Reports, Forms and Record Keeping Requirements Agency Information Collection Activity Under OMB Review, 19138-19139 [2017-08355]

Download as PDF 19138 Federal Register / Vol. 82, No. 78 / Tuesday, April 25, 2017 / Notices Ebony Coleman, Designated Federal Officer, Office of the U.S. Global AIDS Coordinator and Health Diplomacy, Department of State. DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Railroad Administration [Docket No. FRA–1999–6439, Notice No. 25] Adjustment of Nationwide Significant Risk Threshold Federal Railroad Administration (FRA), Department of Transportation (DOT). ACTION: Notice of Adjustment of Nationwide Significant Risk Threshold. AGENCY: Under title 49 Code of Federal Regulations, Use of Locomotive Horns at Public Highway-Rail Grade Crossings, FRA is updating the Nationwide Significant Risk Threshold (NSRT). This action is needed to ensure the public has the proper permissible risk threshold to evaluate risk resulting from prohibiting routine locomotive horn sounding at highway-rail grade crossings located in quiet zones. This is the seventh update to the NSRT and it is increasing from 14,347 to 14,723. DATES: The effective date of this notice is April 25, 2017. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Mr. Ron Ries, Office of Railroad Safety, FRA, 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE., Washington, DC 20590, (202) 493–6299, Ronald.Ries@dot.gov; or Ms. Kathryn Gresham, Office of Chief Counsel, FRA, 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE., Washington, DC 20590, (202) 493–6038, Kathryn.Gresham@dot.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: SUMMARY: nationwide where train horns are routinely sounded. FRA developed this risk index to serve as one threshold of permissible risk for quiet zones established across the nation under 49 CFR part 222, Use of Locomotive Horns at Public Highway-Rail Grade Crossings. Thus, a community trying to establish and/or maintain its quiet zone, under 49 CFR part 222, can compare the Quiet Zone Risk Index calculated for its specific crossing corridor to the NSRT to determine whether sufficient measures have been taken to compensate for the excess risk that results from prohibiting routine sounding of the locomotive horn. In the alternative, a community can establish its quiet zone in comparison to the Risk Index With Horns, which is defined in 49 CFR 222.9 as a measure of risk to the motoring public when locomotive horns are routinely sounded at every public highway-rail grade crossing within a quiet zone. FRA has periodically updated the NSRT since 2006. FRA last updated the NSRT in 2013, when FRA calculated the NSRT to be 14,347. 78 FR 70623, Nov. 26, 2013. New NSRT Background The NSRT is an average of the risk indexes for gated public crossings [FR Doc. 2017–08360 Filed 4–24–17; 8:45 am] asabaliauskas on DSK3SPTVN1PROD with NOTICES BILLING CODE 4710–10–P Applying the fatality rate and injury rate to the probable number of fatalities and injuries predicted to occur at each of the 44,591 identified crossings, and the predicted cost of the associated injuries and fatalities, FRA calculates the NSRT is 14,723. Accordingly, this updated NSRT value will serve as one threshold of permissible risk for quiet zones established across the nation pursuant to 49 CFR part 222. [FR Doc. 2017–08337 Filed 4–24–17; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4910–06–P 17:42 Apr 24, 2017 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION SUMMARY: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration [Docket No. NHTSA–2016–0123] Reports, Forms and Record Keeping Requirements Agency Information Collection Activity Under OMB Review National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, DOT. AGENCY: Patrick T. Warren, Acting Administrator. VerDate Sep<11>2014 Using collision data over a 5-year period from 2011 to 2015, FRA has recalculated the NSRT based on formulas identified in 49 CFR part 222, appendix D. In making this recalculation, FRA noted the total number of gated crossings nationwide where train horns are routinely sounded was 44,591. Jkt 241001 Notice and request for comments. ACTION: PO 00000 Frm 00123 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 In compliance with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, this notice announces that the Information Collection Request (ICR) abstracted below has been forwarded to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for review and comment. The ICR describes the nature of the information collections and their expected burden. Comments must be submitted on or before May 25, 2017. DATES: Send comments to the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs, Office of Management and Budget, 725 17th Street NW., ADDRESSES: E:\FR\FM\25APN1.SGM 25APN1 EN25AP17.002</GPH> Department’’) as set forth in Title 22 of the United States Code, in particular Section 2656 of that Title, and consistent with the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as amended (5 U.S.C. Appendix). The approval of this Charter by the Under Secretary for Management constitutes a determination by the Secretary of State that this Committee Charter is in the public interest in connection with the performance of duties of the Department. The previous Charter for the Board was established on March 6, 2015. In accordance with Public Law 92–463, Section 14, it has been formally determined to be in the public interest to continue the Charter for another two years. The Charter renewal was approved on April 5, 2017. For further information about the Board, please contact Dr. Ebony Coleman, Designated Federal Officer for the Board, Office of the U.S. Global AIDS Coordinator and Health Diplomacy at ColemanEM@state.gov. Federal Register / Vol. 82, No. 78 / Tuesday, April 25, 2017 / Notices Washington, DC 20503, Attention: NHTSA Desk Officer. For additional information or access to background documents, contact John Kindelberger, Office of Regulatory Analysis and Evaluation, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE., NSA–310, Washington, DC 20590. Mr. Kindelberger’s telephone number is 202–366–4696. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Before a Federal agency can collect certain information from the public, it must receive approval from the Office of Management and Budget (OMB). In compliance with these requirements, this notice announces that the following information collection request has been forwarded to OMB. A Federal Register notice requesting comments on the following information collection was published on December 21, 2016 (81 FR 93728). The agency received no comments on that notice. Title: Tire Pressure Monitoring System—Outage Rate and Repair Costs (TPMS–ORRC). OMB Number: 2127–0626. Type of Request: Revision of a currently approved collection. Abstract: Improperly inflated tires pose a safety risk, increasing the chance of skidding, hydroplaning, longer stopping distances, and crashes due to flat tires and blowouts. Section 13 of the Transportation Recall Enhancement, Accountability, and Documentation (TREAD) Act, which Congress passed on November 1, 2000, directed NHTSA to conduct rulemaking actions to revise and update the Federal motor vehicle safety standards for tires, to improve labeling on tires, and to require a system in new motor vehicles that warns the operator when a tire is significantly underinflated. Tire Pressure Monitoring Systems (TPMS) were mandated in Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard (FMVSS) No. 138, so that drivers are warned when the pressure in one or more of the vehicle’s tires has fallen to 25 percent or more below the placard pressure, or a minimum level of pressure specified in the standard, whichever pressure is higher, and may be informed about which of the four tires is underinflated. As of September 1, 2007, after a phasein period beginning on October 5, 2005, TPMS was required on all new light vehicles (i.e., passenger cars, trucks, multipurpose passenger vehicles, and buses with a gross vehicle weight rating of 10,000 pounds or less, except those vehicles with dual wheels on an axle). Executive Order 12866 requires Federal agencies to evaluate their asabaliauskas on DSK3SPTVN1PROD with NOTICES FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:42 Apr 24, 2017 Jkt 241001 existing regulations and programs and measure their effectiveness in achieving their objectives. Since the phase-in of TPMS, there has been only one evaluation of TPMS. The TPMS–SS (OMB #2127–0626) was conducted in 2011, as a special study through the infrastructure of the National Automotive Sampling System (NASS), to collect nationally representative data on how effective TPMS was in reducing underinflation in the on-road fleet of passenger vehicles. Analysis of the survey results indicated that direct TPMS is 55.6-percent effective at preventing severe underinflation as defined in FMVSS No. 138. However, effectiveness was substantially lower in vehicles that were 6–7 years old at the time of the survey. One explanation as to why this is true was the possibility that the drivers of these older vehicles were not taking all the maintenance actions (e.g., adding TPMS sensors to new replacement tires, replacing nonfunctioning sensors on current tires, having the system properly re-set when needed) that were needed to insure the vehicles had functioning TPMS. Relevant data are needed to examine why the effectiveness of TPMSs in older vehicles is reduced and what can be done to increase it. This was the original goal of the TPMS–ORRC and is still a goal. Additionally, on December 4, 2015, the Fixing America’s Surface Transportation (FAST) Act (Pub. L. 114– 94) was signed into law. An amendment (Section 24115) directs the Secretary of Transportation to update the standard on tire pressure monitoring systems, FMVSS No. 138, to ensure that they cannot be overridden, reset or recalibrated in a way that will prevent the system from identifying a tire that is significantly underinflated. The Act also states that the revised requirements shall not contain any provision that has the effect of prohibiting the availability of direct or indirect tire pressure monitoring systems. Data are needed to help inform the required rulemaking. For this purpose, the design of the TPMS–ORRC field survey has been changed from a convenience sample to a probability sample, allowing nationally representative estimates; this revision also adds a module for indirect TPMS. Affected Public: Individuals and businesses. Estimated Total Annual Burden: 1,352 hours. Comments are Invited on: Whether the proposed collection of information is necessary for the proper performance of the functions of the Department, including: Whether the information will PO 00000 Frm 00124 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 19139 have practical utility; the accuracy of the Department’s estimate of the burden of the proposed information collection; ways to enhance the quality, utility and clarity of the information to be collected; and ways to minimize the burden of the collection of information on respondents, including the use of automated collection techniques or other forms of information technology. Authority: The Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995; 44 U.S.C. Chapter 35, as amended and 49 CFR 1.95. Joseph M. Kolly, Acting Associate Administrator, National Center for Statistics and Analysis. [FR Doc. 2017–08355 Filed 4–24–17; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4910–59–P DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Office of Foreign Assets Control Sanctions Actions Pursuant to the Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act Office of Foreign Assets Control, Treasury. ACTION: Notice. SUB-AGENCY: The U.S. Department of the Treasury’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) is publishing the names of two entities whose property and interests in property are blocked pursuant to the Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act (Kingpin Act). DATE: OFAC’s actions described in this notice were effective on April 20, 2017. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: OFAC: Associate Director for Global Targeting, tel.: 202–622–2420; Assistant Director for Licensing, tel.: 202–622– 2480, Assistant Director for Regulatory Affairs, tel.: 202–622–4855, Assistant Director for Sanctions Compliance & Evaluation, tel.: 202–622–2490; or the Department of the Treasury’s Office of the General Counsel: Office of the Chief Counsel (Foreign Assets Control), tel.: 202–622–2410 (not toll free numbers). SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: SUMMARY: Electronic Availability The Specially Designated Nationals and Blocked Persons List (SDN List) and additional information concerning OFAC sanctions programs are available on OFAC’s Web site (http:// www.treasury.gov/ofac). Notice of OFAC Actions On April 20, 2017, OFAC’s Acting Director determined that the property and interests in property of the following persons are blocked. E:\FR\FM\25APN1.SGM 25APN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 82, Number 78 (Tuesday, April 25, 2017)]
[Notices]
[Pages 19138-19139]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2017-08355]


-----------------------------------------------------------------------

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION

National Highway Traffic Safety Administration

[Docket No. NHTSA-2016-0123]


Reports, Forms and Record Keeping Requirements Agency Information 
Collection Activity Under OMB Review

AGENCY: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, DOT.

ACTION: Notice and request for comments.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: In compliance with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, this 
notice announces that the Information Collection Request (ICR) 
abstracted below has been forwarded to the Office of Management and 
Budget (OMB) for review and comment. The ICR describes the nature of 
the information collections and their expected burden.

DATES: Comments must be submitted on or before May 25, 2017.

ADDRESSES: Send comments to the Office of Information and Regulatory 
Affairs, Office of Management and Budget, 725 17th Street NW.,

[[Page 19139]]

Washington, DC 20503, Attention: NHTSA Desk Officer.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: For additional information or access 
to background documents, contact John Kindelberger, Office of 
Regulatory Analysis and Evaluation, National Highway Traffic Safety 
Administration, 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE., NSA-310, Washington, DC 
20590. Mr. Kindelberger's telephone number is 202-366-4696.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Before a Federal agency can collect certain 
information from the public, it must receive approval from the Office 
of Management and Budget (OMB). In compliance with these requirements, 
this notice announces that the following information collection request 
has been forwarded to OMB. A Federal Register notice requesting 
comments on the following information collection was published on 
December 21, 2016 (81 FR 93728). The agency received no comments on 
that notice.
    Title: Tire Pressure Monitoring System--Outage Rate and Repair 
Costs (TPMS-ORRC).
    OMB Number: 2127-0626.
    Type of Request: Revision of a currently approved collection.
    Abstract: Improperly inflated tires pose a safety risk, increasing 
the chance of skidding, hydroplaning, longer stopping distances, and 
crashes due to flat tires and blowouts. Section 13 of the 
Transportation Recall Enhancement, Accountability, and Documentation 
(TREAD) Act, which Congress passed on November 1, 2000, directed NHTSA 
to conduct rulemaking actions to revise and update the Federal motor 
vehicle safety standards for tires, to improve labeling on tires, and 
to require a system in new motor vehicles that warns the operator when 
a tire is significantly underinflated.
    Tire Pressure Monitoring Systems (TPMS) were mandated in Federal 
Motor Vehicle Safety Standard (FMVSS) No. 138, so that drivers are 
warned when the pressure in one or more of the vehicle's tires has 
fallen to 25 percent or more below the placard pressure, or a minimum 
level of pressure specified in the standard, whichever pressure is 
higher, and may be informed about which of the four tires is 
underinflated. As of September 1, 2007, after a phase-in period 
beginning on October 5, 2005, TPMS was required on all new light 
vehicles (i.e., passenger cars, trucks, multipurpose passenger 
vehicles, and buses with a gross vehicle weight rating of 10,000 pounds 
or less, except those vehicles with dual wheels on an axle).
    Executive Order 12866 requires Federal agencies to evaluate their 
existing regulations and programs and measure their effectiveness in 
achieving their objectives. Since the phase-in of TPMS, there has been 
only one evaluation of TPMS. The TPMS-SS (OMB #2127-0626) was conducted 
in 2011, as a special study through the infrastructure of the National 
Automotive Sampling System (NASS), to collect nationally representative 
data on how effective TPMS was in reducing underinflation in the on-
road fleet of passenger vehicles. Analysis of the survey results 
indicated that direct TPMS is 55.6-percent effective at preventing 
severe underinflation as defined in FMVSS No. 138. However, 
effectiveness was substantially lower in vehicles that were 6-7 years 
old at the time of the survey. One explanation as to why this is true 
was the possibility that the drivers of these older vehicles were not 
taking all the maintenance actions (e.g., adding TPMS sensors to new 
replacement tires, replacing non-functioning sensors on current tires, 
having the system properly re-set when needed) that were needed to 
insure the vehicles had functioning TPMS. Relevant data are needed to 
examine why the effectiveness of TPMSs in older vehicles is reduced and 
what can be done to increase it. This was the original goal of the 
TPMS-ORRC and is still a goal.
    Additionally, on December 4, 2015, the Fixing America's Surface 
Transportation (FAST) Act (Pub. L. 114-94) was signed into law. An 
amendment (Section 24115) directs the Secretary of Transportation to 
update the standard on tire pressure monitoring systems, FMVSS No. 138, 
to ensure that they cannot be overridden, reset or recalibrated in a 
way that will prevent the system from identifying a tire that is 
significantly underinflated. The Act also states that the revised 
requirements shall not contain any provision that has the effect of 
prohibiting the availability of direct or indirect tire pressure 
monitoring systems. Data are needed to help inform the required 
rulemaking. For this purpose, the design of the TPMS-ORRC field survey 
has been changed from a convenience sample to a probability sample, 
allowing nationally representative estimates; this revision also adds a 
module for indirect TPMS.
    Affected Public: Individuals and businesses.
    Estimated Total Annual Burden: 1,352 hours.
    Comments are Invited on: Whether the proposed collection of 
information is necessary for the proper performance of the functions of 
the Department, including: Whether the information will have practical 
utility; the accuracy of the Department's estimate of the burden of the 
proposed information collection; ways to enhance the quality, utility 
and clarity of the information to be collected; and ways to minimize 
the burden of the collection of information on respondents, including 
the use of automated collection techniques or other forms of 
information technology.

    Authority: The Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995; 44 U.S.C. 
Chapter 35, as amended and 49 CFR 1.95.

Joseph M. Kolly,
Acting Associate Administrator, National Center for Statistics and 
Analysis.
[FR Doc. 2017-08355 Filed 4-24-17; 8:45 am]
 BILLING CODE 4910-59-P