Executive-Led Power Technologies Trade Mission to the United Arab Emirates and Saudi Arabia, March 12-16, 2017, 70094-70097 [2016-24479]

Download as PDF 70094 Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 196 / Tuesday, October 11, 2016 / Notices entries of subject merchandise exported by the PRC-wide entity, including Nantong Wangzhuang and the other six companies noted above which did not qualify for separate rate status, at the PRC-wide rate. Additionally, pursuant to the Department’s practice in NME cases, if we continue to determine that the 11 companies noted above had no shipments of subject merchandise, any suspended entries of subject merchandise during the POR under their case numbers will be liquidated at the PRC-wide rate.13 Cash Deposit Requirements The following cash deposit requirements will be effective upon publication of the final results of this review for shipments of the subject merchandise from the PRC entered, or withdrawn from warehouse, for consumption on or after the publication date, as provided by sections 751(a)(2)(C) of the Act: (1) For previously investigated or reviewed PRC and non-PRC exporters that received a separate rate in a prior segment of this proceeding, the cash deposit rate will continue to be the existing exporterspecific rate; (2) for all PRC exporters of subject merchandise that have not been found to be entitled to a separate rate, the cash deposit rate will be the rate for the PRC-wide entity, which is 216.01 percent; and (3) for all non-PRC exporters of subject merchandise which have not received their own rate, the cash deposit rate will be the rate applicable to the PRC exporter that supplied that non-PRC exporter. These deposit requirements, when imposed, shall remain in effect until further notice. asabaliauskas on DSK3SPTVN1PROD with NOTICES Notification to Importers This notice also serves as a preliminary reminder to importers of their responsibility under 19 CFR 351.402(f)(2) to file a certificate regarding the reimbursement of antidumping duties prior to liquidation of the relevant entries during this review period. Failure to comply with this requirement could result in the Department’s presumption that reimbursement of antidumping duties occurred and the subsequent assessment of double antidumping duties. We are issuing and publishing these results in accordance with sections 751(a)(1) and 777(i)(1) of the Act and 19 CFR 351.213. 13 For a full discussion of this practice, see NonMarket Economy Antidumping Proceedings: Assessment of Antidumping Duties, 76 FR 65694 (October 24, 2011). VerDate Sep<11>2014 20:12 Oct 07, 2016 Jkt 241001 Dated: October 3, 2016. Ronald K. Lorentzen, Acting Assistant Secretary for Enforcement and Compliance. Appendix I List of Topics Discussed in the Preliminary Decision Memorandum (1) Summary (2) Background (3) Scope of the Order (4) Respondent Selection (5) Discussion of the Methodology a. Preliminary Determination of No Shipments b. Duty Absorption c. NME Country Status d. Separate Rates (6) Conclusion [FR Doc. 2016–24488 Filed 10–7–16; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 3510–DS–P DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration Executive-Led Power Technologies Trade Mission to the United Arab Emirates and Saudi Arabia, March 12– 16, 2017 International Trade Administration, Department of Commerce. ACTION: Notice. AGENCY: The United States Department of Commerce (DOC), International Trade Administration (ITA), is organizing an executive-led Power Technologies Trade Mission to the United Arab Emirates (UAE) and Saudi Arabia (KSA) on March 12–16, 2017. The purpose of the trade mission is to introduce U.S. firms to KSA and UAE’s expanding power technology sector, which seeks to procure power equipment, distribution, power grid, as well as spare parts, and equipment with a focus on the renewable sector, and also to assist those U.S. firms in pursuing export opportunities in this sector, by helping new-to-market companies learn about the KSA and UAE energy markets and make initial contacts, and by supporting U.S. companies already doing business in the KSA and UAE to widen and deepen their business interests. SUMMARY: UAE Commercial Setting The UAE is a federation of the seven emirates of Abu Dhabi, Ajman, Dubai, Fujairah, Ras Al-Khaimah, Sharjah and Umm Al-Quwain. The generation, transmission and distribution of electricity in the UAE is dominated by three water and power authorities owned by each of the individual emirates: Abu Dhabi Water and Electricity Authority (ADWEA), Dubai PO 00000 Frm 00010 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 Electricity and Water Authority (DEWA) and Sharjah Electricity and Water Authority, and by a federal authority that operates in the smaller northern emirates (FEWA). In Abu Dhabi, ADWEA has established a long-term program for the privatization of the electricity sector and a number of independent water and power producers have been established as joint-venture arrangements between ADWEA and various international power companies as Build—Operate— Own projects. The Dubai government is also promoting private investment in its electricity generation sector, and recently passed legislation allowing the private sector to participate in electricity generation by establishing project companies and by collaborating with third parties. Per the UAE Ministry of Energy, the total generated electricity in 2014 was 116, 528 GWH and consumption was about 111.685 GWH. Rapid economic and demographic growth over the past decade is pushing the UAE’s electricity grid close to its limits. The UAE currently relies primarily on natural gas, but it is also adding nuclear, renewable, and coal-fired electricity generating capacity. To support its economic diversification and sustainable development, the UAE plans to meet a significant portion of its energy needs using renewable sources. According to statements made by Energy Minister Suhail Al Mazrouei in January 2016, the UAE plans to increase its target for power generation from clean energy to 30 percent by 2030, with at least 25 percent of the country’s electricity generated from both nuclear and solar. Below is information on various subsectors of the power sector in the UAE. D Solar: In 2013, DEWA launched the Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum Solar Park in Dubai, which was originally slated to generate 1,000MW of solar energy; however, in January 2016, DEWA announced that it would triple the project’s size to 3,000MW, and then in February, the Dubai directives expanded the plant to 5,000MW by 2030 (the expected completion date). Also in 2013, Abu Dhabi’s Masdar Clean Energy commissioned the 100-megawatt, grid connected concentrated solar power plant Shams One, a joint venture with Abengoa Solar and Total. Masdar also developed the 10MW solar PV plant at Masdar City and is developing a 30MW wind farm and a PV array on Sir BaniYas Island. D Smart Grid and Smart Metering: In 2014, ADWEA achieved a milestone when it successfully deployed a Battery Energy Storage System which is connected to the Abu Dhabi electricity E:\FR\FM\11OCN1.SGM 11OCN1 Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 196 / Tuesday, October 11, 2016 / Notices asabaliauskas on DSK3SPTVN1PROD with NOTICES grid. That was one of many Smart Grid initiatives being implemented in the sector that will contribute to accomplishing the 2030 vision of having a fully integrated ‘‘Smart Utility.’’ Late last year, DEWA signed a contract to build a smart grid station at the Dubai Electricity and Water Authority’s Green Garage in Ruwayyah. D Selected Projects: In January 2016, DEWA announced it would tender renewable energy projects worth more than Dh27 billion (U.S. $7.3 Billion) based on an independent power producer model to leverage publicprivate partnerships. The DEWA 2016 budget includes a number of key projects including U.S. $.6 bn in generation, U.S. $.9 bn in power transmission, U.S. $.32 bn in power distribution and U.S. $.28 bn in water and civil works in addition to other amounts totaling U.S. $25.9 million. In addition, DEWA has released the standards for installing solar photovoltaic (PV) panels on buildings in Dubai and has invited manufacturers to submit their eligibility applications. KSA Commercial Setting The Saudi Electricity Company (SEC) is the largest producer of electricity in the KSA with current available generation capacity of around 58 GW. Other producers include the Saline Water Conversion Corporation (SWCC), SABIC, MARAFIQ and Saudi Aramco. For the medium term, the Saudi Arabia Electricity and Cogeneration Regulatory Authority (ECRA) allow Saudi Aramco to sell excess electricity it produces back to the SEC. ECRA also projected that the Kingdom would need to invest approximately USD 140 billion through 2020 to increase SEC generation capacity to 71 GW, in which it is projected that the country will have sufficient generating capacity to meet demand. SEC plans to increase electricity generating capacity to 120 GW by 2032. The KSA continues to experience population growth, greater industrial diversification led by the development of petrochemical and financial cities, high demand for air conditioning, and subsidized electricity rates. As a result, the KSA requires additional production capacity of 4 GW generation capacity to come on line each year to meet growing electricity demand. Saudi Arabia generated 292.2 billion kilowatt hours (kWh) of electricity in 2013, which represents a 7 percent increase and more than double the electricity generated in 2000. The 7 percent increase in electricity generation still does not meet the 9 percent annual growth rate in the demand for VerDate Sep<11>2014 20:12 Oct 07, 2016 Jkt 241001 70095 electricity. For this reason, the KSA has embarked on the largest infrastructure expansion plan in the Middle East to address electricity generation, efficient distribution, the diversification of fuels, and electricity/energy conservation issues. Below is information on various sub-sectors of the power sector in the KSA. D Solar: The KSA plans to install a staggering 54 GW of new renewable power by 2032. Solar photovoltaic (PV) and concentrated solar power (CSP) boast great long term potential in isolated areas of the Kingdom. The SEC is developing non-fossil-fuel-fired power plants as is evidenced by the integrated solar combined-cycle scheme at Dubai 1, under which two main contracts have been awarded in 2015. The project marks Saudi Arabia‘s first integration of CSP in a combined cycle plant. Saudi Aramco is working with relevant corporate and national stakeholders to form joint ventures to develop, build and operate a portfolio of 300MW of solar and wind projects to displace high value hydrocarbons. D Wind: Wind has considerable potential to be a short term solution and the KSA enjoys good wind speeds particularly in the southeast offering potential development in this sector. D Smart Grid and Smart Metering: The SEC has taken an important step into the deployment of smart grids by defining a new functionality and a new data model for the performance of smart meters. The SEC plans to install smart meters across the country first in the industrial, construction, commercial and government sectors, and then the residential sector by 2021. D Engineering Projects: With the SEC planning to increase electricity generating capacity to 120 GW by 2032 with approximately $140 billion of investment through 2020, the awarding and execution of a string of new power plants presents exciting opportunities to U.S. engineering companies. The following equipment enjoys strong export sales from the U.S. to the KSA: Gas turbines; power transformers; industrial generators; valves; compressors; pumps; spare parts; turbine filters; gas turbine inlet systems; fuel oil system skid packages (unloading, transfer, forwarding and heating skids); fuel gas system skid packages for natural gas cleaning and conditioning. goal of increasing U.S. exports of products and services to KSA and UAE. New opportunities exist as a result of demand approaching capacity and recent legislation that will allow private sector participation in the electricity sector. The focus of this mission is on renewable energy and not nuclear energy. Specifically, the mission will provide U.S. participants with first-hand market information, site visits, one-on-one meetings with potential business partners, and meetings with relevant government entities in the UAE and KSA. The mission will include participants from leading U.S. companies that provide state-of-the-art generation, transmission and distribution equipment. Participants will meet key power sector contacts in the UAE and KSA, and gain insights on relevant export opportunities. Participants will have the opportunity to explore contacts with local firms and distributors active in the UAE and KSA who are seeking to procure power equipment, distribution, power grid, as well as spare parts, equipment. Target sub-sectors of the power sector holding high potential for U.S. exporters include: Solar, Wind, Smart Electrical Engineering, Grid and Smart Metering. Mission Goals The mission will help participating firms and associations or organizations gain market insights, make industry contacts, implement business strategies, and advance specific projects, with the • Business matchmaking sessions • Government meetings • Evening travel to Dubai PO 00000 Frm 00011 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 Mission Scenario Trade mission delegates will participate in a five-day program, including roundtables and policy meetings with officials in UAE and KSA. The delegates will also have networking opportunities to meet faceto-face with decision maker officials, potential strategic partners, local firms, industry experts and distributor systems integrators. Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates (UAE) Sunday, March 12, 2017 • Delegates arrive in Abu Dhabi • Briefing with Embassy and industry experts • Networking reception (All day group bus transportation included.) Abu Dhabi, Dubai, United Arab Emirates (UAE) Monday, March 13, 2017 (All day group bus transportation included.) E:\FR\FM\11OCN1.SGM 11OCN1 70096 Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 196 / Tuesday, October 11, 2016 / Notices Dubai, United Arab Emirates (UAE) Riyadh, Saudi Arabia (KSA) • • • • Business matchmaking sessions Government meetings Delegates depart for Riyadh Briefing with Embassy and industry experts (All day group bus transportation included.) $6,700 for large firms and trade associations/organizations. The fee for each additional representative (SME or large firm or/trade associations/ organizations) is $750 and is subject to availability. Expenses for travel, lodging, meals, and incidentals will be the responsibility of each event delegate. Delegation members will be able to take advantage of U.S. Embassy rates for hotel rooms. Riyadh, Saudi Arabia (KSA) Application Wednesday, March 15, 2017 All interested firms and associations may register via the following link: http://2016.export.gov/trademissions/ powertechsaudiuae/. Tuesday, March 14, 2017 • Business matchmaking sessions • Government meetings • Evening travel to Dhahran (All day group bus transportation included.) Exclusions Dhahran, Saudi Arabia (KSA) Thursday, March 16, 2017 • Briefing with U.S. Consulate in Dhahran • Business matchmaking sessions • Visit to Aramco • Networking reception (Group bus transportation to official events only, included.) Traded Mission concludes. Web site: Please visit our official mission Web site for more information: http://export.gov/trademissions/eg_ main_023185.asp. Participation Requirements All parties interested in participating in the trade mission must complete and submit an application package for consideration by the Department of Commerce (DOC). All applicants will be evaluated, staggered comparative, on their ability to meet certain conditions and best satisfy the selection criteria as outlined below. A minimum of 12 and a maximum of 15 companies will be selected to participate from the applicant pool. Fees and Expenses asabaliauskas on DSK3SPTVN1PROD with NOTICES After a firm or trade association/ organization has been selected to participate in the event, a payment to the Department of Commerce in the form of a participation fee is required. The participation fee for the trade mission will be $5,000 for a small or medium-sized enterprise (SME) 1 and 1 An SME is defined as a firm with 500 or fewer employees or that otherwise qualifies as a small business under SBA regulations (see http:// www.sba.gov/services/contractingopportunities/size standardstopics/index.html). Parent companies, affiliates, and subsidiaries will be considered when determining business size. The dual pricing reflects the Commercial Service’s user fee schedule that became effective November 24, 2015 (see http:// itacentral/myorg/gm/odg/osp/User%20Fees%20 VerDate Sep<11>2014 20:12 Oct 07, 2016 Jkt 241001 The mission fee does not include any personal travel expenses such as lodging, most meals, local ground transportation (except for transportation to and from meetings, and airport transfers during the mission), and air transportation. Participants will, however, be able to take advantage of U.S. Government rates for hotel rooms. Electronic visas are required to participate on the mission, which are easily obtainable online. Applying for and obtaining such visas will be the responsibility of the mission participant. Government fees and processing expenses to obtain such visas are not included in the participation fee. However, the Department of Commerce will provide instructions to each participant on the procedures required to obtain necessary business visas. Further, U.S. Trade Mission members participate in the trade mission and undertake mission-related travel at their own risk. The nature of the security situation in a given foreign market at a given time cannot be guaranteed. The U.S. Government does not make any representations or guarantees as to the safety or security of participants. The U.S. Department of State issues U.S. Government international travel alerts and warnings for U.S. citizens available at https://travel.state.gov/content/ passports/en/alertswarnings.html. Any question regarding insurance coverage must be resolved by the participant and its insurer of choice. Timeline for Recruitment and Applications Trade mission recruitment will be conducted in an open and public manner, including, posting on the Commerce Department trade mission calendar and other Internet Web sites, Resource%20Document%20Library/Marketing%20 Flyer%20for%20Communicating%20with%20 Clients%20(FY2016).pdf. PO 00000 Frm 00012 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 email, press releases to general and trade media, notices by industry trade associations and other multiplier groups, and publicity at industry meetings, symposia, conferences, and trade shows. Recruitment for the trade mission will begin immediately and conclude no later than December 31, 2016. The Department of Commerce will review applications and inform applicants of selection decisions periodically during the recruitment period. All applications received subsequent to an evaluation date will be considered at the next evaluation. However, applications received after December 31, 2016, will be considered only if space and scheduling constraints permit. Conditions for Participation An applicant must sign and submit a completed application and supplemental application materials, including adequate information on the company’s products and/or services, primary market objectives, and goals for participation. If an incomplete application form is submitted or the information and material submitted does not demonstrate how the applicant satisfies the participation criteria, the Department of Commerce may reject the application, request additional information, or take the lack of information into account when evaluating the application. Each applicant must also: • Identify whether the products and services it seeks to export through the mission are either produced in the United States, or, if not, marketed under the name of a U.S. firm and have at least 51% U.S. content. In cases where the U.S. content does not exceed 50%, especially where the applicant intends to pursue investment in major project opportunities, the following factors, may be considered in determining whether the applicant’s participation in the Trade Mission is in the U.S. national interest: Æ U.S. materials and equipment content; Æ U.S. labor content; Æ Contribution to the U.S. technology base, including conduct of research and development in the United States; Æ Repatriation of profits to the U.S. economy; Æ Potential for follow-on business that would benefit the U.S. economy; A trade association/organization applicant must certify to the above for all of the companies it seeks to represent on the mission. An applicant must also certify that: • The export of its goods, software, technology, and services would be in E:\FR\FM\11OCN1.SGM 11OCN1 Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 196 / Tuesday, October 11, 2016 / Notices compliance with U.S. export control laws and regulations, including those administered by the Department of Commerce’s Bureau of Industry and Security; • It has identified any matter pending before any bureau or office of the Department of Commerce; • It has identified any pending litigation (including any administrative proceedings) to which it is a party that involves the Department of Commerce; • It and its affiliates (1) have not and will not engage in the bribery of foreign officials in connection with its involvement in this Mission, and (2) maintain and enforce a policy that prohibits the bribery of foreign officials. Selection Criteria for Participation • Suitability of the company’s products or services to the market. Please note: this mission will not include nuclear power technologies given the imbalance of this sub-sector in UAE and Saudi Arabia. • Applicant’s potential for business in the target countries, including likelihood of exports resulting from the mission. • Consistency of the applicant’s goals and objectives with the stated scope of the mission. Balance of company size, sector or subsector, and location may also be considered during the review process. Referrals from political organizations and any documents containing references to partisan political activities (including political contributions) will be removed from an applicant’s submission and not considered during the selection process. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: International Trade Administration, Melissa Blackledge, Trade Promotion Programs, Washington, DC, Tel: (202) 482–1765, Email: melissa.blackledge@ trade.gov. asabaliauskas on DSK3SPTVN1PROD with NOTICES U.S. Commercial Service Saudi Arabia, Douglas Wallace, U.S. Commercial Service, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, Tel: + 966 +11– 488–3800, Email: douglas.wallace@trade.gov. U.S. Commercial Service United Arab Emirates, Dao M. Le, U.S. Commercial Service, Abu Dhabi, UAE, Tel: + 971 +2– 414–2665, Email: dao.le@ trade.gov. Frank Spector, Trade Missions Program. [FR Doc. 2016–24479 Filed 10–7–16; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 3510–DR–P VerDate Sep<11>2014 20:12 Oct 07, 2016 Jkt 241001 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648–XE783 Draft 2016 Marine Mammal Stock Assessment Reports National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice; request for comments. AGENCY: NMFS reviewed the Alaska, Atlantic, and Pacific regional marine mammal stock assessment reports (SARs) in accordance with the Marine Mammal Protection Act. SARs for marine mammals in the Alaska, Atlantic, and Pacific regions were revised according to new information. NMFS solicits public comments on the draft 2016 SARs. DATES: Comments must be received by January 9, 2017. ADDRESSES: The 2016 draft SARs are available in electronic form via the Internet at http://www.nmfs.noaa.gov/ pr/sars/draft.htm. Copies of the Alaska Regional SARs may be requested from Marcia Muto, Alaska Fisheries Science Center, NMFS, 7600 Sand Point Way, NE BIN 15700, Seattle, WA 98115–0070. Copies of the Atlantic, Gulf of Mexico, and Caribbean Regional SARs may be requested from Elizabeth Josephson, Northeast Fisheries Science Center, 166 Water St., Woods Hole, MA 02543. Copies of the Pacific Regional SARs may be requested from Jim Carretta, Southwest Fisheries Science Center, 8604 La Jolla Shores Drive, La Jolla, CA 92037–1508. You may submit comments, identified by NOAA–NMFS–2016–0101, by any of the following methods: Federal e-Rulemaking Portal: Go to www.regulations.gov/ #!docketDetail;D=NOAA-NMFS-20160101, click the ‘‘Comment Now!’’ icon, complete the required fields, and enter or attach your comments. Mail: Send comments or requests for copies of reports to: Chief, Marine Mammal and Sea Turtle Conservation Division, Office of Protected Resources, National Marine Fisheries Service, 1315 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910–3226, Attn: Stock Assessments. Instructions: NMFS may not consider comments if they are sent by any other method, to any other address or individual, or received after the end of the comment period. All comments received are a part of the public record SUMMARY: PO 00000 Frm 00013 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 70097 and will generally be posted for public viewing on www.regulations.gov without change. All personal identifying information (e.g., name, address, etc.), confidential business information, or otherwise sensitive information submitted voluntarily by the sender will be publicly accessible. NMFS will accept anonymous comments (enter ‘‘N/ A’’ in the required fields if you wish to remain anonymous). FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Shannon Bettridge, Office of Protected Resources, 301–427–8402, Shannon.Bettridge@noaa.gov; Marcia Muto 206–526–4026, Marcia.Muto@ noaa.gov, regarding Alaska regional stock assessments; Elizabeth Josephson, 508–495–2362, Elizabeth.Josephson@ noaa.gov, regarding Atlantic, Gulf of Mexico, and Caribbean regional stock assessments; or Jim Carretta, 858–546– 7171, Jim.Carretta@noaa.gov, regarding Pacific regional stock assessments. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Background Section 117 of the Marine Mammal Protection Act (MMPA) (16 U.S.C. 1361 et seq.) requires NMFS and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) to prepare stock assessments for each stock of marine mammals occurring in waters under the jurisdiction of the United States, including the Exclusive Economic Zone. These reports must contain information regarding the distribution and abundance of the stock, population growth rates and trends, estimates of annual human-caused mortality and serious injury (M/SI) from all sources, descriptions of the fisheries with which the stock interacts, and the status of the stock. Initial reports were completed in 1995. The MMPA requires NMFS and FWS to review the SARs at least annually for strategic stocks and stocks for which significant new information is available, and at least once every three years for non-strategic stocks. The term ‘‘strategic stock’’ means a marine mammal stock: (A) For which the level of direct humancaused mortality exceeds the potential biological removal level; (B) which, based on the best available scientific information, is declining and is likely to be listed as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) within the foreseeable future; or (C) which is listed as a threatened species or endangered species under the ESA. NMFS and the FWS are required to revise a SAR if the status of the stock has changed or can be more accurately determined. NMFS, in conjunction with the Alaska, Atlantic, and Pacific independent Scientific Review Groups E:\FR\FM\11OCN1.SGM 11OCN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 81, Number 196 (Tuesday, October 11, 2016)]
[Notices]
[Pages 70094-70097]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2016-24479]


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DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE

International Trade Administration


Executive-Led Power Technologies Trade Mission to the United Arab 
Emirates and Saudi Arabia, March 12-16, 2017

AGENCY: International Trade Administration, Department of Commerce.

ACTION: Notice.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY:  The United States Department of Commerce (DOC), International 
Trade Administration (ITA), is organizing an executive-led Power 
Technologies Trade Mission to the United Arab Emirates (UAE) and Saudi 
Arabia (KSA) on March 12-16, 2017. The purpose of the trade mission is 
to introduce U.S. firms to KSA and UAE's expanding power technology 
sector, which seeks to procure power equipment, distribution, power 
grid, as well as spare parts, and equipment with a focus on the 
renewable sector, and also to assist those U.S. firms in pursuing 
export opportunities in this sector, by helping new-to-market companies 
learn about the KSA and UAE energy markets and make initial contacts, 
and by supporting U.S. companies already doing business in the KSA and 
UAE to widen and deepen their business interests.

UAE Commercial Setting

    The UAE is a federation of the seven emirates of Abu Dhabi, Ajman, 
Dubai, Fujairah, Ras Al-Khaimah, Sharjah and Umm Al-Quwain. The 
generation, transmission and distribution of electricity in the UAE is 
dominated by three water and power authorities owned by each of the 
individual emirates: Abu Dhabi Water and Electricity Authority (ADWEA), 
Dubai Electricity and Water Authority (DEWA) and Sharjah Electricity 
and Water Authority, and by a federal authority that operates in the 
smaller northern emirates (FEWA).
    In Abu Dhabi, ADWEA has established a long-term program for the 
privatization of the electricity sector and a number of independent 
water and power producers have been established as joint-venture 
arrangements between ADWEA and various international power companies as 
Build--Operate--Own projects. The Dubai government is also promoting 
private investment in its electricity generation sector, and recently 
passed legislation allowing the private sector to participate in 
electricity generation by establishing project companies and by 
collaborating with third parties.
    Per the UAE Ministry of Energy, the total generated electricity in 
2014 was 116, 528 GWH and consumption was about 111.685 GWH. Rapid 
economic and demographic growth over the past decade is pushing the 
UAE's electricity grid close to its limits. The UAE currently relies 
primarily on natural gas, but it is also adding nuclear, renewable, and 
coal-fired electricity generating capacity. To support its economic 
diversification and sustainable development, the UAE plans to meet a 
significant portion of its energy needs using renewable sources. 
According to statements made by Energy Minister Suhail Al Mazrouei in 
January 2016, the UAE plans to increase its target for power generation 
from clean energy to 30 percent by 2030, with at least 25 percent of 
the country's electricity generated from both nuclear and solar.
    Below is information on various sub-sectors of the power sector in 
the UAE.
    [ssquf] Solar: In 2013, DEWA launched the Mohammed bin Rashid Al 
Maktoum Solar Park in Dubai, which was originally slated to generate 
1,000MW of solar energy; however, in January 2016, DEWA announced that 
it would triple the project's size to 3,000MW, and then in February, 
the Dubai directives expanded the plant to 5,000MW by 2030 (the 
expected completion date). Also in 2013, Abu Dhabi's Masdar Clean 
Energy commissioned the 100-megawatt, grid connected concentrated solar 
power plant Shams One, a joint venture with Abengoa Solar and Total. 
Masdar also developed the 10MW solar PV plant at Masdar City and is 
developing a 30MW wind farm and a PV array on Sir BaniYas Island.
    [ssquf] Smart Grid and Smart Metering: In 2014, ADWEA achieved a 
milestone when it successfully deployed a Battery Energy Storage System 
which is connected to the Abu Dhabi electricity

[[Page 70095]]

grid. That was one of many Smart Grid initiatives being implemented in 
the sector that will contribute to accomplishing the 2030 vision of 
having a fully integrated ``Smart Utility.'' Late last year, DEWA 
signed a contract to build a smart grid station at the Dubai 
Electricity and Water Authority's Green Garage in Ruwayyah.
    [ssquf] Selected Projects: In January 2016, DEWA announced it would 
tender renewable energy projects worth more than Dh27 billion (U.S. 
$7.3 Billion) based on an independent power producer model to leverage 
public-private partnerships. The DEWA 2016 budget includes a number of 
key projects including U.S. $.6 bn in generation, U.S. $.9 bn in power 
transmission, U.S. $.32 bn in power distribution and U.S. $.28 bn in 
water and civil works in addition to other amounts totaling U.S. $25.9 
million. In addition, DEWA has released the standards for installing 
solar photovoltaic (PV) panels on buildings in Dubai and has invited 
manufacturers to submit their eligibility applications.

KSA Commercial Setting

    The Saudi Electricity Company (SEC) is the largest producer of 
electricity in the KSA with current available generation capacity of 
around 58 GW. Other producers include the Saline Water Conversion 
Corporation (SWCC), SABIC, MARAFIQ and Saudi Aramco. For the medium 
term, the Saudi Arabia Electricity and Cogeneration Regulatory 
Authority (ECRA) allow Saudi Aramco to sell excess electricity it 
produces back to the SEC. ECRA also projected that the Kingdom would 
need to invest approximately USD 140 billion through 2020 to increase 
SEC generation capacity to 71 GW, in which it is projected that the 
country will have sufficient generating capacity to meet demand. SEC 
plans to increase electricity generating capacity to 120 GW by 2032.
    The KSA continues to experience population growth, greater 
industrial diversification led by the development of petrochemical and 
financial cities, high demand for air conditioning, and subsidized 
electricity rates. As a result, the KSA requires additional production 
capacity of 4 GW generation capacity to come on line each year to meet 
growing electricity demand. Saudi Arabia generated 292.2 billion 
kilowatt hours (kWh) of electricity in 2013, which represents a 7 
percent increase and more than double the electricity generated in 
2000. The 7 percent increase in electricity generation still does not 
meet the 9 percent annual growth rate in the demand for electricity. 
For this reason, the KSA has embarked on the largest infrastructure 
expansion plan in the Middle East to address electricity generation, 
efficient distribution, the diversification of fuels, and electricity/
energy conservation issues. Below is information on various sub-sectors 
of the power sector in the KSA.
    [ssquf] Solar: The KSA plans to install a staggering 54 GW of new 
renewable power by 2032. Solar photovoltaic (PV) and concentrated solar 
power (CSP) boast great long term potential in isolated areas of the 
Kingdom. The SEC is developing non-fossil-fuel-fired power plants as is 
evidenced by the integrated solar combined-cycle scheme at Dubai 1, 
under which two main contracts have been awarded in 2015. The project 
marks Saudi Arabia`s first integration of CSP in a combined cycle 
plant. Saudi Aramco is working with relevant corporate and national 
stakeholders to form joint ventures to develop, build and operate a 
portfolio of 300MW of solar and wind projects to displace high value 
hydrocarbons.
    [ssquf] Wind: Wind has considerable potential to be a short term 
solution and the KSA enjoys good wind speeds particularly in the 
southeast offering potential development in this sector.
    [ssquf] Smart Grid and Smart Metering: The SEC has taken an 
important step into the deployment of smart grids by defining a new 
functionality and a new data model for the performance of smart meters. 
The SEC plans to install smart meters across the country first in the 
industrial, construction, commercial and government sectors, and then 
the residential sector by 2021.
    [ssquf] Engineering Projects: With the SEC planning to increase 
electricity generating capacity to 120 GW by 2032 with approximately 
$140 billion of investment through 2020, the awarding and execution of 
a string of new power plants presents exciting opportunities to U.S. 
engineering companies.

The following equipment enjoys strong export sales from the U.S. to the 
KSA: Gas turbines; power transformers; industrial generators; valves; 
compressors; pumps; spare parts; turbine filters; gas turbine inlet 
systems; fuel oil system skid packages (unloading, transfer, forwarding 
and heating skids); fuel gas system skid packages for natural gas 
cleaning and conditioning.

Mission Goals

    The mission will help participating firms and associations or 
organizations gain market insights, make industry contacts, implement 
business strategies, and advance specific projects, with the goal of 
increasing U.S. exports of products and services to KSA and UAE. New 
opportunities exist as a result of demand approaching capacity and 
recent legislation that will allow private sector participation in the 
electricity sector. The focus of this mission is on renewable energy 
and not nuclear energy.
    Specifically, the mission will provide U.S. participants with 
first-hand market information, site visits, one-on-one meetings with 
potential business partners, and meetings with relevant government 
entities in the UAE and KSA. The mission will include participants from 
leading U.S. companies that provide state-of-the-art generation, 
transmission and distribution equipment. Participants will meet key 
power sector contacts in the UAE and KSA, and gain insights on relevant 
export opportunities. Participants will have the opportunity to explore 
contacts with local firms and distributors active in the UAE and KSA 
who are seeking to procure power equipment, distribution, power grid, 
as well as spare parts, equipment. Target sub-sectors of the power 
sector holding high potential for U.S. exporters include: Solar, Wind, 
Smart Electrical Engineering, Grid and Smart Metering.

Mission Scenario

    Trade mission delegates will participate in a five-day program, 
including roundtables and policy meetings with officials in UAE and 
KSA. The delegates will also have networking opportunities to meet 
face-to-face with decision maker officials, potential strategic 
partners, local firms, industry experts and distributor systems 
integrators.

Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates (UAE)

Sunday, March 12, 2017

 Delegates arrive in Abu Dhabi
 Briefing with Embassy and industry experts
 Networking reception

    (All day group bus transportation included.)

Abu Dhabi, Dubai, United Arab Emirates (UAE)

Monday, March 13, 2017

 Business matchmaking sessions
 Government meetings
 Evening travel to Dubai

    (All day group bus transportation included.)

[[Page 70096]]

Dubai, United Arab Emirates (UAE) Riyadh, Saudi Arabia (KSA)

Tuesday, March 14, 2017

 Business matchmaking sessions
 Government meetings
 Delegates depart for Riyadh
 Briefing with Embassy and industry experts

    (All day group bus transportation included.)

Riyadh, Saudi Arabia (KSA)

Wednesday, March 15, 2017

 Business matchmaking sessions
 Government meetings
 Evening travel to Dhahran

    (All day group bus transportation included.)

Dhahran, Saudi Arabia (KSA)

Thursday, March 16, 2017

 Briefing with U.S. Consulate in Dhahran
 Business matchmaking sessions
 Visit to Aramco
 Networking reception

    (Group bus transportation to official events only, included.)
    Traded Mission concludes.
    Web site: Please visit our official mission Web site for more 
information: http://export.gov/trademissions/eg_main_023185.asp.

Participation Requirements

    All parties interested in participating in the trade mission must 
complete and submit an application package for consideration by the 
Department of Commerce (DOC). All applicants will be evaluated, 
staggered comparative, on their ability to meet certain conditions and 
best satisfy the selection criteria as outlined below. A minimum of 12 
and a maximum of 15 companies will be selected to participate from the 
applicant pool.

Fees and Expenses

    After a firm or trade association/organization has been selected to 
participate in the event, a payment to the Department of Commerce in 
the form of a participation fee is required. The participation fee for 
the trade mission will be $5,000 for a small or medium-sized enterprise 
(SME) \1\ and $6,700 for large firms and trade associations/
organizations. The fee for each additional representative (SME or large 
firm or/trade associations/organizations) is $750 and is subject to 
availability. Expenses for travel, lodging, meals, and incidentals will 
be the responsibility of each event delegate. Delegation members will 
be able to take advantage of U.S. Embassy rates for hotel rooms.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \1\ An SME is defined as a firm with 500 or fewer employees or 
that otherwise qualifies as a small business under SBA regulations 
(see http://www.sba.gov/services/contractingopportunities/sizestandardstopics/index.html). Parent companies, affiliates, and 
subsidiaries will be considered when determining business size. The 
dual pricing reflects the Commercial Service's user fee schedule 
that became effective November 24, 2015 (see http://itacentral/
myorg/gm/odg/osp/User%20Fees%20Resource%20Document%20Library/
Marketing%20Flyer%20for%20Communicating%20with%20Clients%20(FY2016).p
df.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Application

    All interested firms and associations may register via the 
following link: http://2016.export.gov/trademissions/powertechsaudiuae/
.

Exclusions

    The mission fee does not include any personal travel expenses such 
as lodging, most meals, local ground transportation (except for 
transportation to and from meetings, and airport transfers during the 
mission), and air transportation. Participants will, however, be able 
to take advantage of U.S. Government rates for hotel rooms. Electronic 
visas are required to participate on the mission, which are easily 
obtainable online. Applying for and obtaining such visas will be the 
responsibility of the mission participant. Government fees and 
processing expenses to obtain such visas are not included in the 
participation fee. However, the Department of Commerce will provide 
instructions to each participant on the procedures required to obtain 
necessary business visas. Further, U.S. Trade Mission members 
participate in the trade mission and undertake mission-related travel 
at their own risk. The nature of the security situation in a given 
foreign market at a given time cannot be guaranteed. The U.S. 
Government does not make any representations or guarantees as to the 
safety or security of participants. The U.S. Department of State issues 
U.S. Government international travel alerts and warnings for U.S. 
citizens available at https://travel.state.gov/content/passports/en/alertswarnings.html. Any question regarding insurance coverage must be 
resolved by the participant and its insurer of choice.

Timeline for Recruitment and Applications

    Trade mission recruitment will be conducted in an open and public 
manner, including, posting on the Commerce Department trade mission 
calendar and other Internet Web sites, email, press releases to general 
and trade media, notices by industry trade associations and other 
multiplier groups, and publicity at industry meetings, symposia, 
conferences, and trade shows. Recruitment for the trade mission will 
begin immediately and conclude no later than December 31, 2016. The 
Department of Commerce will review applications and inform applicants 
of selection decisions periodically during the recruitment period. All 
applications received subsequent to an evaluation date will be 
considered at the next evaluation. However, applications received after 
December 31, 2016, will be considered only if space and scheduling 
constraints permit.

Conditions for Participation

    An applicant must sign and submit a completed application and 
supplemental application materials, including adequate information on 
the company's products and/or services, primary market objectives, and 
goals for participation. If an incomplete application form is submitted 
or the information and material submitted does not demonstrate how the 
applicant satisfies the participation criteria, the Department of 
Commerce may reject the application, request additional information, or 
take the lack of information into account when evaluating the 
application. Each applicant must also:
     Identify whether the products and services it seeks to 
export through the mission are either produced in the United States, 
or, if not, marketed under the name of a U.S. firm and have at least 
51% U.S. content. In cases where the U.S. content does not exceed 50%, 
especially where the applicant intends to pursue investment in major 
project opportunities, the following factors, may be considered in 
determining whether the applicant's participation in the Trade Mission 
is in the U.S. national interest:
    [cir] U.S. materials and equipment content;
    [cir] U.S. labor content;
    [cir] Contribution to the U.S. technology base, including conduct 
of research and development in the United States;
    [cir] Repatriation of profits to the U.S. economy;
    [cir] Potential for follow-on business that would benefit the U.S. 
economy;
    A trade association/organization applicant must certify to the 
above for all of the companies it seeks to represent on the mission.
    An applicant must also certify that:
     The export of its goods, software, technology, and 
services would be in

[[Page 70097]]

compliance with U.S. export control laws and regulations, including 
those administered by the Department of Commerce's Bureau of Industry 
and Security;
     It has identified any matter pending before any bureau or 
office of the Department of Commerce;
     It has identified any pending litigation (including any 
administrative proceedings) to which it is a party that involves the 
Department of Commerce;
     It and its affiliates (1) have not and will not engage in 
the bribery of foreign officials in connection with its involvement in 
this Mission, and (2) maintain and enforce a policy that prohibits the 
bribery of foreign officials.

Selection Criteria for Participation

     Suitability of the company's products or services to the 
market. Please note: this mission will not include nuclear power 
technologies given the imbalance of this sub-sector in UAE and Saudi 
Arabia.
     Applicant's potential for business in the target 
countries, including likelihood of exports resulting from the mission.
     Consistency of the applicant's goals and objectives with 
the stated scope of the mission. Balance of company size, sector or 
subsector, and location may also be considered during the review 
process. Referrals from political organizations and any documents 
containing references to partisan political activities (including 
political contributions) will be removed from an applicant's submission 
and not considered during the selection process.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: 
International Trade Administration, Melissa Blackledge, Trade Promotion 
Programs, Washington, DC, Tel: (202) 482-1765, Email: 
melissa.blackledge@trade.gov.

U.S. Commercial Service Saudi Arabia, Douglas Wallace, U.S. Commercial 
Service, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, Tel: + 966 +11- 488-3800, Email: 
douglas.wallace@trade.gov.

U.S. Commercial Service United Arab Emirates, Dao M. Le, U.S. 
Commercial Service, Abu Dhabi, UAE, Tel: + 971 +2- 414-2665, Email: 
dao.le@trade.gov.

Frank Spector,
Trade Missions Program.
[FR Doc. 2016-24479 Filed 10-7-16; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 3510-DR-P