Applications for New Awards; Training and Information for Parents of Children With Disabilities-Technical Assistance for Parent Centers, 34987-34998 [2018-15832]

Download as PDF 34987 Federal Register / Vol. 83, No. 142 / Tuesday, July 24, 2018 / Notices 2. COLLECTION 3038–0069—ANNUAL REPORTING REQUIREMENT FOR DERIVATIVES CLEARING ORGANIZATIONS [Regulation 39.19] Estimated number of respondents per year Reports annually by each Total annual responses Estimated average number of hours per response Estimated total annual burden hours 16 ..................................................................................................................... 1 16 2,606 3 41,696 3. EVENT-SPECIFIC REPORTING REQUIREMENTS FOR DERIVATIVES CLEARING ORGANIZATIONS [Regulation 39.19] Estimated number of respondents per year Reports annually by each Total annual responses Estimated average number of hours per response Estimated total annual burden hours 16 ..................................................................................................................... 4 64 5.6 4 358.4 4. COLLECTION 3038–0069—RECORDKEEPING REQUIREMENTS FOR DERIVATIVES CLEARING ORGANIZATIONS Estimated number of respondents per year Reports annually by each Total annual responses Estimated average number of hours per response Estimated total annual burden hours 16 ..................................................................................................................... 1 16 100 1,600 Respondents/affected entities: Derivatives clearing organizations (DCOs). Estimated annual number of respondents: 16.5 Estimated hours per response: 10 hours.6 Annual responses by each respondent: 260. Grand total annual burden hours: 44,054 hours (400 + 41,696 + 358.4 + 1,600). Frequency of collection: Daily, annually, and on occasion. There are no capital costs or operating and maintenance costs associated with this collection. (Authority: 44 U.S.C. 3501 et seq.) Dated: July 19, 2018. Robert Sidman, Deputy Secretary of the Commission. [FR Doc. 2018–15800 Filed 7–23–18; 8:45 am] jstallworth on DSKBBY8HB2PROD with NOTICES BILLING CODE 6351–01–P 4 16 respondents × 4 annual responses per respondent = 64 total responses, × 5.6 hours per response = 358.4 total annual burden hours. 5 Includes 16 currently registered DCOs (an increase of 2 since the last extension). 6 Since burden hours vary widely within the collection (see above tables), this is the average of burden hours per response for the collection as a whole (aggregate of 2,661.7 hours per response/ aggregate of 260 responses = 10.24 hours, rounded to 10). VerDate Sep<11>2014 13:59 Jul 23, 2018 Jkt 244001 DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Army Intent To Grant an Exclusive License of U.S. Government-Owned Patents Department of the Army, DoD. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: In accordance with applicable laws and regulations, announcement is made of the intent to grant an exclusive, non-royalty-bearing, revocable license. ADDRESSES: Commander, U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command, ATTN: Command Judge Advocate, MCMR–JA, 504 Scott Street, Fort Detrick, MD 21702–5012. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: For licensing issues, Mr. Paul G. Michaels, Office of Research & Technology Applications, (301) 619–4145. For patent issues, Ms. Elizabeth Arwine, Patent Attorney, (301) 619–7808, both at telefax (301) 619–5034. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: In accordance with 35 U.S.C. 209(e) and 37 CFR 404.7(a)(1)(i), announcement is made of the intent to grant an exclusive, non-royalty-bearing, revocable license to United States Patent Application US 15/ 723,448, filed October 3, 2017, entitled, ‘‘Aerosol Concentrating Apparatus for Use with Aerosol Aging Drum,’’ and Patent Cooperation Treaty Patent Application PCT/US2017/016845, filed SUMMARY: PO 00000 Frm 00007 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 February 7, 2017, entitled, ‘‘Oro-Nasal Inhalation Plethysmography Mask Exposure System,’’ and Patent Cooperation Treaty Patent Application PCT/US2017/016811, filed February 7, 2017, entitled, ‘‘Head-Only and/or Whole Body Inhalation Exposure Chamber’’ to PneumoDose, LLC, having its principal place of business at 112 Lynhaven Drive, Alexandria, VA 22305. Anyone wishing to object to grant of this license can file written objections along with supporting evidence, if any, within 15 days from the date of this publication. Written objections are to be filed with the Command Judge Advocate (see ADDRESSES). Brenda S. Bowen, Army Federal Register Liaison Officer. [FR Doc. 2018–15787 Filed 7–23–18; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 5001–03–P DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Applications for New Awards; Training and Information for Parents of Children With Disabilities—Technical Assistance for Parent Centers Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services, Department of Education. ACTION: Notice. AGENCY: The Department of Education (Department) is issuing a notice inviting SUMMARY: E:\FR\FM\24JYN1.SGM 24JYN1 34988 Federal Register / Vol. 83, No. 142 / Tuesday, July 24, 2018 / Notices applications for new awards for fiscal year (FY) 2018 for Training and Information for Parents of Children with Disabilities—Technical Assistance for Parent Centers, Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance (CFDA) number 84.328R. DATES: Applications Available: July 24, 2018. Deadline for Transmittal of Applications: August 23, 2018. ADDRESSES: For the addresses for obtaining and submitting an application, please refer to our Common Instructions for Applicants to Department of Education Discretionary Grant Programs, published in the Federal Register on February 12, 2018 (83 FR 6003) and available at www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2018-02-12/ pdf/2018-02558.pdf. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Carmen Sanchez, U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue SW, Room 5175, Potomac Center Plaza, Washington, DC 20202–5076. Telephone: (202) 245–6595. If you use a telecommunications device for the deaf (TDD) or a text telephone (TTY), call the Federal Relay Service (FRS), toll free, at 1–800–877– 8339. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Full Text of Announcement jstallworth on DSKBBY8HB2PROD with NOTICES I. Funding Opportunity Description Purpose of Program: The purpose of this program is to ensure that parents of children with disabilities receive impartial training and information to help improve outcomes for their children. Priority: In accordance with 34 CFR 75.105(b)(2)(v), this priority is from allowable activities specified in the statute (see sections 671, 672, 673, and 681(d) of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA); 20 U.S.C. 1471, 1472, 1473, and 1481(d)). Absolute Priority: For FY 2018 and any subsequent year in which we make awards from the list of unfunded applications from this competition, this priority is an absolute priority. Under 34 CFR 75.105(c)(3), we consider only applications that meet this priority. This priority is: Technical Assistance for Parent Centers. Background: The mission of the Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services (OSERS) is to improve early childhood, educational, and employment outcomes and raise expectations for all people with disabilities, their families, their communities, and the Nation. The work VerDate Sep<11>2014 13:59 Jul 23, 2018 Jkt 244001 of the centers we are proposing to fund is generally consistent with the following priorities included in the Secretary’s Supplemental Priorities, which were published in the Federal Register on March 2, 2018 (83 FR 9096): Priority 1—Empowering Families and Individuals to Choose a High-Quality Education That Meets Their Unique Needs; Priority 5—Meeting the Unique Needs of Students and Children With Disabilities and/or Those With Unique Gifts and Talents; and Priority 9— Promoting Economic Opportunity. The purpose of this priority is to fund five cooperative agreements to establish and operate five technical assistance centers for parent centers across two focus areas. A center for parent information and resources (CPIR) will focus on developing products for parent centers (Focus Area 1). Four regional parent training and technical assistance centers (regional PTACs) will focus on providing capacity-building technical assistance (TA) to the parent centers in their regions (Focus Area 2). Section 673 of IDEA authorizes TA for developing, assisting, and coordinating parent training and information programs carried out by parent training and information centers (PTIs) that receive assistance under section 671 of IDEA and community parent resource centers (CPRCs) that receive assistance under section 672 of IDEA (collectively, ‘‘parent centers’’). The 93 parent centers (www.parentcenterhub.org/find-yourcenter/) currently funded by the Department promote the effective education of infants, toddlers, children, and youth with disabilities by ‘‘strengthening the role and responsibility of parents and ensuring that families of such children have meaningful opportunities to participate in the education of their children at school and at home’’ (section 601(c)(5)(B) of IDEA). For the past 30 years, parent centers, consistent with section 671(b) of IDEA, have helped parents navigate systems providing early intervention, special education and related services, general education, and postsecondary options; understand the nature of their children’s disabilities; learn about their rights and responsibilities under IDEA; expand their knowledge of practices based on evidence to help their children succeed; strengthen their collaboration with professionals; locate resources for themselves and their children; and advocate for improved child outcomes and student achievement, increased graduation rates, and improved postsecondary outcomes for all children PO 00000 Frm 00008 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 through participation in program and school reform activities. In addition, parent centers have helped youth with disabilities understand their rights and responsibilities and learn self-advocacy skills. PTACs provide support to parent centers to carry out these statutorily required activities and thereby help parents participate in the education of their children to improve their children’s outcomes. In addition, section 673(b) of IDEA lists areas in which parent centers may also need TA from PTACs: (1) Coordinating parent training efforts; (2) disseminating scientifically based research and information; (3) promoting the use of technology, including assistive technology devices and services; (4) reaching underserved populations, including parents of low-income and limited English proficient children with disabilities; (5) including children with disabilities in general education programs; (6) facilitating all transitions from early intervention through postsecondary environments; and (7) promoting alternative methods of dispute resolution, including mediation. PTACs provide needed support to parent centers on other topics as well, including current information on laws and policies; evidence-based (as defined in this notice) practices (EBPs) that impact children with disabilities and their families; how to help parents learn about and access high-quality education options that meet their children’s unique needs; and ways to effectively engage in school reform activities, including Federal, State, and local initiatives. Ongoing TA, responsive to the individual needs of parent centers, can increase parent center staff knowledge and expertise on these topics. In addition, since many parent centers are grassroots organizations with small budgets, they often benefit from TA on managing a Federal grant, maximizing efficiencies, meeting complex statutory and regulatory requirements for nonprofits, and providing professional development to staff. Parent centers also need support to increase their capacity to reach and provide services to youth with disabilities and to all parents of children with disabilities, particularly parents of infants, toddlers, preschool children and transition-age youth; and underserved parents with additional needs or unique circumstances, including low income-parents, parents with limited English proficiency, parents with low literacy levels, parents who themselves experience disability, parents of youth involved in the E:\FR\FM\24JYN1.SGM 24JYN1 jstallworth on DSKBBY8HB2PROD with NOTICES Federal Register / Vol. 83, No. 142 / Tuesday, July 24, 2018 / Notices juvenile justice system, foster parents, military-connected parents, and Native American parents. In order to ensure that parent centers receive the TA they need to increase their knowledge and capacity to provide services to parents and youth effectively and efficiently, the Department plans to fund five technical assistance centers for parent centers. The Department will fund a CPIR that will, in coordination with the regional PTACs, develop and disseminate resources for all parent centers to use when working with parents of children with disabilities and youth with disabilities. CPIR will also develop and disseminate materials that all parent centers can use to train staff to effectively reach and serve all parents and youth. The Department will also fund four regional PTACs that will provide TA to parent centers to effectively manage their centers and reach and serve all parents and youth within their region. The CPIR and regional PTACs will coordinate their efforts in order to maximize resources and avoid duplication. The following website provides more information on the current parent centers, including links to each grantee’s website: www.parentcenterhub.org. Priority: Under this priority, we will fund five cooperative agreements to establish and operate one CPIR and four regional PTACs across two focus areas. An applicant may submit separate applications in more than one focus area; however, an applicant is limited to only one application in each focus area. Focus Area 1: Under Focus Area 1, the Department intends to fund one CPIR to achieve at a minimum, the following expected outcomes: (a) Increased parent centers’ knowledge, through the development and dissemination of high-quality, accurate, and impartial information and products, of: (1) Early intervention and educational EBPs, and current Federal and State laws and policies, that impact children with disabilities and their families; (2) The range of educational options that may be available in States to families of children with disabilities; (3) Effective practices in carrying out parent center activities including outreach, family-centered services, and self-advocacy skill building; (4) Effective and appropriate practices in outreach and service provision to underserved parents, including parents with limited English proficiency, parents with low literacy levels, parents who themselves experience disability, parents of youth involved in the juvenile justice system, foster parents, VerDate Sep<11>2014 13:59 Jul 23, 2018 Jkt 244001 military-connected parents, and Native American parents; and (5) Effective nonprofit management practices; (b) Increased parent centers’ use of, high-quality, accurate, and impartial materials and approaches to train: (1) Staff in reaching all parents and youth, including underserved parents of children with disabilities, which includes parents with limited English proficiency, parents with low literacy levels, parents who themselves experience disability, parents of youth involved in the juvenile justice system, foster parents, military-connected parents, and Native American parents; and (2) Multilingual staff in their native languages and assure the accuracy of the information the staff provide in languages other than English. In addition to these programmatic requirements, to be considered for funding under Focus Area 1 of this priority, applicants must meet the application and administrative requirements in this priority, which are: (a) Demonstrate, in the narrative section of the application under ‘‘Significance,’’ how the proposed project will— (1) Address parent centers’ needs both for resources to effectively reach and serve all parents of children with disabilities and youth with disabilities, including underserved parents, which includes parents with limited English proficiency, parents with low literacy levels, parents who themselves experience disability, parents of youth involved in the juvenile justice system, foster parents, military-connected parents, and Native American parents, and for materials to train staff to effectively reach and serve all parents and youth. To meet this requirement, the applicant must— (i) Present applicable information on the needs of parent centers nationally; and (ii) Demonstrate knowledge of— (A) Current educational issues and policy initiatives relating to early childhood (ages birth through five), general and special education, secondary transition services, and postsecondary options; and (B) Best practices in: (1) Outreach; family-centered services; and self-advocacy skill building, including effective and appropriate outreach and service provision to underserved parents of children with disabilities, including parents with limited English proficiency, parents with low literacy levels, parents who themselves experience disability, parents of youth PO 00000 Frm 00009 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 34989 involved in the juvenile justice system, foster parents, military-connected parents, and Native American parents; (2) Staff training, including multilingual staff; and (3) Nonprofit management; and (2) Increase the knowledge of parent centers on how to reach and provide services to all parents and youth, train staff using high-quality, accurate, and impartial training materials, and manage their projects; and indicate the likely magnitude or importance of the improvements. (b) Demonstrate, in the narrative section of the application under ‘‘Quality of project services,’’ how the proposed project will— (1) Ensure equal access and treatment for members of groups that have traditionally been underrepresented based on race, color, national origin, gender, age, or disability. To meet this requirement, the applicant must describe how it will— (i) Identify the informational and TA needs of the parent centers. Note: The methods and tools to identify needs will be finalized in consultation with the regional PTACs and the OSEP project officer in order to assure coordination and avoid duplication; and (ii) Ensure that services and products meet the needs of the parent centers; (2) Achieve its goals, objectives, and intended outcomes. To meet this requirement, the applicant must provide— (i) Measurable intended project outcomes; and (ii) In Appendix A, the logic model (as defined in this notice) by which the proposed project will achieve its intended outcomes that depicts, at a minimum, the goals, activities, outputs, and intended outcomes of the proposed project; (3) Use a conceptual framework (and provide a copy in Appendix A) to develop project plans and activities, describing any underlying concepts, assumptions, expectations, beliefs, or theories, as well as the presumed relationships or linkages among these variables, and any empirical support for this framework; Note: The following websites provide more information on logic models and conceptual frameworks: www.osepideasthatwork.org/logicModel and www.osepideasthatwork.org/ resources-grantees/program-areas/ta-ta/ tad-project-logic-model-and-conceptualframework. (4) Be based on current research and make use of EBPs. To meet this requirement, the applicant must describe— E:\FR\FM\24JYN1.SGM 24JYN1 34990 Federal Register / Vol. 83, No. 142 / Tuesday, July 24, 2018 / Notices jstallworth on DSKBBY8HB2PROD with NOTICES (i) The current research on outreach, family-centered services, and selfadvocacy skill building, including effective and appropriate outreach and service provision to underserved parents of children with disabilities, including parents with limited English proficiency, parents with low literacy levels, parents who themselves experience disability, parents of youth involved in the juvenile justice system, foster parents, military-connected parents, and Native American parents; staff training, including multilingual staff; and nonprofit management; (ii) The current research about adult learning principles and implementation science that will inform the proposed TA; and (iii) How the proposed project will incorporate current research and EBPs in the development and delivery of its products and services; (5) Develop products and provide services that are of high quality and sufficient intensity and duration to achieve the intended outcomes of the proposed project. To address this requirement, the applicant must describe— (i) How it proposes to identify how knowledgeable the parent centers are of: Outreach, family-centered services, and self-advocacy skill building, including effective and appropriate outreach and service provision to underserved parents of children with disabilities, including parents with limited English proficiency, parents with low literacy levels, parents who themselves experience disability, parents of youth involved in the juvenile justice system, foster parents, military-connected parents, and Native American parents; staff training, including multilingual staff; and nonprofit management; (ii) Its proposed approach to universal, general TA,1 which must identify the intended recipients within the parent centers, including the type and number of recipients, that will receive the products and services under this approach, and should, at minimum, include how the project will— (A) Create, update, and maintain an online, annotated repository of highquality, accurate, and impartial 1 ‘‘Universal, general TA’’ means TA and information provided to independent users through their own initiative, resulting in minimal interaction with TA center staff and including onetime, invited or offered conference presentations by TA center staff. This category of TA also includes information or products, such as newsletters, guidebooks, or research syntheses, downloaded from the TA center’s website by independent users. Brief communications by TA center staff with recipients, either by telephone or email, are also considered universal, general TA. VerDate Sep<11>2014 13:59 Jul 23, 2018 Jkt 244001 resources,2 including translations of materials as needed, produced by the CPIR, the previously funded Military and Native American PTACs, parent centers, OSEP-funded projects, and other federally funded projects for parent centers’ use with families, youth, staff members, and members of the boards of directors; (B) Develop up-to-date, familycentered resources as needed that parent centers can use with parents in a variety of languages, formats, and reading levels; disseminate and modify, as needed, family-centered resources developed by OSEP and other federally funded centers to provide families with strategies to enhance their children’s literacy, numeracy, and scientific reasoning at home; and revise materials developed by the previously funded Military PTAC and the Native American PTAC as necessary; (C) Compile and create materials to train staff, including multilingual staff, to provide effective, appropriate, and impartial outreach and service provision to underserved parents of children with disabilities, including parents with limited English proficiency, parents with low literacy levels, parents who themselves experience disability, parents of youth involved in the juvenile justice system, foster parents, military-connected parents, and Native American parents; (D) Compile and create materials on nonprofit management, as necessary, and develop a process for an annual orientation of new parent center directors and other key personnel and members of the boards of directors that provides the new personnel with the information and resources they need to carry out their responsibilities; and (6) Develop products and implement services that maximize efficiency. To address this requirement, the applicant must describe— (i) How the proposed project will use technology to achieve the intended project outcomes; (ii) With whom the proposed project will collaborate and the intended outcomes of this collaboration; (iii) How the proposed project will use existing knowledge and expertise within parent centers to achieve intended project outcomes; and 2 Resources shall include information on Federal and State laws and policies, including comprehensive and impartial information on the range of education options that may be available in States, including district public schools, charter schools, virtual education, voucher programs, education scholarship account (ESA) programs, taxcredit scholarship programs, tax deductions and credits, course choice programs, and any other relevant education options that impact children with disabilities and their families. PO 00000 Frm 00010 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 (v) How the proposed project will use non-project resources to achieve the intended project outcomes; and (7) Assist parent centers in the collection of annual performance data required under section 671(b)(12) of IDEA, in consultation with the OSEP project officer. (c) In the narrative section of the application under ‘‘Quality of the project evaluation,’’ include an evaluation plan for the project as described in the following paragraphs. The evaluation plan must describe: Measures for evaluating the quality, accuracy, and impartiality of project services and products; measures of progress in implementation, including the criteria for determining the extent to which the project’s products and services have met the goals for reaching its target population; measures of intended outcomes or results of the project’s activities in order to evaluate those activities; and how well the goals or objectives of the proposed project, as described in its logic model, have been met. The applicant must provide an assurance that, in designing the evaluation plan, it will— (1) Designate, with the approval of the OSEP project officer, a project liaison staff person with sufficient dedicated time, experience in evaluation, and knowledge of the project to work in collaboration with the TA Center to Improve Program and Project Performance (CIP3),3 the project director, and the OSEP project officer on the following tasks: (i) Revise, as needed, the logic model submitted in the grant application to provide for a more comprehensive measurement of implementation and outcomes and to reflect any changes or clarifications to the model discussed at the kick-off meeting; (ii) Refine the evaluation design and instrumentation proposed in the grant application consistent with the logic model (e.g., prepare evaluation questions about significant program processes and outcomes; develop quantitative or qualitative data collections that permit both the 3 The major tasks of CIP3 are to guide, coordinate, and oversee the design of formative evaluations for every large discretionary investment (i.e., those awarded $500,000 or more per year and required to participate in the 3+2 process) in OSEP’s Technical Assistance and Dissemination; Personnel Development; Parent Training and Information Centers; and Educational Technology, Media, and Materials programs. The efforts of CIP3 are expected to enhance individual project evaluation plans by providing expert and unbiased TA in designing the evaluations with due consideration of the project’s budget. CIP3 does not function as a third-party evaluator. E:\FR\FM\24JYN1.SGM 24JYN1 jstallworth on DSKBBY8HB2PROD with NOTICES Federal Register / Vol. 83, No. 142 / Tuesday, July 24, 2018 / Notices collection of progress data, including fidelity of implementation, as appropriate, and the assessment of project outcomes; and identify analytic strategies); and (iii) Revise, as needed, the evaluation plan submitted in the grant application such that it clearly— (A) Specifies the measures and associated instruments or sources for data appropriate to the evaluation questions, suggests analytic strategies for those data, provides a timeline for conducting the evaluation, and includes staff assignments for completion of the plan; (B) Delineates the data expected to be available by the end of the second project year for use during the project’s evaluation (3+2 review) for continued funding described under the heading Fourth and Fifth Years of the Project; and (C) Can be used to assist the project director and the OSEP project officer, with the assistance of CIP3, as needed, to specify the performance measures to be addressed in the project’s Annual Performance Report; (2) Cooperate with CIP3 staff in order to accomplish the tasks described in paragraph (1) of this section; and (3) Dedicate sufficient funds in each budget year to cover the costs of carrying out the tasks described in paragraphs (1) and (2) of this section and implementing the evaluation plan. (d) Demonstrate, in the narrative section of the application under ‘‘Adequacy of resources,’’ how— (1) The proposed project will encourage applications for employment from persons who are members of groups that have traditionally been underrepresented based on race, color, national origin, gender, age, or disability, as appropriate; (2) The proposed key project personnel, consultants, and subcontractors have the qualifications and experience to carry out the proposed activities and achieve the project’s intended outcomes; (3) The applicant and any key partners have adequate resources to carry out the proposed activities; and (4) The proposed costs are reasonable in relation to the anticipated results and benefits. (e) Demonstrate, in the narrative section of the application under ‘‘Quality of the management plan,’’ how— (1) The proposed management plan will ensure that the project’s intended outcomes will be achieved on time and within budget. To address this requirement, the applicant must describe— VerDate Sep<11>2014 13:59 Jul 23, 2018 Jkt 244001 (i) Clearly defined responsibilities for key project personnel, consultants, and subcontractors, as applicable; and (ii) Timelines and milestones for accomplishing the project tasks; (2) Key project personnel and any consultants and subcontractors will be allocated and how these allocations are appropriate and adequate to achieve the project’s intended outcomes; (3) The proposed management plan will ensure that the products and services provided are of high quality, impartial, relevant, and useful to recipients; and (4) The proposed project will benefit from a diversity of perspectives, including those of families using a variety of education options, youth, educators, TA providers, researchers, and policy makers, among others, in its development and operation. (f) Address the following application requirements. The applicant must— (1) Include, in Appendix A, personnel-loading charts and timelines, as applicable, to illustrate the management plan described in the narrative; (2) Include, in the budget, attendance at the following: (i) A one and one-half day kick-off meeting in Washington, DC, after receipt of the award, and an annual planning meeting in Washington, DC, with the OSEP project officer and other relevant staff during each subsequent year of the project period; Note: Within 30 days of receipt of the award, a post-award teleconference must be held between the OSEP project officer and the grantee’s project director or other authorized representative; (ii) A two and one-half day project directors’ conference in Washington, DC, during each year of the project period; (iii) Two annual two-day trips to attend Department briefings, Department-sponsored conferences, and other meetings, as requested by OSEP; and (iv) A one-day intensive 3+2 review meeting in Washington, DC, during the last half of the second year of the project period; (3) Include, in the budget, a line item for an annual set-aside of five percent of the grant amount to support emerging needs that are consistent with the proposed project’s intended outcomes, as those needs are identified in consultation with, and approved by, the OSEP project officer. With approval from the OSEP project officer, the project must reallocate any remaining funds from this annual set-aside no later than the end of the third quarter of each budget period; PO 00000 Frm 00011 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 34991 (4) Ensure that the budget allocates at least $200,000 annually to carry out the project services described in paragraphs (b)(5)(ii)(A) through (C) of this focus area; (5) Maintain a high-quality website, with an easy-to-navigate design, including the repository described in paragraph (b)(5)(ii)(A) of this focus area, that meets government or industryrecognized standards for accessibility; and (6) Include, in Appendix A, an assurance to assist OSEP with the transfer of pertinent resources and products and to maintain the continuity of services to parent centers during the transition to this new award period, as appropriate. Fourth and Fifth Years of the Project: In deciding whether to continue funding the project for the fourth and fifth years, the Secretary will consider the requirements of 34 CFR 75.253(a), as well as— (a) The recommendation of a 3+2 review team consisting of experts selected by the Secretary. This review will be conducted during a one-day intensive meeting that will be held during the last half of the second year of the project period; (b) The timeliness with which, and how well, the requirements of the negotiated cooperative agreement have been or are being met by the project; and (c) The quality, relevance, and usefulness of the project’s products and services and the extent to which the project’s products and services are aligned with the project’s objectives and likely to result in the project achieving its intended outcomes. Focus Area 2: Under Focus Area 2, the Department intends to fund four regional PTACs to meet the unique needs of parent centers in their region and to achieve, at a minimum, the following expected outcomes: (a) Increased parent center capacity to accurately and impartially train parents on, and inform them about: (1) Early intervention and educational EBPs; (2) Their rights and responsibilities under Federal, State, and local laws and policies that impact children with disabilities and their families; and (3) The range of education options that may be available to families of children with disabilities in the area served by the parent center. (b) Increased parent center capacity to reach more parents and youth; and effectively provide parent center services to help more parents improve outcomes for their children, and youth build their self-advocacy skills; E:\FR\FM\24JYN1.SGM 24JYN1 jstallworth on DSKBBY8HB2PROD with NOTICES 34992 Federal Register / Vol. 83, No. 142 / Tuesday, July 24, 2018 / Notices (c) Increased parent center capacity to provide effective and appropriate outreach and service provision to underserved parents of children with disabilities including parents with limited English proficiency, parents with low literacy levels, parents who themselves experience disability, parents of youth involved in the juvenile justice system, foster parents, military-connected parents, and Native American parents; and (d) Increased parent center capacity to effectively manage their projects and provide high-quality training to staff, including multilingual staff, to reach and serve all parents and youth in their region. The geographic regions served by the four regional PTACs are generally aligned with the States served by the Equity Assistance Centers funded under Title IV of the 1964 Civil Rights Act, while also balancing the number of centers each regional PTAC will have in their region. This alignment will help the regional PTACs meet the requirement in section 673(c) of IDEA that the regional PTACs develop collaborative agreements with the geographically appropriate centers. The four regional PTACs will be awarded to represent the following geographic regions: Region A PTAC: CT, DC, DE, ME, MA, MD, NH, NJ, NY, PA, Puerto Rico, RI, U.S. Virgin Islands, VT. Region B PTAC: AL, AR, FL, GA, LA, MS, NC, OK, SC, TN, TX, VA. Region C PTAC: IL, IN, IA, KS, KY, MI, MN, MO, MT, NE, ND, OH, SD, WI, WV, WY. Region D PTAC: AK, AZ, CA, CO, HI, ID, NM, NV, OR, UT, WA, and the outlying areas of the Pacific Basin, and the Freely Associated States. In addition to these programmatic requirements, to be considered for funding under Focus Area 2 of this priority, applicants must meet the application and administrative requirements in this priority, which are: (a) Demonstrate, in the narrative section of the application under ‘‘Significance,’’ how the proposed project will— (1) Address the needs of parent centers in its region for TA to increase their capacity to reach and provide services to parents and youth in their areas, including underserved parents of children with disabilities, which includes parents with limited English proficiency, parents with low literacy levels, parents who themselves experience disability, parents of youth involved in the juvenile justice system, foster parents, military-connected parents, and Native American parents; VerDate Sep<11>2014 13:59 Jul 23, 2018 Jkt 244001 build youth’s self-advocacy skills; train staff; and effectively manage their centers. To meet this requirement the applicant must— (i) Present applicable information on the needs of parent centers in the region; and (ii) Demonstrate knowledge of— (A) Current early intervention and educational issues and policy initiatives relating to early childhood, general and special education, secondary transition services, and postsecondary options; and (B) Best practices in: (1) Outreach, family-centered services, and self-advocacy skill building, including effective and appropriate outreach and service provision to underserved parents of children with disabilities, including parents with limited English proficiency, parents with low literacy levels, parents who themselves experience disability, parents of youth involved in the juvenile justice system, foster parents, military-connected parents, and Native American parents; (2) Staff training, including multilingual staff; and (3) Nonprofit management; and (2) Increase the capacity of parent centers to reach and provide services to all parents and youth, train staff, and manage their projects; and indicate the likely magnitude or importance of the improvements. (b) Demonstrate, in the narrative section of the application under ‘‘Quality of project services,’’ how the proposed project will— (1) Ensure equal access and treatment for members of groups that have traditionally been underrepresented based on race, color, national origin, gender, age, or disability. To meet this requirement, the applicant must describe how it will— (i) Identify the needs of the parent centers in the proposed region for TA and information. Note: The methods and tools to identify needs will be finalized in consultation with the CPIR, other regional PTACs, and the OSEP project officer in order to assure coordination and avoid duplication; and (ii) Ensure that services and products meet the needs of the parent centers; (2) Achieve its goals, objectives, and intended outcomes. To meet this requirement, the applicant must provide— (i) Measurable intended project outcomes; and (ii) In Appendix A, the logic model (as defined in this notice) by which the proposed project will achieve its intended outcomes that depicts, at a PO 00000 Frm 00012 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 minimum, the goals, activities, outputs, and intended outcomes of the proposed project; (3) Use a conceptual framework (and provide a copy in Appendix A) to develop project plans and activities, describing any underlying concepts, assumptions, expectations, beliefs, or theories, as well as the presumed relationships or linkages among these variables, and any empirical support for this framework; Note: The following websites provide more information on logic models and conceptual frameworks: www.osepideasthatwork.org/logicModel and www.osepideasthatwork.org/ resources-grantees/program-areas/ta-ta/ tad-project-logic-model-and-conceptualframework. (4) Be based on current research and make use of EBPs. To meet this requirement, the applicant must describe— (i) The current research on: Outreach, family-centered services, and selfadvocacy skill building, including effective and appropriate outreach and service provision to underserved parents of children with disabilities, including parents with limited English proficiency, parents with low literacy levels, parents who themselves experience disability, parents of youth involved in the juvenile justice system, foster parents, military-connected parents, and Native American parents; staff training, including multilingual staff; and nonprofit management; (ii) The current research about adult learning principles and implementation science that will inform the proposed TA; and (iii) How the proposed project will incorporate current research and EBPs in the development and delivery of its products and services; (5) Develop products and provide services that are of high quality and sufficient intensity and duration to achieve the intended outcomes of the proposed project. To address this requirement, the applicant must describe— (i) How it proposes to work with the CPIR to identify the knowledge base for parent centers’: Outreach, familycentered services, and self-advocacy skill building, including effective and appropriate outreach and service provision to underserved families of children with disabilities, including parents with limited English proficiency, parents with low literacy levels, parents who themselves experience disability, parents of youth involved in the juvenile justice system, foster parents, military-connected parents, and Native American parents; E:\FR\FM\24JYN1.SGM 24JYN1 Federal Register / Vol. 83, No. 142 / Tuesday, July 24, 2018 / Notices jstallworth on DSKBBY8HB2PROD with NOTICES staff training, including multilingual staff; and nonprofit management; (ii) Its proposed approach to targeted, specialized TA,4 which must identify the intended recipients within the parent centers, including the type and number of recipients, that will receive the products and services under this approach, and how the project will— (A) Conduct at least one in-person, on-site visit to each parent center in the region during the course of the five-year project period; (B) Increase parent centers’ capacity to reach and provide services to all parents with children with disabilities and youth, including underserved parents, which includes parents with limited English proficiency, parents with low literacy levels, parents who themselves experience disability, parents of youth involved in the juvenile justice system, foster parents, military-connected parents, and Native American parents; (C) Increase parent centers’ capacity to train staff, including multilingual staff, to provide effective and appropriate outreach and service provision to underserved families of children with disabilities, including parents with limited English proficiency, parents with low literacy levels, parents who themselves experience disability, parents of youth involved in the juvenile justice system, foster parents, military-connected parents, and Native American parents; and (D) Increase parent centers’ capacity to effectively manage nonprofit organizations, including developing the board of directors so that parent centers have the organizational policies, procedures, and a structure in place to manage their grants effectively; (iii) Its proposed approach to intensive, sustained TA,5 which must identify— 4 ‘‘Targeted, specialized TA’’ means TA services based on needs common to multiple recipients and not extensively individualized. A relationship is established between the TA recipient and one or more TA center staff. This category of TA includes one-time, labor-intensive events, such as facilitating strategic planning or hosting regional or national conferences. It can also include episodic, less laborintensive events that extend over a period of time, such as facilitating a series of conference calls on single or multiple topics that are designed around the needs of the recipients. Facilitating communities of practice can also be considered targeted, specialized TA. 5 ‘‘Intensive, sustained TA’’ means TA services often provided on-site and requiring a stable, ongoing relationship between the TA center staff and the TA recipient. ‘‘TA services’’ are defined as negotiated series of activities designed to reach a valued outcome. This category of TA should result in changes to policy, program, practice, or operations that support increased recipient capacity or improved outcomes at one or more systems levels. VerDate Sep<11>2014 13:59 Jul 23, 2018 Jkt 244001 (A) The intended recipients, including the type and number of recipients, that will receive the products and services under this approach; (B) Its proposed approach to measure the readiness of the parent centers to work with the project, including their commitment to the initiative, current infrastructure, and available resources; (C) Its proposed plan for assisting parent centers to build or enhance their staff training and professional development based on adult learning principles and coaching; and (D) Its proposed approach to providing intensive TA when requested by OSEP project officers; and (6) Develop products and implement services that maximize efficiency. To address this requirement, the applicant must describe— (i) How the proposed project will use technology to achieve the intended project outcomes; (ii) With whom the proposed project will collaborate and the intended outcomes of this collaboration; (iii) How the proposed project will use existing knowledge and expertise within parent centers to achieve intended project outcomes; (iv) How the proposed project will use the resources housed in and developed by the CPIR—including family-centered resources that provide families with strategies to enhance their children’s literacy, numeracy, and scientific reasoning at home—and build on the CPIR’s universal TA; and (v) How the proposed project will use non-project resources to achieve the intended project outcomes. (c) In the narrative section of the application under ‘‘Quality of the project evaluation,’’ include an evaluation plan for the project. The evaluation plan must describe: Measures for evaluating the quality, accuracy, and impartiality of project services and products; measures of progress in implementation, including the criteria for determining the extent to which the project’s products and services have met the goals for reaching its target population; measures of intended outcomes or results of the project’s activities in order to evaluate those activities; and how well the goals or objectives of the proposed project, as described in its logic model, have been met. Note: The evaluations for all the regional PTACs will be developed in consultation with the regional PTACs and OSEP project officers for the regional PTACs. (d) Demonstrate, in the narrative section of the application under ‘‘Adequacy of resources,’’ how— PO 00000 Frm 00013 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 34993 (1) The proposed project will encourage applications for employment from persons who are members of groups that have traditionally been underrepresented based on race, color, national origin, gender, age, or disability, as appropriate; (2) The proposed key project personnel, consultants, and subcontractors have the qualifications and experience to carry out the proposed activities and achieve the project’s intended outcomes; (3) The applicant and any key partners have adequate resources to carry out the proposed activities; and (4) The proposed costs are reasonable in relation to the anticipated results and benefits. (e) Demonstrate, in the narrative section of the application under ‘‘Quality of the management plan,’’ how— (1) The proposed management plan will ensure that the project’s intended outcomes will be achieved on time and within budget. To address this requirement, the applicant must describe— (i) Clearly defined responsibilities for key project personnel, consultants, and subcontractors, as applicable; and (ii) Timelines and milestones for accomplishing the project tasks; (2) Key project personnel and any consultants and subcontractors will be allocated and how these allocations are appropriate and adequate to achieve the project’s intended outcomes; (3) The proposed management plan will ensure that the products and services provided are of high quality, impartial, relevant, and useful to recipients; and (4) The proposed project will benefit from a diversity of perspectives, including those of families using a variety of education options, youth, educators, TA providers, researchers, and policy makers, among others, in its development and operation. (f) Address the following application requirements. The applicant must— (1) Include, in Appendix A, personnel-loading charts and timelines, as applicable, to illustrate the management plan described in the narrative; (2) Include, in the budget, attendance at the following: (i) A one and one-half day kick-off meeting in Washington, DC, after receipt of the award, and an annual planning meeting in Washington, DC, with the OSEP project officer and other relevant staff during each subsequent year of the project period. Note: Within 30 days of receipt of the award, a post-award teleconference E:\FR\FM\24JYN1.SGM 24JYN1 jstallworth on DSKBBY8HB2PROD with NOTICES 34994 Federal Register / Vol. 83, No. 142 / Tuesday, July 24, 2018 / Notices must be held between the OSEP project officer and the grantee’s project director or other authorized representative; (ii) A two and one-half day project directors’ conference in Washington, DC, during each year of the project period; and (iii) Two annual two-day trips to attend Department briefings, Department-sponsored conferences, and other meetings, as requested by OSEP; (5) Ensure that the budget allocates $75,000 annually to carry out the project services described in paragraphs (b)(5)(ii)(B) and (C) (military connected and native American parents and youth) of this focus area. (6) Include, in the budget, a line item for an annual set-aside of five percent of the grant amount to support emerging needs that are consistent with the proposed project’s intended outcomes, as those needs are identified in consultation with, and approved by, the OSEP project officer. With approval from the OSEP project officer, the project must reallocate any remaining funds from this annual set-aside no later than the end of the third quarter of each budget period; and (7) Maintain a presence on a highquality website, with an easy-tonavigate design, that meets government or industry-recognized standards for accessibility. Competitive Preference Priorities: Within this absolute priority, we give competitive preference to applications that address the following priorities. Under 34 CFR 75.105(c)(2)(i), we will award five additional points to an application for Focus Area 2 that meets each of these priorities, for a total of no more than 10 points, as follows. These priorities are: Competitive Preference Priority 1— Applicants that are parent organizations (5 Points). Section 671(a)(2) of IDEA defines a ‘‘parent organization’’ as a private nonprofit organization (other than an institution of higher education) that— (A) Has a board of directors— (i) The majority of whom are parents of children with disabilities ages birth through 26; (ii) That includes— (I) Individuals working in the fields of special education, related services, and early intervention; (II) Individuals with disabilities; and (iii) The parent and professional members of which are broadly representative of the population to be served, including low-income parents and parents of limited English proficient children; and (B) Has as its mission serving families of children with disabilities who— VerDate Sep<11>2014 13:59 Jul 23, 2018 Jkt 244001 (i) Are ages birth through 26; and (ii) Have the full range of disabilities described in section 602(3) of IDEA. Competitive Preference Priority 2— Location (5 Points). Applicants under Focus Area 2 that are located in the region they propose to serve. Definitions: The following definitions are from 34 CFR 77.1: Demonstrates a rationale means a key project component included in the project’s logic model is informed by research or evaluation findings that suggest the project component is likely to improve relevant outcomes. Evidence-based means the proposed project component is supported by one or more of strong evidence, moderate evidence, promising evidence, or evidence that demonstrates a rationale. Experimental study means a study that is designed to compare outcomes between two groups of individuals (such as students) that are otherwise equivalent except for their assignment to either a treatment group receiving a project component or a control group that does not. Randomized controlled trials, regression discontinuity design studies, and single-case design studies are the specific types of experimental studies that, depending on their design and implementation (e.g., sample attrition in randomized controlled trials and regression discontinuity design studies), can meet What Works Clearinghouse (WWC) standards without reservations as described in the WWC Handbook: (i) A randomized controlled trial employs random assignment of, for example, students, teachers, classrooms, or schools to receive the project component being evaluated (the treatment group) or not to receive the project component (the control group). (ii) A regression discontinuity design study assigns the project component being evaluated using a measured variable (e.g., assigning students reading below a cutoff score to tutoring or developmental education classes) and controls for that variable in the analysis of outcomes. (iii) A single-case design study uses observations of a single case (e.g., a student eligible for a behavioral intervention) over time in the absence and presence of a controlled treatment manipulation to determine whether the outcome is systematically related to the treatment. Logic model (also referred to as a theory of action) means a framework that identifies key project components of the proposed project (i.e., the active ‘‘ingredients’’ that are hypothesized to be critical to achieving the relevant PO 00000 Frm 00014 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 outcomes) and describes the theoretical and operational relationships among the key project components and relevant outcomes. Moderate evidence means that there is evidence of effectiveness of a key project component in improving a relevant outcome for a sample that overlaps with the populations or settings proposed to receive that component, based on a relevant finding from one of the following: (i) A practice guide prepared by the WWC using version 2.1 or 3.0 of the WWC Handbook reporting a ‘‘strong evidence base’’ or ‘‘moderate evidence base’’ for the corresponding practice guide recommendation; (ii) An intervention report prepared by the WWC using version 2.1 or 3.0 of the WWC Handbook reporting a ‘‘positive effect’’ or ‘‘potentially positive effect’’ on a relevant outcome based on a ‘‘medium to large’’ extent of evidence, with no reporting of a ‘‘negative effect’’ or ‘‘potentially negative effect’’ on a relevant outcome; or (iii) A single experimental study or quasi-experimental design study reviewed and reported by the WWC using version 2.1 or 3.0 of the WWC Handbook, or otherwise assessed by the Department using version 3.0 of the WWC Handbook, as appropriate, and that— (A) Meets WWC standards with or without reservations; (B) Includes at least one statistically significant and positive (i.e., favorable) effect on a relevant outcome; (C) Includes no overriding statistically significant and negative effects on relevant outcomes reported in the study or in a corresponding WWC intervention report prepared under version 2.1 or 3.0 of the WWC Handbook; and (D) Is based on a sample from more than one site (e.g., State, county, city, school district, or postsecondary campus) and includes at least 350 students or other individuals across sites. Multiple studies of the same project component that each meet requirements in paragraphs (iii)(A), (B), and (C) of this definition may together satisfy this requirement. Project component means an activity, strategy, intervention, process, product, practice, or policy included in a project. Evidence may pertain to an individual project component or to a combination of project components (e.g., training teachers on instructional practices for English learners and follow-on coaching for these teachers). Promising evidence means that there is evidence of the effectiveness of a key project component in improving a E:\FR\FM\24JYN1.SGM 24JYN1 jstallworth on DSKBBY8HB2PROD with NOTICES Federal Register / Vol. 83, No. 142 / Tuesday, July 24, 2018 / Notices relevant outcome, based on a relevant finding from one of the following: (i) A practice guide prepared by WWC reporting a ‘‘strong evidence base’’ or ‘‘moderate evidence base’’ for the corresponding practice guide recommendation; (ii) An intervention report prepared by the WWC reporting a ‘‘positive effect’’ or ‘‘potentially positive effect’’ on a relevant outcome with no reporting of a ‘‘negative effect’’ or ‘‘potentially negative effect’’ on a relevant outcome; or (iii) A single study assessed by the Department, as appropriate, that— (A) Is an experimental study, a quasiexperimental design study, or a welldesigned and well-implemented correlational study with statistical controls for selection bias (e.g., a study using regression methods to account for differences between a treatment group and a comparison group); and (B) Includes at least one statistically significant and positive (i.e., favorable) effect on a relevant outcome. Quasi-experimental design study means a study using a design that attempts to approximate an experimental study by identifying a comparison group that is similar to the treatment group in important respects. This type of study, depending on design and implementation (e.g., establishment of baseline equivalence of the groups being compared), can meet WWC standards with reservations, but cannot meet WWC standards without reservations, as described in the WWC Handbook. Relevant outcome means the student outcome(s) or other outcome(s) the key project component is designed to improve, consistent with the specific goals of the program. Strong evidence means that there is evidence of the effectiveness of a key project component in improving a relevant outcome for a sample that overlaps with the populations and settings proposed to receive that component, based on a relevant finding from one of the following: (i) A practice guide prepared by the WWC using version 2.1 or 3.0 of the WWC Handbook reporting a ‘‘strong evidence base’’ for the corresponding practice guide recommendation; (ii) An intervention report prepared by the WWC using version 2.1 or 3.0 of the WWC Handbook reporting a ‘‘positive effect’’ on a relevant outcome based on a ‘‘medium to large’’ extent of evidence, with no reporting of a ‘‘negative effect’’ or ‘‘potentially negative effect’’ on a relevant outcome; or VerDate Sep<11>2014 13:59 Jul 23, 2018 Jkt 244001 (iii) A single experimental study reviewed and reported by the WWC using version 2.1 or 3.0 of the WWC Handbook, or otherwise assessed by the Department using version 3.0 of the WWC Handbook, as appropriate, and that— (A) Meets WWC standards without reservations; (B) Includes at least one statistically significant and positive (i.e., favorable) effect on a relevant outcome; (C) Includes no overriding statistically significant and negative effects on relevant outcomes reported in the study or in a corresponding WWC intervention report prepared under version 2.1 or 3.0 of the WWC Handbook; and (D) Is based on a sample from more than one site (e.g., State, county, city, school district, or postsecondary campus) and includes at least 350 students or other individuals across sites. Multiple studies of the same project component that each meet requirements in paragraphs (iii)(A), (B), and (C) of this definition may together satisfy this requirement. What Works Clearinghouse Handbook (WWC Handbook) means the standards and procedures set forth in the WWC Procedures and Standards Handbook, Version 3.0 or Version 2.1 (incorporated by reference, see 34 CFR 77.2). Study findings eligible for review under WWC standards can meet WWC standards without reservations, meet WWC standards with reservations, or not meet WWC standards. WWC practice guides and intervention reports include findings from systematic reviews of evidence as described in the Handbook documentation. Waiver of Proposed Rulemaking: Under the Administrative Procedure Act (APA) (5 U.S.C. 553) the Department generally offers interested parties the opportunity to comment on proposed priorities and requirements. Section 681(d) of IDEA, however, makes the public comment requirements of the APA inapplicable to the priority in this notice. Program Authority: 20 U.S.C. 1471, 1472, 1473, and 1481. Applicable Regulations: (a) The Education Department General Administrative Regulations in 34 CFR parts 75, 77, 79, 81, 82, 84, 97, 98, and 99. (b) The Office of Management and Budget Guidelines to Agencies on Governmentwide Debarment and Suspension (Nonprocurement) in 2 CFR part 180, as adopted and amended as regulations of the Department in 2 CFR part 3485. (c) The Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles, and Audit Requirements for PO 00000 Frm 00015 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 34995 Federal Awards in 2 CFR part 200, as adopted and amended as regulations of the Department in 2 CFR part 3474. Note: The regulations in 34 CFR part 79 apply to all applicants except federally recognized Indian Tribes. II. Award Information Type of Award: Cooperative agreements. Estimated Available Funds: $2,800,000. Contingent upon the availability of funds and the quality of applications, we may make additional awards in FY 2019 from the list of unfunded applications from this competition. Estimated Range of Awards: $500,000–$800,000. Estimated Average Size of Awards: 4 awards at $500,000 for the regional PTACs; 1 award of $800,000 for the CPIR. Maximum Award: We will not make an award exceeding $500,000 for each of the regional PTACs or $800,000 for the CPIR for a single budget period of 12 months. Estimated Number of Awards: 5. Note: The Department is not bound by any estimates in this notice. Project Period: Up to 60 months. III. Eligibility Information 1. Eligible Applicants: Nonprofit private organizations. 2. Cost Sharing or Matching: This program does not require cost sharing or matching. 3. Subgrantees: Under 34 CFR 75.708(b) and (c), a grantee under this competition may award subgrants—to directly carry out project activities described in its application—to the following types of entities: IHEs and private nonprofit organizations suitable to carry out the activities proposed in the application The grantee may award subgrants to entities it has identified in an approved application. 4. Other General Requirements: (a) Recipients of funding under this competition must make positive efforts to employ and advance in employment qualified individuals with disabilities (see section 606 of IDEA). (b) Applicants for, and recipients of, funding must, with respect to the aspects of their proposed project relating to the absolute priority, involve individuals with disabilities, or parents of individuals with disabilities ages birth through 26, in planning, implementing, and evaluating the project (see section 682(a)(1)(A) of IDEA). E:\FR\FM\24JYN1.SGM 24JYN1 34996 Federal Register / Vol. 83, No. 142 / Tuesday, July 24, 2018 / Notices jstallworth on DSKBBY8HB2PROD with NOTICES IV. Application and Submission Information 1. Application Submission Instructions: For information on how to submit an application please refer to our Common Instructions for Applicants to Department of Education Discretionary Grant Programs, published in the Federal Register on February 12, 2018 (83 FR 6003) and available at www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2018-02-12/ pdf/2018-02558.pdf. 2. Intergovernmental Review: This competition is subject to Executive Order 12372 and the regulations in 34 CFR part 79. However, under 34 CFR 79.8(a), we waive intergovernmental review in order to make awards by the end of FY 2018. 3. Funding Restrictions: We reference regulations outlining funding restrictions in the Applicable Regulations section of this notice. 4. Recommended Page Limit: The application narrative (Part III of the application) is where you, the applicant, address the selection criteria that reviewers use to evaluate your application. We recommend that you (1) limit the application narrative to no more than 50 pages, and (2) use the following standards: • A ‘‘page’’ is 8.5″ x 11″, on one side only, with 1″ margins at the top, bottom, and both sides. • Double-space (no more than three lines per vertical inch) all text in the application narrative, including titles, headings, footnotes, quotations, reference citations, and captions, as well as all text in charts, tables, figures, graphs, and screen shots. • Use a font that is 12 point or larger. • Use one of the following fonts: Times New Roman, Courier, Courier New, or Arial. The recommended page limit does not apply to Part I, the cover sheet; Part II, the budget section, including the narrative budget justification; Part IV, the assurances and certifications; or the abstract (follow the guidance provided in the application package for completing the abstract), the table of contents, the list of priority requirements, the resumes, the reference list, the letters of support, or the appendices. However, the recommended page limit does apply to all of the application narrative, including all text in charts, tables, figures, graphs, and screen shots. V. Application Review Information 1. Selection Criteria: The selection criteria for this competition are from 34 CFR 75.210 and are as follows: (a) Significance (10 points). VerDate Sep<11>2014 13:59 Jul 23, 2018 Jkt 244001 (1) The Secretary considers the significance of the proposed project. (2) In determining the significance of the proposed project, the Secretary considers the following factors: (i) The extent to which the proposed project will focus on serving or otherwise addressing the needs of disadvantaged individuals; (ii) The extent to which specific gaps or weaknesses in services, infrastructure, or opportunities have been identified and will be addressed by the proposed project, including the nature and magnitude of those gaps or weaknesses; and (iii) The importance or magnitude of the results or outcomes likely to be attained by the proposed project. (b) Quality of the project services (35 points). (1) The Secretary considers the quality of the services to be provided by the proposed project. (2) In determining the quality of the services to be provided by the proposed project, the Secretary considers the quality and sufficiency of strategies for ensuring equal access and treatment for eligible project participants who are members of groups that have traditionally been underrepresented based on race, color, national origin, gender, age, or disability. (3) In addition, the Secretary considers the following factors: (i) The extent to which the goals, objectives, and outcomes to be achieved by the proposed project are clearly specified and measurable; (ii) The extent to which there is a conceptual framework underlying the proposed research or demonstration activities and the quality of that framework; (iii) The extent to which the services to be provided by the proposed project reflect up-to-date knowledge from research and effective practice; (iv) The extent to which the services to be provided by the proposed project are appropriate to the needs of the intended recipients or beneficiaries of those services; (v) The extent to which the services to be provided by the proposed project involve the collaboration of appropriate partners for maximizing the effectiveness of project services; and (vi) The extent to which the technical assistance services to be provided by the proposed project involve the use of efficient strategies, including the use of technology, as appropriate, and the leveraging of non-project resources. (c) Quality of project evaluation (20 points). (1) The Secretary considers the quality of the evaluation to be conducted of the proposed project. PO 00000 Frm 00016 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 (2) In determining the quality of the evaluation, the Secretary considers the following factors: (i) The extent to which the methods of evaluation are thorough, feasible, and appropriate to the goals, objectives, and outcomes of the proposed project; (ii) The extent to which the methods of evaluation are appropriate to the context within which the project operates; (iii) The extent to which the methods of evaluation will provide performance feedback and permit periodic assessment of progress toward achieving intended outcomes; and (iv) The extent to which the methods of evaluation include the use of objective performance measures that are clearly related to the intended outcomes of the project and will produce quantitative and qualitative data to the extent possible. (d) Adequacy of resources and Quality of Project Personnel (15 points). (1) The Secretary considers the adequacy of resources and quality of project personnel for the proposed project. (2) In determining the quality of project personnel, the Secretary considers the extent to which the applicant encourages applications for employment from persons who are members of groups that have traditionally been underrepresented based on race, color, national origin, gender, age, or disability. (3) In determining the adequacy of resources and quality of project personnel for the proposed project, the Secretary considers the following factors: (i) The qualifications, including relevant training and experience, of the project director or principal investigator; (ii) The qualifications, including relevant training and experience, of key project personnel; (iii) The qualifications, including relevant training and experience, of project consultants or subcontractors; (iv) The adequacy of support, including facilities, equipment, supplies, and other resources, from the applicant organization or the lead applicant organization; (v) The relevance and demonstrated commitment of each partner in the proposed project to the implementation and success of the project; and (vi) The extent to which the costs are reasonable in relation to the objectives, design, and potential significance of the proposed project. (e) Quality of the management plan (20 points). E:\FR\FM\24JYN1.SGM 24JYN1 jstallworth on DSKBBY8HB2PROD with NOTICES Federal Register / Vol. 83, No. 142 / Tuesday, July 24, 2018 / Notices (1) The Secretary considers the quality of the management plan for the proposed project. (2) In determining the quality of the management plan for the proposed project, the Secretary considers the following factors: (i) The adequacy of the management plan to achieve the objectives of the proposed project on time and within budget, including clearly defined responsibilities, timelines, and milestones for accomplishing project tasks; (ii) The extent to which the time commitments of the project director and principal investigator and other key project personnel are appropriate and adequate to meet the objectives of the proposed project; (iii) The adequacy of mechanisms for ensuring high-quality products and services from the proposed project; and (iv) How the applicant will ensure that a diversity of perspectives are brought to bear in the operation of the proposed project, including those of parents, teachers, the business community, a variety of disciplinary and professional fields, recipients or beneficiaries of services, or others, as appropriate. 2. Review and Selection Process: We remind potential applicants that in reviewing applications in any discretionary grant competition, the Secretary may consider, under 34 CFR 75.217(d)(3), the past performance of the applicant in carrying out a previous award, such as the applicant’s use of funds, achievement of project objectives, and compliance with grant conditions. The Secretary may also consider whether the applicant failed to submit a timely performance report or submitted a report of unacceptable quality. In addition, in making a competitive grant award, the Secretary requires various assurances, including those applicable to Federal civil rights laws that prohibit discrimination in programs or activities receiving Federal financial assistance from the Department of Education (34 CFR 100.4, 104.5, 106.4, 108.8, and 110.23). 3. Additional Review and Selection Process Factors: In the past, the Department has had difficulty finding peer reviewers for certain competitions because so many individuals who are eligible to serve as peer reviewers have conflicts of interest. The standing panel requirements under section 682(b) of IDEA also have placed additional constraints on the availability of reviewers. Therefore, the Department has determined that for some discretionary grant competitions, VerDate Sep<11>2014 13:59 Jul 23, 2018 Jkt 244001 applications may be separated into two or more groups and ranked and selected for funding within specific groups. This procedure will make it easier for the Department to find peer reviewers by ensuring that greater numbers of individuals who are eligible to serve as reviewers for any particular group of applicants will not have conflicts of interest. It also will increase the quality, independence, and fairness of the review process, while permitting panel members to review applications under discretionary grant competitions for which they also have submitted applications. 4. Risk Assessment and Specific Conditions: Consistent with 2 CFR 200.205, before awarding grants under this competition the Department conducts a review of the risks posed by applicants. Under 2 CFR 3474.10, the Secretary may impose specific conditions and, in appropriate circumstances, high-risk conditions on a grant if the applicant or grantee is not financially stable; has a history of unsatisfactory performance; has a financial or other management system that does not meet the standards in 2 CFR part 200, subpart D; has not fulfilled the conditions of a prior grant; or is otherwise not responsible. 5. Integrity and Performance System: If you are selected under this competition to receive an award that over the course of the project period may exceed the simplified acquisition threshold (currently $150,000), under 2 CFR 200.205(a)(2) we must make a judgment about your integrity, business ethics, and record of performance under Federal awards—that is, the risk posed by you as an applicant—before we make an award. In doing so, we must consider any information about you that is in the integrity and performance system (currently referred to as the Federal Awardee Performance and Integrity Information System (FAPIIS)), accessible through the System for Award Management (SAM) at https:// www.sam.gov. You may review and comment on any information about yourself that a Federal agency previously entered and that is currently in FAPIIS. Please note that, if the total value of your currently active grants, cooperative agreements, and procurement contracts from the Federal Government exceeds $10,000,000, the reporting requirements in 2 CFR part 200, Appendix XII, require you to report certain integrity information to FAPIIS semiannually. Please review the requirements in 2 CFR part 200, Appendix XII, if this grant plus all the other Federal funds you receive exceed $10,000,000. PO 00000 Frm 00017 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 34997 VI. Award Administration Information 1. Award Notices: If your application is successful, we notify your U.S. Representative and U.S. Senators and send you a Grant Award Notification (GAN); or we may send you an email containing a link to access an electronic version of your GAN. We may notify you informally, also. If your application is not evaluated or not selected for funding, we notify you. 2. Administrative and National Policy Requirements: We identify administrative and national policy requirements in the application package and reference these and other requirements in the Applicable Regulations section of this notice. We reference the regulations outlining the terms and conditions of an award in the Applicable Regulations section of this notice and include these and other specific conditions in the GAN. The GAN also incorporates your approved application as part of your binding commitments under the grant. 3. Open Licensing Requirements: Unless an exception applies, if you are awarded a grant under this competition, you will be required to openly license to the public grant deliverables created in whole, or in part, with Department grant funds. When the deliverable consists of modifications to pre-existing works, the license extends only to those modifications that can be separately identified and only to the extent that open licensing is permitted under the terms of any licenses or other legal restrictions on the use of pre-existing works. Additionally, a grantee or subgrantee that is awarded competitive grant funds must have a plan to disseminate these public grant deliverables. This dissemination plan can be developed and submitted after your application has been reviewed and selected for funding. For additional information on the open licensing requirements please refer to 2 CFR 3474.20. 4. Reporting: (a) If you apply for a grant under this competition, you must ensure that you have in place the necessary processes and systems to comply with the reporting requirements in 2 CFR part 170 should you receive funding under the competition. This does not apply if you have an exception under 2 CFR 170.110(b). (b) At the end of your project period, you must submit a final performance report, including financial information, as directed by the Secretary. If you receive a multiyear award, you must submit an annual performance report that provides the most current performance and financial expenditure E:\FR\FM\24JYN1.SGM 24JYN1 34998 Federal Register / Vol. 83, No. 142 / Tuesday, July 24, 2018 / Notices jstallworth on DSKBBY8HB2PROD with NOTICES information as directed by the Secretary under 34 CFR 75.118. The Secretary may also require more frequent performance reports under 34 CFR 75.720(c). For specific requirements on reporting, please go to www.ed.gov/ fund/grant/apply/appforms/ appforms.html. 5. Performance Measures: Under the Government Performance and Results Act of 1993 (GPRA), the Department has established a set of performance measures, including long-term measures, that are designed to yield information on the quality, relevance, and usefulness of the materials, products, and services of the Parent Training and Information Centers program. These measures are: • Program Performance Measure #1: The percentage of materials used by projects that are deemed to be of high quality; • Program Performance Measure #2: The percentage of products and services deemed to be of high relevance to educational and early intervention policy and practice; and • Program Performance Measure #3: The percentage of all products and services deemed to be useful by target audiences to improve educational or early intervention policy or practice. Grantees will be required to report information on their project’s performance in annual reports to the Department (34 CFR 75.590). 5. Continuation Awards: In making a continuation award under 34 CFR 75.253, the Secretary considers, among other things: Whether a grantee has made substantial progress in achieving the goals and objectives of the project; whether the grantee has expended funds in a manner that is consistent with its approved application and budget; and, if the Secretary has established performance measurement requirements, the performance targets in the grantee’s approved application. In making a continuation award, the Secretary also considers whether the grantee is operating in compliance with the assurances in its approved application, including those applicable to Federal civil rights laws that prohibit discrimination in programs or activities receiving Federal financial assistance from the Department (34 CFR 100.4, 104.5, 106.4, 108.8, and 110.23). VII. Other Information Accessible Format: Individuals with disabilities can obtain this document and a copy of the application package in an accessible format (e.g., Braille, large print, audiotape, or compact disc) by contacting the Management Support Services Team, U.S. Department of VerDate Sep<11>2014 13:59 Jul 23, 2018 Jkt 244001 Education, 400 Maryland Avenue SW, Room 5113, Potomac Center Plaza, Washington, DC 20202–2500. Telephone: (202) 245–7363. If you use a TDD or a TTY, call the FRS, toll free, at 1–800–877–8339. Electronic Access to This Document: The official version of this document is the document published in the Federal Register. You may access the official edition of the Federal Register and the Code of Federal Regulations via the Federal Digital System at: www.gpo.gov/ fdsys. At this site you can view this document, as well as all other documents of this Department published in the Federal Register, in text or Portable Document Format (PDF). To use PDF you must have Adobe Acrobat Reader, which is available free at the site. You may also access documents of the Department published in the Federal Register by using the article search feature at: www.federalregister.gov. Specifically, through the advanced search feature at this site, you can limit your search to documents published by the Department. Dated: July 19, 2018. Johnny W. Collett, Assistant Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative Services. [FR Doc. 2018–15832 Filed 7–23–18; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4000–01–P DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Agency Information Collection Extension U.S. Department of Energy. Notice and request for OMB review and comment. AGENCY: ACTION: The Department of Energy (DOE) has submitted an information collection request to OMB for extension under the provisions of the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995. The information collection requests a three-year extension of its Labor Relations Report collection. The collection requests information from the Department of Energy Management and Operation (M&O) and Facilities Management Contractors for contract administration, management oversight, and cost control. The information collection will assist the Department in evaluating the implementation of the contractors’ work force collective bargaining agreements, and apprise the Department of significant labor-management developments at DOE contractor sites. This information is used to ensure that Department contractors maintain good labor relations and retain a workforce in SUMMARY: PO 00000 Frm 00018 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 accordance with the terms of their contract and in compliance with statutory and regulatory requirements as identified by contract. DATES: Comments regarding this collection must be received on or before August 23, 2018. If you anticipate that you will be submitting comments, but find it difficult to do so within the period of time allowed by this notice, please advise the OMB Desk Officer of your intention to make a submission as soon as possible. The Desk Officer may be telephoned at (202) 395–4650. ADDRESSES: Written comments should be sent to the: DOE Desk Officer, Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs, Office of Management and Budget, New Executive Office Building, Room 10102, 735 17th Street NW, Washington, DC 20503. And to: John M. Sullivan, GC–63, U.S. Department of Energy, 1000 Independence Avenue SW, Washington, DC 20585, Or by fax at (202) 586–0971; or by email to john.m.sullivan@ hq.doe.gov. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Requests for additional information or copies of the information collection instrument and instructions should be directed to: John M. Sullivan, AttorneyAdvisor (Labor), GC–63, U.S. Department of Energy, 1000 Independence Avenue SW, Washington, DC 20585, or by fax at (202) 586–0971 or by email to john.m.sullivan@ hq.doe.gov. This information collection request contains: (1) OMB No.: 1910–5143; (2) Information Collection Request Title: Labor Relations Report; (3) Type of Request: Renewal; (4) Purpose: The proposed collection will request information from the Department of Energy M&O and Facilities Management Contractors for contract administration, management oversight, and cost control. This information is used to ensure that Department contractors maintain good labor relations and retain a workforce in accordance with the terms of their contract and in compliance with statutory and regulatory requirements as identified by contract. The respondents are Department M&O and Facility Management Contractors; (5) Annual Estimated Number of Respondents: 35; (6) Annual Estimated Number of Total Responses: 35; (7) Annual Estimated Number of Burden Hours: 1.84 per respondent for total of 64.4 per year; (8) Annual Estimated Reporting and Recordkeeping Cost Burden: $3,316.60. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Statutory Authority: 42 U.S.C. 7254, 7256. E:\FR\FM\24JYN1.SGM 24JYN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 83, Number 142 (Tuesday, July 24, 2018)]
[Notices]
[Pages 34987-34998]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2018-15832]


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DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION


Applications for New Awards; Training and Information for Parents 
of Children With Disabilities--Technical Assistance for Parent Centers

AGENCY: Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services, 
Department of Education.

ACTION: Notice.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: The Department of Education (Department) is issuing a notice 
inviting

[[Page 34988]]

applications for new awards for fiscal year (FY) 2018 for Training and 
Information for Parents of Children with Disabilities--Technical 
Assistance for Parent Centers, Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance 
(CFDA) number 84.328R.

DATES: 
    Applications Available: July 24, 2018.
    Deadline for Transmittal of Applications: August 23, 2018.

ADDRESSES: For the addresses for obtaining and submitting an 
application, please refer to our Common Instructions for Applicants to 
Department of Education Discretionary Grant Programs, published in the 
Federal Register on February 12, 2018 (83 FR 6003) and available at 
www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2018-02-12/pdf/2018-02558.pdf.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Carmen Sanchez, U.S. Department of 
Education, 400 Maryland Avenue SW, Room 5175, Potomac Center Plaza, 
Washington, DC 20202-5076. Telephone: (202) 245-6595.
    If you use a telecommunications device for the deaf (TDD) or a text 
telephone (TTY), call the Federal Relay Service (FRS), toll free, at 1-
800-877-8339.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:

Full Text of Announcement

I. Funding Opportunity Description

    Purpose of Program: The purpose of this program is to ensure that 
parents of children with disabilities receive impartial training and 
information to help improve outcomes for their children.
    Priority: In accordance with 34 CFR 75.105(b)(2)(v), this priority 
is from allowable activities specified in the statute (see sections 
671, 672, 673, and 681(d) of the Individuals with Disabilities 
Education Act (IDEA); 20 U.S.C. 1471, 1472, 1473, and 1481(d)).
    Absolute Priority: For FY 2018 and any subsequent year in which we 
make awards from the list of unfunded applications from this 
competition, this priority is an absolute priority. Under 34 CFR 
75.105(c)(3), we consider only applications that meet this priority.
    This priority is:
    Technical Assistance for Parent Centers.
    Background: The mission of the Office of Special Education and 
Rehabilitative Services (OSERS) is to improve early childhood, 
educational, and employment outcomes and raise expectations for all 
people with disabilities, their families, their communities, and the 
Nation. The work of the centers we are proposing to fund is generally 
consistent with the following priorities included in the Secretary's 
Supplemental Priorities, which were published in the Federal Register 
on March 2, 2018 (83 FR 9096): Priority 1--Empowering Families and 
Individuals to Choose a High-Quality Education That Meets Their Unique 
Needs; Priority 5--Meeting the Unique Needs of Students and Children 
With Disabilities and/or Those With Unique Gifts and Talents; and 
Priority 9--Promoting Economic Opportunity. The purpose of this 
priority is to fund five cooperative agreements to establish and 
operate five technical assistance centers for parent centers across two 
focus areas. A center for parent information and resources (CPIR) will 
focus on developing products for parent centers (Focus Area 1). Four 
regional parent training and technical assistance centers (regional 
PTACs) will focus on providing capacity-building technical assistance 
(TA) to the parent centers in their regions (Focus Area 2). Section 673 
of IDEA authorizes TA for developing, assisting, and coordinating 
parent training and information programs carried out by parent training 
and information centers (PTIs) that receive assistance under section 
671 of IDEA and community parent resource centers (CPRCs) that receive 
assistance under section 672 of IDEA (collectively, ``parent 
centers'').
    The 93 parent centers (www.parentcenterhub.org/find-your-center/) 
currently funded by the Department promote the effective education of 
infants, toddlers, children, and youth with disabilities by 
``strengthening the role and responsibility of parents and ensuring 
that families of such children have meaningful opportunities to 
participate in the education of their children at school and at home'' 
(section 601(c)(5)(B) of IDEA). For the past 30 years, parent centers, 
consistent with section 671(b) of IDEA, have helped parents navigate 
systems providing early intervention, special education and related 
services, general education, and postsecondary options; understand the 
nature of their children's disabilities; learn about their rights and 
responsibilities under IDEA; expand their knowledge of practices based 
on evidence to help their children succeed; strengthen their 
collaboration with professionals; locate resources for themselves and 
their children; and advocate for improved child outcomes and student 
achievement, increased graduation rates, and improved postsecondary 
outcomes for all children through participation in program and school 
reform activities. In addition, parent centers have helped youth with 
disabilities understand their rights and responsibilities and learn 
self-advocacy skills.
    PTACs provide support to parent centers to carry out these 
statutorily required activities and thereby help parents participate in 
the education of their children to improve their children's outcomes. 
In addition, section 673(b) of IDEA lists areas in which parent centers 
may also need TA from PTACs: (1) Coordinating parent training efforts; 
(2) disseminating scientifically based research and information; (3) 
promoting the use of technology, including assistive technology devices 
and services; (4) reaching underserved populations, including parents 
of low-income and limited English proficient children with 
disabilities; (5) including children with disabilities in general 
education programs; (6) facilitating all transitions from early 
intervention through postsecondary environments; and (7) promoting 
alternative methods of dispute resolution, including mediation.
    PTACs provide needed support to parent centers on other topics as 
well, including current information on laws and policies; evidence-
based (as defined in this notice) practices (EBPs) that impact children 
with disabilities and their families; how to help parents learn about 
and access high-quality education options that meet their children's 
unique needs; and ways to effectively engage in school reform 
activities, including Federal, State, and local initiatives. Ongoing 
TA, responsive to the individual needs of parent centers, can increase 
parent center staff knowledge and expertise on these topics. In 
addition, since many parent centers are grassroots organizations with 
small budgets, they often benefit from TA on managing a Federal grant, 
maximizing efficiencies, meeting complex statutory and regulatory 
requirements for nonprofits, and providing professional development to 
staff.
    Parent centers also need support to increase their capacity to 
reach and provide services to youth with disabilities and to all 
parents of children with disabilities, particularly parents of infants, 
toddlers, preschool children and transition-age youth; and underserved 
parents with additional needs or unique circumstances, including low 
income-parents, parents with limited English proficiency, parents with 
low literacy levels, parents who themselves experience disability, 
parents of youth involved in the

[[Page 34989]]

juvenile justice system, foster parents, military-connected parents, 
and Native American parents.
    In order to ensure that parent centers receive the TA they need to 
increase their knowledge and capacity to provide services to parents 
and youth effectively and efficiently, the Department plans to fund 
five technical assistance centers for parent centers. The Department 
will fund a CPIR that will, in coordination with the regional PTACs, 
develop and disseminate resources for all parent centers to use when 
working with parents of children with disabilities and youth with 
disabilities. CPIR will also develop and disseminate materials that all 
parent centers can use to train staff to effectively reach and serve 
all parents and youth. The Department will also fund four regional 
PTACs that will provide TA to parent centers to effectively manage 
their centers and reach and serve all parents and youth within their 
region. The CPIR and regional PTACs will coordinate their efforts in 
order to maximize resources and avoid duplication. The following 
website provides more information on the current parent centers, 
including links to each grantee's website: www.parentcenterhub.org.
    Priority: Under this priority, we will fund five cooperative 
agreements to establish and operate one CPIR and four regional PTACs 
across two focus areas. An applicant may submit separate applications 
in more than one focus area; however, an applicant is limited to only 
one application in each focus area.
    Focus Area 1: Under Focus Area 1, the Department intends to fund 
one CPIR to achieve at a minimum, the following expected outcomes:
    (a) Increased parent centers' knowledge, through the development 
and dissemination of high-quality, accurate, and impartial information 
and products, of:
    (1) Early intervention and educational EBPs, and current Federal 
and State laws and policies, that impact children with disabilities and 
their families;
    (2) The range of educational options that may be available in 
States to families of children with disabilities;
    (3) Effective practices in carrying out parent center activities 
including outreach, family-centered services, and self-advocacy skill 
building;
    (4) Effective and appropriate practices in outreach and service 
provision to underserved parents, including parents with limited 
English proficiency, parents with low literacy levels, parents who 
themselves experience disability, parents of youth involved in the 
juvenile justice system, foster parents, military-connected parents, 
and Native American parents; and
    (5) Effective nonprofit management practices;
    (b) Increased parent centers' use of, high-quality, accurate, and 
impartial materials and approaches to train:
    (1) Staff in reaching all parents and youth, including underserved 
parents of children with disabilities, which includes parents with 
limited English proficiency, parents with low literacy levels, parents 
who themselves experience disability, parents of youth involved in the 
juvenile justice system, foster parents, military-connected parents, 
and Native American parents; and
    (2) Multilingual staff in their native languages and assure the 
accuracy of the information the staff provide in languages other than 
English.
    In addition to these programmatic requirements, to be considered 
for funding under Focus Area 1 of this priority, applicants must meet 
the application and administrative requirements in this priority, which 
are:
    (a) Demonstrate, in the narrative section of the application under 
``Significance,'' how the proposed project will--
    (1) Address parent centers' needs both for resources to effectively 
reach and serve all parents of children with disabilities and youth 
with disabilities, including underserved parents, which includes 
parents with limited English proficiency, parents with low literacy 
levels, parents who themselves experience disability, parents of youth 
involved in the juvenile justice system, foster parents, military-
connected parents, and Native American parents, and for materials to 
train staff to effectively reach and serve all parents and youth. To 
meet this requirement, the applicant must--
    (i) Present applicable information on the needs of parent centers 
nationally; and
    (ii) Demonstrate knowledge of--
    (A) Current educational issues and policy initiatives relating to 
early childhood (ages birth through five), general and special 
education, secondary transition services, and postsecondary options; 
and
    (B) Best practices in:
    (1) Outreach; family-centered services; and self-advocacy skill 
building, including effective and appropriate outreach and service 
provision to underserved parents of children with disabilities, 
including parents with limited English proficiency, parents with low 
literacy levels, parents who themselves experience disability, parents 
of youth involved in the juvenile justice system, foster parents, 
military-connected parents, and Native American parents;
    (2) Staff training, including multilingual staff; and
    (3) Nonprofit management; and
    (2) Increase the knowledge of parent centers on how to reach and 
provide services to all parents and youth, train staff using high-
quality, accurate, and impartial training materials, and manage their 
projects; and indicate the likely magnitude or importance of the 
improvements.
    (b) Demonstrate, in the narrative section of the application under 
``Quality of project services,'' how the proposed project will--
    (1) Ensure equal access and treatment for members of groups that 
have traditionally been underrepresented based on race, color, national 
origin, gender, age, or disability. To meet this requirement, the 
applicant must describe how it will--
    (i) Identify the informational and TA needs of the parent centers.
    Note: The methods and tools to identify needs will be finalized in 
consultation with the regional PTACs and the OSEP project officer in 
order to assure coordination and avoid duplication; and
    (ii) Ensure that services and products meet the needs of the parent 
centers;
    (2) Achieve its goals, objectives, and intended outcomes. To meet 
this requirement, the applicant must provide--
    (i) Measurable intended project outcomes; and
    (ii) In Appendix A, the logic model (as defined in this notice) by 
which the proposed project will achieve its intended outcomes that 
depicts, at a minimum, the goals, activities, outputs, and intended 
outcomes of the proposed project;
    (3) Use a conceptual framework (and provide a copy in Appendix A) 
to develop project plans and activities, describing any underlying 
concepts, assumptions, expectations, beliefs, or theories, as well as 
the presumed relationships or linkages among these variables, and any 
empirical support for this framework;
    Note: The following websites provide more information on logic 
models and conceptual frameworks: www.osepideasthatwork.org/logicModel 
and www.osepideasthatwork.org/resources-grantees/program-areas/ta-ta/tad-project-logic-model-and-conceptual-framework.
    (4) Be based on current research and make use of EBPs. To meet this 
requirement, the applicant must describe--

[[Page 34990]]

    (i) The current research on outreach, family-centered services, and 
self-advocacy skill building, including effective and appropriate 
outreach and service provision to underserved parents of children with 
disabilities, including parents with limited English proficiency, 
parents with low literacy levels, parents who themselves experience 
disability, parents of youth involved in the juvenile justice system, 
foster parents, military-connected parents, and Native American 
parents; staff training, including multilingual staff; and nonprofit 
management;
    (ii) The current research about adult learning principles and 
implementation science that will inform the proposed TA; and
    (iii) How the proposed project will incorporate current research 
and EBPs in the development and delivery of its products and services;
    (5) Develop products and provide services that are of high quality 
and sufficient intensity and duration to achieve the intended outcomes 
of the proposed project. To address this requirement, the applicant 
must describe--
    (i) How it proposes to identify how knowledgeable the parent 
centers are of: Outreach, family-centered services, and self-advocacy 
skill building, including effective and appropriate outreach and 
service provision to underserved parents of children with disabilities, 
including parents with limited English proficiency, parents with low 
literacy levels, parents who themselves experience disability, parents 
of youth involved in the juvenile justice system, foster parents, 
military-connected parents, and Native American parents; staff 
training, including multilingual staff; and nonprofit management;
    (ii) Its proposed approach to universal, general TA,\1\ which must 
identify the intended recipients within the parent centers, including 
the type and number of recipients, that will receive the products and 
services under this approach, and should, at minimum, include how the 
project will--
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \1\ ``Universal, general TA'' means TA and information provided 
to independent users through their own initiative, resulting in 
minimal interaction with TA center staff and including one-time, 
invited or offered conference presentations by TA center staff. This 
category of TA also includes information or products, such as 
newsletters, guidebooks, or research syntheses, downloaded from the 
TA center's website by independent users. Brief communications by TA 
center staff with recipients, either by telephone or email, are also 
considered universal, general TA.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    (A) Create, update, and maintain an online, annotated repository of 
high-quality, accurate, and impartial resources,\2\ including 
translations of materials as needed, produced by the CPIR, the 
previously funded Military and Native American PTACs, parent centers, 
OSEP-funded projects, and other federally funded projects for parent 
centers' use with families, youth, staff members, and members of the 
boards of directors;
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \2\ Resources shall include information on Federal and State 
laws and policies, including comprehensive and impartial information 
on the range of education options that may be available in States, 
including district public schools, charter schools, virtual 
education, voucher programs, education scholarship account (ESA) 
programs, tax-credit scholarship programs, tax deductions and 
credits, course choice programs, and any other relevant education 
options that impact children with disabilities and their families.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    (B) Develop up-to-date, family-centered resources as needed that 
parent centers can use with parents in a variety of languages, formats, 
and reading levels; disseminate and modify, as needed, family-centered 
resources developed by OSEP and other federally funded centers to 
provide families with strategies to enhance their children's literacy, 
numeracy, and scientific reasoning at home; and revise materials 
developed by the previously funded Military PTAC and the Native 
American PTAC as necessary;
    (C) Compile and create materials to train staff, including 
multilingual staff, to provide effective, appropriate, and impartial 
outreach and service provision to underserved parents of children with 
disabilities, including parents with limited English proficiency, 
parents with low literacy levels, parents who themselves experience 
disability, parents of youth involved in the juvenile justice system, 
foster parents, military-connected parents, and Native American 
parents;
    (D) Compile and create materials on nonprofit management, as 
necessary, and develop a process for an annual orientation of new 
parent center directors and other key personnel and members of the 
boards of directors that provides the new personnel with the 
information and resources they need to carry out their 
responsibilities; and
    (6) Develop products and implement services that maximize 
efficiency. To address this requirement, the applicant must describe--
    (i) How the proposed project will use technology to achieve the 
intended project outcomes;
    (ii) With whom the proposed project will collaborate and the 
intended outcomes of this collaboration;
    (iii) How the proposed project will use existing knowledge and 
expertise within parent centers to achieve intended project outcomes; 
and
    (v) How the proposed project will use non-project resources to 
achieve the intended project outcomes; and
    (7) Assist parent centers in the collection of annual performance 
data required under section 671(b)(12) of IDEA, in consultation with 
the OSEP project officer.
    (c) In the narrative section of the application under ``Quality of 
the project evaluation,'' include an evaluation plan for the project as 
described in the following paragraphs. The evaluation plan must 
describe: Measures for evaluating the quality, accuracy, and 
impartiality of project services and products; measures of progress in 
implementation, including the criteria for determining the extent to 
which the project's products and services have met the goals for 
reaching its target population; measures of intended outcomes or 
results of the project's activities in order to evaluate those 
activities; and how well the goals or objectives of the proposed 
project, as described in its logic model, have been met.
    The applicant must provide an assurance that, in designing the 
evaluation plan, it will--
    (1) Designate, with the approval of the OSEP project officer, a 
project liaison staff person with sufficient dedicated time, experience 
in evaluation, and knowledge of the project to work in collaboration 
with the TA Center to Improve Program and Project Performance 
(CIP3),\3\ the project director, and the OSEP project officer on the 
following tasks:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \3\ The major tasks of CIP3 are to guide, coordinate, and 
oversee the design of formative evaluations for every large 
discretionary investment (i.e., those awarded $500,000 or more per 
year and required to participate in the 3+2 process) in OSEP's 
Technical Assistance and Dissemination; Personnel Development; 
Parent Training and Information Centers; and Educational Technology, 
Media, and Materials programs. The efforts of CIP3 are expected to 
enhance individual project evaluation plans by providing expert and 
unbiased TA in designing the evaluations with due consideration of 
the project's budget. CIP3 does not function as a third-party 
evaluator.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    (i) Revise, as needed, the logic model submitted in the grant 
application to provide for a more comprehensive measurement of 
implementation and outcomes and to reflect any changes or 
clarifications to the model discussed at the kick-off meeting;
    (ii) Refine the evaluation design and instrumentation proposed in 
the grant application consistent with the logic model (e.g., prepare 
evaluation questions about significant program processes and outcomes; 
develop quantitative or qualitative data collections that permit both 
the

[[Page 34991]]

collection of progress data, including fidelity of implementation, as 
appropriate, and the assessment of project outcomes; and identify 
analytic strategies); and
    (iii) Revise, as needed, the evaluation plan submitted in the grant 
application such that it clearly--
    (A) Specifies the measures and associated instruments or sources 
for data appropriate to the evaluation questions, suggests analytic 
strategies for those data, provides a timeline for conducting the 
evaluation, and includes staff assignments for completion of the plan;
    (B) Delineates the data expected to be available by the end of the 
second project year for use during the project's evaluation (3+2 
review) for continued funding described under the heading Fourth and 
Fifth Years of the Project; and
    (C) Can be used to assist the project director and the OSEP project 
officer, with the assistance of CIP3, as needed, to specify the 
performance measures to be addressed in the project's Annual 
Performance Report;
    (2) Cooperate with CIP3 staff in order to accomplish the tasks 
described in paragraph (1) of this section; and
    (3) Dedicate sufficient funds in each budget year to cover the 
costs of carrying out the tasks described in paragraphs (1) and (2) of 
this section and implementing the evaluation plan.
    (d) Demonstrate, in the narrative section of the application under 
``Adequacy of resources,'' how--
    (1) The proposed project will encourage applications for employment 
from persons who are members of groups that have traditionally been 
underrepresented based on race, color, national origin, gender, age, or 
disability, as appropriate;
    (2) The proposed key project personnel, consultants, and 
subcontractors have the qualifications and experience to carry out the 
proposed activities and achieve the project's intended outcomes;
    (3) The applicant and any key partners have adequate resources to 
carry out the proposed activities; and
    (4) The proposed costs are reasonable in relation to the 
anticipated results and benefits.
    (e) Demonstrate, in the narrative section of the application under 
``Quality of the management plan,'' how--
    (1) The proposed management plan will ensure that the project's 
intended outcomes will be achieved on time and within budget. To 
address this requirement, the applicant must describe--
    (i) Clearly defined responsibilities for key project personnel, 
consultants, and subcontractors, as applicable; and
    (ii) Timelines and milestones for accomplishing the project tasks;
    (2) Key project personnel and any consultants and subcontractors 
will be allocated and how these allocations are appropriate and 
adequate to achieve the project's intended outcomes;
    (3) The proposed management plan will ensure that the products and 
services provided are of high quality, impartial, relevant, and useful 
to recipients; and
    (4) The proposed project will benefit from a diversity of 
perspectives, including those of families using a variety of education 
options, youth, educators, TA providers, researchers, and policy 
makers, among others, in its development and operation.
    (f) Address the following application requirements. The applicant 
must--
    (1) Include, in Appendix A, personnel-loading charts and timelines, 
as applicable, to illustrate the management plan described in the 
narrative;
    (2) Include, in the budget, attendance at the following:
    (i) A one and one-half day kick-off meeting in Washington, DC, 
after receipt of the award, and an annual planning meeting in 
Washington, DC, with the OSEP project officer and other relevant staff 
during each subsequent year of the project period;
    Note: Within 30 days of receipt of the award, a post-award 
teleconference must be held between the OSEP project officer and the 
grantee's project director or other authorized representative;
    (ii) A two and one-half day project directors' conference in 
Washington, DC, during each year of the project period;
    (iii) Two annual two-day trips to attend Department briefings, 
Department-sponsored conferences, and other meetings, as requested by 
OSEP; and
    (iv) A one-day intensive 3+2 review meeting in Washington, DC, 
during the last half of the second year of the project period;
    (3) Include, in the budget, a line item for an annual set-aside of 
five percent of the grant amount to support emerging needs that are 
consistent with the proposed project's intended outcomes, as those 
needs are identified in consultation with, and approved by, the OSEP 
project officer. With approval from the OSEP project officer, the 
project must reallocate any remaining funds from this annual set-aside 
no later than the end of the third quarter of each budget period;
    (4) Ensure that the budget allocates at least $200,000 annually to 
carry out the project services described in paragraphs (b)(5)(ii)(A) 
through (C) of this focus area;
    (5) Maintain a high-quality website, with an easy-to-navigate 
design, including the repository described in paragraph (b)(5)(ii)(A) 
of this focus area, that meets government or industry-recognized 
standards for accessibility; and
    (6) Include, in Appendix A, an assurance to assist OSEP with the 
transfer of pertinent resources and products and to maintain the 
continuity of services to parent centers during the transition to this 
new award period, as appropriate.
    Fourth and Fifth Years of the Project: In deciding whether to 
continue funding the project for the fourth and fifth years, the 
Secretary will consider the requirements of 34 CFR 75.253(a), as well 
as--
    (a) The recommendation of a 3+2 review team consisting of experts 
selected by the Secretary. This review will be conducted during a one-
day intensive meeting that will be held during the last half of the 
second year of the project period;
    (b) The timeliness with which, and how well, the requirements of 
the negotiated cooperative agreement have been or are being met by the 
project; and
    (c) The quality, relevance, and usefulness of the project's 
products and services and the extent to which the project's products 
and services are aligned with the project's objectives and likely to 
result in the project achieving its intended outcomes.
    Focus Area 2: Under Focus Area 2, the Department intends to fund 
four regional PTACs to meet the unique needs of parent centers in their 
region and to achieve, at a minimum, the following expected outcomes:
    (a) Increased parent center capacity to accurately and impartially 
train parents on, and inform them about:
    (1) Early intervention and educational EBPs;
    (2) Their rights and responsibilities under Federal, State, and 
local laws and policies that impact children with disabilities and 
their families; and
    (3) The range of education options that may be available to 
families of children with disabilities in the area served by the parent 
center.
    (b) Increased parent center capacity to reach more parents and 
youth; and effectively provide parent center services to help more 
parents improve outcomes for their children, and youth build their 
self-advocacy skills;

[[Page 34992]]

    (c) Increased parent center capacity to provide effective and 
appropriate outreach and service provision to underserved parents of 
children with disabilities including parents with limited English 
proficiency, parents with low literacy levels, parents who themselves 
experience disability, parents of youth involved in the juvenile 
justice system, foster parents, military-connected parents, and Native 
American parents; and
    (d) Increased parent center capacity to effectively manage their 
projects and provide high-quality training to staff, including 
multilingual staff, to reach and serve all parents and youth in their 
region.
    The geographic regions served by the four regional PTACs are 
generally aligned with the States served by the Equity Assistance 
Centers funded under Title IV of the 1964 Civil Rights Act, while also 
balancing the number of centers each regional PTAC will have in their 
region. This alignment will help the regional PTACs meet the 
requirement in section 673(c) of IDEA that the regional PTACs develop 
collaborative agreements with the geographically appropriate centers. 
The four regional PTACs will be awarded to represent the following 
geographic regions:
    Region A PTAC: CT, DC, DE, ME, MA, MD, NH, NJ, NY, PA, Puerto Rico, 
RI, U.S. Virgin Islands, VT.
    Region B PTAC: AL, AR, FL, GA, LA, MS, NC, OK, SC, TN, TX, VA.
    Region C PTAC: IL, IN, IA, KS, KY, MI, MN, MO, MT, NE, ND, OH, SD, 
WI, WV, WY.
    Region D PTAC: AK, AZ, CA, CO, HI, ID, NM, NV, OR, UT, WA, and the 
outlying areas of the Pacific Basin, and the Freely Associated States.
    In addition to these programmatic requirements, to be considered 
for funding under Focus Area 2 of this priority, applicants must meet 
the application and administrative requirements in this priority, which 
are:
    (a) Demonstrate, in the narrative section of the application under 
``Significance,'' how the proposed project will--
    (1) Address the needs of parent centers in its region for TA to 
increase their capacity to reach and provide services to parents and 
youth in their areas, including underserved parents of children with 
disabilities, which includes parents with limited English proficiency, 
parents with low literacy levels, parents who themselves experience 
disability, parents of youth involved in the juvenile justice system, 
foster parents, military-connected parents, and Native American 
parents; build youth's self-advocacy skills; train staff; and 
effectively manage their centers. To meet this requirement the 
applicant must--
    (i) Present applicable information on the needs of parent centers 
in the region; and
    (ii) Demonstrate knowledge of--
    (A) Current early intervention and educational issues and policy 
initiatives relating to early childhood, general and special education, 
secondary transition services, and postsecondary options; and
    (B) Best practices in:
    (1) Outreach, family-centered services, and self-advocacy skill 
building, including effective and appropriate outreach and service 
provision to underserved parents of children with disabilities, 
including parents with limited English proficiency, parents with low 
literacy levels, parents who themselves experience disability, parents 
of youth involved in the juvenile justice system, foster parents, 
military-connected parents, and Native American parents;
    (2) Staff training, including multilingual staff; and
    (3) Nonprofit management; and
    (2) Increase the capacity of parent centers to reach and provide 
services to all parents and youth, train staff, and manage their 
projects; and indicate the likely magnitude or importance of the 
improvements.
    (b) Demonstrate, in the narrative section of the application under 
``Quality of project services,'' how the proposed project will--
    (1) Ensure equal access and treatment for members of groups that 
have traditionally been underrepresented based on race, color, national 
origin, gender, age, or disability. To meet this requirement, the 
applicant must describe how it will--
    (i) Identify the needs of the parent centers in the proposed region 
for TA and information.
    Note: The methods and tools to identify needs will be finalized in 
consultation with the CPIR, other regional PTACs, and the OSEP project 
officer in order to assure coordination and avoid duplication; and
    (ii) Ensure that services and products meet the needs of the parent 
centers;
    (2) Achieve its goals, objectives, and intended outcomes. To meet 
this requirement, the applicant must provide--
    (i) Measurable intended project outcomes; and
    (ii) In Appendix A, the logic model (as defined in this notice) by 
which the proposed project will achieve its intended outcomes that 
depicts, at a minimum, the goals, activities, outputs, and intended 
outcomes of the proposed project;
    (3) Use a conceptual framework (and provide a copy in Appendix A) 
to develop project plans and activities, describing any underlying 
concepts, assumptions, expectations, beliefs, or theories, as well as 
the presumed relationships or linkages among these variables, and any 
empirical support for this framework;
    Note: The following websites provide more information on logic 
models and conceptual frameworks: www.osepideasthatwork.org/logicModel 
and www.osepideasthatwork.org/resources-grantees/program-areas/ta-ta/tad-project-logic-model-and-conceptual-framework.
    (4) Be based on current research and make use of EBPs. To meet this 
requirement, the applicant must describe--
    (i) The current research on: Outreach, family-centered services, 
and self-advocacy skill building, including effective and appropriate 
outreach and service provision to underserved parents of children with 
disabilities, including parents with limited English proficiency, 
parents with low literacy levels, parents who themselves experience 
disability, parents of youth involved in the juvenile justice system, 
foster parents, military-connected parents, and Native American 
parents; staff training, including multilingual staff; and nonprofit 
management;
    (ii) The current research about adult learning principles and 
implementation science that will inform the proposed TA; and
    (iii) How the proposed project will incorporate current research 
and EBPs in the development and delivery of its products and services;
    (5) Develop products and provide services that are of high quality 
and sufficient intensity and duration to achieve the intended outcomes 
of the proposed project. To address this requirement, the applicant 
must describe--
    (i) How it proposes to work with the CPIR to identify the knowledge 
base for parent centers': Outreach, family-centered services, and self-
advocacy skill building, including effective and appropriate outreach 
and service provision to underserved families of children with 
disabilities, including parents with limited English proficiency, 
parents with low literacy levels, parents who themselves experience 
disability, parents of youth involved in the juvenile justice system, 
foster parents, military-connected parents, and Native American 
parents;

[[Page 34993]]

staff training, including multilingual staff; and nonprofit management;
    (ii) Its proposed approach to targeted, specialized TA,\4\ which 
must identify the intended recipients within the parent centers, 
including the type and number of recipients, that will receive the 
products and services under this approach, and how the project will--
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \4\ ``Targeted, specialized TA'' means TA services based on 
needs common to multiple recipients and not extensively 
individualized. A relationship is established between the TA 
recipient and one or more TA center staff. This category of TA 
includes one-time, labor-intensive events, such as facilitating 
strategic planning or hosting regional or national conferences. It 
can also include episodic, less labor-intensive events that extend 
over a period of time, such as facilitating a series of conference 
calls on single or multiple topics that are designed around the 
needs of the recipients. Facilitating communities of practice can 
also be considered targeted, specialized TA.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    (A) Conduct at least one in-person, on-site visit to each parent 
center in the region during the course of the five-year project period;
    (B) Increase parent centers' capacity to reach and provide services 
to all parents with children with disabilities and youth, including 
underserved parents, which includes parents with limited English 
proficiency, parents with low literacy levels, parents who themselves 
experience disability, parents of youth involved in the juvenile 
justice system, foster parents, military-connected parents, and Native 
American parents;
    (C) Increase parent centers' capacity to train staff, including 
multilingual staff, to provide effective and appropriate outreach and 
service provision to underserved families of children with 
disabilities, including parents with limited English proficiency, 
parents with low literacy levels, parents who themselves experience 
disability, parents of youth involved in the juvenile justice system, 
foster parents, military-connected parents, and Native American 
parents; and
    (D) Increase parent centers' capacity to effectively manage 
nonprofit organizations, including developing the board of directors so 
that parent centers have the organizational policies, procedures, and a 
structure in place to manage their grants effectively;
    (iii) Its proposed approach to intensive, sustained TA,\5\ which 
must identify--
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \5\ ``Intensive, sustained TA'' means TA services often provided 
on-site and requiring a stable, ongoing relationship between the TA 
center staff and the TA recipient. ``TA services'' are defined as 
negotiated series of activities designed to reach a valued outcome. 
This category of TA should result in changes to policy, program, 
practice, or operations that support increased recipient capacity or 
improved outcomes at one or more systems levels.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    (A) The intended recipients, including the type and number of 
recipients, that will receive the products and services under this 
approach;
    (B) Its proposed approach to measure the readiness of the parent 
centers to work with the project, including their commitment to the 
initiative, current infrastructure, and available resources;
    (C) Its proposed plan for assisting parent centers to build or 
enhance their staff training and professional development based on 
adult learning principles and coaching; and
    (D) Its proposed approach to providing intensive TA when requested 
by OSEP project officers; and
    (6) Develop products and implement services that maximize 
efficiency. To address this requirement, the applicant must describe--
    (i) How the proposed project will use technology to achieve the 
intended project outcomes;
    (ii) With whom the proposed project will collaborate and the 
intended outcomes of this collaboration;
    (iii) How the proposed project will use existing knowledge and 
expertise within parent centers to achieve intended project outcomes;
    (iv) How the proposed project will use the resources housed in and 
developed by the CPIR--including family-centered resources that provide 
families with strategies to enhance their children's literacy, 
numeracy, and scientific reasoning at home--and build on the CPIR's 
universal TA; and
    (v) How the proposed project will use non-project resources to 
achieve the intended project outcomes.
    (c) In the narrative section of the application under ``Quality of 
the project evaluation,'' include an evaluation plan for the project. 
The evaluation plan must describe: Measures for evaluating the quality, 
accuracy, and impartiality of project services and products; measures 
of progress in implementation, including the criteria for determining 
the extent to which the project's products and services have met the 
goals for reaching its target population; measures of intended outcomes 
or results of the project's activities in order to evaluate those 
activities; and how well the goals or objectives of the proposed 
project, as described in its logic model, have been met.
    Note: The evaluations for all the regional PTACs will be developed 
in consultation with the regional PTACs and OSEP project officers for 
the regional PTACs.
    (d) Demonstrate, in the narrative section of the application under 
``Adequacy of resources,'' how--
    (1) The proposed project will encourage applications for employment 
from persons who are members of groups that have traditionally been 
underrepresented based on race, color, national origin, gender, age, or 
disability, as appropriate;
    (2) The proposed key project personnel, consultants, and 
subcontractors have the qualifications and experience to carry out the 
proposed activities and achieve the project's intended outcomes;
    (3) The applicant and any key partners have adequate resources to 
carry out the proposed activities; and
    (4) The proposed costs are reasonable in relation to the 
anticipated results and benefits.
    (e) Demonstrate, in the narrative section of the application under 
``Quality of the management plan,'' how--
    (1) The proposed management plan will ensure that the project's 
intended outcomes will be achieved on time and within budget. To 
address this requirement, the applicant must describe--
    (i) Clearly defined responsibilities for key project personnel, 
consultants, and subcontractors, as applicable; and
    (ii) Timelines and milestones for accomplishing the project tasks;
    (2) Key project personnel and any consultants and subcontractors 
will be allocated and how these allocations are appropriate and 
adequate to achieve the project's intended outcomes;
    (3) The proposed management plan will ensure that the products and 
services provided are of high quality, impartial, relevant, and useful 
to recipients; and
    (4) The proposed project will benefit from a diversity of 
perspectives, including those of families using a variety of education 
options, youth, educators, TA providers, researchers, and policy 
makers, among others, in its development and operation.
    (f) Address the following application requirements. The applicant 
must--
    (1) Include, in Appendix A, personnel-loading charts and timelines, 
as applicable, to illustrate the management plan described in the 
narrative;
    (2) Include, in the budget, attendance at the following:
    (i) A one and one-half day kick-off meeting in Washington, DC, 
after receipt of the award, and an annual planning meeting in 
Washington, DC, with the OSEP project officer and other relevant staff 
during each subsequent year of the project period.
    Note: Within 30 days of receipt of the award, a post-award 
teleconference

[[Page 34994]]

must be held between the OSEP project officer and the grantee's project 
director or other authorized representative;
    (ii) A two and one-half day project directors' conference in 
Washington, DC, during each year of the project period; and
    (iii) Two annual two-day trips to attend Department briefings, 
Department-sponsored conferences, and other meetings, as requested by 
OSEP;
    (5) Ensure that the budget allocates $75,000 annually to carry out 
the project services described in paragraphs (b)(5)(ii)(B) and (C) 
(military connected and native American parents and youth) of this 
focus area.
    (6) Include, in the budget, a line item for an annual set-aside of 
five percent of the grant amount to support emerging needs that are 
consistent with the proposed project's intended outcomes, as those 
needs are identified in consultation with, and approved by, the OSEP 
project officer. With approval from the OSEP project officer, the 
project must reallocate any remaining funds from this annual set-aside 
no later than the end of the third quarter of each budget period; and
    (7) Maintain a presence on a high-quality website, with an easy-to-
navigate design, that meets government or industry-recognized standards 
for accessibility.
    Competitive Preference Priorities: Within this absolute priority, 
we give competitive preference to applications that address the 
following priorities. Under 34 CFR 75.105(c)(2)(i), we will award five 
additional points to an application for Focus Area 2 that meets each of 
these priorities, for a total of no more than 10 points, as follows.
    These priorities are:
    Competitive Preference Priority 1--Applicants that are parent 
organizations (5 Points).
    Section 671(a)(2) of IDEA defines a ``parent organization'' as a 
private nonprofit organization (other than an institution of higher 
education) that--
    (A) Has a board of directors--
    (i) The majority of whom are parents of children with disabilities 
ages birth through 26;
    (ii) That includes--
    (I) Individuals working in the fields of special education, related 
services, and early intervention;
    (II) Individuals with disabilities; and
    (iii) The parent and professional members of which are broadly 
representative of the population to be served, including low-income 
parents and parents of limited English proficient children; and
    (B) Has as its mission serving families of children with 
disabilities who--
    (i) Are ages birth through 26; and
    (ii) Have the full range of disabilities described in section 
602(3) of IDEA.
    Competitive Preference Priority 2--Location (5 Points).
    Applicants under Focus Area 2 that are located in the region they 
propose to serve.
    Definitions: The following definitions are from 34 CFR 77.1:
    Demonstrates a rationale means a key project component included in 
the project's logic model is informed by research or evaluation 
findings that suggest the project component is likely to improve 
relevant outcomes.
    Evidence-based means the proposed project component is supported by 
one or more of strong evidence, moderate evidence, promising evidence, 
or evidence that demonstrates a rationale.
    Experimental study means a study that is designed to compare 
outcomes between two groups of individuals (such as students) that are 
otherwise equivalent except for their assignment to either a treatment 
group receiving a project component or a control group that does not. 
Randomized controlled trials, regression discontinuity design studies, 
and single-case design studies are the specific types of experimental 
studies that, depending on their design and implementation (e.g., 
sample attrition in randomized controlled trials and regression 
discontinuity design studies), can meet What Works Clearinghouse (WWC) 
standards without reservations as described in the WWC Handbook:
    (i) A randomized controlled trial employs random assignment of, for 
example, students, teachers, classrooms, or schools to receive the 
project component being evaluated (the treatment group) or not to 
receive the project component (the control group).
    (ii) A regression discontinuity design study assigns the project 
component being evaluated using a measured variable (e.g., assigning 
students reading below a cutoff score to tutoring or developmental 
education classes) and controls for that variable in the analysis of 
outcomes.
    (iii) A single-case design study uses observations of a single case 
(e.g., a student eligible for a behavioral intervention) over time in 
the absence and presence of a controlled treatment manipulation to 
determine whether the outcome is systematically related to the 
treatment.
    Logic model (also referred to as a theory of action) means a 
framework that identifies key project components of the proposed 
project (i.e., the active ``ingredients'' that are hypothesized to be 
critical to achieving the relevant outcomes) and describes the 
theoretical and operational relationships among the key project 
components and relevant outcomes.
    Moderate evidence means that there is evidence of effectiveness of 
a key project component in improving a relevant outcome for a sample 
that overlaps with the populations or settings proposed to receive that 
component, based on a relevant finding from one of the following:
    (i) A practice guide prepared by the WWC using version 2.1 or 3.0 
of the WWC Handbook reporting a ``strong evidence base'' or ``moderate 
evidence base'' for the corresponding practice guide recommendation;
    (ii) An intervention report prepared by the WWC using version 2.1 
or 3.0 of the WWC Handbook reporting a ``positive effect'' or 
``potentially positive effect'' on a relevant outcome based on a 
``medium to large'' extent of evidence, with no reporting of a 
``negative effect'' or ``potentially negative effect'' on a relevant 
outcome; or
    (iii) A single experimental study or quasi-experimental design 
study reviewed and reported by the WWC using version 2.1 or 3.0 of the 
WWC Handbook, or otherwise assessed by the Department using version 3.0 
of the WWC Handbook, as appropriate, and that--
    (A) Meets WWC standards with or without reservations;
    (B) Includes at least one statistically significant and positive 
(i.e., favorable) effect on a relevant outcome;
    (C) Includes no overriding statistically significant and negative 
effects on relevant outcomes reported in the study or in a 
corresponding WWC intervention report prepared under version 2.1 or 3.0 
of the WWC Handbook; and
    (D) Is based on a sample from more than one site (e.g., State, 
county, city, school district, or postsecondary campus) and includes at 
least 350 students or other individuals across sites. Multiple studies 
of the same project component that each meet requirements in paragraphs 
(iii)(A), (B), and (C) of this definition may together satisfy this 
requirement.
    Project component means an activity, strategy, intervention, 
process, product, practice, or policy included in a project. Evidence 
may pertain to an individual project component or to a combination of 
project components (e.g., training teachers on instructional practices 
for English learners and follow-on coaching for these teachers).
    Promising evidence means that there is evidence of the 
effectiveness of a key project component in improving a

[[Page 34995]]

relevant outcome, based on a relevant finding from one of the 
following:
    (i) A practice guide prepared by WWC reporting a ``strong evidence 
base'' or ``moderate evidence base'' for the corresponding practice 
guide recommendation;
    (ii) An intervention report prepared by the WWC reporting a 
``positive effect'' or ``potentially positive effect'' on a relevant 
outcome with no reporting of a ``negative effect'' or ``potentially 
negative effect'' on a relevant outcome; or
    (iii) A single study assessed by the Department, as appropriate, 
that--
    (A) Is an experimental study, a quasi-experimental design study, or 
a well-designed and well-implemented correlational study with 
statistical controls for selection bias (e.g., a study using regression 
methods to account for differences between a treatment group and a 
comparison group); and
    (B) Includes at least one statistically significant and positive 
(i.e., favorable) effect on a relevant outcome.
    Quasi-experimental design study means a study using a design that 
attempts to approximate an experimental study by identifying a 
comparison group that is similar to the treatment group in important 
respects. This type of study, depending on design and implementation 
(e.g., establishment of baseline equivalence of the groups being 
compared), can meet WWC standards with reservations, but cannot meet 
WWC standards without reservations, as described in the WWC Handbook.
    Relevant outcome means the student outcome(s) or other outcome(s) 
the key project component is designed to improve, consistent with the 
specific goals of the program.
    Strong evidence means that there is evidence of the effectiveness 
of a key project component in improving a relevant outcome for a sample 
that overlaps with the populations and settings proposed to receive 
that component, based on a relevant finding from one of the following:
    (i) A practice guide prepared by the WWC using version 2.1 or 3.0 
of the WWC Handbook reporting a ``strong evidence base'' for the 
corresponding practice guide recommendation;
    (ii) An intervention report prepared by the WWC using version 2.1 
or 3.0 of the WWC Handbook reporting a ``positive effect'' on a 
relevant outcome based on a ``medium to large'' extent of evidence, 
with no reporting of a ``negative effect'' or ``potentially negative 
effect'' on a relevant outcome; or
    (iii) A single experimental study reviewed and reported by the WWC 
using version 2.1 or 3.0 of the WWC Handbook, or otherwise assessed by 
the Department using version 3.0 of the WWC Handbook, as appropriate, 
and that--
    (A) Meets WWC standards without reservations;
    (B) Includes at least one statistically significant and positive 
(i.e., favorable) effect on a relevant outcome;
    (C) Includes no overriding statistically significant and negative 
effects on relevant outcomes reported in the study or in a 
corresponding WWC intervention report prepared under version 2.1 or 3.0 
of the WWC Handbook; and
    (D) Is based on a sample from more than one site (e.g., State, 
county, city, school district, or postsecondary campus) and includes at 
least 350 students or other individuals across sites. Multiple studies 
of the same project component that each meet requirements in paragraphs 
(iii)(A), (B), and (C) of this definition may together satisfy this 
requirement.
    What Works Clearinghouse Handbook (WWC Handbook) means the 
standards and procedures set forth in the WWC Procedures and Standards 
Handbook, Version 3.0 or Version 2.1 (incorporated by reference, see 34 
CFR 77.2). Study findings eligible for review under WWC standards can 
meet WWC standards without reservations, meet WWC standards with 
reservations, or not meet WWC standards. WWC practice guides and 
intervention reports include findings from systematic reviews of 
evidence as described in the Handbook documentation.
    Waiver of Proposed Rulemaking: Under the Administrative Procedure 
Act (APA) (5 U.S.C. 553) the Department generally offers interested 
parties the opportunity to comment on proposed priorities and 
requirements. Section 681(d) of IDEA, however, makes the public comment 
requirements of the APA inapplicable to the priority in this notice.
    Program Authority: 20 U.S.C. 1471, 1472, 1473, and 1481.
    Applicable Regulations: (a) The Education Department General 
Administrative Regulations in 34 CFR parts 75, 77, 79, 81, 82, 84, 97, 
98, and 99. (b) The Office of Management and Budget Guidelines to 
Agencies on Governmentwide Debarment and Suspension (Nonprocurement) in 
2 CFR part 180, as adopted and amended as regulations of the Department 
in 2 CFR part 3485. (c) The Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost 
Principles, and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards in 2 CFR part 
200, as adopted and amended as regulations of the Department in 2 CFR 
part 3474.
    Note: The regulations in 34 CFR part 79 apply to all applicants 
except federally recognized Indian Tribes.

II. Award Information

    Type of Award: Cooperative agreements.
    Estimated Available Funds: $2,800,000.
    Contingent upon the availability of funds and the quality of 
applications, we may make additional awards in FY 2019 from the list of 
unfunded applications from this competition.
    Estimated Range of Awards: $500,000-$800,000.
    Estimated Average Size of Awards: 4 awards at $500,000 for the 
regional PTACs; 1 award of $800,000 for the CPIR.
    Maximum Award: We will not make an award exceeding $500,000 for 
each of the regional PTACs or $800,000 for the CPIR for a single budget 
period of 12 months.
    Estimated Number of Awards: 5.
    Note: The Department is not bound by any estimates in this notice.
    Project Period: Up to 60 months.

III. Eligibility Information

    1. Eligible Applicants: Nonprofit private organizations.
    2. Cost Sharing or Matching: This program does not require cost 
sharing or matching.
    3. Subgrantees: Under 34 CFR 75.708(b) and (c), a grantee under 
this competition may award subgrants--to directly carry out project 
activities described in its application--to the following types of 
entities: IHEs and private nonprofit organizations suitable to carry 
out the activities proposed in the application The grantee may award 
subgrants to entities it has identified in an approved application.
    4. Other General Requirements: (a) Recipients of funding under this 
competition must make positive efforts to employ and advance in 
employment qualified individuals with disabilities (see section 606 of 
IDEA).
    (b) Applicants for, and recipients of, funding must, with respect 
to the aspects of their proposed project relating to the absolute 
priority, involve individuals with disabilities, or parents of 
individuals with disabilities ages birth through 26, in planning, 
implementing, and evaluating the project (see section 682(a)(1)(A) of 
IDEA).

[[Page 34996]]

IV. Application and Submission Information

    1. Application Submission Instructions: For information on how to 
submit an application please refer to our Common Instructions for 
Applicants to Department of Education Discretionary Grant Programs, 
published in the Federal Register on February 12, 2018 (83 FR 6003) and 
available at www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2018-02-12/pdf/2018-02558.pdf.
    2. Intergovernmental Review: This competition is subject to 
Executive Order 12372 and the regulations in 34 CFR part 79. However, 
under 34 CFR 79.8(a), we waive intergovernmental review in order to 
make awards by the end of FY 2018.
    3. Funding Restrictions: We reference regulations outlining funding 
restrictions in the Applicable Regulations section of this notice.
    4. Recommended Page Limit: The application narrative (Part III of 
the application) is where you, the applicant, address the selection 
criteria that reviewers use to evaluate your application. We recommend 
that you (1) limit the application narrative to no more than 50 pages, 
and (2) use the following standards:
     A ``page'' is 8.5'' x 11'', on one side only, with 1'' 
margins at the top, bottom, and both sides.
     Double-space (no more than three lines per vertical inch) 
all text in the application narrative, including titles, headings, 
footnotes, quotations, reference citations, and captions, as well as 
all text in charts, tables, figures, graphs, and screen shots.
     Use a font that is 12 point or larger.
     Use one of the following fonts: Times New Roman, Courier, 
Courier New, or Arial.
    The recommended page limit does not apply to Part I, the cover 
sheet; Part II, the budget section, including the narrative budget 
justification; Part IV, the assurances and certifications; or the 
abstract (follow the guidance provided in the application package for 
completing the abstract), the table of contents, the list of priority 
requirements, the resumes, the reference list, the letters of support, 
or the appendices. However, the recommended page limit does apply to 
all of the application narrative, including all text in charts, tables, 
figures, graphs, and screen shots.

V. Application Review Information

    1. Selection Criteria: The selection criteria for this competition 
are from 34 CFR 75.210 and are as follows:
    (a) Significance (10 points).
    (1) The Secretary considers the significance of the proposed 
project.
    (2) In determining the significance of the proposed project, the 
Secretary considers the following factors:
    (i) The extent to which the proposed project will focus on serving 
or otherwise addressing the needs of disadvantaged individuals;
    (ii) The extent to which specific gaps or weaknesses in services, 
infrastructure, or opportunities have been identified and will be 
addressed by the proposed project, including the nature and magnitude 
of those gaps or weaknesses; and
    (iii) The importance or magnitude of the results or outcomes likely 
to be attained by the proposed project.
    (b) Quality of the project services (35 points).
    (1) The Secretary considers the quality of the services to be 
provided by the proposed project.
    (2) In determining the quality of the services to be provided by 
the proposed project, the Secretary considers the quality and 
sufficiency of strategies for ensuring equal access and treatment for 
eligible project participants who are members of groups that have 
traditionally been underrepresented based on race, color, national 
origin, gender, age, or disability.
    (3) In addition, the Secretary considers the following factors:
    (i) The extent to which the goals, objectives, and outcomes to be 
achieved by the proposed project are clearly specified and measurable;
    (ii) The extent to which there is a conceptual framework underlying 
the proposed research or demonstration activities and the quality of 
that framework;
    (iii) The extent to which the services to be provided by the 
proposed project reflect up-to-date knowledge from research and 
effective practice;
    (iv) The extent to which the services to be provided by the 
proposed project are appropriate to the needs of the intended 
recipients or beneficiaries of those services;
    (v) The extent to which the services to be provided by the proposed 
project involve the collaboration of appropriate partners for 
maximizing the effectiveness of project services; and
    (vi) The extent to which the technical assistance services to be 
provided by the proposed project involve the use of efficient 
strategies, including the use of technology, as appropriate, and the 
leveraging of non-project resources.
    (c) Quality of project evaluation (20 points).
    (1) The Secretary considers the quality of the evaluation to be 
conducted of the proposed project.
    (2) In determining the quality of the evaluation, the Secretary 
considers the following factors:
    (i) The extent to which the methods of evaluation are thorough, 
feasible, and appropriate to the goals, objectives, and outcomes of the 
proposed project;
    (ii) The extent to which the methods of evaluation are appropriate 
to the context within which the project operates;
    (iii) The extent to which the methods of evaluation will provide 
performance feedback and permit periodic assessment of progress toward 
achieving intended outcomes; and
    (iv) The extent to which the methods of evaluation include the use 
of objective performance measures that are clearly related to the 
intended outcomes of the project and will produce quantitative and 
qualitative data to the extent possible.
    (d) Adequacy of resources and Quality of Project Personnel (15 
points).
    (1) The Secretary considers the adequacy of resources and quality 
of project personnel for the proposed project.
    (2) In determining the quality of project personnel, the Secretary 
considers the extent to which the applicant encourages applications for 
employment from persons who are members of groups that have 
traditionally been underrepresented based on race, color, national 
origin, gender, age, or disability.
    (3) In determining the adequacy of resources and quality of project 
personnel for the proposed project, the Secretary considers the 
following factors:
    (i) The qualifications, including relevant training and experience, 
of the project director or principal investigator;
    (ii) The qualifications, including relevant training and 
experience, of key project personnel;
    (iii) The qualifications, including relevant training and 
experience, of project consultants or subcontractors;
    (iv) The adequacy of support, including facilities, equipment, 
supplies, and other resources, from the applicant organization or the 
lead applicant organization;
    (v) The relevance and demonstrated commitment of each partner in 
the proposed project to the implementation and success of the project; 
and
    (vi) The extent to which the costs are reasonable in relation to 
the objectives, design, and potential significance of the proposed 
project.
    (e) Quality of the management plan (20 points).

[[Page 34997]]

    (1) The Secretary considers the quality of the management plan for 
the proposed project.
    (2) In determining the quality of the management plan for the 
proposed project, the Secretary considers the following factors:
    (i) The adequacy of the management plan to achieve the objectives 
of the proposed project on time and within budget, including clearly 
defined responsibilities, timelines, and milestones for accomplishing 
project tasks;
    (ii) The extent to which the time commitments of the project 
director and principal investigator and other key project personnel are 
appropriate and adequate to meet the objectives of the proposed 
project;
    (iii) The adequacy of mechanisms for ensuring high-quality products 
and services from the proposed project; and
    (iv) How the applicant will ensure that a diversity of perspectives 
are brought to bear in the operation of the proposed project, including 
those of parents, teachers, the business community, a variety of 
disciplinary and professional fields, recipients or beneficiaries of 
services, or others, as appropriate.
    2. Review and Selection Process: We remind potential applicants 
that in reviewing applications in any discretionary grant competition, 
the Secretary may consider, under 34 CFR 75.217(d)(3), the past 
performance of the applicant in carrying out a previous award, such as 
the applicant's use of funds, achievement of project objectives, and 
compliance with grant conditions. The Secretary may also consider 
whether the applicant failed to submit a timely performance report or 
submitted a report of unacceptable quality.
    In addition, in making a competitive grant award, the Secretary 
requires various assurances, including those applicable to Federal 
civil rights laws that prohibit discrimination in programs or 
activities receiving Federal financial assistance from the Department 
of Education (34 CFR 100.4, 104.5, 106.4, 108.8, and 110.23).
    3. Additional Review and Selection Process Factors: In the past, 
the Department has had difficulty finding peer reviewers for certain 
competitions because so many individuals who are eligible to serve as 
peer reviewers have conflicts of interest. The standing panel 
requirements under section 682(b) of IDEA also have placed additional 
constraints on the availability of reviewers. Therefore, the Department 
has determined that for some discretionary grant competitions, 
applications may be separated into two or more groups and ranked and 
selected for funding within specific groups. This procedure will make 
it easier for the Department to find peer reviewers by ensuring that 
greater numbers of individuals who are eligible to serve as reviewers 
for any particular group of applicants will not have conflicts of 
interest. It also will increase the quality, independence, and fairness 
of the review process, while permitting panel members to review 
applications under discretionary grant competitions for which they also 
have submitted applications.
    4. Risk Assessment and Specific Conditions: Consistent with 2 CFR 
200.205, before awarding grants under this competition the Department 
conducts a review of the risks posed by applicants. Under 2 CFR 
3474.10, the Secretary may impose specific conditions and, in 
appropriate circumstances, high-risk conditions on a grant if the 
applicant or grantee is not financially stable; has a history of 
unsatisfactory performance; has a financial or other management system 
that does not meet the standards in 2 CFR part 200, subpart D; has not 
fulfilled the conditions of a prior grant; or is otherwise not 
responsible.
    5. Integrity and Performance System: If you are selected under this 
competition to receive an award that over the course of the project 
period may exceed the simplified acquisition threshold (currently 
$150,000), under 2 CFR 200.205(a)(2) we must make a judgment about your 
integrity, business ethics, and record of performance under Federal 
awards--that is, the risk posed by you as an applicant--before we make 
an award. In doing so, we must consider any information about you that 
is in the integrity and performance system (currently referred to as 
the Federal Awardee Performance and Integrity Information System 
(FAPIIS)), accessible through the System for Award Management (SAM) at 
https://www.sam.gov. You may review and comment on any information 
about yourself that a Federal agency previously entered and that is 
currently in FAPIIS.
    Please note that, if the total value of your currently active 
grants, cooperative agreements, and procurement contracts from the 
Federal Government exceeds $10,000,000, the reporting requirements in 2 
CFR part 200, Appendix XII, require you to report certain integrity 
information to FAPIIS semiannually. Please review the requirements in 2 
CFR part 200, Appendix XII, if this grant plus all the other Federal 
funds you receive exceed $10,000,000.

VI. Award Administration Information

    1. Award Notices: If your application is successful, we notify your 
U.S. Representative and U.S. Senators and send you a Grant Award 
Notification (GAN); or we may send you an email containing a link to 
access an electronic version of your GAN. We may notify you informally, 
also.
    If your application is not evaluated or not selected for funding, 
we notify you.
    2. Administrative and National Policy Requirements: We identify 
administrative and national policy requirements in the application 
package and reference these and other requirements in the Applicable 
Regulations section of this notice.
    We reference the regulations outlining the terms and conditions of 
an award in the Applicable Regulations section of this notice and 
include these and other specific conditions in the GAN. The GAN also 
incorporates your approved application as part of your binding 
commitments under the grant.
    3. Open Licensing Requirements: Unless an exception applies, if you 
are awarded a grant under this competition, you will be required to 
openly license to the public grant deliverables created in whole, or in 
part, with Department grant funds. When the deliverable consists of 
modifications to pre-existing works, the license extends only to those 
modifications that can be separately identified and only to the extent 
that open licensing is permitted under the terms of any licenses or 
other legal restrictions on the use of pre-existing works. 
Additionally, a grantee or subgrantee that is awarded competitive grant 
funds must have a plan to disseminate these public grant deliverables. 
This dissemination plan can be developed and submitted after your 
application has been reviewed and selected for funding. For additional 
information on the open licensing requirements please refer to 2 CFR 
3474.20.
    4. Reporting: (a) If you apply for a grant under this competition, 
you must ensure that you have in place the necessary processes and 
systems to comply with the reporting requirements in 2 CFR part 170 
should you receive funding under the competition. This does not apply 
if you have an exception under 2 CFR 170.110(b).
    (b) At the end of your project period, you must submit a final 
performance report, including financial information, as directed by the 
Secretary. If you receive a multiyear award, you must submit an annual 
performance report that provides the most current performance and 
financial expenditure

[[Page 34998]]

information as directed by the Secretary under 34 CFR 75.118. The 
Secretary may also require more frequent performance reports under 34 
CFR 75.720(c). For specific requirements on reporting, please go to 
www.ed.gov/fund/grant/apply/appforms/appforms.html.
    5. Performance Measures: Under the Government Performance and 
Results Act of 1993 (GPRA), the Department has established a set of 
performance measures, including long-term measures, that are designed 
to yield information on the quality, relevance, and usefulness of the 
materials, products, and services of the Parent Training and 
Information Centers program. These measures are:
     Program Performance Measure #1: The percentage of 
materials used by projects that are deemed to be of high quality;
     Program Performance Measure #2: The percentage of products 
and services deemed to be of high relevance to educational and early 
intervention policy and practice; and
     Program Performance Measure #3: The percentage of all 
products and services deemed to be useful by target audiences to 
improve educational or early intervention policy or practice.
    Grantees will be required to report information on their project's 
performance in annual reports to the Department (34 CFR 75.590).
    5. Continuation Awards: In making a continuation award under 34 CFR 
75.253, the Secretary considers, among other things: Whether a grantee 
has made substantial progress in achieving the goals and objectives of 
the project; whether the grantee has expended funds in a manner that is 
consistent with its approved application and budget; and, if the 
Secretary has established performance measurement requirements, the 
performance targets in the grantee's approved application.
    In making a continuation award, the Secretary also considers 
whether the grantee is operating in compliance with the assurances in 
its approved application, including those applicable to Federal civil 
rights laws that prohibit discrimination in programs or activities 
receiving Federal financial assistance from the Department (34 CFR 
100.4, 104.5, 106.4, 108.8, and 110.23).

VII. Other Information

    Accessible Format: Individuals with disabilities can obtain this 
document and a copy of the application package in an accessible format 
(e.g., Braille, large print, audiotape, or compact disc) by contacting 
the Management Support Services Team, U.S. Department of Education, 400 
Maryland Avenue SW, Room 5113, Potomac Center Plaza, Washington, DC 
20202-2500. Telephone: (202) 245-7363. If you use a TDD or a TTY, call 
the FRS, toll free, at 1-800-877-8339.
    Electronic Access to This Document: The official version of this 
document is the document published in the Federal Register. You may 
access the official edition of the Federal Register and the Code of 
Federal Regulations via the Federal Digital System at: www.gpo.gov/fdsys. At this site you can view this document, as well as all other 
documents of this Department published in the Federal Register, in text 
or Portable Document Format (PDF). To use PDF you must have Adobe 
Acrobat Reader, which is available free at the site.
    You may also access documents of the Department published in the 
Federal Register by using the article search feature at: 
www.federalregister.gov. Specifically, through the advanced search 
feature at this site, you can limit your search to documents published 
by the Department.

    Dated: July 19, 2018.
Johnny W. Collett,
Assistant Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative Services.
[FR Doc. 2018-15832 Filed 7-23-18; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4000-01-P