Revision of the Emergency Medical Services Agenda for the Future; Request for Information, 18934-18935 [2016-06960]

Download as PDF 18934 Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 63 / Friday, April 1, 2016 / Notices Drinking Water Act (42 U.S.C. 300); Rivers and Harbors Act of 1899 (33 U.S.C. 401–406); and the National Flood Insurance Act of 1968 and Flood Disaster Protection Act (42 U.S.C. 4012a, 4106); 9. Executive Orders (E.O.): E.O. 11990, Protection of Wetlands; E.O. 11988, Floodplain Management; E.O. 12898, Federal Actions to Address Environmental Justice in Minority Populations and Low Income Populations; E.O. 11593, Protection and Enhancement of Cultural Resources; E.O. 13007, Indian Sacred Sites; E.O. 13175, Consultation and Coordination with Indian Tribal Governments; E.O. 11514, Protection and Enhancement of Environmental Quality; and E.O. 13112, Invasive Species. (Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance Program Number 20.205, Highway Planning and Construction. The regulations implementing E.O.12372 regarding intergovernmental consultation on Federal programs and activities apply to this program.) Authority: 23 U.S.C. 139 (l)(1). Issued on: March 25, 2016. Peter J. Hartman, FHWA Idaho Division Administrator, Boise, Idaho. [FR Doc. 2016–07412 Filed 3–31–16; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4910–RY–P DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION National Highway Traffic Safety Administration [Docket No. NHTSA–2016–0035] Revision of the Emergency Medical Services Agenda for the Future; Request for Information National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), Department of Transportation (DOT). ACTION: Notice; request for information. AGENCY: NHTSA, on behalf of the Federal Interagency Committee on Emergency Medical Services (FICEMS), is seeking comments from all sources (public, private, governmental, academic, professional, public interest groups, and other interested parties) on the planned revision of the 1996 Emergency Medical Services Agenda for the Future (EMS Agenda). FICEMS was created (42 U.S.C. 300d– 4) by the Secretaries of Transportation, Health and Human Services and Homeland Security to, in part, ensure coordination among the Federal agencies involved with State, local, tribal or regional emergency medical asabaliauskas on DSK3SPTVN1PROD with NOTICES SUMMARY: VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:25 Mar 31, 2016 Jkt 238001 services and 9–1–1 systems. FICEMS has statutory authority to identify State and local Emergency Medical Services (EMS) and 9–1–1 needs, to recommend new or expanded programs and to identify the ways in which Federal agencies can streamline their processes for support of EMS. FICEMS includes representatives from the Department of Defense (DoD) Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense—Health Affairs, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response (ASPR), HHS Indian Health Service (IHS), HHS Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), HHS Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), HHS Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Office of Health Affairs (OHA), DHS U.S. Fire Administration (USFA), NHTSA, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) and a State EMS Director appointed by the Secretary of Transportation. On June 19, 2014, FICEMS unanimously approved a motion to proceed with a revision of the EMS Agenda, with a focus on data-driven approaches to future improvements. This followed an April 24, 2014 letter in which the National Emergency Medical Services Advisory Council (NEMSAC) issued recommendations to NHTSA regarding revision of the EMS Agenda. NEMSAC’s recommendations were as follows: • A major revision of the EMS Agenda for the Future should be undertaken as soon as possible; • The revision process should be guided by an external entity (not NEMSAC) that will ensure a consensusand data-driven process with broad stakeholder representation. The goal should be to replicate the process used to develop the original EMS Agenda for the Future, published in 1996; • The U.S. Department of Transportation should seek financial support and assistance from members of FICEMS to accomplish this task. The purpose of this notice is to solicit comments on the planned revision of the EMS Agenda, and to request responses to specific questions provided below. This is neither a request for proposals nor an invitation for bids. DATES: It is requested that comments on this announcement be submitted by June 30, 2016. ADDRESSES: You may submit comments [identified by Docket No. NHTSA– 2016–0035] through one of the following methods: PO 00000 Frm 00112 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 • Federal eRulemaking Portal: http:// www.regulations.gov. Follow the online instructions for submitting comments. • Mail or Hand Delivery: Docket Management Facility, U.S. Department of Transportation, 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE., West Building, Room W12– 140, Washington, DC 20590, between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, except on Federal holidays. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Gamunu Wijetunge, Office of Emergency Medical Services, (202) 493– 2793, gamunu.wijetunge@dot.gov, located at the United States Department of Transportation; 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE., NPD–400, Room W44–232, Washington, DC 20590. Office hours are from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, except Federal holidays. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Background In 1996 NHTSA, in partnership with HRSA, published the EMS Agenda (www.ems.gov/pdf/2010/ EMSAgendaWeb_7-06-10.pdf). The document created a vision for the future of EMS systems in the United States and led to EMS system improvements across the Nation. Changes envisioned by the EMS Agenda included the National EMS Information System (NEMSIS), the ‘‘EMS Education Agenda for the Future: A Systems Approach’’, universal wireless 9–1–1, automatic crash notification, the recognition of EMS as a physician sub-specialty, and many others. The EMS Agenda included the following vision statement: ‘‘Emergency medical services (EMS) of the future will be community-based health management that is fully integrated with the overall health care system. It will have the ability to identify and modify illness and injury risks, provide acute illness and injury care and follow-up, and contribute to treatment of chronic conditions and community health monitoring. This new entity will be developed from redistribution of existing health care resources and will be integrated with other health care providers and public health and public safety agencies. It will improve community health and result in more appropriate use of acute health care resources. EMS will remain the public’s emergency medical safety net.’’ Furthermore, the EMS Agenda proposed development of the following 14 EMS attributes: • Integration of Health Services; • EMS Research; • Legislation and Regulation; • System Finance; • Human Resources; E:\FR\FM\01APN1.SGM 01APN1 Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 63 / Friday, April 1, 2016 / Notices • Medical Direction; • Education Systems; • Public Education; • Prevention; • Public Access; • Communication Systems; • Clinical Care; • Information Systems; • Evaluation. In 2014, NEMSAC recommended that NHTSA undertake a major revision of the EMS Agenda. NHTSA, on behalf of FICEMS, intends to work closely with EMS stakeholders in revising the EMS Agenda. It is anticipated the revised EMS Agenda will envision the evolution of EMS systems over the next 30 years. asabaliauskas on DSK3SPTVN1PROD with NOTICES Questions on the Proposed Revision of the EMS Agenda Responses to the following questions are requested to help plan the revision of the EMS Agenda. Please provide references as appropriate. 1. What are the most critical issues facing EMS systems that should be addressed in the revision of the EMS Agenda? Please be as specific as possible. 2. What progress has been made in implementing the EMS Agenda since its publication in 1996? 3. How have you used the EMS Agenda? Please provide specific examples. 4. As an EMS stakeholder, how might the revised EMS Agenda be most useful to you? 5. What significant changes have occurred in EMS systems at the national, State and local levels since 1996? 6. What significant changes will impact EMS systems over the next 30 years? 7. How might the revised EMS Agenda support the following FICEMS Strategic Plan goals: a. Coordinated, regionalized, and accountable EMS and 9–1–1 systems that provide safe, high-quality care; b. data-driven and evidence-based EMS systems that promote improved patient care quality; c. EMS systems fully integrated into State, territorial, local, tribal, regional, and Federal preparedness planning, response, and recovery; d. EMS systems that are sustainable, forward looking, and integrated with the evolving health care system; e. an EMS culture in which safety considerations for patients, providers, and the community permeate the full spectrum of activities; and f. a well-educated and uniformly credentialed EMS workforce. 8. How could the revised EMS Agenda contribute to enhanced VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:25 Mar 31, 2016 Jkt 238001 emergency medical services for children? 9. How could the revised EMS Agenda address the future of EMS data collection and information sharing? 10. How could the revised EMS Agenda support data-driven and evidence-based improvements in EMS systems? 11. How could the revised EMS Agenda enhance collaboration among EMS systems, health care providers, hospitals, public safety answering points, public health, insurers, palliative care and others? 12. How will innovative patient care delivery and finance models impact EMS systems over the next 30 years? 13. How could the revised EMS Agenda promote community preparedness and resilience? 14. How could the revised EMS Agenda contribute to improved coordination for mass casualty incident preparedness and response? 15. How could the revised EMS Agenda enhance the exchange of evidence based practices between military and civilian medicine? 16. How could the revised EMS Agenda support the seamless and unimpeded transfer of military EMS personnel to roles as civilian EMS providers? 17. How could the revised EMS Agenda support interstate credentialing of EMS personnel? 18. How could the revised EMS Agenda support improved patient outcomes in rural and frontier communities? 19. How could the revised EMS Agenda contribute to improved EMS education systems at the local, State, and national levels? 20. How could the revised EMS Agenda lead to improved EMS systems in tribal communities? 21. How could the revised EMS Agenda promote a culture of safety among EMS personnel, agencies and organizations? 22. Are there additional EMS attributes that should be included in the revised EMS Agenda? If so, please provide an explanation for why these additional EMS attributes should be included. 23. Are there EMS attributes in the EMS Agenda that should be eliminated from the revised edition? If so, please provide an explanation for why these EMS attributes should be eliminated. 24. What are your suggestions for the process that should be used in revising the EMS Agenda? 25. What specific agencies/ organizations/entities are essential to involve, in a revision of the EMS Agenda? PO 00000 Frm 00113 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 18935 26. Do you have any additional comments regarding the revision of the EMS Agenda? Issued on: March 22, 2016. Jeffrey P. Michael, Associate Administrator, Research and Program Development. [FR Doc. 2016–06960 Filed 3–31–16; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4910–59–P DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION National Highway Traffic Safety Administration [Docket No. NHTSA–2016–0040] Request for Public Comments on NHTSA Enforcement Guidance Bulletin 2016–02: Safety-Related Defects and Emerging Automotive Technologies National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), Department of Transportation. ACTION: Request for public comments. AGENCY: Automotive technology is at a moment of rapid change and may evolve farther in the next decade than in the previous 45-plus year history of the Agency. As the world moves toward autonomous vehicles and innovative mobility solutions, NHTSA is interested in facilitating the rapid advance of technologies that will promote safety. NHTSA is commanded by Congress to protect the safety of the driving public against unreasonable risks of harm that may occur because of the design, construction, or performance of a motor vehicle or motor vehicle equipment, and mitigate risks of harm, including risks that may be emerging or contingent. As NHTSA always has done when evaluating new technologies and solutions, we will be guided by our statutory mission, the laws we are obligated to enforce, and the benefits of the emerging technologies appearing on America’s roadways. NHTSA has broad enforcement authority, under existing statutes and regulations, to address existing and emerging automotive technologies. This proposed Enforcement Guidance Bulletin sets forth NHTSA’s current views on emerging automotive technologies—including its view that when vulnerabilities of such technology or equipment pose an unreasonable risk to safety, those vulnerabilities constitute a safety-related defect—and suggests guiding principles and best practices for motor vehicle and equipment manufacturers in this context. This notice solicits comments from the public, motor vehicle and equipment manufacturers, and other interested SUMMARY: E:\FR\FM\01APN1.SGM 01APN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 81, Number 63 (Friday, April 1, 2016)]
[Notices]
[Pages 18934-18935]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2016-06960]


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DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION

National Highway Traffic Safety Administration

[Docket No. NHTSA-2016-0035]


Revision of the Emergency Medical Services Agenda for the Future; 
Request for Information

AGENCY: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), 
Department of Transportation (DOT).

ACTION: Notice; request for information.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: NHTSA, on behalf of the Federal Interagency Committee on 
Emergency Medical Services (FICEMS), is seeking comments from all 
sources (public, private, governmental, academic, professional, public 
interest groups, and other interested parties) on the planned revision 
of the 1996 Emergency Medical Services Agenda for the Future (EMS 
Agenda).
    FICEMS was created (42 U.S.C. 300d-4) by the Secretaries of 
Transportation, Health and Human Services and Homeland Security to, in 
part, ensure coordination among the Federal agencies involved with 
State, local, tribal or regional emergency medical services and 9-1-1 
systems. FICEMS has statutory authority to identify State and local 
Emergency Medical Services (EMS) and 9-1-1 needs, to recommend new or 
expanded programs and to identify the ways in which Federal agencies 
can streamline their processes for support of EMS. FICEMS includes 
representatives from the Department of Defense (DoD) Office of the 
Assistant Secretary of Defense--Health Affairs, the Department of 
Health and Human Services (HHS) Office of the Assistant Secretary for 
Preparedness and Response (ASPR), HHS Indian Health Service (IHS), HHS 
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), HHS Health Resources 
and Services Administration (HRSA), HHS Centers for Medicare and 
Medicaid Services (CMS), the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) 
Office of Health Affairs (OHA), DHS U.S. Fire Administration (USFA), 
NHTSA, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) and a State EMS 
Director appointed by the Secretary of Transportation.
    On June 19, 2014, FICEMS unanimously approved a motion to proceed 
with a revision of the EMS Agenda, with a focus on data-driven 
approaches to future improvements.
    This followed an April 24, 2014 letter in which the National 
Emergency Medical Services Advisory Council (NEMSAC) issued 
recommendations to NHTSA regarding revision of the EMS Agenda. NEMSAC's 
recommendations were as follows:
     A major revision of the EMS Agenda for the Future should 
be undertaken as soon as possible;
     The revision process should be guided by an external 
entity (not NEMSAC) that will ensure a consensus- and data-driven 
process with broad stakeholder representation. The goal should be to 
replicate the process used to develop the original EMS Agenda for the 
Future, published in 1996;
     The U.S. Department of Transportation should seek 
financial support and assistance from members of FICEMS to accomplish 
this task.
    The purpose of this notice is to solicit comments on the planned 
revision of the EMS Agenda, and to request responses to specific 
questions provided below. This is neither a request for proposals nor 
an invitation for bids.

DATES: It is requested that comments on this announcement be submitted 
by June 30, 2016.

ADDRESSES: You may submit comments [identified by Docket No. NHTSA-
2016-0035] through one of the following methods:
     Federal eRulemaking Portal: http://www.regulations.gov. 
Follow the online instructions for submitting comments.
     Mail or Hand Delivery: Docket Management Facility, U.S. 
Department of Transportation, 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE., West 
Building, Room W12-140, Washington, DC 20590, between 9 a.m. and 5 
p.m., Monday through Friday, except on Federal holidays.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Gamunu Wijetunge, Office of Emergency 
Medical Services, (202) 493-2793, gamunu.wijetunge@dot.gov, located at 
the United States Department of Transportation; 1200 New Jersey Avenue 
SE., NPD-400, Room W44-232, Washington, DC 20590. Office hours are from 
9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, except Federal holidays.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: 

Background

    In 1996 NHTSA, in partnership with HRSA, published the EMS Agenda 
(www.ems.gov/pdf/2010/EMSAgendaWeb_7-06-10.pdf). The document created a 
vision for the future of EMS systems in the United States and led to 
EMS system improvements across the Nation. Changes envisioned by the 
EMS Agenda included the National EMS Information System (NEMSIS), the 
``EMS Education Agenda for the Future: A Systems Approach'', universal 
wireless 9-1-1, automatic crash notification, the recognition of EMS as 
a physician sub-specialty, and many others.
    The EMS Agenda included the following vision statement: ``Emergency 
medical services (EMS) of the future will be community-based health 
management that is fully integrated with the overall health care 
system. It will have the ability to identify and modify illness and 
injury risks, provide acute illness and injury care and follow-up, and 
contribute to treatment of chronic conditions and community health 
monitoring. This new entity will be developed from redistribution of 
existing health care resources and will be integrated with other health 
care providers and public health and public safety agencies. It will 
improve community health and result in more appropriate use of acute 
health care resources. EMS will remain the public's emergency medical 
safety net.''
    Furthermore, the EMS Agenda proposed development of the following 
14 EMS attributes:
     Integration of Health Services;
     EMS Research;
     Legislation and Regulation;
     System Finance;
     Human Resources;

[[Page 18935]]

     Medical Direction;
     Education Systems;
     Public Education;
     Prevention;
     Public Access;
     Communication Systems;
     Clinical Care;
     Information Systems;
     Evaluation.
    In 2014, NEMSAC recommended that NHTSA undertake a major revision 
of the EMS Agenda. NHTSA, on behalf of FICEMS, intends to work closely 
with EMS stakeholders in revising the EMS Agenda. It is anticipated the 
revised EMS Agenda will envision the evolution of EMS systems over the 
next 30 years.

Questions on the Proposed Revision of the EMS Agenda

    Responses to the following questions are requested to help plan the 
revision of the EMS Agenda. Please provide references as appropriate.
    1. What are the most critical issues facing EMS systems that should 
be addressed in the revision of the EMS Agenda? Please be as specific 
as possible.
    2. What progress has been made in implementing the EMS Agenda since 
its publication in 1996?
    3. How have you used the EMS Agenda? Please provide specific 
examples.
    4. As an EMS stakeholder, how might the revised EMS Agenda be most 
useful to you?
    5. What significant changes have occurred in EMS systems at the 
national, State and local levels since 1996?
    6. What significant changes will impact EMS systems over the next 
30 years?
    7. How might the revised EMS Agenda support the following FICEMS 
Strategic Plan goals:
    a. Coordinated, regionalized, and accountable EMS and 9-1-1 systems 
that provide safe, high-quality care;
    b. data-driven and evidence-based EMS systems that promote improved 
patient care quality;
    c. EMS systems fully integrated into State, territorial, local, 
tribal, regional, and Federal preparedness planning, response, and 
recovery;
    d. EMS systems that are sustainable, forward looking, and 
integrated with the evolving health care system;
    e. an EMS culture in which safety considerations for patients, 
providers, and the community permeate the full spectrum of activities; 
and
    f. a well-educated and uniformly credentialed EMS workforce.
    8. How could the revised EMS Agenda contribute to enhanced 
emergency medical services for children?
    9. How could the revised EMS Agenda address the future of EMS data 
collection and information sharing?
    10. How could the revised EMS Agenda support data-driven and 
evidence-based improvements in EMS systems?
    11. How could the revised EMS Agenda enhance collaboration among 
EMS systems, health care providers, hospitals, public safety answering 
points, public health, insurers, palliative care and others?
    12. How will innovative patient care delivery and finance models 
impact EMS systems over the next 30 years?
    13. How could the revised EMS Agenda promote community preparedness 
and resilience?
    14. How could the revised EMS Agenda contribute to improved 
coordination for mass casualty incident preparedness and response?
    15. How could the revised EMS Agenda enhance the exchange of 
evidence based practices between military and civilian medicine?
    16. How could the revised EMS Agenda support the seamless and 
unimpeded transfer of military EMS personnel to roles as civilian EMS 
providers?
    17. How could the revised EMS Agenda support interstate 
credentialing of EMS personnel?
    18. How could the revised EMS Agenda support improved patient 
outcomes in rural and frontier communities?
    19. How could the revised EMS Agenda contribute to improved EMS 
education systems at the local, State, and national levels?
    20. How could the revised EMS Agenda lead to improved EMS systems 
in tribal communities?
    21. How could the revised EMS Agenda promote a culture of safety 
among EMS personnel, agencies and organizations?
    22. Are there additional EMS attributes that should be included in 
the revised EMS Agenda? If so, please provide an explanation for why 
these additional EMS attributes should be included.
    23. Are there EMS attributes in the EMS Agenda that should be 
eliminated from the revised edition? If so, please provide an 
explanation for why these EMS attributes should be eliminated.
    24. What are your suggestions for the process that should be used 
in revising the EMS Agenda?
    25. What specific agencies/organizations/entities are essential to 
involve, in a revision of the EMS Agenda?
    26. Do you have any additional comments regarding the revision of 
the EMS Agenda?

    Issued on: March 22, 2016.
Jeffrey P. Michael,
Associate Administrator, Research and Program Development.
[FR Doc. 2016-06960 Filed 3-31-16; 8:45 am]
 BILLING CODE 4910-59-P