Guidelines for the Safe Deployment and Operation of Automated Vehicle Safety Technologies, 22365-22367 [2016-08708]

Download as PDF asabaliauskas on DSK3SPTVN1PROD with NOTICES Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 73 / Friday, April 15, 2016 / Notices medium-lift launches, including the construction of a launch pad and associated facilities. As part of the Proposed Action addressed in the EA, AAC would make improvements to the KLC to add both solid and liquidpropellant, medium-lift launch capability, and to operate the KLC in the future as a small-lift and medium-lift launch complex. Proposed construction at KLC includes six primary modifications: Construction of Launch Pad 3 (LP3), a vehicle processing facility, rocket staging facility, liquid fuel facility, mission control center and improvements to Pasagshak Point Road. Proposed launch operations would include up to six orbital small-lift launches and three medium-lift launches per year from the existing launch pads and from the proposed LP3; however, to be conservative in the analysis of potential environmental impacts, the EA assumes a maximum of nine medium-lift launches per year. The EA addresses the potential environmental impacts of implementing the Proposed Action and the No Action Alternative. Under the No Action Alternative, the FAA would not modify AAC’s Launch Site Operator License to include medium-lift launch capability and AAC would not proceed with the construction of medium-lift launch support infrastructure at KLC. Existing launch activities for up to nine orbital small-lift class launches per year from the existing launch pads would continue. The impact categories considered in the EA include air quality; compatible land use; Department of Transportation Act: Section 4(f); fish, wildlife, and plants; hazardous materials, pollution prevention, and solid waste; historical, architectural, archaeological, and cultural resources; light emissions and visual impacts; natural resources and energy supply; noise; socioeconomic, environmental justice, and children’s environmental health and safety risk; water quality; and wetlands. The EA also considers potential cumulative environmental impacts. The FAA has posted the Final EA and FONSI/ROD on the FAA Office of Commercial Space Transportation Web site: http://www.faa.gov/about/office_ org/headquarters_offices/ast/ environmental/nepa_docs/review/ operator/. The FAA published a Notice of Availability (NOA) of the Draft EA in the Federal Register on September 15, 2014. An electronic version was also made available on the FAA Web site. In addition, the FAA printed and mailed a copy of the Draft EA to local libraries. The FAA held an open house public VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:27 Apr 14, 2016 Jkt 238001 meeting on October 7, 2014. The public comment period for the Draft EA ended on November 1, 2014. After taking into consideration the nature of public comments received on the Draft EA, the FAA issued a Second Draft EA and provided the public with an opportunity to review and comment on updates and clarification information that had since been added to the EA in response to public comments. The FAA published a NOA of the Second Draft EA in the Federal Register on December 7, 2015. Interested parties were invited to submit comments on the Second Draft EA by January 11, 2016. Public comments on the Second Draft EA resulted in minor changes to the EA. Issued in Washington, DC, on April 11, 2016. Daniel Murray, Manager, Space Transportation Development Division. [FR Doc. 2016–08746 Filed 4–14–16; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4310–13–P DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration Sunshine Act Meetings; Unified Carrier Registration Plan Board of Directors Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of Unified Carrier Registration Plan Board of Directors Meeting. AGENCY: The meeting will be held on May 12, 2016, from 12:00 Noon to 3:00 p.m., Eastern Daylight Time. PLACE: This meeting will be open to the public via conference call. Any interested person may call 1–877–422– 1931, passcode 2855443940, to listen and participate in this meeting. STATUS: Open to the public. MATTERS TO BE CONSIDERED: The Unified Carrier Registration Plan Board of Directors (the Board) will continue its work in developing and implementing the Unified Carrier Registration Plan and Agreement and to that end, may consider matters properly before the Board. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Mr. Avelino Gutierrez, Chair, Unified Carrier Registration Board of Directors at (505) 827–4565. DATES: Issued on: April 11, 2016. Larry W. Minor, Associate Administrator, Office of Policy, Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration. [FR Doc. 2016–08865 Filed 4–13–16; 11:15 am] BILLING CODE 4910–EX–P PO 00000 Frm 00158 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 22365 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION National Highway Traffic Safety Administration [Docket No. NHTSA–2016–0036] Guidelines for the Safe Deployment and Operation of Automated Vehicle Safety Technologies National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), Department of Transportation (DOT). ACTION: Announcement of public meeting. AGENCY: NHTSA is announcing a second public meeting to seek input on planned guidelines for the safe deployment and operation of automated vehicles. NHTSA held its first public meeting on this topic on April 8, 2016, in Washington, DC. The intent of the operational guidelines is to encourage innovative and safe deployment of automated vehicle technologies. At this meeting, NHTSA is seeking public input on those aspects of automated vehicle (AV) systems that would benefit from operational guidelines. For example, of high importance to the Agency is information on the roadway scenarios and operational environments highly automated vehicles will need to address and the associated design and evaluation processes and methods needed to ensure that AV systems can detect and appropriately react to these scenarios such that a high level of safety is assured when these systems are deployed on US roadways. Also of interest to the Agency is input on aspects of automated vehicle technology that may not be suitable or ready for guidelines. For these areas, information would be useful on alternative approaches to assure safety. DATES: NHTSA will hold the public meeting on April 27, 2016, in Stanford, CA. The meeting will start at 9:00 a.m. and continue until 4:00 p.m., local time. Check-in will begin at 8 a.m. Location: The meeting will be held at the CARS Facility at Stanford University, 473 Oak Rd, Stanford, CA 94305. This facility is accessible to individuals with disabilities. The meeting will also be webcast live, and a link to the actual webcast will be available through http://www.nhtsa.gov/ Research/Crash+Avoidance/ Automated+Vehicles. SUMMARY: If you have questions about the public meeting, please contact us at av_info_ nhtsa@dot.gov. Registration is necessary for all attendees. Attendees should register at FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: E:\FR\FM\15APN1.SGM 15APN1 asabaliauskas on DSK3SPTVN1PROD with NOTICES 22366 Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 73 / Friday, April 15, 2016 / Notices http://goo.gl/forms/T67E0B20Ie by April 22, 2016. Please provide name and affiliation, indicate if you wish to offer technical remarks, and please indicate whether you require accommodations such as a sign language interpreter. Space is limited, so advanced registration is highly encouraged. Although attendees will be given the opportunity to offer technical remarks, there will not be time for attendees to make audio-visual presentations during the meeting. Note: We may not be able to accommodate all attendees who wish to make oral remarks. Should it be necessary to cancel the meeting due to inclement weather or other emergency, NHTSA will take available measures to notify registered participants. NHTSA will conduct the public meeting informally, and technical rules of evidence will not apply. We will arrange for a written transcript of the meeting and keep the official record open for 30 days after the meeting to allow submission of supplemental information. You may make arrangements for copies of the transcript directly with the court reporter, and the transcript will also be posted in the docket when it becomes available. Written Comments: Written statements and supporting information submitted during the comment period will be considered with the same weight as oral comments and supporting information presented at the public meeting. Please submit all written comments no later than May 9, 2016, by any of the following methods: • Federal Rulemaking Portal: Go to http://www.regulations.gov. Follow the online instructions for submitting comments. • Mail: Docket Management Facility: U.S. Department of Transportation, 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE., West Building Ground Floor, Room W12–140, Washington, DC 20590–0001. • Hand Delivery or Courier: 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE., West Building Ground Floor, Room W12–140, Washington, DC 20590–0001, between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. ET, Monday through Friday, except Federal Holidays. • Fax: 202–366–1767. Instructions: All submissions must include the agency name and docket number. Note that all comments received will be posted without change to http://www.regulations.gov, including any personal information provided. Please see the Privacy Act discussion below. Docket: For access to the docket go to http://www.regulations.gov at any time or to 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE., West Building, Ground Floor, Room W12– 140, Washington, DC 20590, between 9 VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:27 Apr 14, 2016 Jkt 238001 a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, except Federal Holidays. Telephone: 202–366–9826. Privacy Act: Anyone is able to search the electronic form of all comments received into any of our dockets by the name of the individual submitting the comment (or signing the comment, if submitted on behalf of an association, business, labor union, etc.). You may review DOT’s complete Privacy Act Statement in the Federal Register published on April 11, 2000 (Volume 65, Number 70; Pages 19477–78), or you may visit http://www.regulations.gov/ privacy.html. Confidential Business Information: If you wish to submit any information under a claim of confidentiality, you should submit three copies of your complete submission, including the information you claim to be confidential business information to the Chief Counsel, NHTSA, at the address given under FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT. In addition, you should submit two copies, from which you have deleted the claimed confidential business information, to Docket Management at the address given above. When you send a comment containing information claimed to be confidential business information, you should submit a cover letter setting forth the information specified in our confidential business information regulation (49 CFR part 512). SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Background DOT recently announced a series of actions to remove potential roadblocks to the integration of innovative automotive technology. As part of this effort, the Department announced several milestones for 2016, including development of guidance on the safe deployment and operation of automated vehicles. Draft Agenda (In Local Time) 08:00–09:00—Arrival/Check-In 09:00–12:00—Morning Public Meeting Session 12:00–13:00—Lunch Break 13:00–16:00—Afternoon Public Meeting Session 16:00—Adjourn Public Meeting Topics NHTSA is seeking input on the following topics during the morning and afternoon sessions of the meeting. 1. Evaluation and testing of scenarios the AV system should detect and correctly operate in: Within the AV system’s operating envelope, consider how to identify the scenarios that could be encountered by the AV system (e.g., PO 00000 Frm 00159 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 behavioral competencies/normal driving, pre-crash scenarios, etc.) and what design and evaluation (testing) processes and methods are needed to ensure that the vehicle can detect and appropriately react to these scenarios. Consider whether third party testing is appropriate for validating test results. 2. Detection and communication of operational boundaries: If there are limitations on where AV technology will operate—what methods should the AV technology use to sense when it is reaching the operational domain limit and how should that be communicated to the driver? 3. Environmental operation and sensing: Consider what environmental conditions AV systems will likely operate in. For environmental conditions in which AV systems are not designed to operate, discuss methods used to detect these conditions. 4. Driver transitioning to/from AV operating mode: For AV systems that rely on transferring vehicle operation back to the driver, discuss approaches to (a) ensuring safe transitioning back to a fully capable non-impaired driver (e.g., geo-fencing, adverse weather) and (b) how non-optimal driver behavior (e.g., decision errors, erratic behavior, driver impairment) will be addressed by the AV system. 5. AV for persons with disabilities: Consider the unique needs of people with different types of disabilities in the design, development, and policy setting for self-driving cars and related automation. 6. Data: Consider data recording capabilities of system(s) necessary to monitor the correct operation of the AV system, and what are appropriate triggers (crash, near crash, etc.) to determine system operational status or possible malfunction of the system. Also consider how recorded data could be accessed and by whom. During the testing phase, consider what data should be made public for further analysis and understanding. 7. Crash avoidance capability: Consider the capabilities of AV systems with respect to detecting roadway hazards (other vehicles, pedestrians, animals, etc.) such that common crash scenarios involving these hazards (control loss, crossing paths head-on, etc.) can be detected and either avoided or mitigated. 8. Electronics systems safety: Consider methods and potential documentation that could be produced with respect to functional safety and cybersecurity. 9. Non-passenger AVs: Consider differences between AVs designed for delivery of goods and products that are E:\FR\FM\15APN1.SGM 15APN1 Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 73 / Friday, April 15, 2016 / Notices not intended to have a human operator or potentially even human passengers. 10. Aspects of AV technology that may not be suitable or ready for guidelines: For these areas, information would be useful on alternative approaches to assure safety. 11. Identification of industry voluntary standards, best practices, etc., related to automated vehicle operation. 12. Information AVs may need to communicate to pedestrians and other vehicles (manual or automated) just as a driver would. Consider situations such as pedestrians crossing a travel lane in a parking lot and how this communication should be accomplished. 13. Conditions in which AVs may need to be able to identify and communicate to a central location or authority that a problem has occurred. Consider situations where passengers may be delivered to their destination but a medical problem or potential incapacitation enroute may potentially suggest considerations for vehicle capabilities that could handle such cases. 14. Operation of an AV with open safety recall: Consider if automated vehicles should be allowed to operate in automated mode in cases when there is an open safety recall on that vehicle or if automated functions should be restrained until recall repairs are completed (perhaps reversion to manual driving when possible). Consider if AVs with open recalls should be allowed to operate on public roads at all, and if so, under what conditions. 15. Other topics needed for operational guidance: Other topics that would be beneficial to address in an operational guidance document to facilitate innovation and safe deployment of these systems on public roadways. Issued in Washington, DC, under authority delegated by 49 CFR 1.95. Nathaniel Beuse, Associate Administrator for Vehicle Safety Research. [FR Doc. 2016–08708 Filed 4–14–16; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4910–59–P asabaliauskas on DSK3SPTVN1PROD with NOTICES DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION National Highway Traffic Safety Administration [Docket No. NHTSA—2016–0042] Request for Information National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), Department of Transportation (DOT). AGENCY: VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:27 Apr 14, 2016 Jkt 238001 ACTION: Request for information. Section 24105 of the Fixing America’s Surface Transportation (FAST) Act, Public Law 114–94 (2015), requires NHTSA to implement a twoyear pilot program to evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of a State process for informing consumers of open motor vehicle recalls at the time of motor vehicle registration. This notice requests information from interested parties to help inform the agency’s approach as it moves forward to implement the pilot program. DATES: Written comments should be submitted by: May 16, 2016. ADDRESSES: Written comments may be submitted using any one of the following methods: • Mail: Docket Management Facility, M–30, U.S. Department of Transportation, West Building, Ground Floor, Rm. W12–140, 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE., Washington, DC 20590. • Fax: Written comments may be faxed to (202) 493–2251. • Internet: To submit comments electronically, go to the Federal regulations Web site at http:// www.regulations.gov. Follow the online instructions for submitting comments. • Hand Delivery: West Building Ground Floor, Room W12–140, 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE., between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. Eastern Time, Monday through Friday, except Federal holidays. Instructions: All comments submitted in relation to this notice must include the agency name and docket number. Please note that all comments received will be posted without change to http://www.regulations.gov, including any personal information provided. You may also call the Docket at 202–366– 9324. SUMMARY: FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Andrew DiMarsico, Office of Chief Counsel, NHTSA (phone: 202–366– 5263). You may send email to Mr. DiMarsico at Andrew.dimarsico@ dot.gov, or by regular mail at the Office of Chief Counsel, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, W41–326, 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE., Washington, DC 20590. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: This notice requests information to assist NHTSA in implementing a pilot grant program required under the FAST Act. See Public Law 114–94, § 24105 (2015). The FAST Act requires that, by October 1, 2016, NHTSA must implement a twoyear pilot program with up to six States to evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of a State process for informing consumers of open motor vehicle recalls at the time of motor PO 00000 Frm 00160 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 22367 vehicle registration. NHTSA plans to solicit grant applications following the receipt and consideration of comments and information submitted in response to this notice. Background The National Traffic and Motor Vehicle Safety Act, 49 U.S.C. 30101 et. seq. as amended, requires that a motor vehicle manufacturer notify the owners and purchasers of its vehicles of a safety-related defect or that the vehicle does not comply with an applicable Federal motor vehicle safety standard. 49 U.S.C. 30118. A vehicle manufacturer must provide notice of a recall in a manner prescribed through regulation by NHTSA to each person registered under State law as the owner and whose name and address are reasonably ascertainable by the manufacturer through State records or other available source or (if a registered owner is not notified through State registration information) to the most recent purchaser known to the manufacturer. 49 U.S.C. 30119(d). In order to identify owners of vehicles subject to a safety-related recall and provide notification to them, a motor vehicle manufacturer typically contracts with a third party that obtains vehicle registration data for the affected vehicles from State motor vehicle administrations. The motor vehicle manufacturer then notifies owners and purchasers, typically by U.S. Mail, about the safety recall and, among other things, about how to obtain a remedy to fix the defect. See 49 U.S.C. 30119(d); 49 CFR part 577. NHTSA and the motor vehicle industry have sought to improve notice of safety-related defects to owners and to develop ways to increase the rate at which owners complete the remedy identified in the notice.1 Section 24105 of the recently enacted FAST Act provides for the two-year pilot program to evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of a State process for informing consumers of open motor vehicle recalls at the time of motor vehicle registration in the State. To carry out this program, the FAST Act permits NHTSA to make a grant to up to six States. To be eligible for a grant, the Act requires a State to: (i) Submit an 1 In April 2015, NHTSA hosted a workshop called ‘‘Retooling Recalls’’ to explore ways to increase recall remedy completion rates. See http:// www.nhtsa.gov/About+NHTSA/Press+Releases/ 2015/nhtsa-retooling-recalls-workshop-04282015. Recently, the agency published an ANPRM requesting public comment on, among other things, additional ways by which manufacturers could not only notify owners, but also influence owners to have recalls completed. See 81 FR 81 FR 4007 (January 25, 2016). E:\FR\FM\15APN1.SGM 15APN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 81, Number 73 (Friday, April 15, 2016)]
[Notices]
[Pages 22365-22367]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2016-08708]


-----------------------------------------------------------------------

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION

National Highway Traffic Safety Administration

[Docket No. NHTSA-2016-0036]


Guidelines for the Safe Deployment and Operation of Automated 
Vehicle Safety Technologies

AGENCY: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), 
Department of Transportation (DOT).

ACTION: Announcement of public meeting.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: NHTSA is announcing a second public meeting to seek input on 
planned guidelines for the safe deployment and operation of automated 
vehicles. NHTSA held its first public meeting on this topic on April 8, 
2016, in Washington, DC. The intent of the operational guidelines is to 
encourage innovative and safe deployment of automated vehicle 
technologies. At this meeting, NHTSA is seeking public input on those 
aspects of automated vehicle (AV) systems that would benefit from 
operational guidelines. For example, of high importance to the Agency 
is information on the roadway scenarios and operational environments 
highly automated vehicles will need to address and the associated 
design and evaluation processes and methods needed to ensure that AV 
systems can detect and appropriately react to these scenarios such that 
a high level of safety is assured when these systems are deployed on US 
roadways.
    Also of interest to the Agency is input on aspects of automated 
vehicle technology that may not be suitable or ready for guidelines. 
For these areas, information would be useful on alternative approaches 
to assure safety.

DATES: NHTSA will hold the public meeting on April 27, 2016, in 
Stanford, CA. The meeting will start at 9:00 a.m. and continue until 
4:00 p.m., local time. Check-in will begin at 8 a.m.
    Location: The meeting will be held at the CARS Facility at Stanford 
University, 473 Oak Rd, Stanford, CA 94305. This facility is accessible 
to individuals with disabilities. The meeting will also be webcast 
live, and a link to the actual webcast will be available through http://www.nhtsa.gov/Research/Crash+Avoidance/Automated+Vehicles.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: If you have questions about the public 
meeting, please contact us at av_info_nhtsa@dot.gov.
    Registration is necessary for all attendees. Attendees should 
register at

[[Page 22366]]

http://goo.gl/forms/T67E0B20Ie by April 22, 2016. Please provide name 
and affiliation, indicate if you wish to offer technical remarks, and 
please indicate whether you require accommodations such as a sign 
language interpreter. Space is limited, so advanced registration is 
highly encouraged.
    Although attendees will be given the opportunity to offer technical 
remarks, there will not be time for attendees to make audio-visual 
presentations during the meeting. Note: We may not be able to 
accommodate all attendees who wish to make oral remarks. Should it be 
necessary to cancel the meeting due to inclement weather or other 
emergency, NHTSA will take available measures to notify registered 
participants.
    NHTSA will conduct the public meeting informally, and technical 
rules of evidence will not apply. We will arrange for a written 
transcript of the meeting and keep the official record open for 30 days 
after the meeting to allow submission of supplemental information. You 
may make arrangements for copies of the transcript directly with the 
court reporter, and the transcript will also be posted in the docket 
when it becomes available.
    Written Comments: Written statements and supporting information 
submitted during the comment period will be considered with the same 
weight as oral comments and supporting information presented at the 
public meeting. Please submit all written comments no later than May 9, 
2016, by any of the following methods:
     Federal Rulemaking Portal: Go to http://www.regulations.gov. Follow the online instructions for submitting 
comments.
     Mail: Docket Management Facility: U.S. Department of 
Transportation, 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE., West Building Ground Floor, 
Room W12-140, Washington, DC 20590-0001.
     Hand Delivery or Courier: 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE., West 
Building Ground Floor, Room W12-140, Washington, DC 20590-0001, between 
9 a.m. and 5 p.m. ET, Monday through Friday, except Federal Holidays.
     Fax: 202-366-1767.
    Instructions: All submissions must include the agency name and 
docket number. Note that all comments received will be posted without 
change to http://www.regulations.gov, including any personal 
information provided. Please see the Privacy Act discussion below.
    Docket: For access to the docket go to http://www.regulations.gov 
at any time or to 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE., West Building, Ground 
Floor, Room W12-140, Washington, DC 20590, between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., 
Monday through Friday, except Federal Holidays. Telephone: 202-366-
9826.
    Privacy Act: Anyone is able to search the electronic form of all 
comments received into any of our dockets by the name of the individual 
submitting the comment (or signing the comment, if submitted on behalf 
of an association, business, labor union, etc.). You may review DOT's 
complete Privacy Act Statement in the Federal Register published on 
April 11, 2000 (Volume 65, Number 70; Pages 19477-78), or you may visit 
http://www.regulations.gov/privacy.html.
    Confidential Business Information: If you wish to submit any 
information under a claim of confidentiality, you should submit three 
copies of your complete submission, including the information you claim 
to be confidential business information to the Chief Counsel, NHTSA, at 
the address given under FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT. In addition, 
you should submit two copies, from which you have deleted the claimed 
confidential business information, to Docket Management at the address 
given above. When you send a comment containing information claimed to 
be confidential business information, you should submit a cover letter 
setting forth the information specified in our confidential business 
information regulation (49 CFR part 512).

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:

Background

    DOT recently announced a series of actions to remove potential 
roadblocks to the integration of innovative automotive technology. As 
part of this effort, the Department announced several milestones for 
2016, including development of guidance on the safe deployment and 
operation of automated vehicles.

Draft Agenda (In Local Time)

08:00-09:00--Arrival/Check-In
09:00-12:00--Morning Public Meeting Session
12:00-13:00--Lunch Break
13:00-16:00--Afternoon Public Meeting Session
16:00--Adjourn

Public Meeting Topics

    NHTSA is seeking input on the following topics during the morning 
and afternoon sessions of the meeting.
    1. Evaluation and testing of scenarios the AV system should detect 
and correctly operate in: Within the AV system's operating envelope, 
consider how to identify the scenarios that could be encountered by the 
AV system (e.g., behavioral competencies/normal driving, pre-crash 
scenarios, etc.) and what design and evaluation (testing) processes and 
methods are needed to ensure that the vehicle can detect and 
appropriately react to these scenarios. Consider whether third party 
testing is appropriate for validating test results.
    2. Detection and communication of operational boundaries: If there 
are limitations on where AV technology will operate--what methods 
should the AV technology use to sense when it is reaching the 
operational domain limit and how should that be communicated to the 
driver?
    3. Environmental operation and sensing: Consider what environmental 
conditions AV systems will likely operate in. For environmental 
conditions in which AV systems are not designed to operate, discuss 
methods used to detect these conditions.
    4. Driver transitioning to/from AV operating mode: For AV systems 
that rely on transferring vehicle operation back to the driver, discuss 
approaches to (a) ensuring safe transitioning back to a fully capable 
non-impaired driver (e.g., geo-fencing, adverse weather) and (b) how 
non-optimal driver behavior (e.g., decision errors, erratic behavior, 
driver impairment) will be addressed by the AV system.
    5. AV for persons with disabilities: Consider the unique needs of 
people with different types of disabilities in the design, development, 
and policy setting for self-driving cars and related automation.
    6. Data: Consider data recording capabilities of system(s) 
necessary to monitor the correct operation of the AV system, and what 
are appropriate triggers (crash, near crash, etc.) to determine system 
operational status or possible malfunction of the system. Also consider 
how recorded data could be accessed and by whom. During the testing 
phase, consider what data should be made public for further analysis 
and understanding.
    7. Crash avoidance capability: Consider the capabilities of AV 
systems with respect to detecting roadway hazards (other vehicles, 
pedestrians, animals, etc.) such that common crash scenarios involving 
these hazards (control loss, crossing paths head-on, etc.) can be 
detected and either avoided or mitigated.
    8. Electronics systems safety: Consider methods and potential 
documentation that could be produced with respect to functional safety 
and cybersecurity.
    9. Non-passenger AVs: Consider differences between AVs designed for 
delivery of goods and products that are

[[Page 22367]]

not intended to have a human operator or potentially even human 
passengers.
    10. Aspects of AV technology that may not be suitable or ready for 
guidelines: For these areas, information would be useful on alternative 
approaches to assure safety.
    11. Identification of industry voluntary standards, best practices, 
etc., related to automated vehicle operation.
    12. Information AVs may need to communicate to pedestrians and 
other vehicles (manual or automated) just as a driver would. Consider 
situations such as pedestrians crossing a travel lane in a parking lot 
and how this communication should be accomplished.
    13. Conditions in which AVs may need to be able to identify and 
communicate to a central location or authority that a problem has 
occurred. Consider situations where passengers may be delivered to 
their destination but a medical problem or potential incapacitation 
enroute may potentially suggest considerations for vehicle capabilities 
that could handle such cases.
    14. Operation of an AV with open safety recall: Consider if 
automated vehicles should be allowed to operate in automated mode in 
cases when there is an open safety recall on that vehicle or if 
automated functions should be restrained until recall repairs are 
completed (perhaps reversion to manual driving when possible). Consider 
if AVs with open recalls should be allowed to operate on public roads 
at all, and if so, under what conditions.
    15. Other topics needed for operational guidance: Other topics that 
would be beneficial to address in an operational guidance document to 
facilitate innovation and safe deployment of these systems on public 
roadways.

    Issued in Washington, DC, under authority delegated by 49 CFR 
1.95.
Nathaniel Beuse,
Associate Administrator for Vehicle Safety Research.
[FR Doc. 2016-08708 Filed 4-14-16; 8:45 am]
 BILLING CODE 4910-59-P