Reports, Forms, and Record Keeping Requirements, 88320-88322 [2016-29320]

Download as PDF 88320 Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 235 / Wednesday, December 7, 2016 / Notices Authority: 49 U.S.C. 30141(a)(1)(A), (a)(1)(B), and (b)(1); 49 CFR 593.7; delegation of authority at 49 CFR 1.95 and 501.8. Jeffrey M. Giuseppe, Director, Office of Vehicle Safety Compliance. [FR Doc. 2016–29268 Filed 12–6–16; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4910–59–P Programs (NPD–210), National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE., W44–230, Washington, DC 20590. Mr. Chodrow’s phone number is 202–366–9765 and his email address is Brian.Chodrow@ dot.gov. Under the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, before an agency submits a proposed collection of information to OMB for approval, it must publish a document in the Federal Register providing a 60-day comment period and otherwise consult with members of the public and affected agencies concerning each proposed collection of information. The OMB has promulgated regulations describing what must be included in such a document. Under OMB’s regulations (at 5 CFR 1320.8(d)), an agency must ask for public comment on the following: (i) whether the proposed collection of information is necessary for the proper performance of the functions of the agency, including whether the information will have practical utility; (ii) the accuracy of the agency’s estimate of the burden of the proposed collection of information, including the validity of the methodology and assumptions used; (iii) how to enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the information to be collected; and (iv) how to minimize the burden of the collection of information on those who are to respond, including the use of appropriate automated, electronic, mechanical, or other technological collection techniques or other forms of information technology, e.g., permitting electronic submission of responses. In compliance with these requirements, NHTSA asks public comment on the following proposed collection of information: Title: Education on Proper Use of Safety Belts on School Buses. Type of Request: New information collection requirement. OMB Clearance Number: None. Form Number: None. Requested Expiration Date of Approval: 3 years from date of approval. Summary of the Collection of Information: The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) proposes to conduct discussions and informal interviews to identify school districts who have implemented seat belts on school buses, and to gather information to understand the states’ and local agencies’ decisions to implement seat belts on school buses and the funding mechanisms that are used to pay for seat belt installation. These discussions will be held via SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION National Highway Traffic Safety Administration [U.S. DOT Docket No. NHTSA–2016–0121] Reports, Forms, and Record Keeping Requirements National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), DOT. ACTION: Request for public comment on proposed collection of information. AGENCY: Before a Federal agency can collect certain information from the public, it must receive approval from the Office of Management and Budget (OMB). Under procedures established by the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, before seeking OMB approval, Federal agencies must solicit public comment on proposed collections of information, including extensions and reinstatements of previously approved collections. This document describes one collection of information for which NHTSA intends to seek OMB approval. DATES: Comments must be received on or before February 6, 2017. ADDRESSES: You may submit comments identified by DOT Docket ID Number NHTSA–2016–0121 using any of the following methods: Electronic submissions: Go to http:// www.regulations.gov. Follow the online instructions for submitting comments. Mail: Docket Management Facility, M–30, U.S. Department of Transportation, 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE., West Building Ground Floor, Room W12–140, Washington, DC 20590. Hand Delivery: West Building Ground Floor, Room W12–140, 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE., Washington, DC, between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, except Federal holidays. Fax: 1–202–493–2251. Instructions: Each submission must include the Agency name and the Docket number for this Notice. Note that all comments received will be posted without change to http:// www.regulations.gov including any personal information provided. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Brian Chodrow, Office of Safety asabaliauskas on DSK3SPTVN1PROD with NOTICES SUMMARY: VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:54 Dec 06, 2016 Jkt 241001 PO 00000 Frm 00124 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 telephone, email, and/or in-person throughout the course of the project. The findings will be used to develop a model policy and a best practices guide to assist jurisdictions that are considering the use of seat belts on school buses. NHTSA also proposes to conduct a web-based survey to gather information about bus driver distraction as related to student behavior and seat belt use to see if the use of seat belts has influenced disruptive behavior. NHTSA expects to distribute the survey to at least one bus driver in each of the school districts that participate in the aforementioned interviews, but hopes to collect surveys from more than one driver in each of those school districts. The survey will not take more than 10–15 minutes to complete. Follow-up telephone discussions may also be conducted depending on the interest of respondents in providing additional information. Description of the Need for the Information and Proposed Use of the Information—On average, from 2004– 2013, each year eight (8) school-age pedestrians killed were struck by school transportation vehicles (school buses and non-school-bus vehicles used as school buses), and 4 by other vehicles involved in school-bus-related crashes. During this same time period, on average each year six school age children are killed in collisions while riding in a school bus. By focusing on safety both in and around the school bus, we could envision a future where there are zero school transportation fatalities. There has generally been resistance against installing seat belts on school buses based on a variety of reasons including the existing safety features of school buses compared to other vehicles (i.e. taller and heavier vehicles, padded and high seat backs, etc.), need for drivers or aides to enforce wearing seat belts, cost, and other factors. However, it is commonly known that the use of seat belts has improved safety for other types of vehicles. Thus, on November 8, 2015, NHTSA Administrator Dr. Mark Rosekind stated, ‘‘NHTSA has not always spoken with a clear voice on the issue of seat belts on school buses. So let me clear up any ambiguity now: The position of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration is that seat belts save lives. That is true whether in a passenger car or in a big yellow bus. And saving lives is what we are about. So NHTSA’s policy is that every child on every school bus should have a three-point seat belt. NHTSA will seek to use all the tools at our disposal to help achieve that goal, and today I want E:\FR\FM\07DEN1.SGM 07DEN1 asabaliauskas on DSK3SPTVN1PROD with NOTICES Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 235 / Wednesday, December 7, 2016 / Notices to launch a nationwide effort to get us there.’’ The current project seeks to understand the decisions that states and local agencies use when deciding to implement seat belts on school buses and the funding mechanisms that are used to pay for seat belt installation. From there, model policy and a best practices guide will be developed to assist jurisdictions that are considering the use of seat belts on school buses. Finally, the project will also obtain data related to the role of distraction and whether seat belts aid in managing behavior on school buses. The project will culminate with a final report to explain the results and outcomes from the project’s activities. Description of the Likely Respondents (Including Estimated Number, and Proposed Frequency of Response to the Collection of Information)—The first step of this process is to identify school districts who have implemented, or are planning to implement, seat belts on their school buses. NHTSA will reach out to current partners and connections including contacts in the National Association of State Directors of Pupil Transportation Services (NASDPTS), the National Association of Pupil Transportation (NAPT), the National School Transportation Association (NSTA), American School Bus Council (ASBC), school bus manufacturers and dealers, as well as any existing contacts in transportation departments, in order to help identify school districts. NHTSA anticipates contacting approximately 100 individuals across the country to ask general questions related to seat belt use in their jurisdictions. NHTSA will hold general discussions with these partners and contacts via telephone, email, and/or in person. As the goal of these conversations is to identify school districts that have implemented, or are considering implementing, seat belts on school buses, it is expected that these conversations will take no longer than 5 minutes. To the extent possible, NHTSA will also identify, in coordination with their partners, an appropriate contact(s) in each school district. The next step, after school districts have been identified, is to reach out to these school districts who have agreed to provide NHTSA with more information and to gather information to understand the states’ and local agencies’ decisions to implement seat belts on school buses and the funding mechanisms that are used to pay for seat belt installation. Informational interviews will be conducted with State directors of pupil transportation and local school district professionals to identify policy components that VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:54 Dec 06, 2016 Jkt 241001 influence seat belt acquisition and use. Prior to reaching out to any of the school districts, NHTSA will contact the NHTSA Regional Administrators to inform them of the school districts that NHTSA (through their contractor) intends to contact within their region. The process will then commence with introduction emails that NHTSA will send to the identified contact in each school district. The email will provide a brief overview of the project and discussion/interview goals, and will contain two attachments: (1) An introduction letter from NHTSA describing the goals of the project and interview process, and explaining how the information that they provide will be incorporated into the project and report, and (2) a list of discussion topics and questions. Although specific interview questions will be developed to keep the discussion on track as needed, it is expected that the actual interviews will occur as more of a fluid, conversational dialogue rather than a structured interview. NHTSA will follow up with each contact via telephone within 1–2 weeks of sending the email. During this call, NHTSA (through their contractor) will either work with the contact to schedule a time to conduct the interview, or will conduct the interview on the spot if preferred by the contact. In some cases, the necessary information may be retrieved through a one-time telephone or in-person discussion, while in other cases discussions may continue via telephone and email as an on-going discussion throughout the course of the project as school districts think of more information to provide or if they provide additional contacts to follow up with in their district. NHTSA is seeking to gather as much information as the school districts are willing to provide, and frequency of response and discussion will be driven by how involved the school district would like to be in the conversation. It is anticipated that the more detailed discussions will be held with approximately 25 individuals for a collective total of 100 hours, or an average of 4 hours per individual over an extended period. Finally, NHTSA will conduct a survey to gather information about bus driver distraction as related to student behavior and seat belt use to see if the use of seat belts has influenced disruptive behavior. The potential respondents would include bus drivers from school districts who have implemented seat belts. The survey will be web-based and should take no longer than 10–15 minutes to complete. PO 00000 Frm 00125 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 88321 NHTSA expects to distribute the survey to at least one bus driver in each of the school districts that participate in the aforementioned interviews, but hopes to collect surveys from more than one driver in each of those school districts. NHTSA will share the link to the survey with their existing contact(s) within that school district, and will request that they distribute the survey to the appropriate bus drivers within their school district. Follow-up discussions may also be conducted via telephone or email depending on the interest of respondents in providing additional information that may not have been captured by the survey. Throughout the project, the privacy of all participants will be protected. The Model Policy and Best Practices Guide, or any other reports developed as a result of this data collection effort, will not identify any individuals by name. School districts may be identified, but only if permission is given to NHTSA by the school district. Additionally, any school district identified in the Model Policy and Best Practices will be given the opportunity to review and edit any text referring directly to their school district. The online bus driver survey results will be password protected and access will only be given to team members who have been authorized by the Project Manager (principal investigators and research assistants). The survey data will be exported to an Excel® file and stored in a SharePoint site folder that is also only visible to those who have been authorized by the Project Manager. The research team will check the data file as soon as it is exported to the secure SharePoint folder to ensure that no personally identifiable information (e.g. bus driver name or email address) is included. Though survey respondents will be asked to indicate their school district, they will not be required to provide their name or contact information unless they wish to provide additional information to the project team. Any personally identifiable information that is provided will be kept separate from the data collected. Estimate of the Total Annual Reporting and Record Keeping Burden Resulting from the Collection of Information—NHTSA estimates that the total respondent burden for this data collection would be 133.3 hours. The initial discussions would take approximately 5 minutes with 100 people for a total of 8.3 hours. The detailed discussions with school districts who have agreed to participate with the project will take place with a commitment of an average of 4 hours with 25 people for a total of 100 hours. E:\FR\FM\07DEN1.SGM 07DEN1 88322 Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 235 / Wednesday, December 7, 2016 / Notices The bus driver survey would take 15 minutes with approximately 100 people for a total of 25 hours. Authority: 44 U.S.C. Section 3506(c)(2)(A). Dated: December 2, 2016. Jeff Michael, Associate Administrator, Research and Program Development. [FR Doc. 2016–29320 Filed 12–6–16; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4910–59–P DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration [Docket No. PHMSA–2016–0136] Pipeline Safety: Meeting of the Gas Pipeline Safety Advisory Committee Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA), DOT. ACTION: Notice; Advisory Committee meeting reschedule. AGENCY: This notice announces that the public meeting of the Technical Pipeline Safety Standards Committee, also known as the Gas Pipeline Advisory Committee (GPAC), scheduled for December 7–8, 2016, has been rescheduled for January 11–12, 2017. Notice of the original meeting appeared in the Federal Register on November 22, 2016, (81 FR 83795). DATES: The postponed meeting was scheduled for 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. EST on both December 7, 2016, and December 8, 2016. The rescheduled meeting will take place from 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. on both January 11, 2017, and January 12, 2017. The meetings will not be web cast; however, presentations will be available on the meeting Web site and posted on the E-Gov Web site: http:// www.regulations.gov under docket number PHMSA–2016–0136 within 30 days following the meeting. ADDRESSES: The meeting will be held at the Hilton Arlington, 950 North Stafford Street, Arlington, VA, 22203. Additional information regarding hotel and meeting registration and the agenda will be published on the following pipeline advisory committee meeting and registration page: https:// primis.phmsa.dot.gov/meetings/ MtgHome.mtg?mtg=121. asabaliauskas on DSK3SPTVN1PROD with NOTICES SUMMARY: Public Participation This meeting will be open to the public. Members of the public who wish to attend in person are asked to register at: https://primis.phmsa.dot.gov/ meetings/MtgHome.mtg?mtg=121 no VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:54 Dec 06, 2016 Jkt 241001 later than January 4, 2017, in order to facilitate entry and guarantee seating. Members of the public who attend in person will also be provided opportunities to make statements during the meeting. Written comments: Persons who wish to submit written comments on the meeting may be submitted to the docket in the following ways: E-Gov Web site: http:// www.regulations.gov. This site allows the public to enter comments on any Federal Register notice issued by any agency. Fax: 1–202–493–2251. Mail: Docket Management Facility; U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT), 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE., West Building, Room W12–140, Washington, DC 20590–0001. Hand Delivery: Room W12–140 on the ground level of the DOT West Building, 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE., Washington, DC, between 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, except on Federal holidays. Instructions: Identify the docket number PHMSA–2016–0136 at the beginning of your comments. Note that all comments received will be posted without change to http:// www.regulations.gov, including any personal information provided. Anyone can search the electronic form of all comments received into any of our dockets by the name of the individual submitting the comment (or signing the comment, if submitted on behalf of an association, business, labor union, etc.). Therefore, consider reviewing DOT’s complete Privacy Act Statement in the Federal Register published on April 11, 2000, (65 FR 19477) or view the Privacy Notice at http://www.regulations.gov before submitting any such comments. Docket: For access to the docket or to read background documents or comments, go to http:// www.regulations.gov at any time or to Room W12–140 on the ground level of the DOT West Building, 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE., Washington, DC, between 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, except Federal holidays. If you wish to receive confirmation of receipt of your written comments, please include a self-addressed, stamped postcard with the following statement: ‘‘Comments on PHMSA– 2016- 0136.’’ The Docket Clerk will date stamp the postcard prior to returning it to you via the U.S. mail. Privacy Act Statement In accordance with 5 U.S.C. 553(c), DOT solicits comments from the public to better inform its rulemaking process. PO 00000 Frm 00126 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 DOT posts these comments, without edit, including any personal information the commenter provides, to www.regulations.gov, as described in the system of records notice (DOT/ALL– 14 FDMS), which can be reviewed at www.dot.gov/privacy. Services for Individuals with Disabilities: The public meeting will be physically accessible to people with disabilities. Individuals requiring accommodations, such as sign language interpretation or other ancillary aids, are asked to notify Cheryl Whetsel at cheryl.whetsel@dot.gov by December 30, 2016. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: For information about the meeting, contact Cheryl Whetsel by phone at 202–366– 4431 or by email at cheryl.whetsel@ dot.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Meeting Details and Agenda The GPAC will be discussing the proposed rule, ‘‘Safety of Gas Transmission and Gathering Pipelines’’ published in the Federal Register on April 8, 2016, (81 FR 20722), and the associated regulatory analysis. PHMSA is proposing changes to part 192 that include: • Requiring periodic assessments of pipelines in locations where persons are expected to be at risk that are not already covered under the integrity management program requirements; • Modifying the repair criteria, both inside and outside of high consequence areas; • Requiring inspections of pipelines in areas affected by extreme weather, man-made and natural disasters, and other similar events; • Providing additional specificity for in-line inspection, including explicit requirements to account for uncertainty of reported inspection data when evaluating in-line inspection data to identify anomalies; • Expanding integrity assessment methods to explicitly address guided wave ultrasonic inspection and excavation with direct in-situ examination; • Providing clearer functional requirements for conducting risk assessment for integrity management, including addressing seismic risk; • Expanding the mandatory data collection and integration requirements for integrity management, including data validation and seismicity; • Adding requirements to address Management of Change; • Repealing the use of API 80 for gathering lines; • Applying Type B requirements to newly regulated Type A gathering lines E:\FR\FM\07DEN1.SGM 07DEN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 81, Number 235 (Wednesday, December 7, 2016)]
[Notices]
[Pages 88320-88322]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2016-29320]


-----------------------------------------------------------------------

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION

National Highway Traffic Safety Administration

[U.S. DOT Docket No. NHTSA-2016-0121]


Reports, Forms, and Record Keeping Requirements

AGENCY: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), DOT.

ACTION: Request for public comment on proposed collection of 
information.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: Before a Federal agency can collect certain information from 
the public, it must receive approval from the Office of Management and 
Budget (OMB). Under procedures established by the Paperwork Reduction 
Act of 1995, before seeking OMB approval, Federal agencies must solicit 
public comment on proposed collections of information, including 
extensions and reinstatements of previously approved collections.
    This document describes one collection of information for which 
NHTSA intends to seek OMB approval.

DATES: Comments must be received on or before February 6, 2017.

ADDRESSES: You may submit comments identified by DOT Docket ID Number 
NHTSA-2016-0121 using any of the following methods:
    Electronic submissions: Go to http://www.regulations.gov. Follow 
the online instructions for submitting comments.
    Mail: Docket Management Facility, M-30, U.S. Department of 
Transportation, 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE., West Building Ground Floor, 
Room W12-140, Washington, DC 20590.
    Hand Delivery: West Building Ground Floor, Room W12-140, 1200 New 
Jersey Avenue SE., Washington, DC, between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday 
through Friday, except Federal holidays.
    Fax: 1-202-493-2251.
    Instructions: Each submission must include the Agency name and the 
Docket number for this Notice. Note that all comments received will be 
posted without change to http://www.regulations.gov including any 
personal information provided.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Brian Chodrow, Office of Safety 
Programs (NPD-210), National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, 
1200 New Jersey Avenue SE., W44-230, Washington, DC 20590. Mr. 
Chodrow's phone number is 202-366-9765 and his email address is 
Brian.Chodrow@dot.gov.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Under the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, 
before an agency submits a proposed collection of information to OMB 
for approval, it must publish a document in the Federal Register 
providing a 60-day comment period and otherwise consult with members of 
the public and affected agencies concerning each proposed collection of 
information. The OMB has promulgated regulations describing what must 
be included in such a document. Under OMB's regulations (at 5 CFR 
1320.8(d)), an agency must ask for public comment on the following:
    (i) whether the proposed collection of information is necessary for 
the proper performance of the functions of the agency, including 
whether the information will have practical utility;
    (ii) the accuracy of the agency's estimate of the burden of the 
proposed collection of information, including the validity of the 
methodology and assumptions used;
    (iii) how to enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the 
information to be collected; and
    (iv) how to minimize the burden of the collection of information on 
those who are to respond, including the use of appropriate automated, 
electronic, mechanical, or other technological collection techniques or 
other forms of information technology, e.g., permitting electronic 
submission of responses.
    In compliance with these requirements, NHTSA asks public comment on 
the following proposed collection of information:
    Title: Education on Proper Use of Safety Belts on School Buses.
    Type of Request: New information collection requirement.
    OMB Clearance Number: None.
    Form Number: None.
    Requested Expiration Date of Approval: 3 years from date of 
approval.
    Summary of the Collection of Information: The National Highway 
Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) proposes to conduct discussions 
and informal interviews to identify school districts who have 
implemented seat belts on school buses, and to gather information to 
understand the states' and local agencies' decisions to implement seat 
belts on school buses and the funding mechanisms that are used to pay 
for seat belt installation. These discussions will be held via 
telephone, email, and/or in-person throughout the course of the 
project. The findings will be used to develop a model policy and a best 
practices guide to assist jurisdictions that are considering the use of 
seat belts on school buses.
    NHTSA also proposes to conduct a web-based survey to gather 
information about bus driver distraction as related to student behavior 
and seat belt use to see if the use of seat belts has influenced 
disruptive behavior. NHTSA expects to distribute the survey to at least 
one bus driver in each of the school districts that participate in the 
aforementioned interviews, but hopes to collect surveys from more than 
one driver in each of those school districts. The survey will not take 
more than 10-15 minutes to complete. Follow-up telephone discussions 
may also be conducted depending on the interest of respondents in 
providing additional information.
    Description of the Need for the Information and Proposed Use of the 
Information--On average, from 2004-2013, each year eight (8) school-age 
pedestrians killed were struck by school transportation vehicles 
(school buses and non-school-bus vehicles used as school buses), and 4 
by other vehicles involved in school-bus-related crashes. During this 
same time period, on average each year six school age children are 
killed in collisions while riding in a school bus. By focusing on 
safety both in and around the school bus, we could envision a future 
where there are zero school transportation fatalities.
    There has generally been resistance against installing seat belts 
on school buses based on a variety of reasons including the existing 
safety features of school buses compared to other vehicles (i.e. taller 
and heavier vehicles, padded and high seat backs, etc.), need for 
drivers or aides to enforce wearing seat belts, cost, and other 
factors. However, it is commonly known that the use of seat belts has 
improved safety for other types of vehicles. Thus, on November 8, 2015, 
NHTSA Administrator Dr. Mark Rosekind stated, ``NHTSA has not always 
spoken with a clear voice on the issue of seat belts on school buses. 
So let me clear up any ambiguity now: The position of the National 
Highway Traffic Safety Administration is that seat belts save lives. 
That is true whether in a passenger car or in a big yellow bus. And 
saving lives is what we are about. So NHTSA's policy is that every 
child on every school bus should have a three-point seat belt. NHTSA 
will seek to use all the tools at our disposal to help achieve that 
goal, and today I want

[[Page 88321]]

to launch a nationwide effort to get us there.''
    The current project seeks to understand the decisions that states 
and local agencies use when deciding to implement seat belts on school 
buses and the funding mechanisms that are used to pay for seat belt 
installation. From there, model policy and a best practices guide will 
be developed to assist jurisdictions that are considering the use of 
seat belts on school buses. Finally, the project will also obtain data 
related to the role of distraction and whether seat belts aid in 
managing behavior on school buses. The project will culminate with a 
final report to explain the results and outcomes from the project's 
activities.
    Description of the Likely Respondents (Including Estimated Number, 
and Proposed Frequency of Response to the Collection of Information)--
The first step of this process is to identify school districts who have 
implemented, or are planning to implement, seat belts on their school 
buses. NHTSA will reach out to current partners and connections 
including contacts in the National Association of State Directors of 
Pupil Transportation Services (NASDPTS), the National Association of 
Pupil Transportation (NAPT), the National School Transportation 
Association (NSTA), American School Bus Council (ASBC), school bus 
manufacturers and dealers, as well as any existing contacts in 
transportation departments, in order to help identify school districts. 
NHTSA anticipates contacting approximately 100 individuals across the 
country to ask general questions related to seat belt use in their 
jurisdictions. NHTSA will hold general discussions with these partners 
and contacts via telephone, email, and/or in person. As the goal of 
these conversations is to identify school districts that have 
implemented, or are considering implementing, seat belts on school 
buses, it is expected that these conversations will take no longer than 
5 minutes. To the extent possible, NHTSA will also identify, in 
coordination with their partners, an appropriate contact(s) in each 
school district.
    The next step, after school districts have been identified, is to 
reach out to these school districts who have agreed to provide NHTSA 
with more information and to gather information to understand the 
states' and local agencies' decisions to implement seat belts on school 
buses and the funding mechanisms that are used to pay for seat belt 
installation. Informational interviews will be conducted with State 
directors of pupil transportation and local school district 
professionals to identify policy components that influence seat belt 
acquisition and use. Prior to reaching out to any of the school 
districts, NHTSA will contact the NHTSA Regional Administrators to 
inform them of the school districts that NHTSA (through their 
contractor) intends to contact within their region. The process will 
then commence with introduction emails that NHTSA will send to the 
identified contact in each school district. The email will provide a 
brief overview of the project and discussion/interview goals, and will 
contain two attachments: (1) An introduction letter from NHTSA 
describing the goals of the project and interview process, and 
explaining how the information that they provide will be incorporated 
into the project and report, and (2) a list of discussion topics and 
questions. Although specific interview questions will be developed to 
keep the discussion on track as needed, it is expected that the actual 
interviews will occur as more of a fluid, conversational dialogue 
rather than a structured interview. NHTSA will follow up with each 
contact via telephone within 1-2 weeks of sending the email. During 
this call, NHTSA (through their contractor) will either work with the 
contact to schedule a time to conduct the interview, or will conduct 
the interview on the spot if preferred by the contact. In some cases, 
the necessary information may be retrieved through a one-time telephone 
or in-person discussion, while in other cases discussions may continue 
via telephone and email as an on-going discussion throughout the course 
of the project as school districts think of more information to provide 
or if they provide additional contacts to follow up with in their 
district. NHTSA is seeking to gather as much information as the school 
districts are willing to provide, and frequency of response and 
discussion will be driven by how involved the school district would 
like to be in the conversation. It is anticipated that the more 
detailed discussions will be held with approximately 25 individuals for 
a collective total of 100 hours, or an average of 4 hours per 
individual over an extended period.
    Finally, NHTSA will conduct a survey to gather information about 
bus driver distraction as related to student behavior and seat belt use 
to see if the use of seat belts has influenced disruptive behavior. The 
potential respondents would include bus drivers from school districts 
who have implemented seat belts. The survey will be web-based and 
should take no longer than 10-15 minutes to complete. NHTSA expects to 
distribute the survey to at least one bus driver in each of the school 
districts that participate in the aforementioned interviews, but hopes 
to collect surveys from more than one driver in each of those school 
districts. NHTSA will share the link to the survey with their existing 
contact(s) within that school district, and will request that they 
distribute the survey to the appropriate bus drivers within their 
school district. Follow-up discussions may also be conducted via 
telephone or email depending on the interest of respondents in 
providing additional information that may not have been captured by the 
survey.
    Throughout the project, the privacy of all participants will be 
protected. The Model Policy and Best Practices Guide, or any other 
reports developed as a result of this data collection effort, will not 
identify any individuals by name. School districts may be identified, 
but only if permission is given to NHTSA by the school district. 
Additionally, any school district identified in the Model Policy and 
Best Practices will be given the opportunity to review and edit any 
text referring directly to their school district.
    The online bus driver survey results will be password protected and 
access will only be given to team members who have been authorized by 
the Project Manager (principal investigators and research assistants). 
The survey data will be exported to an Excel[supreg] file and stored in 
a SharePoint site folder that is also only visible to those who have 
been authorized by the Project Manager. The research team will check 
the data file as soon as it is exported to the secure SharePoint folder 
to ensure that no personally identifiable information (e.g. bus driver 
name or email address) is included. Though survey respondents will be 
asked to indicate their school district, they will not be required to 
provide their name or contact information unless they wish to provide 
additional information to the project team. Any personally identifiable 
information that is provided will be kept separate from the data 
collected.
    Estimate of the Total Annual Reporting and Record Keeping Burden 
Resulting from the Collection of Information--NHTSA estimates that the 
total respondent burden for this data collection would be 133.3 hours.
    The initial discussions would take approximately 5 minutes with 100 
people for a total of 8.3 hours. The detailed discussions with school 
districts who have agreed to participate with the project will take 
place with a commitment of an average of 4 hours with 25 people for a 
total of 100 hours.

[[Page 88322]]

The bus driver survey would take 15 minutes with approximately 100 
people for a total of 25 hours.

    Authority:  44 U.S.C. Section 3506(c)(2)(A).

    Dated: December 2, 2016.
Jeff Michael,
Associate Administrator, Research and Program Development.
[FR Doc. 2016-29320 Filed 12-6-16; 8:45 am]
 BILLING CODE 4910-59-P