Elimination of Regulations Implementing the Automotive Products Trade Act of 1965, 38117-38118 [2019-16699]

Download as PDF Federal Register / Vol. 84, No. 151 / Tuesday, August 6, 2019 / Rules and Regulations accordance with appropriate airplane flight manual instructions. Depending on the application, suitable annunciations may include flight-deck control position, annunciator light, or surface position indicators. Furthermore, this requirement applies at limits of control authority, not necessarily at limits of any individual surface travel. (2) Suitability of such a display or alerting must take into account that some pilot-demanded maneuvers are necessarily associated with intended full performance, which may require full surface deflection. Therefore, simple alerting systems, which would function in both intended or unexpected control-limiting situations, must be properly balanced between needed flightcrew awareness and nuisance factors. A monitoring system, which might compare airplane motion, surface deflection, and pilot demand, could be useful for eliminating nuisance alerting. Issued in Des Moines, Washington, on July 31, 2019. Victor Wicklund, Manager, Transport Standards Branch, Policy and Innovation Division, Aircraft Certification Service. [FR Doc. 2019–16729 Filed 8–5–19; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4910–13–P DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration 15 CFR Part 315 [Docket No. 180223210–8210–01] RIN 0625–AB14 Elimination of Regulations Implementing the Automotive Products Trade Act of 1965 International Trade Administration, U.S. Department of Commerce. ACTION: Final rule. AGENCY: Through this final rule, the International Trade Administration (ITA), U.S. Department of Commerce, removes the regulations implementing the Automotive Products Trade Act of 1965 (Act). That statute implemented the 1965 Canada-United States Automotive Products Agreement (Auto Pact). Since the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) came into effect in 1994, trade in automotive products between the United States and Canada is no longer governed by the Auto Pact or the Act. Implementing regulations for the Act are thus obsolete and unnecessary. jbell on DSK3GLQ082PROD with RULES SUMMARY: VerDate Sep<11>2014 16:16 Aug 05, 2019 Jkt 247001 DATES: This rule is effective August 6, 2019. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Scott Kennedy, Office of Transportation and Machinery, U.S. Department of Commerce, 1401 Constitution Avenue NW, Room 38032, Washington, DC 20230; telephone: (202) 482–1474. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Background In 1965, the United States and Canada entered into the Auto Pact concerning trade between Canada and the United States in automotive parts. Under the Auto Pact, the United States agreed to accord duty-free treatment to imports of certain automotive products of Canada. Specifically, Annex B of the Auto Pact listed certain kinds of motor vehicles and fabricated components that would receive duty-free treatment upon entry into the United States, subject to a limitation relating to non-Canadian content. Annex B limited the duty-free treatment of automotive parts upon entry into the United States to those ‘‘for use as original equipment in the manufacture of motor vehicles’’ described in Annex B. The United States implemented the Auto Pact through the Automotive Products Trade Act of 1965, Public Law 89–283 (the Act). The Act gave the President the authority to proclaim modifications to the Tariff Schedules of the United States (tariff schedules), as provided in the Auto Pact. Section 404 of the Act defined the term ‘‘original motor vehicle equipment’’ as an imported Canadian article ‘‘which has been obtained from a supplier in Canada under or pursuant to a written order, contract or letter of intent from a bona fide motor-vehicle manufacturer in the United States, and which is a fabricated component intended for use as original equipment in the manufacture in the United States of a motor vehicle.’’ The Act directed the Secretary of Commerce to publish periodically in the Federal Register a list of bona fide motor-vehicle manufacturers. In 1980, the Department of Commerce promulgated regulations to establish a procedure by which a person could apply to be determined to be a bona fide motor-vehicle manufacturer (15 CFR part 315). Trade in automobiles and automotive products between the United States and Canada is now governed by the NAFTA, which went into effect on January 1, 1994. Imports of the products described in the Auto Pact and the Act now enter the United States duty-free, with no distinction based on the nature of the importer. The amendments to the tariff schedules proclaimed by the President PO 00000 Frm 00003 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 38117 on October 21, 1965, regarding bona fide motor-vehicle manufacturers, ceased to be relevant when the NAFTA went into effect. Since that date, no person has applied to be determined to be a bona fide motor-vehicle manufacturer, and the Secretary has published no listing in the Federal Register of bona fide motorvehicle manufacturers. As a result, the regulations found at 15 CFR part 315 are obsolete and unnecessary. Classification This final rule was drafted in accordance with Executive Orders 12866, 13563, and 13771. OMB has determined that this rule is not significant for purposes of Executive Orders 12866. This final rule to eliminate 15 CFR part 315 is a deregulatory action under Executive Order 13771. Since the regulation has not been utilized in almost 25 years, there are no cost savings associated with this elimination. Administrative Procedure Act and Regulatory Flexibility Act Pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 553(b)(B), there is good cause to waive prior notice and opportunity for public comment on this action, as notice and comment are unnecessary. This rule removes obsolete regulations that were superseded by the implementation of the NAFTA, and that will remain obsolete under the new United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA), once that agreement is implemented. Therefore, public comment would serve no purpose and is unnecessary. There is also good cause under 5 U.S.C. 553(d)(3) to waive the 30-day delay in the date of effectiveness for this final rule. Because this rule does not alter the rights or responsibilities of any party, delaying implementation of this rule would serve no purpose. Because prior notice and opportunity for public comment are not required pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 553, or any other law, the analytical requirements of the Regulatory Flexibility Act (5 U.S.C. 601 et seq.) do not apply. Therefore, a regulatory flexibility analysis has not been prepared. Congressional Review Act This final rule is not major under the Congressional Review Act (5 U.S.C. 801 et seq.). Executive Order No. 13132 This final rule does not contain policies that have federalism implications. E:\FR\FM\06AUR1.SGM 06AUR1 38118 Federal Register / Vol. 84, No. 151 / Tuesday, August 6, 2019 / Rules and Regulations Paperwork Reduction Act The Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (44 U.S.C. 3501 et seq.) (PRA) requires that a Federal agency consider the impact of paperwork and other information collection burdens imposed on the public and obtain approval from OMB for each collection of information it conducts, sponsors, or requires through regulations. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, no person is required to respond to, nor shall any person be subject to a penalty for failure to comply with a collection of information subject to the PRA unless that collection displays a currently valid OMB Control Number. This final rule does not require the collection of any information. List of Subjects in 15 CFR Part 315 Canada, Customs duties and inspection, Imports, Motor vehicles. Dated: July 22, 2019. Bart Meroney, Senior Advisor to the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Manufacturing, International Trade Administration, U.S. Department of Commerce. PART 315—[REMOVED AND RESERVED] For the reasons set out in the preamble, and under the authority of 5 U.S.C. 301, we remove and reserve part 315 of title 15 of the Code of Federal Regulations. ■ [FR Doc. 2019–16699 Filed 8–5–19; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 3510–GT–P DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration 15 CFR Part 923 [Docket No. 080416573–8999–03] RIN 0648–AW74 Coastal Zone Management Act Program Change Procedures Office for Coastal Management, National Ocean Service, National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Department of Commerce (Commerce). ACTION: Final rule. AGENCY: The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is providing states and NOAA with a more efficient process for making changes to state coastal management programs (‘‘management programs’’). The final rule revises the Coastal Zone jbell on DSK3GLQ082PROD with RULES SUMMARY: VerDate Sep<11>2014 16:16 Aug 05, 2019 Jkt 247001 Management Act (CZMA) program change regulations and alleviates the need for previous associated guidance (Program Change Guidance (July 1996) and Addendum (November 2013)); the 1996 Guidance and 2013 Addendum no longer apply. Under the CZMA, a coastal state may not implement any amendment, modification, or other change as part of its approved management program unless the amendment, modification, or other change is approved by the Secretary of Commerce under the regulations. Once NOAA approves the incorporation of a change into a management program, any new or amended management program enforceable policies are applied to Federal actions through the CZMA Federal consistency provision. The final rule addresses the objectives raised in NOAA’s May 2008 Advance Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (ANPR) and November 2016 Proposed Rule. These objectives include: Provide a more efficient process for states and NOAA to make changes to state management programs; remove unnecessary requirements in the current regulations; establish program change documentation that all states would adhere to; continue to ensure that Federal agencies and the public have an opportunity to comment to NOAA on a state’s proposed change to its management program; and comply with the requirements of the CZMA and other applicable Federal law. The final rule also addresses comments submitted on the proposed rule. DATES: Effective: September 5, 2019. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Mr. Kerry Kehoe, Federal Consistency Specialist, Office for Coastal Management, NOAA, at 240–533–0782 or kerry.kehoe@noaa.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Background Unless otherwise specified, the term ‘‘NOAA’’ refers to the Office for Coastal Management, within NOAA’s National Ocean Service. The Office for Coastal Management formed in 2014 through the merger of the former Office of Ocean and Coastal Resource Management and the Coastal Services Center. The CZMA (16 U.S.C. 1451–1466) was enacted on October 27, 1972, to encourage coastal states, Great Lake states, and United States territories and commonwealths (collectively referred to as ‘‘coastal states’’ or ‘‘states’’) to be proactive in managing the uses and resources of the coastal zone for their benefit and the benefit of the Nation. The CZMA recognizes a national interest in the uses and resources of the PO 00000 Frm 00004 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 coastal zone and in the importance of balancing the competing uses of coastal resources. The CZMA established the National Coastal Zone Management Program, a voluntary program for states. If a state decides to participate in the program, it must develop and implement a comprehensive management program pursuant to Federal requirements. See CZMA § 306(d) (16 U.S.C. 1455(d)); 15 CFR part 923. Of the thirty-five coastal states that are eligible to participate in the National Coastal Zone Management Program, thirty-four have federally-approved management programs. Alaska is currently not participating in the program. An important component of the National Coastal Zone Management Program is that state management programs are developed with the full participation of state and local agencies, industry, the public, other interested groups and Federal agencies. See e.g., 16 U.S.C. 1451(i) and (m), 1452(2)(H) and (I), 1452(4) and (5), 1455(d)(1) and (3)(B), and 1456. The comprehensive state management programs must address the following areas pursuant to 15 CFR part 923: 1. Uses Subject to Management (Subpart B); 2. Special Management Areas (Subpart C); 3. Boundaries (Subpart D); 4. Authorities and Organization (Subpart E); and 5. Coordination, Public Involvement and National Interest (Subpart F). NOAA approval is required for the establishment of a state management program. Once approved, changes to one or more of the program management areas listed above, including new or revised enforceable policies, must be submitted to NOAA for approval through the program change process. Program changes are important for several reasons: The CZMA requires states to submit changes to their programs to NOAA for review and approval (16 U.S.C. 1455(e)); state programs are not static—laws and issues change, requiring continual operation of the CZMA state-Federal partnership; and the CZMA ‘‘Federal consistency’’ provisions require that Federal actions that have reasonably foreseeable coastal effects be consistent with the enforceable policies of federallyapproved management programs. The state-Federal partnership is a cornerstone of the CZMA. The primacy of state decisions under the CZMA and compliance with the CZMA Federal consistency provision is balanced with adequate consideration of the national interest in CZMA objectives; the E:\FR\FM\06AUR1.SGM 06AUR1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 84, Number 151 (Tuesday, August 6, 2019)]
[Rules and Regulations]
[Pages 38117-38118]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2019-16699]


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DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE

International Trade Administration

15 CFR Part 315

[Docket No. 180223210-8210-01]
RIN 0625-AB14


Elimination of Regulations Implementing the Automotive Products 
Trade Act of 1965

AGENCY: International Trade Administration, U.S. Department of 
Commerce.

ACTION: Final rule.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: Through this final rule, the International Trade 
Administration (ITA), U.S. Department of Commerce, removes the 
regulations implementing the Automotive Products Trade Act of 1965 
(Act). That statute implemented the 1965 Canada-United States 
Automotive Products Agreement (Auto Pact). Since the North American 
Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) came into effect in 1994, trade in 
automotive products between the United States and Canada is no longer 
governed by the Auto Pact or the Act. Implementing regulations for the 
Act are thus obsolete and unnecessary.

DATES: This rule is effective August 6, 2019.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Scott Kennedy, Office of 
Transportation and Machinery, U.S. Department of Commerce, 1401 
Constitution Avenue NW, Room 38032, Washington, DC 20230; telephone: 
(202) 482-1474.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: 

Background

    In 1965, the United States and Canada entered into the Auto Pact 
concerning trade between Canada and the United States in automotive 
parts. Under the Auto Pact, the United States agreed to accord duty-
free treatment to imports of certain automotive products of Canada. 
Specifically, Annex B of the Auto Pact listed certain kinds of motor 
vehicles and fabricated components that would receive duty-free 
treatment upon entry into the United States, subject to a limitation 
relating to non-Canadian content. Annex B limited the duty-free 
treatment of automotive parts upon entry into the United States to 
those ``for use as original equipment in the manufacture of motor 
vehicles'' described in Annex B.
    The United States implemented the Auto Pact through the Automotive 
Products Trade Act of 1965, Public Law 89-283 (the Act). The Act gave 
the President the authority to proclaim modifications to the Tariff 
Schedules of the United States (tariff schedules), as provided in the 
Auto Pact. Section 404 of the Act defined the term ``original motor 
vehicle equipment'' as an imported Canadian article ``which has been 
obtained from a supplier in Canada under or pursuant to a written 
order, contract or letter of intent from a bona fide motor-vehicle 
manufacturer in the United States, and which is a fabricated component 
intended for use as original equipment in the manufacture in the United 
States of a motor vehicle.'' The Act directed the Secretary of Commerce 
to publish periodically in the Federal Register a list of bona fide 
motor-vehicle manufacturers. In 1980, the Department of Commerce 
promulgated regulations to establish a procedure by which a person 
could apply to be determined to be a bona fide motor-vehicle 
manufacturer (15 CFR part 315).
    Trade in automobiles and automotive products between the United 
States and Canada is now governed by the NAFTA, which went into effect 
on January 1, 1994. Imports of the products described in the Auto Pact 
and the Act now enter the United States duty-free, with no distinction 
based on the nature of the importer. The amendments to the tariff 
schedules proclaimed by the President on October 21, 1965, regarding 
bona fide motor-vehicle manufacturers, ceased to be relevant when the 
NAFTA went into effect. Since that date, no person has applied to be 
determined to be a bona fide motor-vehicle manufacturer, and the 
Secretary has published no listing in the Federal Register of bona fide 
motor-vehicle manufacturers. As a result, the regulations found at 15 
CFR part 315 are obsolete and unnecessary.

Classification

    This final rule was drafted in accordance with Executive Orders 
12866, 13563, and 13771. OMB has determined that this rule is not 
significant for purposes of Executive Orders 12866. This final rule to 
eliminate 15 CFR part 315 is a deregulatory action under Executive 
Order 13771. Since the regulation has not been utilized in almost 25 
years, there are no cost savings associated with this elimination.

Administrative Procedure Act and Regulatory Flexibility Act

    Pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 553(b)(B), there is good cause to waive prior 
notice and opportunity for public comment on this action, as notice and 
comment are unnecessary. This rule removes obsolete regulations that 
were superseded by the implementation of the NAFTA, and that will 
remain obsolete under the new United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement 
(USMCA), once that agreement is implemented. Therefore, public comment 
would serve no purpose and is unnecessary. There is also good cause 
under 5 U.S.C. 553(d)(3) to waive the 30-day delay in the date of 
effectiveness for this final rule. Because this rule does not alter the 
rights or responsibilities of any party, delaying implementation of 
this rule would serve no purpose.
    Because prior notice and opportunity for public comment are not 
required pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 553, or any other law, the analytical 
requirements of the Regulatory Flexibility Act (5 U.S.C. 601 et seq.) 
do not apply. Therefore, a regulatory flexibility analysis has not been 
prepared.

Congressional Review Act

    This final rule is not major under the Congressional Review Act (5 
U.S.C. 801 et seq.).

Executive Order No. 13132

    This final rule does not contain policies that have federalism 
implications.

[[Page 38118]]

Paperwork Reduction Act

    The Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (44 U.S.C. 3501 et seq.) (PRA) 
requires that a Federal agency consider the impact of paperwork and 
other information collection burdens imposed on the public and obtain 
approval from OMB for each collection of information it conducts, 
sponsors, or requires through regulations. Notwithstanding any other 
provision of law, no person is required to respond to, nor shall any 
person be subject to a penalty for failure to comply with a collection 
of information subject to the PRA unless that collection displays a 
currently valid OMB Control Number. This final rule does not require 
the collection of any information.

List of Subjects in 15 CFR Part 315

    Canada, Customs duties and inspection, Imports, Motor vehicles.

    Dated: July 22, 2019.
Bart Meroney,
Senior Advisor to the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Manufacturing, 
International Trade Administration, U.S. Department of Commerce.

PART 315--[REMOVED AND RESERVED]

0
 For the reasons set out in the preamble, and under the authority of 5 
U.S.C. 301, we remove and reserve part 315 of title 15 of the Code of 
Federal Regulations.

[FR Doc. 2019-16699 Filed 8-5-19; 8:45 am]
 BILLING CODE 3510-GT-P