Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for Review and Approval; Request for Comment; Effects of Education on Speeding Behavior, 68292-68294 [2019-26823]

Download as PDF 68292 Federal Register / Vol. 84, No. 240 / Friday, December 13, 2019 / Notices to comply with the terms and conditions of the exemption; (2) the exemption has resulted in a lower level of safety than was maintained before it was granted; or (3) continuation of the exemption would not be consistent with the goals and objectives of 49 U.S.C. 31136(e) and 31315(b). VI. Preemption During the period the exemption is in effect, no State shall enforce any law or regulation that conflicts with this exemption with respect to a person operating under the exemption. VI. Conclusion Based upon its evaluation of the 90 exemption applications, FMCSA renews the exemptions of the aforementioned drivers from the vision requirement in § 391.41(b)(10), subject to the requirements cited above. In accordance with 49 U.S.C. 31136(e) and 31315(b), each exemption will be valid for two years unless revoked earlier by FMCSA. Issued on: December 10, 2019. Larry W. Minor, Associate Administrator for Policy. [FR Doc. 2019–26941 Filed 12–12–19; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4910–EX–P DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION National Highway Traffic Safety Administration [U.S. DOT Docket No. NHTSA–2019–0051] Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for Review and Approval; Request for Comment; Effects of Education on Speeding Behavior National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), Department of Transportation. ACTION: Notice and request for comments on a new information collection. AGENCY: In compliance with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, this notice announces that the Information Collection Request (ICR) abstracted below will be submitted to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for review. The ICR describes the nature of the information collection and its expected burden. A Federal Register notice with a 60-day comment period soliciting public comments on the following information collection was published on August 30, 2019. NHTSA received one comment, from the Insurance Institute of Highway Safety (IIHS), that was critical of the proposed information collection. DATES: Comments must be received on or before January 13, 2020. ADDRESSES: Send comments regarding the burden estimate, including suggestions for reducing the burden, to the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs, Office of Management and Budget, Attention: Desk Officer for NHTSA, 725 17th Street NW, Washington, DC 20503. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Kelly Sheppard, Research Psychologist, Office of Behavioral Safety Research (NPD–320), National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, Department of Transportation, 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE, W46–499, Washington, DC 20590. Dr. Sheppard’s phone number is 202–366–6401, and her email address is kelly.sheppard@dot.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Before a Federal agency can collect certain information from the public, it must receive approval from the Office of Management and Budget (OMB). In compliance with these requirements, this notice announces that the following information collection request has been forwarded to OMB. A Federal Register notice with a 60day comment period soliciting public comments on the following information collection was published on August 30, 2019.1 NHTSA received one comment, from the Insurance Institute of Highway Safety (IIHS), that was critical of the proposed information collection. IIHS stated that stand-alone education programs have not been found to be effective at addressing driver behaviors like speeding and that pursuing an education program is not an effective use of the agency’s resources. They cited NHTSA’s Speed Management Program Plan as having other activities with more promise for reducing speeding.2 They also indicated that NHTSA’s Countermeasures that Work report promotes communications in support of enforcement but not education alone.3 They stated their view that incentives jbell on DSKJLSW7X2PROD with NOTICES SUMMARY: VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:42 Dec 12, 2019 Jkt 250001 1 84 FR 45827. Highway Traffic Safety Administration, Federal Highway Administration, & Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration. (2014, May). Speed management program plan (Report No. DOT HS 812 028). Washington, DC: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Available at http:// www.nhtsa.gov/sites/nhtsa.dot.gov/files/812028speedmgtprogram.pdf. 3 Richard, C.M., Magee, K., Bacon-Abdelmoteleb, P., & Brown, J. L. (2018, April). Countermeasures that work: A highway safety countermeasure guide for State Highway Safety Offices, Ninth edition (Report No. DOT HS 812 478). Washington, DC: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Available at https://rosap.ntl.bts.gov/view/dot/ 36719. 2 National PO 00000 Frm 00193 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 for intelligent speed adaptation outlined in the National Transportation Safety Board’s (NTSB) Reducing SpeedingRelated Crashes Involving Passenger Vehicles safety report was a more effective use of resources.4 We appreciate the comments from IIHS and thank them for thoughtfully considering the described collection. We agree with IIHS that stand-alone education programs that are not part of a larger comprehensive approach tend to have limited effects. However, as IIHS points out, NHTSA has a Speed Management Program Plan that includes an education component as well as a variety of other strategies. The program associated with this collection is one potential education program that could be part of a larger speeding management strategy that includes many of the additional elements IIHS describes. NHTSA’s Countermeasures that Work indicates that communications and outreach supporting speeding enforcement is a promising strategy (p. 3–31), and NTSB’s Reducing Speeding-Related Crashes Involving Passenger Vehicles concluded that ‘‘traffic safety campaigns that include highly publicized, increased enforcement can be an effective speeding countermeasure’’ (p. 55). Additionally, NTSB recommended that NHTSA ‘‘collaborate with other traffic safety stakeholders to develop and implement an ongoing program to increase public awareness of speeding as a national traffic safety issue’’ (p. 57). A 2011 meta-analysis by Phillips, Ulleberg, and Ross found that traffic safety public information and education campaigns reduced crashes by 9% on average but that campaigns focused on speeding did not indicate a statistically significant reduction.5 Many of the education programs described by IIHS and included in the meta-analysis above are public awareness campaigns where messages are delivered through mass media or at the roadside. These education programs are not focused on drivers who speed but rather on all drivers. These broad education programs may appear less effective, especially on their own, because many drivers who receive the messages do not tend to speed. Education focused on people who have already received a 4 National Transportation Safety Board. (2017, July). Reducing Speeding-Related Crashes Involving Passenger Vehicles (Safety Study NTSB/SS–17/01). Washington, DC: National Transportation Safety Board. Available at https://www.ntsb.gov/safety/ safety-studies/Documents/SS1701.pdf. 5 Phillips, R.O., Ulleberg, P., & Vaa, T. (2011). Meta-analysis of the effect of road safety campaigns on accidents. Accident Analysis & Prevention, 43, 1204–1218. E:\FR\FM\13DEN1.SGM 13DEN1 jbell on DSKJLSW7X2PROD with NOTICES Federal Register / Vol. 84, No. 240 / Friday, December 13, 2019 / Notices speeding citation, such as proposed in this collection, could produce larger effects because they are designed to address the specific issues found with speeding drivers. Furthermore, NHTSA’s Countermeasures that Work chapter on Speeding and Speed Management recommends more comprehensive strategies for drivers already cited for speeding or repeat offenders and mentions several programs that included interventions specifically designed to teach drivers about attitudes, skills, and knowledge related to speeding and personality traits associated with the behavior. These programs showed promise in reducing speeding among drivers who had received citations (p. 3–10). Therefore, education specifically for drivers who speed as well as more broad education to promote public awareness of the dangers of speeding are part of comprehensive programming referenced throughout NHTSA’s Countermeasures that Work and Speed Management Program Plan. The proposed speeding education program has two main elements that make it scientifically strong and likely to contribute to our ability to develop an effective program. The first element is that it will target individuals with a speeding citation instead of being broadly presented to all drivers. This step ensures that the audience who stands to benefit most from the education will receive it and that the content aligns with promising programs discussed in Countermeasures that Work. The second element is that naturalistic and objective data will be collected to determine if the program had an effect. Instead of relying on selfreport, which IIHS rightly indicates can be biased, the proposed data collection will use instrumentation in the vehicle to evaluate speeding while the participants drive as they normally would both before and after the educational course. This step will ensure that conclusions drawn about the effect of the program will be based on objective driving data and not on reports of how people believe they drove or will drive in the future. By undertaking this collection, NHTSA will take steps towards an evidence-based education program that can be included in comprehensive speed management plans and contribute to reducing speeding-related injuries and fatalities. Title: Effects of Education on Speeding Behavior. OMB Clearance Number: New. Type of Review: Regular. Form No.: NHTSA Form 1492, NHTSA Form 1493, NHTSA Form 1494, VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:42 Dec 12, 2019 Jkt 250001 NHTSA Form 1495, NHTSA Form 1496, and NHTSA Form 1497. Type of Information Collection Request: Approval of a new information collection. Requested Expiration Date of Approval: 3 years from date of approval. Abstract: The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) of the U.S. Department of Transportation is seeking approval to collect information from licensed drivers who have at least one speeding citation or conviction in the previous three years for a one-time voluntary study of the effects of an education course being developed that covers vehicle speeds, laws, and the risks of speeding on speeding behavior. NHTSA proposes to approach up to 250 drivers appearing at the Wake County, NC district court because of speeding infractions to ascertain their interest in participating in the study after their case has been adjudicated. Of those 250, we expect to collect information from 150 potential participants determine their eligibility for the study with the goal of recruiting 100 voluntary participants. The 100 participants will complete an informed consent form, three driver speeding questionnaires (before the course, right after the course, and one month after the course) to explore the effects of the course on their attitudes and beliefs regarding speeding as well as their tendency to speed, a course evaluation, and sensation-seeking questionnaire to measure psychological factors related to risky behaviors. In addition, NHTSA will collect naturalistic driving data, which involves unobtrusive observation of driving in a natural, on-road setting using a vehicle instrumented with position, speed, and other sensors. This collection is solely reporting, and there are no recordkeeping costs to the respondents. NHTSA will use the information to produce a technical report that presents the results of the study. The technical report will provide aggregate (summary) statistics and tables as well as the results of statistical analysis of the information, but it will not include any personal information. The technical report will be shared with State highway offices, local governments, and those who develop driver education and traffic safety communications that aim to reduce speed-related crashes. The total estimated burden for recruiting 250 participants (42 hours), for screening 150 participants (23 hours) and for 100 participants to complete the study (600 hours) is 665 total hours. Respondents: Participation in this study will be voluntary, and 100 participants will be recruited from PO 00000 Frm 00194 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 68293 drivers that attend the Wake County, NC district court because of speeding infractions after their case has been adjudicated. An estimated 250 people will be approached and have the study described to them, and 150 people will be screened to recruit the 100 who will complete the study. Participants will be licensed drivers over 18 years old who have had a speeding citation in the past 3 years. Estimated Time per Participant: The estimated time for recruiting 250 possible participants is 10 minutes per person. The estimated time for screening the 150 possible participants is nine minutes per person to complete the screener questionnaire and provide contact information. The estimated time for the 100 study participants is six hours per person to complete the informed consent, take the three-hour and 30-minute course, complete all questionnaires, and wait for equipment to be installed and uninstalled from their vehicles. Total Estimated Burden Hours: The total estimated annual burden is 665 hours for the project activities. Participation in this study is voluntary, and there are no costs to respondents beyond the time spent completing the questionnaires and visits to the study facility. Frequency of Collection: This study is one-time data collection, and there will be no recurrence. Description of the Need for the Information and Proposed Use of the Information: NHTSA was established to reduce deaths, injuries, and economic losses resulting from motor vehicle crashes on the Nation’s highways. As part of this statutory mandate, NHTSA is authorized to conduct research for the development of traffic safety programs. In 2018, there were 9,378 fatalities in speeding-related crashes—26% of all traffic deaths. Public information and education are important elements of any effective speed management program. Recent NHTSA research has indicated that many drivers feel they lack sufficient knowledge about speeding and would like more information on stopping distances, laws, and risks involved. This project is designed to examine the effectiveness of education covering speed, laws, and risks of speeding in changing driver attitudes and behaviors regarding speeding. This information will be useful to State highway offices, local governments, and those who develop driver education and training that aim to reduce speed-related crashes. Public Comments Invited: You are asked to comment on any aspect of this information collection, including (a) E:\FR\FM\13DEN1.SGM 13DEN1 68294 Federal Register / Vol. 84, No. 240 / Friday, December 13, 2019 / Notices whether the proposed collection of information is necessary for the Department’s performance; (b) the accuracy of the estimated burden; (c) ways for the department to enhance the quality, utility and clarity of the information collection; and (d) ways that the burden could be minimized without reducing the quality of the collected information. Authority: The Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995; 44 U.S.C. chapter 35, as amended; 49 CFR 1.49; and DOT Order 1351.29. Issued in Washington, DC. Jon Krohmer, Associate Administrator, Acting, Research and Program Development. [FR Doc. 2019–26823 Filed 12–12–19; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4910–59–P DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration [Docket No. PHMSA–RSPA–2005–20323; Docket No. PHMSA–2008–0141] Pipeline Safety: Request for Special Permit; Northern Natural Gas Company Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA); DOT. ACTION: Notice. AGENCY: PHMSA is publishing this notice to solicit public comments on two (2) requests received from the Northern Natural Gas Company to renew previously issued special permits. These special permit renewal requests seek relief from compliance from certain requirements in the Federal pipeline safety regulations. At the conclusion of the 30-day comment period, PHMSA will review the comments received from this notice as SUMMARY: Docket No. jbell on DSKJLSW7X2PROD with NOTICES PHMSA–RSPA–2005– 20323. VerDate Sep<11>2014 part of its evaluation to grant or deny the special permit renewal requests. DATES: Submit any comments regarding these special permit renewal requests by January 13, 2020. ADDRESSES: Comments should reference the docket number for the specific special permit renewal request and may be submitted in the following ways: • E-Gov website: http:// www.Regulations.gov. This site allows the public to enter comments on any Federal Register notice issued by any agency. • Fax: 1–202–493–2251. • Mail: Docket Management System: U.S. Department of Transportation, Docket Operations, M–30, West Building Ground Floor, Room W12–140, 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE, Washington, DC 20590. • Hand Delivery: Docket Management System: U.S. Department of Transportation, Docket Operations, M– 30, West Building Ground Floor, Room W12–140, 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE, Washington, DC 20590, between 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, except Federal holidays. Instructions: You should identify the docket number for the special permit renewal request you are commenting on at the beginning of your comments. If you submit your comments by mail, please submit two (2) copies. To receive confirmation that PHMSA has received your comments, please include a selfaddressed stamped postcard. Internet users may submit comments at http:// www.Regulations.gov. Note: There is a privacy statement published on http:// www.Regulations.gov. Comments, including any personal information provided, are posted without changes or edits to http://www.Regulations.gov. Confidential Business Information: Confidential Business Information (CBI) is commercial or financial information that is both customarily and actually treated as private by its owner. Under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) (5 U.S.C. 552), CBI is exempt from public disclosure. If your comments responsive to this notice contain commercial or financial information that is customarily treated as private, that you actually treat as private, and that is relevant or responsive to this notice, it is important that you clearly designate the submitted comments as CBI. Pursuant to 49 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) § 190.343, you may ask PHMSA to give confidential treatment to information you give to the agency by taking the following steps: (1) Mark each page of the original document submission containing CBI as ‘‘Confidential’’; (2) send PHMSA, along with the original document, a second copy of the original document with the CBI deleted; and (3) explain why the information you are submitting is CBI. Unless you are notified otherwise, PHMSA will treat such marked submissions as confidential under the FOIA, and they will not be placed in the public docket of this notice. Submissions containing CBI should be sent to Kay McIver, DOT, PHMSA PHP– 80, 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE, Washington, DC 20590–0001. Any commentary PHMSA receives that is not specifically designated as CBI will be placed in the public docket for this matter. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: General: Ms. Kay McIver by telephone at 202–366–0113, or by email at kay.mciver@dot.gov. Technical: Mr. Steve Nanney by telephone at 713–272–2855, or by email at steve.nanney@dot.gov. PHMSA has received the following two (2) special permit renewal requests: SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Requester Regulation(s) Nature of special permit Northern Natural Gas Company (Northern Natural). 49 CFR 192.625(b)(1) To reauthorize Northern Natural to continue its operation of special permit segment 2 as defined in the original special permit issued on April 10, 2010, and renewed on April 7, 2015, for the non-odorization of a pipeline lateral. Special permit segment 1 is not being requested for permit renewal as this pipeline was abandoned and relocated. The special permit renewal request seeks to continue waiving compliance from 49 CFR 192.625(b)(1) for the exclusion from installing and operating odorization equipment on special permit segment 2 defined as 0.369 miles of 41⁄2-inch diameter La Crescent Branch Line (MNB 73701) located in Houston County, Minnesota. The special permit conditions that were imposed would continue to remain in effect. This special permit segment has a maximum allowable operating pressure (MAOP) of 800 pounds per square inch gauge (psig). 17:42 Dec 12, 2019 Jkt 250001 PO 00000 Frm 00195 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 E:\FR\FM\13DEN1.SGM 13DEN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 84, Number 240 (Friday, December 13, 2019)]
[Notices]
[Pages 68292-68294]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2019-26823]


-----------------------------------------------------------------------

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION

National Highway Traffic Safety Administration

[U.S. DOT Docket No. NHTSA-2019-0051]


Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission to the 
Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for Review and Approval; Request 
for Comment; Effects of Education on Speeding Behavior

AGENCY: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), 
Department of Transportation.

ACTION: Notice and request for comments on a new information 
collection.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: In compliance with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, this 
notice announces that the Information Collection Request (ICR) 
abstracted below will be submitted to the Office of Management and 
Budget (OMB) for review. The ICR describes the nature of the 
information collection and its expected burden. A Federal Register 
notice with a 60-day comment period soliciting public comments on the 
following information collection was published on August 30, 2019. 
NHTSA received one comment, from the Insurance Institute of Highway 
Safety (IIHS), that was critical of the proposed information 
collection.

DATES: Comments must be received on or before January 13, 2020.

ADDRESSES: Send comments regarding the burden estimate, including 
suggestions for reducing the burden, to the Office of Information and 
Regulatory Affairs, Office of Management and Budget, Attention: Desk 
Officer for NHTSA, 725 17th Street NW, Washington, DC 20503.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Kelly Sheppard, Research Psychologist, 
Office of Behavioral Safety Research (NPD-320), National Highway 
Traffic Safety Administration, Department of Transportation, 1200 New 
Jersey Avenue SE, W46-499, Washington, DC 20590. Dr. Sheppard's phone 
number is 202-366-6401, and her email address is 
[email protected].

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Before a Federal agency can collect certain 
information from the public, it must receive approval from the Office 
of Management and Budget (OMB). In compliance with these requirements, 
this notice announces that the following information collection request 
has been forwarded to OMB.
    A Federal Register notice with a 60-day comment period soliciting 
public comments on the following information collection was published 
on August 30, 2019.\1\ NHTSA received one comment, from the Insurance 
Institute of Highway Safety (IIHS), that was critical of the proposed 
information collection. IIHS stated that stand-alone education programs 
have not been found to be effective at addressing driver behaviors like 
speeding and that pursuing an education program is not an effective use 
of the agency's resources. They cited NHTSA's Speed Management Program 
Plan as having other activities with more promise for reducing 
speeding.\2\ They also indicated that NHTSA's Countermeasures that Work 
report promotes communications in support of enforcement but not 
education alone.\3\ They stated their view that incentives for 
intelligent speed adaptation outlined in the National Transportation 
Safety Board's (NTSB) Reducing Speeding-Related Crashes Involving 
Passenger Vehicles safety report was a more effective use of 
resources.\4\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \1\ 84 FR 45827.
    \2\ National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, Federal 
Highway Administration, & Federal Motor Carrier Safety 
Administration. (2014, May). Speed management program plan (Report 
No. DOT HS 812 028). Washington, DC: National Highway Traffic Safety 
Administration. Available at http://www.nhtsa.gov/sites/nhtsa.dot.gov/files/812028-speedmgtprogram.pdf.
    \3\ Richard, C.M., Magee, K., Bacon-Abdelmoteleb, P., & Brown, 
J. L. (2018, April). Countermeasures that work: A highway safety 
countermeasure guide for State Highway Safety Offices, Ninth edition 
(Report No. DOT HS 812 478). Washington, DC: National Highway 
Traffic Safety Administration. Available at https://rosap.ntl.bts.gov/view/dot/36719.
    \4\ National Transportation Safety Board. (2017, July). Reducing 
Speeding-Related Crashes Involving Passenger Vehicles (Safety Study 
NTSB/SS-17/01). Washington, DC: National Transportation Safety 
Board. Available at https://www.ntsb.gov/safety/safety-studies/Documents/SS1701.pdf.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    We appreciate the comments from IIHS and thank them for 
thoughtfully considering the described collection. We agree with IIHS 
that stand-alone education programs that are not part of a larger 
comprehensive approach tend to have limited effects. However, as IIHS 
points out, NHTSA has a Speed Management Program Plan that includes an 
education component as well as a variety of other strategies. The 
program associated with this collection is one potential education 
program that could be part of a larger speeding management strategy 
that includes many of the additional elements IIHS describes. NHTSA's 
Countermeasures that Work indicates that communications and outreach 
supporting speeding enforcement is a promising strategy (p. 3-31), and 
NTSB's Reducing Speeding-Related Crashes Involving Passenger Vehicles 
concluded that ``traffic safety campaigns that include highly 
publicized, increased enforcement can be an effective speeding 
countermeasure'' (p. 55). Additionally, NTSB recommended that NHTSA 
``collaborate with other traffic safety stakeholders to develop and 
implement an ongoing program to increase public awareness of speeding 
as a national traffic safety issue'' (p. 57).
    A 2011 meta-analysis by Phillips, Ulleberg, and Ross found that 
traffic safety public information and education campaigns reduced 
crashes by 9% on average but that campaigns focused on speeding did not 
indicate a statistically significant reduction.\5\ Many of the 
education programs described by IIHS and included in the meta-analysis 
above are public awareness campaigns where messages are delivered 
through mass media or at the roadside. These education programs are not 
focused on drivers who speed but rather on all drivers. These broad 
education programs may appear less effective, especially on their own, 
because many drivers who receive the messages do not tend to speed. 
Education focused on people who have already received a

[[Page 68293]]

speeding citation, such as proposed in this collection, could produce 
larger effects because they are designed to address the specific issues 
found with speeding drivers. Furthermore, NHTSA's Countermeasures that 
Work chapter on Speeding and Speed Management recommends more 
comprehensive strategies for drivers already cited for speeding or 
repeat offenders and mentions several programs that included 
interventions specifically designed to teach drivers about attitudes, 
skills, and knowledge related to speeding and personality traits 
associated with the behavior. These programs showed promise in reducing 
speeding among drivers who had received citations (p. 3-10). Therefore, 
education specifically for drivers who speed as well as more broad 
education to promote public awareness of the dangers of speeding are 
part of comprehensive programming referenced throughout NHTSA's 
Countermeasures that Work and Speed Management Program Plan.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \5\ Phillips, R.O., Ulleberg, P., & Vaa, T. (2011). Meta-
analysis of the effect of road safety campaigns on accidents. 
Accident Analysis & Prevention, 43, 1204-1218.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The proposed speeding education program has two main elements that 
make it scientifically strong and likely to contribute to our ability 
to develop an effective program. The first element is that it will 
target individuals with a speeding citation instead of being broadly 
presented to all drivers. This step ensures that the audience who 
stands to benefit most from the education will receive it and that the 
content aligns with promising programs discussed in Countermeasures 
that Work. The second element is that naturalistic and objective data 
will be collected to determine if the program had an effect. Instead of 
relying on self-report, which IIHS rightly indicates can be biased, the 
proposed data collection will use instrumentation in the vehicle to 
evaluate speeding while the participants drive as they normally would 
both before and after the educational course. This step will ensure 
that conclusions drawn about the effect of the program will be based on 
objective driving data and not on reports of how people believe they 
drove or will drive in the future. By undertaking this collection, 
NHTSA will take steps towards an evidence-based education program that 
can be included in comprehensive speed management plans and contribute 
to reducing speeding-related injuries and fatalities.
    Title: Effects of Education on Speeding Behavior.
    OMB Clearance Number: New.
    Type of Review: Regular.
    Form No.: NHTSA Form 1492, NHTSA Form 1493, NHTSA Form 1494, NHTSA 
Form 1495, NHTSA Form 1496, and NHTSA Form 1497.
    Type of Information Collection Request: Approval of a new 
information collection.
    Requested Expiration Date of Approval: 3 years from date of 
approval.
    Abstract: The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration 
(NHTSA) of the U.S. Department of Transportation is seeking approval to 
collect information from licensed drivers who have at least one 
speeding citation or conviction in the previous three years for a one-
time voluntary study of the effects of an education course being 
developed that covers vehicle speeds, laws, and the risks of speeding 
on speeding behavior. NHTSA proposes to approach up to 250 drivers 
appearing at the Wake County, NC district court because of speeding 
infractions to ascertain their interest in participating in the study 
after their case has been adjudicated. Of those 250, we expect to 
collect information from 150 potential participants determine their 
eligibility for the study with the goal of recruiting 100 voluntary 
participants. The 100 participants will complete an informed consent 
form, three driver speeding questionnaires (before the course, right 
after the course, and one month after the course) to explore the 
effects of the course on their attitudes and beliefs regarding speeding 
as well as their tendency to speed, a course evaluation, and sensation-
seeking questionnaire to measure psychological factors related to risky 
behaviors. In addition, NHTSA will collect naturalistic driving data, 
which involves unobtrusive observation of driving in a natural, on-road 
setting using a vehicle instrumented with position, speed, and other 
sensors. This collection is solely reporting, and there are no record-
keeping costs to the respondents. NHTSA will use the information to 
produce a technical report that presents the results of the study. The 
technical report will provide aggregate (summary) statistics and tables 
as well as the results of statistical analysis of the information, but 
it will not include any personal information. The technical report will 
be shared with State highway offices, local governments, and those who 
develop driver education and traffic safety communications that aim to 
reduce speed-related crashes. The total estimated burden for recruiting 
250 participants (42 hours), for screening 150 participants (23 hours) 
and for 100 participants to complete the study (600 hours) is 665 total 
hours.
    Respondents: Participation in this study will be voluntary, and 100 
participants will be recruited from drivers that attend the Wake 
County, NC district court because of speeding infractions after their 
case has been adjudicated. An estimated 250 people will be approached 
and have the study described to them, and 150 people will be screened 
to recruit the 100 who will complete the study. Participants will be 
licensed drivers over 18 years old who have had a speeding citation in 
the past 3 years.
    Estimated Time per Participant: The estimated time for recruiting 
250 possible participants is 10 minutes per person. The estimated time 
for screening the 150 possible participants is nine minutes per person 
to complete the screener questionnaire and provide contact information. 
The estimated time for the 100 study participants is six hours per 
person to complete the informed consent, take the three-hour and 30-
minute course, complete all questionnaires, and wait for equipment to 
be installed and uninstalled from their vehicles.
    Total Estimated Burden Hours: The total estimated annual burden is 
665 hours for the project activities. Participation in this study is 
voluntary, and there are no costs to respondents beyond the time spent 
completing the questionnaires and visits to the study facility.
    Frequency of Collection: This study is one-time data collection, 
and there will be no recurrence.
    Description of the Need for the Information and Proposed Use of the 
Information: NHTSA was established to reduce deaths, injuries, and 
economic losses resulting from motor vehicle crashes on the Nation's 
highways. As part of this statutory mandate, NHTSA is authorized to 
conduct research for the development of traffic safety programs. In 
2018, there were 9,378 fatalities in speeding-related crashes--26% of 
all traffic deaths. Public information and education are important 
elements of any effective speed management program. Recent NHTSA 
research has indicated that many drivers feel they lack sufficient 
knowledge about speeding and would like more information on stopping 
distances, laws, and risks involved. This project is designed to 
examine the effectiveness of education covering speed, laws, and risks 
of speeding in changing driver attitudes and behaviors regarding 
speeding. This information will be useful to State highway offices, 
local governments, and those who develop driver education and training 
that aim to reduce speed-related crashes.
    Public Comments Invited: You are asked to comment on any aspect of 
this information collection, including (a)

[[Page 68294]]

whether the proposed collection of information is necessary for the 
Department's performance; (b) the accuracy of the estimated burden; (c) 
ways for the department to enhance the quality, utility and clarity of 
the information collection; and (d) ways that the burden could be 
minimized without reducing the quality of the collected information.

    Authority:  The Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995; 44 U.S.C. 
chapter 35, as amended; 49 CFR 1.49; and DOT Order 1351.29.

    Issued in Washington, DC.
Jon Krohmer,
Associate Administrator, Acting, Research and Program Development.
[FR Doc. 2019-26823 Filed 12-12-19; 8:45 am]
 BILLING CODE 4910-59-P