cohorts to facilitate 
professional collaboration among such residents.
    (6) The development of admissions goals and priorities--
    (i) That are aligned with the hiring objectives of the LEA 
partnering with the program, as well as the instructional initiatives 
and curriculum of such agency, in exchange for a commitment by such 
agency to hire qualified graduates from the teaching residency program; 
and
    (ii) Which may include consideration of applicants who reflect the 
communities in which they will teach as well as consideration of 
individuals from underrepresented populations in the teaching 
profession.
    (7) Support for residents, once the teaching residents are hired as 
teachers of record, through an induction program, professional 
development, and networking opportunities to support the residents 
through not less than the residents' first two years of teaching.
    (b) Selection of individuals as teacher residents.
    (1) Eligible individual. In order to be eligible to be a teacher 
resident in a teaching residency program under this priority, an 
individual must--
    (i) Be a recent graduate of a four-year IHE or a mid-career 
professional from outside the field of education possessing strong 
content knowledge or a record of professional accomplishment; and
    (ii) Submit an application to the teaching residency program.
    (2) Selection criteria for teaching residency program. An eligible 
partnership carrying out a teaching residency program under this 
priority must establish criteria for the selection of eligible 
individuals to participate in the teaching residency program based on 
the following characteristics--
    (i) Strong content knowledge or record of accomplishment in the 
field or subject area to be taught.
    (ii) Strong verbal and written communication skills, which may be 
demonstrated by performance on appropriate tests.
    (iii) Other attributes linked to effective teaching, which may be 
determined by interviews or performance assessments, as specified by 
the eligible partnership.
    (c) Stipends or salaries; applications; agreements; repayments.
    (1) Stipends or salaries. A teaching residency program under this 
priority must provide a one-year living stipend or salary to teaching 
residents during the teaching residency program.
    (2) Applications for stipends or salaries. Each teacher residency 
candidate desiring a stipend or salary during the period of residency 
must submit an application to the eligible partnership at such time, 
and containing such information and assurances, as the eligible 
partnership may require.
    (3) Agreements to serve. Each application submitted under paragraph 
II-(c)(2) of this priority must contain or be accompanied by an 
agreement that the applicant will--
    (i) Serve as a full-time teacher for a total of not less than three 
academic years immediately after successfully completing the teaching 
residency program;
    (ii) Fulfill the requirement under paragraph II-(c)(3)(i) of this 
priority by teaching in a high-need school served by the high-need LEA 
in the eligible partnership and teach a subject or area that is 
designated as high need by the partnership;
    (iii) Provide to the eligible partnership a certificate, from the 
chief administrative officer of the LEA in which the resident is 
employed, of the employment required under paragraph II-(c)(3)(i) and 
(ii) of this priority at the beginning of, and upon completion of, each 
year or partial year of service;
    (iv) Meet the applicable State certification and licensure 
requirements, including any requirements for certification obtained 
through alternative routes to certification, or, with regard to special 
education teachers, the qualifications described in section 
612(a)(14)(C) of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act 
(IDEA), when the applicant begins to fulfill the service obligation 
under this clause; and
    (v) Comply with the requirements set by the eligible partnership 
under paragraph II-(d) of this priority if the applicant is unable or 
unwilling to complete the service obligation required by paragraph II-
(c)(3).
    (d) Repayments.
    (1) In general. A grantee carrying out a teaching residency program 
under this priority must require a recipient of a stipend or salary 
under paragraph II-(c)(1) of this priority who does not complete, or 
who notifies the

[[Page 29694]]

partnership that the recipient intends not to complete, the service 
obligation required by paragraph II-(c)(3) of this priority to repay 
such stipend or salary to the eligible partnership, together with 
interest, at a rate specified by the partnership in the agreement, and 
in accordance with such other terms and conditions specified by the 
eligible partnership, as necessary.
    (2) Other terms and conditions. Any other terms and conditions 
specified by the eligible partnership may include reasonable provisions 
for pro-rata repayment of the stipend or salary described in paragraph 
II-(c)(1) of this priority or for deferral of a teaching resident's 
service obligation required by paragraph II-(c)(3) of this priority, on 
grounds of health, incapacitation, inability to secure employment in a 
school served by the eligible partnership, being called to active duty 
in the Armed Forces of the United States, or other extraordinary 
circumstances.
    (3) Use of repayments. An eligible partnership must use any 
repayment received under this paragraph (d) to carry out additional 
activities that are consistent with the purpose of this priority.
    Competitive Preference Priorities: For FY 2020 and any subsequent 
year in which we make awards from the list of unfunded applications 
from this competition, these priorities are competitive preference 
priorities. Under 34 CFR 75.105(c)(2)(i), we will award up to an 
additional three points to an application depending on how well the 
application Competitive Preference Priority 1, and we award an 
additional three points to an application that meets Competitive 
Preference Priority 2, for a maximum of six additional points.
    If an applicant chooses to address one or both of the competitive 
preference priorities, the project narrative section of its application 
must identify its response to the competitive preference priorities it 
chooses to address. We will only review for the competitive preference 
priorities those applications which, after review and scoring for the 
absolute priority and selection criteria, are within potential funding 
range.
    These priorities are:
    Competitive Preference Priority 1--Spurring Investment in Qualified 
Opportunity Zones (Up to 3 points).
    Under this priority, an applicant must demonstrate that the area in 
which the applicant proposes to provide services overlaps with a QOZ, 
as designated by the Secretary of the Treasury under section 1400Z-1 of 
the Internal Revenue Code. An applicant must--
    (a) Provide the census tract number of the QOZ(s) in which it 
proposes to provide services; and
    (b) Describe how the applicant will provide services in the QOZ(s).

    Note:  To receive competitive preference points under this 
priority, applicants must provide the Department with the census 
tract number of the Qualified Opportunity Zone(s) they plan to serve 
and describe the services they will provide. For the purposes of 
this TQP competition, applicants should consider the area where the 
partner LEA(s) serves to be the area that must overlap with a QOZ; 
an LEA may be considered to overlap with a QOZ even if only one 
high-need school included in the project in the proposed TQP grant 
application is located in a QOZ.

    Competitive Preference Priority 2--Applications from New Potential 
Grantees (0 or 3 points).
    Under this priority, an applicant must demonstrate that it has 
never received a grant, including through membership in a group 
application submitted in accordance with 34 CFR 75.127-75.129, under 
the program from which it seeks funds.
    Definitions: The definitions for ``Arts and sciences,'' ``Core 
academic subjects,'' ``Early childhood educator,'' ``Essential 
components of reading instruction,'' ``Exemplary teacher,'' ``High-need 
early childhood education (ECE) program,'' ``High-need local 
educational agency (LEA),'' ``High-need school,'' ``Highly competent,'' 
``Induction program,'' ``Partner institution,'' ``Principles of 
scientific research,'' ``Scientifically valid research,'' ``Teacher 
mentoring,'' ``Teaching residency program,'' and ``Teaching skills'' 
are from section 200 of the HEA. The definition of ``children from low-
income families'' is from section 1124(c)(1)(A) of the Elementary and 
Secondary Education Act of 1965, as amended (ESEA). The definition of 
``Charter school'' is from section 4310(2) of the ESEA. The definitions 
of ``Educational service agency,'' ``Limited English proficient,'' 
``Parent,'' and ``Professional development'' are from section 8101 of 
the ESEA. The definitions for ``Demonstrates a rationale,'' ``Evidence-
based,'' ``Experimental study,'' ``Logic model,'' ``Moderate 
evidence,'' ``Project component,'' ``Promising evidence,'' ``Quasi-
experimental design study,'' ``Relevant outcome,'' ``Strong evidence,'' 
and ``What Works Clearinghouse Handbook (WWC Handbook)'' are from 34 
CFR 77.1.
    Arts and sciences means--
    (a) When referring to an organizational unit of an IHE, any 
academic unit that offers one or more academic majors in disciplines or 
content areas corresponding to the academic subject matter areas in 
which teachers provide instruction; and
    (b) When referring to a specific academic subject area, the 
disciplines or content areas in which academic majors are offered by 
the arts and sciences organizational unit.
    Core academic subjects means English, reading or language arts, 
mathematics, science, foreign languages, civics and government, 
economics, arts, history, and geography.
    Charter school means a public school that-
    (a) In accordance with a specific State statute authorizing the 
granting of charters to schools, is exempt from significant State or 
local rules that inhibit the flexible operation and management of 
public schools, but not from any rules relating to the other 
requirements of this paragraph;
    (b) Is created by a developer as a public school, or is adapted by 
a developer from an existing public school, and is operated under 
public supervision and direction;
    (c) Operates in pursuit of a specific set of educational objectives 
determined by the school's developer and agreed to by the authorized 
public chartering agency;
    (d) Provides a program of elementary or secondary education, or 
both;
    (e) Is nonsectarian in its programs, admissions policies, 
employment practices, and all other operations, and is not affiliated 
with a sectarian school or religious institution;
    (f) Does not charge tuition;
    (g) Complies with the Age Discrimination Act of 1975 (42 U.S.C. 
6101 et seq.), title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (42 U.S.C. 
2000d et seq.), title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 (20 U.S.C. 
1681 et seq.), section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (29 U.S.C. 
794), the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et 
seq.), 20 U.S.C. 1232g (commonly referred to as the ``Family 
Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974''), and part B of the IDEA 
(20 U.S.C. 1411 et seq.);
    (h) Is a school to which parents choose to send their children, and 
that--
    (1) Admits students on the basis of a lottery, consistent with 20 
U.S.C. 7221b(c)(3)(A) if more students apply for admission than can be 
accommodated; or
    (2) In the case of a school that has an affiliated charter school 
(such as a school that is part of the same network of schools), 
automatically enrolls students who are enrolled in the immediate prior 
grade level of the affiliated charter school and, for any

[[Page 29695]]

additional student openings or student openings created through regular 
attrition in student enrollment in the affiliated charter school and 
the enrolling school, admits students on the basis of a lottery as 
described in clause (1);
    (i) Agrees to comply with the same Federal and State audit 
requirements as do other elementary schools and secondary schools in 
the State, unless such State audit requirements are waived by the 
State;
    (j) Meets all applicable Federal, State, and local health and 
safety requirements;
    (k) Operates in accordance with State law;
    (l) Has a written performance contract with the authorized public 
chartering agency in the State that includes a description of how 
student performance will be measured in charter schools pursuant to 
State assessments that are required of other schools and pursuant to 
any other assessments mutually agreeable to the authorized public 
chartering agency and the charter school; and
    (m) May serve students in early childhood education programs or 
postsecondary students.
    Children from low-income families means children as described in 
section 1124(c)(1)(A) of the ESEA.
    Demonstrates a rationale means a key project component included in 
the project's logic model is informed by research or evaluation 
findings that suggest the project component is likely to improve 
relevant outcomes.
    Early childhood educator means an individual with primary 
responsibility for the education of children in an ECE program.
    Educational service agency means a regional public multiservice 
agency authorized by State statute to develop, manage, and provide 
services or programs to LEAs.
    Essential components of reading instruction means explicit and 
systematic instruction in--
    (a) Phonemic awareness;
    (b) Phonics;
    (c) Vocabulary development;
    (d) Reading fluency, including oral reading skills; and
    (e) Reading comprehension strategies.
    Evidence-based means the proposed project component is supported by 
one or more of strong evidence, moderate evidence, promising evidence, 
or evidence that demonstrates a rationale.
    Exemplary teacher means a teacher who--
    (a) Is a highly qualified teacher such as a master teacher;
    (b) Has been teaching for at least five years in a public or 
private school or IHE;
    (c) Is recommended to be an exemplary teacher by administrators and 
other teachers who are knowledgeable about the individual's 
performance;
    (d) Is currently teaching and based in a public school; and
    (e) Assists other teachers in improving instructional strategies, 
improves the skills of other teachers, performs teacher mentoring, 
develops curricula, and offers other professional development.
    Experimental study means a study that is designed to compare 
outcomes between two groups of individuals (such as students) that are 
otherwise equivalent except for their assignment to either a treatment 
group receiving a project component or a control group that does not. 
Randomized controlled trials, regression discontinuity design studies, 
and single-case design studies are the specific types of experimental 
studies that, depending on their design and implementation (e.g., 
sample attrition in randomized controlled trials and regression 
discontinuity design studies), can meet What Works Clearinghouse (WWC) 
standards without reservations as described in the WWC Handbook:
    (a) A randomized controlled trial employs random assignment of, for 
example, students, teachers, classrooms, or schools to receive the 
project component being evaluated (the treatment group) or not to 
receive the project component (the control group).
    (b) A regression discontinuity design study assigns the project 
component being evaluated using a measured variable (e.g., assigning 
students reading below a cutoff score to tutoring or developmental 
education classes) and controls for that variable in the analysis of 
outcomes.
    (c) A single-case design study uses observations of a single case 
(e.g., a student eligible for a behavioral intervention) over time in 
the absence and presence of a controlled treatment manipulation to 
determine whether the outcome is systematically related to the 
treatment.
    High-need early childhood education (ECE) program means an ECE 
program serving children from low-income families that is located 
within the geographic area served by a high-need LEA.
    High-need local educational agency (LEA) means an LEA-
    (a)(1) For which not less than 20 percent of the children served by 
the agency are children from low-income families;
    (2) That serves not fewer than 10,000 children from low-income 
families;
    (3) That meets the eligibility requirements for funding under the 
Small, Rural School Achievement (SRSA) program under section 5211(b) of 
the ESEA; or
    (4) That meets eligibility requirements for funding under the Rural 
and Low-Income School (RLIS) program under section 5221(b) of the ESEA; 
and--
    (b)(1) For which there is a high percentage of teachers not 
teaching in the academic subject areas or grade levels in which the 
teachers were trained to teach; or
    (2) For which there is a high teacher turnover rate or a high 
percentage of teachers with emergency, provisional, or temporary 
certification or licensure.

    Note:  Information on how an applicant may demonstrate that a 
partner LEA meets this definition is included in the application 
package.

    High-need school means a school that, based on the most recent data 
available, meets one or both of the following:
    (a) The school is in the highest quartile of schools in a ranking 
of all schools served by an LEA, ranked in descending order by 
percentage of students from low-income families enrolled in such 
schools, as determined by the LEA based on one of the following 
measures of poverty:
    (1) The percentage of students aged 5 through 17 in poverty counted 
in the most recent census data approved by the Secretary.
    (2) The percentage of students eligible for a free or reduced-price 
school lunch under the Richard B. Russell National School Lunch Act.
    (3) The percentage of students in families receiving assistance 
under the State program funded under part A of title IV of the Social 
Security Act.
    (4) The percentage of students eligible to receive medical 
assistance under the Medicaid program.
    (5) A composite of two or more of the measures described in 
paragraphs (1) through (4).
    (b) In the case of--
    (1) An elementary school, the school serves students not less than 
60 percent of whom are eligible for a free or reduced-price school 
lunch under the Richard B. Russell National School Lunch Act; or
    (2) Any other school that is not an elementary school, the other 
school serves students not less than 45 percent of whom are eligible 
for a free or reduced-price school lunch under the Richard B. Russell 
National School Lunch Act.
    (c) The Secretary may, upon approval of an application submitted by 
an

[[Page 29696]]

eligible partnership seeking a grant under title II of the HEA, 
designate a school that does not qualify as a high-need school under 
this definition, as a high-need school for the purpose of this 
competition. The Secretary must base the approval of an application for 
designation of a school under this clause on a consideration of the 
information required under section 200(11)(B)(ii) of the HEA and may 
also take into account other information submitted by the eligible 
partnership.

    Note:  Information on how an applicant may demonstrate that a 
partner school meets this definition is included in the application 
package.

    Highly competent, when used with respect to an early childhood 
educator, means an educator--
    (a) With specialized education and training in development and 
education of young children from birth until entry into kindergarten;
    (b) With--
    (i) A baccalaureate degree in an academic major in the arts and 
sciences; or
    (ii) An associate's degree in a related educational area; and
    (c) Who has demonstrated a high level of knowledge and use of 
content and pedagogy in the relevant areas associated with quality 
early childhood education.
    Induction program means a formalized program for new teachers 
during not less than the teachers' first two years of teaching that is 
designed to provide support for, and improve the professional 
performance and advance the retention in the teaching field of, 
beginning teachers. Such program must promote effective teaching skills 
and must include the following components:
    (a) High-quality teacher mentoring.
    (b) Periodic, structured time for collaboration with teachers in 
the same department or field, including mentor teachers, as well as 
time for information-sharing among teachers, principals, 
administrators, other appropriate instructional staff, and 
participating faculty in the partner institution.
    (c) The application of empirically-based practice and 
scientifically valid research on instructional practices.
    (d) Opportunities for new teachers to draw directly on the 
expertise of teacher mentors, faculty, and researchers to support the 
integration of empirically-based practice and scientifically valid 
research with practice.
    (e) The development of skills in instructional and behavioral 
interventions derived from empirically-based practice and, where 
applicable, scientifically valid research.
    (f) Faculty who--
    (1) Model the integration of research and practice in the 
classroom; and
    (2) Assist new teachers with the effective use and integration of 
technology in the classroom.
    (g) Interdisciplinary collaboration among exemplary teachers, 
faculty, researchers, and other staff who prepare new teachers with 
respect to the learning process and the assessment of learning.
    (h) Assistance with the understanding of data, particularly student 
achievement data, and the applicability of such data in classroom 
instruction.
    (i) Regular and structured observation and evaluation of new 
teachers by multiple evaluators, using valid and reliable measures of 
teaching skills.
    Limited English proficient,\1\ when used with respect to an 
individual, means an individual--
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \1\ ESEA uses the term ``English learner''; however, the term 
cross-referenced from the HEA is ``limited English proficient.''
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    (a) Who is aged 3 through 21;
    (b) Who is enrolled or preparing to enroll in an elementary school 
or secondary school;
    (c)(1) Who was not born in the United States or whose native 
language is a language other than English;
    (2)(i) Who is a Native American or Alaska Native, or a native 
resident of the outlying areas; and
    (ii) Who comes from an environment where a language other than 
English has had a significant impact on the individual's level of 
English language proficiency; or
    (3) Who is migratory, whose native language is a language other 
than English, and who comes from an environment where a language other 
than English is dominant; and
    (d) Whose difficulties in speaking, reading, writing, or 
understanding the English language may be sufficient to deny the 
individual--
    (1) The ability to meet the challenging State academic standards;
    (2) The ability to successfully achieve in classrooms where the 
language of instruction is English; or
    (3) The opportunity to participate fully in society.
    Logic model (also referred to as a theory of action) means a 
framework that identifies key project components of the proposed 
project (i.e., the active ``ingredients'' that are hypothesized to be 
critical to achieving the relevant outcomes) and describes the 
theoretical and operational relationships among the key project 
components and relevant outcomes.
    Moderate evidence means that there is evidence of effectiveness of 
a key project component in improving a relevant outcome for a sample 
that overlaps with the populations or settings proposed to receive that 
component, based on a relevant finding from one of the following:
    (a) A practice guide prepared by the WWC using version 2.1 or 3.0 
of the WWC Handbook reporting a ``strong evidence base'' or ``moderate 
evidence base'' for the corresponding practice guide recommendation;
    (b) An intervention report prepared by the WWC using version 2.1 or 
3.0 of the WWC Handbook reporting a ``positive effect'' or 
``potentially positive effect'' on a relevant outcome based on a 
``medium to large'' extent of evidence, with no reporting of a 
``negative effect'' or ``potentially negative effect'' on a relevant 
outcome; or
    (c) A single experimental study or quasi-experimental design study 
reviewed and reported by the WWC using version 2.1 or 3.0 of the WWC 
Handbook, or otherwise assessed by the Department using version 3.0 of 
the WWC Handbook, as appropriate, and that--
    (1) Meets WWC standards with or without reservations;
    (2) Includes at least one statistically significant and positive 
(i.e., favorable) effect on a relevant outcome;
    (3) Includes no overriding statistically significant and negative 
effects on relevant outcomes reported in the study or in a 
corresponding WWC intervention report prepared under version 2.1 or 3.0 
of the WWC Handbook; and
    (4) Is based on a sample from more than one site (e.g., State, 
county, city, school district, or postsecondary campus) and includes at 
least 350 students or other individuals across sites. Multiple studies 
of the same project component that each meet requirements in paragraphs 
(c)(1), (2), and (3) of this definition may together satisfy this 
requirement.
    Parent includes a legal guardian or other person standing in loco 
parentis (such as a grandparent or stepparent with whom the child 
lives, or a person who is legally responsible for the child's welfare).
    Partner institution means an IHE, which may include a two-year IHE 
offering a dual program with a four-year IHE, participating in an 
eligible partnership that has a teacher preparation program--
    (a) Whose graduates exhibit strong performance on State-determined 
qualifying assessments for new teachers through--
    (1) Demonstrating that 80 percent or more of the graduates of the 
program

[[Page 29697]]

who intend to enter the field of teaching have passed all of the 
applicable State qualification assessments for new teachers, which must 
include an assessment of each prospective teacher's subject matter 
knowledge in the content area in which the teacher intends to teach; or
    (2) Being ranked among the highest-performing teacher preparation 
programs in the State as determined by the State--
    (i) Using criteria consistent with the requirements for the State 
report card under section 205(b) of the HEA before the first 
publication of the report card; and
    (ii) Using the State report card on teacher preparation required 
under section 205(b), after the first publication of such report card 
and for every year thereafter; and
    (b) That requires--
    (1) Each student in the program to meet high academic standards or 
demonstrate a record of success, as determined by the institution 
(including prior to entering and being accepted into a program), and 
participate in intensive clinical experience;
    (2) Each student in the program preparing to become a teacher who 
meets the applicable State certification and licensure requirements, 
including any requirements for certification obtained through 
alternative routes to certification, or, with regard to special 
education teachers, the qualifications described in section 
612(a)(14)(C) of the IDEA; and
    (3) Each student in the program preparing to become an early 
childhood educator to meet degree requirements, as established by the 
State, and become highly competent.
    Principles of scientific research means principles of research 
that--
    (a) Apply rigorous, systematic, and objective methodology to obtain 
reliable and valid knowledge relevant to education activities and 
programs;
    (b) Present findings and make claims that are appropriate to, and 
supported by, the methods that have been employed; and
    (c) Include, appropriate to the research being conducted--
    (i) Use of systematic, empirical methods that draw on observation 
or experiment;
    (ii) Use of data analyses that are adequate to support the general 
findings;
    (iii) Reliance on measurements or observational methods that 
provide reliable and generalizable findings;
    (iv) Strong claims of causal relationships, only with research 
designs that eliminate plausible competing explanations for observed 
results, such as, but not limited to, random-assignment experiments;
    (v) Presentation of studies and methods in sufficient detail and 
clarity to allow for replication or, at a minimum, to offer the 
opportunity to build systematically on the findings of the research;
    (vi) Acceptance by a peer-reviewed journal or critique by a panel 
of independent experts through a comparably rigorous, objective, and 
scientific review; and
    (vii) Consistency of findings across multiple studies or sites to 
support the generality of results and conclusions.
    Professional development means activities that--
    (a) Are an integral part of school and LEA strategies for providing 
educators (including teachers, principals, other school leaders, 
specialized instructional support personnel, paraprofessionals, and, as 
applicable, early childhood educators) with the knowledge and skills 
necessary to enable students to succeed in a well-rounded education and 
to meet the challenging State academic standards; and
    (b) Are sustained (not stand-alone, one-day, or short term 
workshops), intensive, collaborative, job-embedded, data-driven, and 
classroom-focused, and may include activities that--
    (1) Improve and increase teachers'--
    (i) Knowledge of the academic subjects the teachers teach;
    (ii) Understanding of how students learn; and
    (iii) Ability to analyze student work and achievement from multiple 
sources, including how to adjust instructional strategies, assessments, 
and materials based on such analysis;
    (2) Are an integral part of broad schoolwide and districtwide 
educational improvement plans;
    (3) Allow personalized plans for each educator to address the 
educator's specific needs identified in observation or other feedback;
    (4) Improve classroom management skills;
    (5) Support the recruitment, hiring, and training of effective 
teachers, including teachers who became certified through State and 
local alternative routes to certification;
    (6) Advance teacher understanding of--
    (i) Effective instructional strategies that are evidence-based; and
    (ii) Strategies for improving student academic achievement or 
substantially increasing the knowledge and teaching skills of teachers;
    (7) Are aligned with, and directly related to, academic goals of 
the school or LEA;
    (8) Are developed with extensive participation of teachers, 
principals, other school leaders, parents, representatives of Indian 
Tribes (as applicable), and administrators of schools to be served 
under the ESEA;
    (9) Are designed to give teachers of English learners, and other 
teachers and instructional staff, the knowledge and skills to provide 
instruction and appropriate language and academic support services to 
those children, including the appropriate use of curricula and 
assessments;
    (10) To the extent appropriate, provide training for teachers, 
principals, and other school leaders in the use of technology 
(including education about the harms of copyright piracy), so that 
technology and technology applications are effectively used in the 
classroom to improve teaching and learning in the curricula and 
academic subjects in which the teachers teach;
    (11) As a whole, are regularly evaluated for their impact on 
increased teacher effectiveness and improved student academic 
achievement, with the findings of the evaluations used to improve the 
quality of professional development;
    (12) Are designed to give teachers of children with disabilities or 
children with developmental delays, and other teachers and 
instructional staff, the knowledge and skills to provide instruction 
and academic support services, to those children, including positive 
behavioral interventions and supports, multi-tier system of supports, 
and use of accommodations;
    (13) Include instruction in the use of data and assessments to 
inform and instruct classroom practice;
    (14) Include instruction in ways that teachers, principals, other 
school leaders, specialized instructional support personnel, and school 
administrators may work more effectively with parents and families;
    (15) Involve the forming of partnerships with IHEs, including, as 
applicable, Tribal Colleges and Universities as defined in section 
316(b) of the HEA (20 U.S.C. 1059c(b)), to establish school-based 
teacher, principal, and other school leader training programs that 
provide prospective teachers, novice teachers, principals, and other 
school leaders with an opportunity to work under the guidance of 
experienced teachers, principals, other school leaders, and faculty of 
such institutions;
    (16) Create programs to enable paraprofessionals (assisting 
teachers employed by an LEA receiving assistance under part A of title 
I of the ESEA) to obtain the education necessary

[[Page 29698]]

for those paraprofessionals to become certified and licensed teachers;
    (17) Provide follow-up training to teachers who have participated 
in activities described in this paragraph that are designed to ensure 
that the knowledge and skills learned by the teachers are implemented 
in the classroom; and
    (18) Where practicable, provide jointly for school staff and other 
ECE program providers, to address the transition to elementary school, 
including issues related to school readiness.
    Project component means an activity, strategy, intervention, 
process, product, practice, or policy included in a project. Evidence 
may pertain to an individual project component or to a combination of 
project components (e.g., training teachers on instructional practices 
for English learners and follow-on coaching for these teachers).
    Promising evidence means that there is evidence of the 
effectiveness of a key project component in improving a relevant 
outcome, based on a relevant finding from one of the following:
    (a) A practice guide prepared by WWC reporting a ``strong evidence 
base'' or ``moderate evidence base'' for the corresponding practice 
guide recommendation;
    (b) An intervention report prepared by the WWC reporting a 
``positive effect'' or ``potentially positive effect'' on a relevant 
outcome with no reporting of a ``negative effect'' or ``potentially 
negative effect'' on a relevant outcome; or
    (c) A single study assessed by the Department, as appropriate, 
that--
    (1) Is an experimental study, a quasi-experimental design study, or 
a well-designed and well-implemented correlational study with 
statistical controls for selection bias (e.g., a study using regression 
methods to account for differences between a treatment group and a 
comparison group); and
    (2) Includes at least one statistically significant and positive 
(i.e., favorable) effect on a relevant outcome.
    Quasi-experimental design study means a study using a design that 
attempts to approximate an experimental study by identifying a 
comparison group that is similar to the treatment group in important 
respects. This type of study, depending on design and implementation 
(e.g., establishment of baseline equivalence of the groups being 
compared), can meet WWC standards with reservations, but cannot meet 
WWC standards without reservations, as described in the WWC Handbook.
    Relevant outcome means the student outcome(s) or other outcome(s) 
the key project component is designed to improve, consistent with the 
specific goals of the program.
    Scientifically valid research means applied research, basic 
research, and field-initiated research in which the rationale, design, 
and interpretation are soundly developed in accordance with principles 
of scientific research.
    Strong evidence means that there is evidence of the effectiveness 
of a key project component in improving a relevant outcome for a sample 
that overlaps with the populations and settings proposed to receive 
that component, based on a relevant finding from one of the following:
    (a) A practice guide prepared by the WWC using version 2.1 or 3.0 
of the WWC Handbook reporting a ``strong evidence base'' for the 
corresponding practice guide recommendation;
    (b) An intervention report prepared by the WWC using version 2.1 or 
3.0 of the WWC Handbook reporting a ``positive effect'' on a relevant 
outcome based on a ``medium to large'' extent of evidence, with no 
reporting of a ``negative effect'' or ``potentially negative effect'' 
on a relevant outcome; or
    (c) A single experimental study reviewed and reported by the WWC 
using version 2.1 or 3.0 of the WWC Handbook, or otherwise assessed by 
the Department using version 3.0 of the WWC Handbook, as appropriate, 
and that--
    (1) Meets WWC standards without reservations;
    (2) Includes at least one statistically significant and positive 
(i.e., favorable) effect on a relevant outcome;
    (3) Includes no overriding statistically significant and negative 
effects on relevant outcomes reported in the study or in a 
corresponding WWC intervention report prepared under version 2.1 or 3.0 
of the WWC Handbook; and
    (4) Is based on a sample from more than one site (e.g., State, 
county, city, school district, or postsecondary campus) and includes at 
least 350 students or other individuals across sites. Multiple studies 
of the same project component that each meet requirements in paragraphs 
(c)(1), (2), and (3) of this definition may together satisfy this 
requirement.
    Teacher mentoring means the mentoring of new or prospective 
teachers through a program that--
    (a) Includes clear criteria for the selection of teacher mentors 
who will provide role model relationships for mentees, which criteria 
must be developed by the eligible partnership and based on measures of 
teacher effectiveness;
    (b) Provides high-quality training for such mentors, including 
instructional strategies for literacy instruction and classroom 
management (including approaches that improve the schoolwide climate 
for learning, which may include positive behavioral interventions and 
supports);
    (c) Provides regular and ongoing opportunities for mentors and 
mentees to observe each other's teaching methods in classroom settings 
during the day in a high-need school in the high-need LEA in the 
eligible partnership;
    (d) Provides paid release time for mentors, as applicable;
    (e) Provides mentoring to each mentee by a colleague who teaches in 
the same field, grade, or subject as the mentee;
    (f) Promotes empirically-based practice of, and scientifically 
valid research on, where applicable--
    (1) Teaching and learning;
    (2) Assessment of student learning;
    (3) The development of teaching skills through the use of 
instructional and behavioral interventions; and
    (4) The improvement of the mentees' capacity to measurably advance 
student learning; and
    (g) Includes--
    (1) Common planning time or regularly scheduled collaboration for 
the mentor and mentee; and
    (2) Joint professional development opportunities.
    Teaching residency program means a school-based teacher preparation 
program in which a prospective teacher--
    (a) For one academic year, teaches alongside a mentor teacher, who 
is the teacher of record;
    (b) Receives concurrent instruction during the year described in 
paragraph (a) from the partner institution, which courses may be taught 
by LEA personnel or residency program faculty, in the teaching of the 
content area in which the teacher will become certified or licensed;
    (c) Acquires effective teaching skills; and
    (d) Prior to completion of the program--
    (i) Attains full State certification or licensure and, with respect 
to special education teachers, meets the qualifications described in 
section 612(a)(14)(C) of the IDEA; and
    (ii) Acquires a master's degree not later than 18 months after 
beginning the program.
    Teaching skills means skills that enable a teacher to--

[[Page 29699]]

    (a) Increase student learning, achievement, and the ability to 
apply knowledge;
    (b) Effectively convey and explain academic subject matter;
    (c) Effectively teach higher-order analytical, evaluation, problem-
solving, and communication skills;
    (d) Employ strategies grounded in the disciplines of teaching and 
learning that--
    (i) Are based on empirically-based practice and scientifically 
valid research, where applicable, related to teaching and learning;
    (ii) Are specific to academic subject matter; and
    (iii) Focus on the identification of students' specific learning 
needs, particularly students with disabilities, students who are 
limited English proficient, students who are gifted and talented, and 
students with low literacy levels, and the tailoring of academic 
instruction to such needs;
    (e) Conduct an ongoing assessment of student learning, which may 
include the use of formative assessments, performance-based 
assessments, project-based assessments, or portfolio assessments, that 
measures higher-order thinking skills (including application, analysis, 
synthesis, and evaluation);
    (f) Effectively manage a classroom, including the ability to 
implement positive behavioral interventions and support strategies;
    (g) Communicate and work with parents, and involve parents in their 
children's education; and
    (h) Use, in the case of an early childhood educator, age-
appropriate and developmentally appropriate strategies and practices 
for children in early childhood education programs.
    What Works Clearinghouse Handbook (WWC Handbook) means the 
standards and procedures set forth in the WWC Procedures and Standards 
Handbook, Version 3.0 or Version 2.1 (incorporated by reference, see 34 
CFR 77.2). Study findings eligible for review under WWC standards can 
meet WWC standards without reservations, meet WWC standards with 
reservations, or not meet WWC standards. WWC practice guides and 
intervention reports include findings from systematic reviews of 
evidence as described in the Handbook documentation.

    Note:  The What Works Clearinghouse Procedures and Standards 
Handbook (Version 3.0), as well as the more recent What Works 
Clearinghouse Handbooks released in October 2017 (Version 4.0) and 
January 2020 (Version 4.1), are available at https://ies.ed.gov/ncee/wwc/Handbooks.

    Program Authority: 20 U.S.C. 1021-1022c.
    Applicable Regulations: (a) The Education Department General 
Administrative Regulations in 34 CFR parts 75, 77, 79, 82, 84, 86, 97, 
98, and 99. (b) The Office of Management and Budget Guidelines to 
Agencies on Governmentwide Debarment and Suspension (Nonprocurement) in 
2 CFR part 180, as adopted and amended as regulations of the Department 
in 2 CFR part 3485. (c) The Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost 
Principles, and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards in 2 CFR part 
200, as adopted and amended as regulations of the Department in 2 CFR 
part 3474 (Uniform Guidance). (d) The Opportunity Zones NFP. (e) The 
Administrative Priorities.

    Note:  The regulations in 34 CFR part 86 apply to IHEs only.

II. Award Information

    Type of Award: Discretionary grants.
    Estimated Available Funds: $9,000,000.
    Contingent upon the availability of funds and the quality of 
applications, we may make additional awards in subsequent years from 
the list of unfunded applications from this competition.
    Estimated Range of Awards: $500,000-$1,500,000.
    Estimated Average Size of Awards: $750,000 for the first year of 
the project. Funding for the second, third, fourth, and fifth years is 
subject to the availability of funds and the approval of continuation 
awards (see 34 CFR 75.253).
    Maximum Award: We will not make an award exceeding $1,500,000 to 
any applicant per 12-month budget period.
    Estimated Number of Awards: 10-15.
    Note: The Department is not bound by any estimates in this notice.
    Project Period: 60 months.

III. Eligibility Information

    1. Eligible Applicants: An eligible applicant must be an ``eligible 
partnership'' as defined in section 200(6) of the HEA. The term 
``eligible partnership'' means an entity that--
    (1) Must include--
    (i) A high-need LEA;
    (ii) (A) A high-need school or a consortium of high-need schools 
served by the high-need LEA; or
    (B) As applicable, a high-need ECE program;
    (iii) A partner institution;
    (iv) A school, department, or program of education within such 
partner institution, which may include an existing teacher professional 
development program with proven outcomes within a four-year IHE that 
provides intensive and sustained collaboration between faculty and LEAs 
consistent with the requirements of title II of the HEA; and
    (v) A school or department of arts and sciences within such partner 
institution; and
    (2) May include any of the following:
    (i) The Governor of the State.
    (ii) The State educational agency.
    (iii) The State board of education.
    (iv) The State agency for higher education.
    (v) A business.
    (vi) A public or private nonprofit educational organization.
    (vii) An educational service agency.
    (viii) A teacher organization.
    (ix) A high-performing LEA, or a consortium of such LEAs, that can 
serve as a resource to the partnership.
    (x) A charter school.
    (xi) A school or department within the partner institution that 
focuses on psychology and human development.
    (xii) A school or department within the partner institution with 
comparable expertise in the disciplines of teaching, learning, and 
child and adolescent development.
    (xiii) An entity operating a program that provides alternative 
routes to State certification of teachers.

    Note:  So that the Department can confirm the eligibility of the 
LEA(s) that an applicant proposes to serve, applicants must include 
information in their applications that demonstrates that each LEA to 
potentially be served by the project is a ``high-need LEA'' (as 
defined in this notice). Applicants should review the application 
package for additional information on determining whether an LEA 
meets the definition of ``high-need LEA.''


    Note:  An LEA includes a public charter school that operates as 
an LEA.


    Note:  As required by HEA section 203(a)(2), an eligible 
partnership may not receive more than one grant during a five-year 
period.

    More information on eligible partnerships can be found in the TQP 
FAQ document on the program website at https://oese.ed.gov/offices/office-of-discretionary-grants-support-services/effective-educator-development-programs/teacher-quality-partnership/applicant-info-and-eligibility/.
    2. a. Cost Sharing or Matching: Under section 203(c) of the HEA (20 
U.S.C. 1022b(c)), each grant recipient must provide, from non-Federal 
sources, an amount equal to 100 percent of the amount of the grant, 
which may be provided in cash or in-kind, to carry out the activities 
supported by the grant. Applicants should budget their cost share or 
matching contributions on an

[[Page 29700]]

annual basis for the entire five-year project period. Applicants must 
use the TQP Budget Worksheet to provide evidence of how they propose to 
meet their cost share or matching contributions for the entire five-
year project period.
    Consistent with 2 CFR 200.306(b) of the Uniform Guidance, any cost 
share or matching funds must be an allowable use of funds consistent 
with the cost principles detailed in Subpart E of the Uniform Guidance, 
and not included as a contribution for any other Federal award.
    Section 203(c) of the HEA authorizes the Secretary to waive this 
cost share or matching requirement for any fiscal year for an eligible 
partnership if the Secretary determines that applying the cost share or 
matching requirement to the eligible partnership would result in 
serious hardship or an inability to carry out authorized TQP program 
activities. The Secretary does not, as a general matter, anticipate 
waiving this requirement in the future. Furthermore, given the 
importance of cost share or matching funds to the long-term success of 
the project, eligible entities must identify appropriate cost share or 
matching funds for the proposed five-year project period. Finally, the 
selection criteria include factors such as ``the adequacy of support, 
including facilities, equipment, supplies, and other resources, from 
the applicant organization or the lead applicant organization'' and 
``the extent to which the applicant demonstrates that it has the 
resources to operate the project beyond the length of the grant, 
including a multi-year financial and operating model and accompanying 
plan; the demonstrated commitment of any partners; evidence of broad 
support from stakeholders (e.g., State educational agencies, teachers' 
unions) critical to the project's long term success; or more than one 
of these types of evidence'' which may include a consideration of 
demonstrated cost share or matching support.

    Note:  The combination of Federal and non-Federal funds should 
equal the total cost of the project. Therefore, grantees are 
required to support no less than 50 percent of the total cost of the 
project with non-Federal funds. Grantees are strongly encouraged to 
take this requirement into account when requesting Federal funds. 
Grantees must budget their requests accordingly and must verify that 
their budgets reflect the costs allocations appropriately. (Cost 
Share or Matching Formula: Total Project Cost divided by two equals 
Federal Award Amount).

    b. Supplement-Not-Supplant: This program involves supplement-not-
supplant funding requirements. In accordance with section 202(k) of the 
HEA (20 U.S.C. 1022a(k)), funds made available under this program must 
be used to supplement, and not supplant, other Federal, State, and 
local funds that would otherwise be expended to carry out activities 
under this program. Additionally, the supplement-not-supplant 
requirement applies to all cost share or matching funds under the 
program.
    c. Indirect Cost Rate: This program uses a training indirect cost 
rate. This limits indirect cost reimbursement to an entity's actual 
indirect costs, as determined in its negotiated indirect cost rate 
agreement, or eight percent of a modified total direct cost base, 
whichever amount is less. For more information regarding training 
indirect cost rates, see 34 CFR 75.562. For more information regarding 
indirect costs, or to obtain a negotiated indirect cost rate, please 
see https://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocfo/intro.html.
    3. Subgrantees: Under 34 CFR 75.708(b) and (c), a grantee under 
this competition may award subgrants to directly carry out project 
activities described in its application to the following types of 
entities: LEAs, SEAs, nonprofit organizations, or a business. The 
grantee may award subgrants to entities it has identified in an 
approved application.
    4. Other:
    a. Limitation on Administrative Expenses:
    Under HEA section 203(d) (20 U.S.C. 1022b(d)), an eligible 
partnership that receives a grant under this program may not use more 
than two percent of the funds provided to administer the grant.
    b. General Application Requirements:
    All applicants must meet the following general application 
requirements in order to be considered for funding. Except as 
specifically noted, the general application requirements are from HEA 
section 202(b) (20 U.S.C. 1022a(b)).
    Each eligible partnership desiring a grant under this program must 
submit an application that contains--
    (a) A needs assessment of the partners in the eligible partnership 
with respect to the preparation, ongoing training, professional 
development, and retention of general education and special education 
teachers, principals, and, as applicable, early childhood educators;
    (b) A description of the extent to which the program to be carried 
out with grant funds, as described in the absolute priority in this 
notice, will prepare prospective and new teachers with strong teaching 
skills;
    (c) A description of how such a program will prepare prospective 
and new teachers to understand and use research and data to modify and 
improve classroom instruction;
    (d) A description of--
    (1) How the eligible partnership will coordinate strategies and 
activities assisted under the grant with other teacher preparation or 
professional development programs, including programs funded under the 
ESEA and the IDEA, and through the National Science Foundation; and
    (2) How the activities of the partnership will be consistent with 
State, local, and other education reform activities that promote 
teacher quality and student academic achievement;
    (e) An assessment that describes the resources available to the 
eligible partnership, including--
    (1) The integration of funds from other related sources;
    (2) The intended use of the grant funds; and
    (3) The commitment of the resources of the partnership to the 
activities assisted under this program, including financial support, 
faculty participation, and time commitments, and to the continuation of 
the activities when the grant ends;
    (f) A description of--
    (1) How the eligible partnership will meet the purposes of the TQP 
program as specified in section 201 of the HEA;
    (2) How the partnership will carry out the activities required 
under the absolute priority, as described in this notice, based on the 
needs identified in paragraph (a), with the goal of improving student 
academic achievement;
    (3) If the partnership chooses to use funds under this section for 
a project or activities under section 202(f) of the HEA, how the 
partnership will carry out such project or required activities based on 
the needs identified in paragraph (a), with the goal of improving 
student academic achievement;
    (4) The partnership's evaluation plan under section 204(a) of the 
HEA;
    (5) How the partnership will align the teacher preparation program 
with the--
    (i) State early learning standards for ECE programs, as 
appropriate, and with the relevant domains of early childhood 
development; and
    (ii) Challenging State academic standards under section 1111(b)(1) 
of the ESEA, established by the State in which the partnership is 
located;
    (6) How the partnership will prepare general education teachers to 
teach students with disabilities, including training related to 
participation as a member of individualized education program teams, as 
defined in section 614(d)(1)(B) of the IDEA;

[[Page 29701]]

    (7) How the partnership will prepare general education and special 
education teachers to teach students who are limited English 
proficient;
    (8) How faculty at the partner institution will work during the 
term of the grant, with teachers who meet the applicable State 
certification and licensure requirements, including any requirements 
for certification obtained through alternative routes to certification, 
or, with regard to special education teachers, the qualifications 
described in section 612(a)(14)(C) of the IDEA, in the classrooms of 
high-need schools served by the high-need LEA in the partnership to--
    (i) Provide high-quality professional development activities to 
strengthen the content knowledge and teaching skills of elementary 
school and secondary school teachers; and
    (ii) Train other classroom teachers to implement literacy programs 
that incorporate the essential components of reading instruction;
    (9) How the partnership will design, implement, or enhance a year-
long and rigorous teaching preservice clinical program component;
    (10) How the partnership will support in-service professional 
development strategies and activities; and
    (11) How the partnership will collect, analyze, and use data on the 
retention of all teachers and early childhood educators in schools and 
ECE programs located in the geographic area served by the partnership 
to evaluate the effectiveness of the partnership's teacher and educator 
support system; and
    (g) With respect to the induction program required as part of the 
activities carried out under the absolute priority--
    (1) A demonstration that the schools and departments within the IHE 
that are part of the induction program will effectively prepare 
teachers, including providing content expertise and expertise in 
teaching, as appropriate;
    (2) A demonstration of the eligible partnership's capability and 
commitment to, and the accessibility to and involvement of faculty in, 
the use of empirically based practice and scientifically valid research 
on teaching and learning;
    (3) A description of how the teacher preparation program will 
design and implement an induction program to support, though not less 
than the first two years of teaching, all new teachers who are prepared 
by the teacher preparation program in the partnership and who teach in 
the high-need LEA in the partnership, and, to the extent practicable, 
all new teachers who teach in such high-need LEA, in the further 
development of the new teachers' teaching skills, including the use of 
mentors who are trained and compensated by such program for the 
mentors' work with new teachers; and
    (4) A description of how faculty involved in the induction program 
will be able to substantially participate in an ECE program or 
elementary school or secondary school classroom setting, as applicable, 
including release time and receiving workload credit for such 
participation.

IV. Application and Submission Information

    1. Application Submission Instructions: Applicants are required to 
follow the Common Instructions for Applicants to Department of 
Education Discretionary Grant Programs, published in the Federal 
Register on February 13, 2019 (84 FR 3768) and available at 
www.govinfo.gov/content/pkg/FR-2019-02-13/pdf/2019-02206.pdf, which 
contain requirements and information on how to submit an application. 
Grants.gov has relaxed the requirement for applicants to have an active 
registration in the System for Award Management (SAM) in order to apply 
for funding during the COVID-19 pandemic. An applicant that does not 
have an active SAM registration can still register with Grants.gov, but 
must contact the Grants.gov Support Desk, toll-free, at 1-800-518-4726, 
in order to take advantage of this flexibility.

    Note:  The Department has submitted to the Office of Management 
and Budget for its approval an Information Collection package that 
will require all TQP applicants to complete and submit all TQP 
program checklists at the time of application. This information 
collection also includes a required budget worksheet that will 
document applicants' requested Federal funds as well as their non-
Federal cost share and matching funds.
    Applications that do not include the TQP program checklists will 
be considered incomplete and may not be reviewed.

    2. Submission of Proprietary Information: Given the types of 
projects that may be proposed in applications for the TQP program, your 
application may include business information that you consider 
proprietary. In 34 CFR 5.11, we define ``business information'' and 
describe the process we use in determining whether any of that 
information is proprietary and, thus, protected from disclosure under 
Exemption 4 of the Freedom of Information Act (5 U.S.C. 552, as 
amended).
    Because we plan to make successful applications available to the 
public, you may wish to request confidentiality of business 
information.
    Consistent with Executive Order 12600, please designate in your 
application any information that you believe is exempt from disclosure 
under Exemption 4. In the appropriate Appendix section of your 
application, under ``Other Attachments Form,'' please list the page 
number or numbers on which we can find this information. For additional 
information please see 34 CFR 5.11(c).
    3. Intergovernmental Review: This program is subject to Executive 
Order 12372 and the regulations in 34 CFR part 79. Information about 
Intergovernmental Review of Federal Programs under Executive Order 
12372 is in the application package for this competition.
    4. Funding Restrictions: We specify unallowable costs in 2 CFR 200, 
subpart E. We reference additional regulations outlining funding 
restrictions in the Applicable Regulations section of this notice.

    Note:  Tuition is not an allowable use of funds under this 
program.

    5. Recommended Page Limit: The application narrative is where you, 
the applicant, address the selection criteria that reviewers use to 
evaluate your application. We recommend that you (1) limit the 
application narrative to no more than 50 pages and (2) use the 
following standards:
     A ``page'' is 8.5'' x 11'', on one side only, with 1'' 
margins at the top, bottom, and both sides.
     Double space (no more than three lines per vertical inch) 
all text in the application narrative, including titles, headings, 
footnotes, quotations, references, and captions, as well as all text in 
charts, tables, figures, and graphs.
     Use a font that is either 12 point or larger or no smaller 
than 10 pitch (characters per inch).
     Use one of the following fonts: Times New Roman, Courier, 
Courier New, or Arial.
    Furthermore, applicants are strongly encouraged to include a table 
of contents that specifies where each required part of the application 
is located.
    6. Notice of Intent To Apply: The Department will be able to 
develop a more efficient process for reviewing grant applications if it 
has a better understanding of the number of entities that intend to 
apply for funding under this competition. Therefore, the Secretary 
strongly encourages each potential applicant to notify the Department 
of its intent to submit an application for funding by sending an email 
to [email protected] with FY

[[Page 29702]]

2020 TQP Intent to Apply in the subject line. Applicants that do not 
send a notice of intent to apply may still apply for funding.

V. Application Review Information

    1. Selection Criteria: The selection criteria for this competition 
are from 34 CFR 75.210. An applicant may earn up to a total of 100 
points based on the selection criteria. The maximum score for each 
criterion is indicated in parentheses. Each criterion also includes the 
sub-factors that the reviewers will consider in determining how well an 
application meets the criterion. The criteria are as follows:
    (a) Quality of the project design (up to 30 points).
    The Secretary considers the quality of the design of the proposed 
project. In determining the quality of the design of the proposed 
project, the Secretary considers the following factors:
    (i) The extent to which the proposed project demonstrates a 
rationale.
    (ii) The extent to which the goals, objectives, and outcomes to be 
achieved by the proposed project are clearly specified and measurable.
    (iii) The extent to which the proposed project represents an 
exceptional approach for meeting statutory purposes and requirements.
    (iv) The extent to which the proposed project is part of a 
comprehensive effort to improve teaching and learning and support 
rigorous academic standards for students.
    (b) Quality of the project evaluation (up to 20 points).
    The Secretary considers the quality of the evaluation to be 
conducted of the proposed project. In determining the quality of the 
evaluation, the Secretary considers the following factors:
    (i) The extent to which the methods of evaluation will provide 
valid and reliable performance data on relevant outcomes.
    (ii) The extent to which the methods of evaluation are thorough, 
feasible, and appropriate to the goals, objectives, and outcomes of the 
proposed project.
    (c) Adequacy of resources (up to 30 points).
    The Secretary considers the adequacy of resources for the proposed 
project. In determining the adequacy of resources for the proposed 
project, the Secretary considers the following factors:
    (i) The adequacy of support, including facilities, equipment, 
supplies, and other resources, from the applicant organization or the 
lead applicant organization.
    (ii) The extent to which the budget is adequate to support the 
proposed project.
    (iii) The extent to which costs are reasonable in relation to the 
objectives, design, and potential significance of the proposed project.
    (iv) The extent to which the applicant demonstrates that it has the 
resources to operate the project beyond the length of the grant, 
including a multi-year financial and operating model and accompanying 
plan; the demonstrated commitment of any partners; evidence of broad 
support from stakeholders (e.g., State educational agencies, teachers' 
unions) critical to the project's long-term success; or more than one 
of these types of evidence.
    (d) Quality of the management plan (up to 20 points).
    The Secretary considers the quality of the management plan for the 
proposed project. In determining the quality of the management plan for 
the proposed project, the Secretary considers the following factors:
    (i) The adequacy of the management plan to achieve the objectives 
of the proposed project on time and within budget, including clearly 
defined responsibilities, timelines, and milestones for accomplishing 
project tasks.
    (ii) The relevance and demonstrated commitment of each partner in 
the proposed project to the implementation and success of the project.
    2. Review and Selection Process: We remind potential applicants 
that in reviewing applications in any discretionary grant competition, 
the Secretary may consider, under 34 CFR 75.217(d)(3), the past 
performance of the applicant in carrying out a previous award, such as 
the applicant's use of funds, achievement of project objectives, and 
compliance with grant conditions. The Secretary may also consider 
whether the applicant failed to submit a timely performance report or 
submitted a report of unacceptable quality.
    In addition, in making a competitive grant award, the Secretary 
requires various assurances, including those applicable to Federal 
civil rights laws that prohibit discrimination in programs or 
activities receiving Federal financial assistance from the Department 
(34 CFR 100.4, 104.5, 106.4, 108.8, and 110.23).
    3. Risk Assessment and Specific Conditions: Consistent with 2 CFR 
200.205, before awarding grants under this competition the Department 
conducts a review of the risks posed by applicants. Under 2 CFR 
3474.10, the Secretary may impose specific conditions and, in 
appropriate circumstances, high-risk conditions on a grant if the 
applicant or grantee is not financially stable; has a history of 
unsatisfactory performance; has a financial or other management system 
that does not meet the standards in 2 CFR part 200, subpart D; has not 
fulfilled the conditions of a prior grant; or is otherwise not 
responsible.
    4. Integrity and Performance System: If you are selected under this 
competition to receive an award that over the course of the project 
period may exceed the simplified acquisition threshold (currently 
$250,000), under 2 CFR 200.205(a)(2) we must make a judgment about your 
integrity, business ethics, and record of performance under Federal 
awards--that is, the risk posed by you as an applicant--before we make 
an award. In doing so, we must consider any information about you that 
is in the integrity and performance system (currently referred to as 
the Federal Awardee Performance and Integrity Information System 
(FAPIIS)), accessible through the System for Award Management. You may 
review and comment on any information about yourself that a Federal 
agency previously entered and that is currently in FAPIIS.
    Please note that, if the total value of your currently active 
grants, cooperative agreements, and procurement contracts from the 
Federal government exceeds $10,000,000, the reporting requirements in 2 
CFR part 200, Appendix XII, require you to report certain integrity 
information to FAPIIS semiannually. Please review the requirements in 2 
CFR part 200, Appendix XII, if this grant plus all the other Federal 
funds you receive exceed $10,000,000.

VI. Award Administration Information

    1. Award Notices: If your application is successful, we notify your 
U.S. Representative and U.S. Senators and send you a Grant Award 
Notification (GAN); or we may send you an email containing a link to 
access an electronic version of your GAN. We may notify you informally, 
also.
    If your application is not evaluated or not selected for funding, 
we notify you.
    2. Administrative and National Policy Requirements: We identify 
administrative and national policy requirements in the application 
package and reference these and other requirements in the Applicable 
Regulations section of this notice.
    We reference the regulations outlining the terms and conditions of 
an award in the Applicable Regulations section of this notice and 
include these and other specific conditions in the GAN. The GAN also 
incorporates your approved application as part of your binding 
commitments under the grant.

[[Page 29703]]

    3. Open Licensing Requirements: Unless an exception applies, if you 
are awarded a grant under this competition, you will be required to 
openly license to the public grant deliverables created in whole, or in 
part, with Department grant funds. When the deliverable consists of 
modifications to pre-existing works, the license must extend only to 
those modifications that can be separately identified and only to the 
extent that open licensing is permitted under the terms of any licenses 
or other legal restrictions on the use of pre-existing works. 
Additionally, a grantee or subgrantee that is awarded competitive grant 
funds must have a plan to disseminate these public grant deliverables. 
This dissemination plan can be developed and submitted after your 
application has been reviewed and selected for funding. For additional 
information on the open licensing requirements please refer to 2 CFR 
3474.20.
    4. Reporting: (a) If you apply for a grant under this competition, 
you must ensure that you have in place the necessary processes and 
systems to comply with the reporting requirements in 2 CFR part 170 
should you receive funding under the competition. This does not apply 
if you have an exception under 2 CFR 170.110(b).
    (b) At the end of your project period, you must submit a final 
performance report, including financial information, as directed by the 
Secretary. If you receive a multiyear award, you must submit an annual 
performance report that provides the most current performance and 
financial expenditure information as directed by the Secretary under 34 
CFR 75.118. The Secretary may also require more frequent performance 
reports under 34 CFR 75.720(c). For specific requirements on reporting, 
please go to www.ed.gov/fund/grant/apply/appforms/appforms.html.
    (c) Under 34 CFR 75.250(b), the Secretary may provide a grantee 
with additional funding for data collection analysis and reporting. In 
this case the Secretary establishes a data collection period.
    5. Performance Measures: The goal of the TQP program is to increase 
student achievement in K-12 schools by developing teachers who meet 
applicable State certification, including any requirements for 
certification obtained through alternative routes to certification, and 
licensure requirements.
    Under the Government Performance and Results Act of 1993 (GPRA), 
the following measures will be used by the Department to evaluate the 
overall effectiveness of the grantee's project, as well as the TQP 
program as a whole:
    (a) Performance Measure 1: Certification/Licensure. The percentage 
of program graduates who have attained initial State certification/
licensure by passing all necessary licensure/certification assessments 
within one year of program completion.
    (b) Performance Measure 2: STEM Graduation. The percentage of math/
science program graduates that attain initial certification/licensure 
by passing all necessary licensure/certification assessments within one 
year of program completion, if applicable to the applicant or grantee's 
project.
    (c) Performance Measure 3: One-Year Persistence. The percentage of 
program participants who were enrolled in the postsecondary program in 
the previous grant reporting period, did not graduate, and persisted in 
the postsecondary program in the current grant reporting period.
    (d) Performance Measure 4: One-Year Employment Retention. The 
percentage of program completers who were employed for the first time 
as teachers of record in the preceding year by the partner high-need 
LEA or ECE program and were retained for the current school year.
    (e) Performance Measure 5: Three-Year Employment Retention. The 
percentage of program completers who were employed by the partner high-
need LEA or ECE program for three consecutive years after initial 
employment.
    (f) Performance Measure 6: Student Learning. The percentage of 
grantees that report improved aggregate learning outcomes of students 
taught by new teachers. These data can be calculated using student 
growth, a teacher evaluation measure, or both. (This measure is 
optional and not required as part of GPRA reporting.)
    (g) Efficiency Measure: The Federal cost per program completer. 
(This data will not be available until the final year of the project 
period.)

    Note: If funded, grantees will be asked to collect and report 
data on these measures in their project's annual performance reports 
(34 CFR 75.590). Applicants are also advised to consider these 
measures in conceptualizing the design, implementation, and 
evaluation of their proposed projects because of their importance in 
the application review process. Collection of data on these measures 
should be a part of the evaluation plan, along with measures of 
progress on goals and objectives that are specific to your project.

    All grantees will be expected to submit an annual performance 
report documenting their success in addressing these performance 
measures.
    Applicants must also address the evaluation requirements in section 
204(a) of the HEA (20 U.S.C. 1022c(a)). This section asks applicants to 
develop objectives and measures for increasing--
    (1) Achievement for all prospective and new teachers, as measured 
by the eligible partnership;
    (2) Teacher retention in the first three years of a teacher's 
career;
    (3) Improvement in the pass rates and scaled scores for initial 
State certification or licensure of teachers; and
    (4) The percentage of teachers who meet the applicable State 
certification and licensure requirements, including any requirements 
for certification obtained through alternative routes to certification, 
or, with regard to special education teachers, the qualifications 
described in section 612(a)(14)(C) of the IDEA (20 U.S.C. 
1412(a)(14)(C)), hired by the high-need LEA participating in the 
eligible partnership;
    (5) The percentage of teachers who meet the applicable State 
certification and licensure requirements, including any requirements 
for certification obtained through alternative routes to certification, 
or, with regard to special education teachers, the qualifications 
described in section 612(a)(14)(C) of the IDEA (20 U.S.C. 
1412(a)(14)(C)), hired by the high-need LEA who are members of 
underrepresented groups;
    (6) The percentage of teachers who meet the applicable State 
certification and licensure requirements, including any requirements 
for certification obtained through alternative routes to certification, 
or, with regard to special education teachers, the qualifications 
described in section 612(a)(14)(C) of the IDEA (20 U.S.C. 
1412(a)(14)(C)), hired by the high-need LEA who teach high-need 
academic subject areas (such as reading, mathematics, science, and 
foreign language, including less commonly taught languages and critical 
foreign languages);
    (7) The percentage of teachers who meet the applicable State 
certification and licensure requirements, including any requirements 
for certification obtained through alternative routes to certification, 
or, with regard to special education teachers, the qualifications 
described in section 612(a)(14)(C) of the IDEA (20 U.S.C. 
1412(a)(14)(C)), hired by the high-need LEA who teach in high-need 
areas (including special education, language instruction educational 
programs for limited English proficient students, and early childhood 
education);
    (8) The percentage of teachers who meet the applicable State 
certification and licensure requirements, including

[[Page 29704]]

any requirements for certification obtained through alternative routes 
to certification, or, with regard to special education teachers, the 
qualifications described in section 612(a)(14)(C) of the IDEA (20 
U.S.C. 1412(a)(14)(C)), hired by the high-need LEA who teach in high-
need schools, disaggregated by the elementary school and secondary 
school levels;
    (9) As applicable, the percentage of ECE program classes in the 
geographic area served by the eligible partnership taught by early 
childhood educators who are highly competent; and
    (10) As applicable, the percentage of teachers trained--
    (i) To integrate technology effectively into curricula and 
instruction, including technology consistent with the principles of 
universal design for learning; and
    (ii) To use technology effectively to collect, manage, and analyze 
data to improve teaching and learning for the purpose of improving 
student academic achievement.
    6. Continuation Awards: In making a continuation award under 34 CFR 
75.253, the Secretary considers, among other things: Whether a grantee 
has made substantial progress in achieving the goals and objectives of 
the project; whether the grantee has expended funds in a manner that is 
consistent with its approved application and budget; whether the 
grantee has met the required non-Federal cost share or matching 
requirement; and, if the Secretary has established performance 
measurement requirements, the performance targets in the grantee's 
approved application.
    In making a continuation award, the Secretary also considers 
whether the grantee is operating in compliance with the assurances in 
its approved application, including those applicable to Federal civil 
rights laws that prohibit discrimination in programs or activities 
receiving Federal financial assistance from the Department (34 CFR 
100.4, 104.5, 106.4, 108.8, and 110.23).

VII. Other Information

    Accessible Format: Individuals with disabilities can obtain this 
document and a copy of the application package in an accessible format 
(e.g., braille, large print, audiotape, or compact disc) on request to 
the program contact person listed under FOR FURTHER INFORMATION 
CONTACT.
    Electronic Access to This Document: The official version of this 
document is the document published in the Federal Register. You may 
access the official edition of the Federal Register and the Code of 
Federal Regulations at: www.govinfo.gov. At this site you can view this 
document, as well as all other documents of this Department published 
in the Federal Register, in text or Portable Document Format (PDF). To 
use PDF you must have Adobe Acrobat Reader, which is available free at 
the site.
    You may also access documents of the Department published in the 
Federal Register by using the article search feature at: 
www.federalregister.gov. Specifically, through the advanced search 
feature at this site, you can limit your search to documents published 
by the Department.

Frank T. Brogan,
Assistant Secretary for Elementary and Secondary Education.
[FR Doc. 2020-10509 Filed 5-15-20; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4000-01-P