Agency Information Collection Activities: Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request, 788-790 [2019-00421]

Download as PDF 788 Federal Register / Vol. 84, No. 21 / Thursday, January 31, 2019 / Notices Commenters may also mail them to: Office of Management and Budget, Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs, New Executive Office Building, Room 10102, Washington, DC 20503. Summer King, Statistician. [FR Doc. 2019–00420 Filed 1–30–19; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4162–20–P DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration Agency Information Collection Activities: Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request Periodically, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) will publish a summary of information collection requests under OMB review, in compliance with the Paperwork Reduction Act (44 U.S.C. Chapter 35). To request a copy of these documents, call the SAMHSA Reports Clearance Officer on (240) 276–1243. Project: 2019 National Survey on Drug Use and Health (OMB No. 0930–0110)— Extension The National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) is a survey of the U.S. civilian, non-institutionalized population aged 12 years old or older. The data are used to determine the prevalence of use of tobacco products, alcohol, illicit substances, and illicit use of prescription drugs. The results are used by SAMHSA, the Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP), federal government agencies, and other organizations and researchers to establish policy, to direct program activities, and to better allocate resources. This is an extension to the 2019 National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH). There are no substantive changes to the questionnaire or changes in burden. The 2019 NSDUH will continue to include questions on medication-assisted treatment (MAT) and kratom. As with all NSDUH surveys conducted since 1999, including those prior to 2002 when the NSDUH was referred to as the National Household Survey on Drug Abuse, the sample size of the survey for 2019 will be sufficient to permit prevalence estimates for each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia. The total annual burden estimate is shown below in Table 1. TABLE 1—ANNUALIZED ESTIMATED BURDEN FOR 2019 NSDUH Number of respondents Instrument Total number of responses Hours per response Total burden hours Household Screening ........................................................... Interview ............................................................................... Screening Verification .......................................................... Interview Verification ............................................................ 137,231 67,507 4,116 10,126 1 1 1 1 137,231 67,507 4,116 10,126 0.083 1.000 0.067 0.067 11,390 67,507 276 678 Total .............................................................................. 137,231 ........................ 218,980 ........................ 79,851 Written comments and recommendations concerning the proposed information collection should be sent by March 4, 2019 to the SAMHSA Desk Officer at the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs, Office of Management and Budget (OMB). To ensure timely receipt of comments, and to avoid potential delays in OMB’s receipt and processing of mail sent through the U.S. Postal Service, commenters are encouraged to submit their comments to OMB via email to: OIRA_Submission@omb.eop.gov. Although commenters are encouraged to send their comments via email, commenters may also fax their comments to: 202–395–7285. Commenters may also mail them to: Office of Management and Budget, Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs, New Executive Office Building, Room 10102, Washington, DC 20503. amozie on DSK3GDR082PROD with NOTICES1 Responses per respondent Summer King, Statistician. [FR Doc. 2019–00419 Filed 1–30–19; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4162–20–P VerDate Sep<11>2014 20:21 Jan 30, 2019 Jkt 247001 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration Agency Information Collection Activities: Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request Periodically, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) will publish a summary of information collection requests under OMB review, in compliance with the Paperwork Reduction Act (44 U.S.C. Chapter 35). To request a copy of these documents, call the SAMHSA Reports Clearance Officer on (240) 276–1243. Project: Data Resource Toolkit Protocol for the Crisis Counseling Assistance and Training Program (OMB No. 0930– 0270)—Reinstatement The SAMHSA Center for Mental Health Services (CMHS) as part of an interagency agreement with the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) provides a toolkit to be used for the purposes of collecting data on the Crisis Counseling Assistance and Training Program (CCP). The CCP provides supplemental funding to states PO 00000 Frm 00143 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 and territories for individual and community crisis intervention services after a presidentially declared disaster. The CCP has provided disaster mental health services to millions of disaster survivors since its inception, and, with more than 30 years of accumulated expertise, it has become an important model for federal response to a variety of catastrophic events. Recent CCP grants include programs in Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands, Florida, Texas, Tennessee, California, Missouri, Louisiana, and West Virginia. These grants have helped survivors after disasters including Hurricanes Harvey, Maria, and Irma in 2017; wildfires, severe storms, flooding, and tornadoes in 2016 and 2017; and landslides and mudslides in 2016. CCPs address the short-term mental health needs of communities primarily through (a) outreach and public education, (b) individual and group counseling, and (c) referral. Outreach and public education serve primarily to normalize reactions and to engage people who may need further care. Crisis counseling assists survivors in coping with current stress and symptoms to return to predisaster functioning. Crisis counseling relies largely on ‘‘active listening,’’ and E:\FR\FM\31JAN1.SGM 31JAN1 789 Federal Register / Vol. 84, No. 21 / Thursday, January 31, 2019 / Notices crisis counselors also provide psychoeducation (especially about the nature of responses to trauma) and help clients build coping skills. Crisis counselors typically work with a single client once or a few times. Because crisis counseling is time-limited, referral is the third important function of CCPs. Counselors are expected to refer a survivor to formal treatment if he or she has developed a mental and/or substance use disorder or is having difficulty in coping with his or her disaster reactions. Data about services delivered and users of services will be collected throughout the program period. The data will be collected via the use of a toolkit that relies on standardized forms. At the program level, the data will be entered quickly and easily into a cumulative database mainly through mobile data entry or paper forms (depending on resource availability) to yield summary tables for quarterly and final reports for the program. Mobile data entry allows for the data to be uploaded and linked to a national database that houses data collected across CCPs. This database provides SAMHSA/CMHS and FEMA with a way of producing summary reports of services provided across all programs funded. The components of the toolkit are listed and described below: • Encounter logs. These forms document all services provided. The CCP requires crisis counselors to complete these logs. There are three types of encounter logs: (1) Individual/ Family Crisis Counseling Services Encounter Log, (2) Group Encounter Log, and (3) Weekly Tally Sheet. Æ Individual/Family Crisis Counseling Services Encounter Log. Crisis counseling is defined as an interaction that lasts at least 15 minutes and involves participant disclosure. This form is completed by the crisis counselor for each service recipient, defined as the person or people who actively participated in the session (that is, by participating in conversation), not someone who is merely present. The same form may be completed with other family or household members who are actively engaged in the visit. Information collected includes demographics, service characteristics, risk factors, event reactions, and referral data. Æ Group Encounter Log. This form is used to collect data on either a group crisis counseling encounter or a group public education encounter. The crisis counselor indicates in a checkbox at the top the class of activities (that is, counseling or education). Information collected includes service characteristics, group identity and characteristics, and group activities. Æ Weekly Tally Sheet. This form documents brief educational and supportive encounters not captured on any other form. Information collected includes service characteristics, daily tallies, and weekly totals for brief educational or supportive contacts and for material distribution with no or minimal interaction. • Assessment and Referral Tools. These tools—one for adults and one for children and youth—provide descriptive information about intensive users of services, defined as all individuals receiving a third individual crisis counseling visit or those who are continuing to experience severe distress that may be affecting their ability to perform daily activities. This tool will typically be used beginning 3 months after the disaster and will be completed by the crisis counselor. • Participant Feedback Survey. These surveys are completed by and collected from a sample of service recipients, not every recipient. Sampling is done on a biannual basis at 6 months and 1 year after the disaster. Information collected includes satisfaction with services, perceived improvements in coping and functioning, types of exposure, and event reactions. • Service Provider Feedback Form. These surveys are completed by and collected from the CCP service providers anonymously at 6-months and 1-year after the disaster. The survey will be coded on several program-level as well as worker-level variables. However, the program itself will be identified and shared with program management only if the number of individual workers who completed the survey was greater than 10. There are no changes to the Individual Encounter Log, Group Encounter Log, Weekly Tally, and the Assessment and Referral Tools since the last approval. Revisions include the addition of a gross annual household income question to the Participant Feedback Survey form. For the Service Provider Feedback Form, questions about different types of CCP training and their usefulness were updated to improve capturing training feedback. CMHS also added a new section to mobile technology and data entry, and the questions in this section were updated from the previous form where they were listed under a different section. Finally, CMHS has added questions related to the counselors’ income and personal experience(s) with the disaster, as they are typically members of the affected community prior to employment by the CCP, and program leadership is responsible for monitoring the counselors’ stress levels. In Table 1 are the estimates of the annualized burden hours. TABLE 1—ANNUALIZED HOUR BURDEN ESTIMATES Number of respondents amozie on DSK3GDR082PROD with NOTICES1 Form Responses per respondent Hours per response Total hour burden Individual/Family Crisis Counseling Services Encounter Log ....................... Group Encounter Log .................................................................................... Weekly Tally Sheet ........................................................................................ Assessment and Referral Tools .................................................................... Participant Feedback Form ........................................................................... Service Provider Feedback Form .................................................................. 600 100 600 600 1,000 100 196 33 52 14 1 1 0.08 0.05 0.15 0.17 0.25 0.41 9,408 165 4,680 1,428 250 41 Total ........................................................................................................ 3,000 .......................... ........................ 15,972 Written comments and recommendations concerning the proposed information collection should be sent by March 4, 2019 to the SAMHSA Desk Officer at the Office of VerDate Sep<11>2014 20:21 Jan 30, 2019 Jkt 247001 Information and Regulatory Affairs, Office of Management and Budget (OMB). To ensure timely receipt of comments, and to avoid potential delays in OMB’s receipt and processing of mail PO 00000 Frm 00144 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 sent through the U.S. Postal Service, commenters are encouraged to submit their comments to OMB via email to: OIRA_Submission@omb.eop.gov. Although commenters are encouraged to E:\FR\FM\31JAN1.SGM 31JAN1 790 Federal Register / Vol. 84, No. 21 / Thursday, January 31, 2019 / Notices send their comments via email, commenters may also fax their comments to: 202–395–7285. Commenters may also mail them to: Office of Management and Budget, Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs, New Executive Office Building, Room 10102, Washington, DC 20503. Summer King, Statistician. [FR Doc. 2019–00421 Filed 1–30–19; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4162–20–P DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration Agency Information Collection Activities: Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request Periodically, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) will publish a summary of information collection requests under OMB review, in compliance with the Paperwork Reduction Act (44 U.S.C. Chapter 35). To request a copy of these documents, call the SAMHSA Reports Clearance Officer at (240) 276–1243. Project: Substance Abuse Prevention and Treatment Block Grant Synar Report Format, FFY 2020–2022—(OMB No. 0930–0222)—Extension Section 1926 of the Public Health Service Act [42 U.S.C. 300x–26] stipulates that Substance Abuse Prevention and Treatment Block Grant (SABG) funding agreements for alcohol and drug abuse programs for fiscal year 1994 and subsequent fiscal years require states to have in effect a law providing that it is unlawful for any manufacturer, retailer, or distributor of tobacco products to sell or distribute any such product to any individual under the age of 18. This section further requires that states conduct annual, random, unannounced inspections to ensure compliance with the law; that the state submit annually a report describing the results of the inspections, the activities carried out by the state to enforce the required law, the success the state has achieved in reducing the availability of tobacco products to individuals under the age of 18, and the strategies to be utilized by the state for enforcing such law during the fiscal year for which the grant is sought. Before making an award to a state under the SABG, the Secretary must make a determination that the state has maintained compliance with these requirements. If a determination is made that the state is not in compliance, penalties shall be applied. Penalties ranged from 10 percent of the Block Grant in applicable year 1 (FFY 1997 SABG Applications) to 40 percent in applicable year 4 (FFY 2000 SABG Applications) and subsequent years. Respondents include the 50 states, the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands, Guam, American Samoa, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, Palau, Micronesia, and the Marshall Islands. Red Lake Indian Tribe is not subject to tobacco requirements. Regulations that implement this legislation are at 45 CFR 96.130, are approved by OMB under control number 0930–0163, and require that each state submit an annual Synar report to the Secretary describing their progress in complying with section 1926 of the PHS Act. The Synar report, due December 31 following the fiscal year for which the state is reporting, describes the results of the inspections and the activities carried out by the state to enforce the required law; the success the state has achieved in reducing the availability of tobacco products to individuals under the age of 18; and the strategies to be utilized by the state for enforcing such law during the fiscal year for which the grant is sought. SAMHSA’s Center for Substance Abuse Prevention will request an extension of OMB approval of the current report format associated with section 1926 (42 U.S.C. 300x–26) to 2022. Extending OMB approval of the current report format will continue to facilitate consistent, credible, and efficient monitoring of Synar compliance across the states. ANNUAL REPORTING BURDEN Number of respondents 1 45 CFR citation Total number of responses Hours per response Total hour burden Annual Report (Section 1—States and Territories) 96.130(e)(1–3) ................................................................ State Plan (Section II—States and Territories) 96.130(e)(4,5)96.130(g) ................................................. 59 1 59 15 885 59 1 59 3 177 Total ............................................................................ 59 .......................... 118 ........................ 1,062 1 Red amozie on DSK3GDR082PROD with NOTICES1 Responses per respondents Lake Indian Tribe is not subject to tobacco requirements. Written comments and recommendations concerning the proposed information collection should be sent by March 4, 2019 to the SAMHSA Desk Officer at the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs, Office of Management and Budget (OMB). To ensure timely receipt of comments, and to avoid potential delays in OMB’s receipt and processing of mail sent through the U.S. Postal Service, commenters are encouraged to submit their comments to OMB via email to: OIRA_Submission@omb.eop.gov. Although commenters are encouraged to VerDate Sep<11>2014 20:21 Jan 30, 2019 Jkt 247001 send their comments via email, commenters may also fax their comments to: 202–395–7285. Commenters may also mail them to: Office of Management and Budget, Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs, New Executive Office Building, Room 10102, Washington, DC 20503. Summer King, Statistician. [FR Doc. 2019–00422 Filed 1–30–19; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4162–20–P PO 00000 Frm 00145 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Fish and Wildlife Service [FWS–HQ–ES–2018–N112; FXES11130100000C4–189–FF02ENEH00] Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 26 Draft Recovery Plan Amendments for 42 Species Across the United States Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of availability; opening of public comment period. AGENCY: E:\FR\FM\31JAN1.SGM 31JAN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 84, Number 21 (Thursday, January 31, 2019)]
[Notices]
[Pages 788-790]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2019-00421]


-----------------------------------------------------------------------

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration


Agency Information Collection Activities: Submission for OMB 
Review; Comment Request

    Periodically, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services 
Administration (SAMHSA) will publish a summary of information 
collection requests under OMB review, in compliance with the Paperwork 
Reduction Act (44 U.S.C. Chapter 35). To request a copy of these 
documents, call the SAMHSA Reports Clearance Officer on (240) 276-1243.

Project: Data Resource Toolkit Protocol for the Crisis Counseling 
Assistance and Training Program (OMB No. 0930-0270)--Reinstatement

    The SAMHSA Center for Mental Health Services (CMHS) as part of an 
interagency agreement with the Federal Emergency Management Agency 
(FEMA) provides a toolkit to be used for the purposes of collecting 
data on the Crisis Counseling Assistance and Training Program (CCP). 
The CCP provides supplemental funding to states and territories for 
individual and community crisis intervention services after a 
presidentially declared disaster.
    The CCP has provided disaster mental health services to millions of 
disaster survivors since its inception, and, with more than 30 years of 
accumulated expertise, it has become an important model for federal 
response to a variety of catastrophic events. Recent CCP grants include 
programs in Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands, Florida, Texas, 
Tennessee, California, Missouri, Louisiana, and West Virginia. These 
grants have helped survivors after disasters including Hurricanes 
Harvey, Maria, and Irma in 2017; wildfires, severe storms, flooding, 
and tornadoes in 2016 and 2017; and landslides and mudslides in 2016. 
CCPs address the short-term mental health needs of communities 
primarily through (a) outreach and public education, (b) individual and 
group counseling, and (c) referral. Outreach and public education serve 
primarily to normalize reactions and to engage people who may need 
further care. Crisis counseling assists survivors in coping with 
current stress and symptoms to return to pre-disaster functioning. 
Crisis counseling relies largely on ``active listening,'' and

[[Page 789]]

crisis counselors also provide psycho-education (especially about the 
nature of responses to trauma) and help clients build coping skills. 
Crisis counselors typically work with a single client once or a few 
times. Because crisis counseling is time-limited, referral is the third 
important function of CCPs. Counselors are expected to refer a survivor 
to formal treatment if he or she has developed a mental and/or 
substance use disorder or is having difficulty in coping with his or 
her disaster reactions.
    Data about services delivered and users of services will be 
collected throughout the program period. The data will be collected via 
the use of a toolkit that relies on standardized forms. At the program 
level, the data will be entered quickly and easily into a cumulative 
database mainly through mobile data entry or paper forms (depending on 
resource availability) to yield summary tables for quarterly and final 
reports for the program. Mobile data entry allows for the data to be 
uploaded and linked to a national database that houses data collected 
across CCPs. This database provides SAMHSA/CMHS and FEMA with a way of 
producing summary reports of services provided across all programs 
funded.
    The components of the toolkit are listed and described below:
     Encounter logs. These forms document all services 
provided. The CCP requires crisis counselors to complete these logs. 
There are three types of encounter logs: (1) Individual/Family Crisis 
Counseling Services Encounter Log, (2) Group Encounter Log, and (3) 
Weekly Tally Sheet.
    [cir] Individual/Family Crisis Counseling Services Encounter Log. 
Crisis counseling is defined as an interaction that lasts at least 15 
minutes and involves participant disclosure. This form is completed by 
the crisis counselor for each service recipient, defined as the person 
or people who actively participated in the session (that is, by 
participating in conversation), not someone who is merely present. The 
same form may be completed with other family or household members who 
are actively engaged in the visit. Information collected includes 
demographics, service characteristics, risk factors, event reactions, 
and referral data.
    [cir] Group Encounter Log. This form is used to collect data on 
either a group crisis counseling encounter or a group public education 
encounter. The crisis counselor indicates in a checkbox at the top the 
class of activities (that is, counseling or education). Information 
collected includes service characteristics, group identity and 
characteristics, and group activities.
    [cir] Weekly Tally Sheet. This form documents brief educational and 
supportive encounters not captured on any other form. Information 
collected includes service characteristics, daily tallies, and weekly 
totals for brief educational or supportive contacts and for material 
distribution with no or minimal interaction.
     Assessment and Referral Tools. These tools--one for adults 
and one for children and youth--provide descriptive information about 
intensive users of services, defined as all individuals receiving a 
third individual crisis counseling visit or those who are continuing to 
experience severe distress that may be affecting their ability to 
perform daily activities. This tool will typically be used beginning 3 
months after the disaster and will be completed by the crisis 
counselor.
     Participant Feedback Survey. These surveys are completed 
by and collected from a sample of service recipients, not every 
recipient. Sampling is done on a biannual basis at 6 months and 1 year 
after the disaster. Information collected includes satisfaction with 
services, perceived improvements in coping and functioning, types of 
exposure, and event reactions.
     Service Provider Feedback Form. These surveys are 
completed by and collected from the CCP service providers anonymously 
at 6-months and 1-year after the disaster. The survey will be coded on 
several program-level as well as worker-level variables. However, the 
program itself will be identified and shared with program management 
only if the number of individual workers who completed the survey was 
greater than 10.
    There are no changes to the Individual Encounter Log, Group 
Encounter Log, Weekly Tally, and the Assessment and Referral Tools 
since the last approval. Revisions include the addition of a gross 
annual household income question to the Participant Feedback Survey 
form. For the Service Provider Feedback Form, questions about different 
types of CCP training and their usefulness were updated to improve 
capturing training feedback. CMHS also added a new section to mobile 
technology and data entry, and the questions in this section were 
updated from the previous form where they were listed under a different 
section. Finally, CMHS has added questions related to the counselors' 
income and personal experience(s) with the disaster, as they are 
typically members of the affected community prior to employment by the 
CCP, and program leadership is responsible for monitoring the 
counselors' stress levels.
    In Table 1 are the estimates of the annualized burden hours.

                                    Table 1--Annualized Hour Burden Estimates
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                    Number of     Responses per      Hours per      Total hour
                      Form                         respondents      respondent       response         burden
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Individual/Family Crisis Counseling Services                600              196            0.08           9,408
 Encounter Log.................................
Group Encounter Log............................             100               33            0.05             165
Weekly Tally Sheet.............................             600               52            0.15           4,680
Assessment and Referral Tools..................             600               14            0.17           1,428
Participant Feedback Form......................           1,000                1            0.25             250
Service Provider Feedback Form.................             100                1            0.41              41
                                                ----------------------------------------------------------------
    Total......................................           3,000  ...............  ..............          15,972
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Written comments and recommendations concerning the proposed 
information collection should be sent by March 4, 2019 to the SAMHSA 
Desk Officer at the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs, 
Office of Management and Budget (OMB). To ensure timely receipt of 
comments, and to avoid potential delays in OMB's receipt and processing 
of mail sent through the U.S. Postal Service, commenters are encouraged 
to submit their comments to OMB via email to: 
OIRA_Submission@omb.eop.gov. Although commenters are encouraged to

[[Page 790]]

send their comments via email, commenters may also fax their comments 
to: 202-395-7285. Commenters may also mail them to: Office of 
Management and Budget, Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs, 
New Executive Office Building, Room 10102, Washington, DC 20503.

Summer King,
Statistician.
[FR Doc. 2019-00421 Filed 1-30-19; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4162-20-P