A Centennial History of the United States International Trade Commission, 812-813 [2016-00005]

Download as PDF 812 Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 4 / Thursday, January 7, 2016 / Notices responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. rmajette on DSK2TPTVN1PROD with NOTICES Consultation A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the Peabody Museum of Natural History professional staff in consultation with representatives of the AlabamaCoushatta Tribes of Texas; the AlabamaQuassarte Tribal Town, Oklahoma; the Cherokee Nation, Oklahoma; the Chickasaw Nation, Oklahoma; the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians of North Carolina; the Coushatta Tribe of Louisiana; the Muscogee (Creek) Nation, Oklahoma; the Thlopthlocco Tribal Town, Oklahoma; and the United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians in Oklahoma. History and Description of the Remains Prior to 1915, human remains representing, at minimum, one adult individual were removed from Pine Island in Marshall County, AL by John H. Gunter and donated to the Peabody Museum of Natural History. No known individuals were identified. The 82 associated funerary objects are one ceramic vessel fragment, parts of two flint-lock muskets, two lead balls, 65 brass tinklers, one lot of blue and white glass trade beads, two brass bells (variety Circarch), four ramrod thimbles, two metal springs, and three textile fragments. Historical and archeological documentation has identified the early inhabitants of the Guntersville Basin as the Koasati (as called by the English) or Kaskinampo (as called by the French), with the Cherokee moving into the region later in the 18th century. Archeological investigations on Pine Island in the late 1800s and again in the 1930s identified both proto-historic and historic occupations. The historic McKee Island Phase occupation dates to approximately A.D. 1650 to 1715. After 1715, it is believed the Koasati abandoned the island and moved south to the Coosa-Tallapoosa River junction. The associated funerary objects are consistent with the earlier historic McKee Island phase occupation of Pine Island by the Koasati. Historical, linguistic, and tribal evidence indicates that descendants of the Koasati are members of four federally recognized tribes: The Alabama-Coushatta Tribe of Texas, the Alabama-Quassarte Tribal VerDate Sep<11>2014 18:32 Jan 06, 2016 Jkt 238001 Town, Oklahoma, the Coushatta Tribe of Louisiana, and the Muscogee (Creek) Nation, Oklahoma. Dated: December 8, 2015. Amberleigh Malone, Acting Manager, National NAGPRA Program. Determinations made by the Peabody Museum of Natural History [FR Doc. 2016–00061 Filed 1–6–16; 8:45 am] Officials of the Peabody Museum of Natural History have determined that: • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described in this notice represent the physical remains of one individual of Native American ancestry. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A), the 82 objects described in this notice are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remain and associated funerary objects and the Alabama-Coushatta Tribes of Texas, the Alabama-Quassarte Tribal Town, Oklahoma, the Coushatta Tribe of Louisiana, and the Muscogee (Creek) Nation, Oklahoma. Additional Requestors and Disposition Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of the human remain and associated funerary objects should submit a written request with information in support of the request to Professor David Skelly, Director, Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History, P.O. Box 208118, New Haven, CT 06520–8118, telephone (203) 432–3752, by February 8, 2016. After that date, if no additional requestors have come forward, transfer of control of the human remain and associated funerary objects to the AlabamaCoushatta Tribes of Texas, the AlabamaQuassarte Tribal Town, Oklahoma, the Coushatta Tribe of Louisiana, and the Muscogee (Creek) Nation may proceed. The Peabody Museum of Natural History is responsible for notifying Alabama-Coushatta Tribes of Texas; the Alabama-Quassarte Tribal Town, Oklahoma; the Cherokee Nation, Oklahoma; the Chickasaw Nation, Oklahoma; the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians of North Carolina; the Coushatta Tribe of Louisiana; the Muscogee (Creek) Nation, Oklahoma; the Thlopthlocco Tribal Town, Oklahoma; and the United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians in Oklahoma that this notice has been published. PO 00000 Frm 00079 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 BILLING CODE 4312–50–P INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION A Centennial History of the United States International Trade Commission International Trade Commission. ACTION: Call for submissions. AGENCY: The United States International Trade Commission (‘‘Commission’’) is requesting submissions to form parts of a planned Centennial History of the United States International Trade Commission. DATES: Submissions will be accepted if: 1. The author provides written notice to the Secretary to the Commission by January 29, 2016, of the intent to file a submission. 2. The author files the submission by April 29, 2016. ADDRESSES: Documents responsive to this notice should be filed with Lisa R. Barton, Secretary, preferably by electronic mail to secretary@usitc.gov. If electronic transmission is not available, documents can be mailed to the Secretary, United States International Trade Commission, 500 E Street SW., Washington, DC 20436. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Lisa R. Barton, Secretary, telephone (202) 205–2000, United States International Trade Commission. Hearing-impaired individuals are advised that information on this matter can be obtained by contacting the Commission’s TDD terminal at (202) 205–1810. General information concerning the Commission may also be obtained by accessing its Internet server at http://www.usitc.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Commission was created by Public Law 64–271 enacted on September 8, 1916. The Commission is planning to commemorate the 100th anniversary of its founding by publishing a Centennial History of the agency. The Commission’s strategic plan describes the agency in the following terms: ‘‘For decades, the Commission, an independent, nonpartisan agency, has fulfilled its mandate to provide Congress and the President with objective, thorough, and succinct analysis on the most critical trade issues of the day.’’ The Commission seeks to place the agency and its mandate for SUMMARY: E:\FR\FM\07JAN1.SGM 07JAN1 Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 4 / Thursday, January 7, 2016 / Notices independence, lack of partisanship, and objectivity in its historical context. The Commission intends to focus on this mandate as a theme of the book. The book is planned to include the following chapters: Chapter 1. Introduction The agency and its mission 100 years on An independent, nonpartisan agency: A technical, not policy, mission aspects of independence (budget, litigation, etc.) The framework of the book; summary of chapters Chapter 2. The Creation of the Tariff Commission The perceived need for an agency President Wilson’s initiative Communications between Administration and Congress Evolution of organic legislation The Tariff Commission opens its doors Chapter 3. Evolution of the Agency, 1917– 2016 Early activities Debates over the number of Commissioners Tie-breaker provisions Debate over the strong Chairmanship Issues with Commissioner and Chairman appointments Old DC and NYC offices, new building, libraries Agency alumni strengthen the trade community Chapter 4. Tariff-Related Proceedings Tariffs before the creation of the Tariff Commission Early Tariff Commission activities Commission role in the drafting of the 1930, 1962 (TSUS), and 1988 (HTS) tariff schedules The Tariff Schedule of the United States The Harmonized Tariff Schedule World Customs Organization activities The 484(f) Committee Miscellaneous tariff bills Recommendations to the President updating the HTS rmajette on DSK2TPTVN1PROD with NOTICES Chapter 5. Antidumping and Countervailing Duty Investigations The problems of dumping and subsidization Antidumping and countervailing duty activities prior to the 1979 Act Practice from the 1979 Act to the Uruguay Round Implementation Act Practice since the URAA Litigation Chapter 6. Safeguards Development of the concept under domestic law (the Reciprocal Trade Agreements Act and various extensions) Inclusion of the concept in international agreements (the GATT and WTO Safeguards Agreement and in bilateral free trade agreements) Commission investigations under executive orders and U.S. trade legislation (the 1951, 1962, 1974, 1988, and 1994 trade legislation) Three prominent cases—footwear (1968), VerDate Sep<11>2014 18:32 Jan 06, 2016 Jkt 238001 autos (1980), and steel (2001) China safeguards The lack of cases in recent years Chapter 7. Intellectual Property Investigations The problem of unfair imports The first statute Section 337 Patent infringement Trademark infringement Non-IP investigations The evolution of the injury requirement The surge of investigations Presidential overrides; the Samsung/Apple case Selected recent developments: e.g., domestic industry, public interest Litigation Chapter 8. Industry and Economic Analysis for Congress Reports prepared for Congress vs. reports for the President Fact-finding investigations under the 1916 act and section 332 of the Tariff Act Fact-finding investigations under other authorities Economic modeling Chapter 9. Industry and Economic Analysis for the Executive Branch Role prior to World War II, war time role, and supporting role in trade negotiations Role in supporting STR and USTR with factfinding reports and trade negotiation advice Chapter 10. Conclusion Summary of the book This table of contents is preliminary and has not yet been finalized. The Commission is willing to entertain suggestions from prospective authors for modifications to the table. The Commission is seeking authors to prepare chapters for the book (other than the Conclusion). Each submission for a chapter on one of the Commission’s functions would need to address the following: Why Congress felt the need for legislation on the subject of the chapter (e.g., antidumping and countervailing duty determinations); why the Commission was selected to provide such determinations (such as the need for objectivity); and how the Commission has implemented the law. The Commission is willing to accept submissions that are a joint effort of two or more co-authors. Submissions should be consistent with the above-described mandate of non-partisanship and objectivity. Once filed, each submission will undergo an extensive review process. The Commission reserves the right to edit each submission for form, style, and content. The agency provides no guarantee that a submission will be published in the Centennial History. PO 00000 Frm 00080 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 813 Publication of a chapter will not result in monetary remuneration. The Commission is considering convening a conference at which submissions for the Centennial History would be discussed. All authors whose contributions have been accepted for the book would have an opportunity to participate in the conference. In addition, authors whose contributions do not become part of the book may be permitted to participate. Their contributions would also be considered for inclusion in the proceedings of the conference. As stated above, a prospective author must provide written notice to the Commission by January 29, 2016, of the intent to file a submission. This intent to file must include the following information: 1. Name(s) 2. Institutional Affiliation(s) 3. Status (e.g., doctoral student, Assistant Professor, practitioners) 4. Email address(es) 5. Mailing Address(es) 6. One (1) page single-spaced abstract of the chapter(s) in Microsoft Word format. Once the Commission has received the notices, each author will receive a packet including: A tentative offer to publish, a voluntary services agreement, and guidelines on editorial styles and compliance with section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. By order of the Commission. Issued: January 4, 2016. William R. Bishop, Supervisory Hearings and Information Officer. [FR Doc. 2016–00005 Filed 1–6–16; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 7020–02–P JUDICIAL CONFERENCE OF THE UNITED STATES Hearings of the Judicial Conference Advisory Committee on the Federal Rules of Bankruptcy Procedure Advisory Committee on the Federal Rules of Bankruptcy Procedure, Judicial Conference of the United States. ACTION: Notice of cancellation of public hearing. AGENCY: The following public hearing on proposed amendments to the Federal Rules of Bankruptcy Procedure has been canceled: Bankruptcy Rules Hearing on January 29, 2016, in Pasadena, California. Announcements for this meeting were previously published in 80 FR 48120, 80 FR 50324 and 80 FR 51604. SUMMARY: E:\FR\FM\07JAN1.SGM 07JAN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 81, Number 4 (Thursday, January 7, 2016)]
[Notices]
[Pages 812-813]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2016-00005]


=======================================================================
-----------------------------------------------------------------------

 INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION


A Centennial History of the United States International Trade 
Commission

AGENCY: International Trade Commission.

ACTION: Call for submissions.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: The United States International Trade Commission 
(``Commission'') is requesting submissions to form parts of a planned 
Centennial History of the United States International Trade Commission.

DATES: Submissions will be accepted if:
    1. The author provides written notice to the Secretary to the 
Commission by January 29, 2016, of the intent to file a submission.
    2. The author files the submission by April 29, 2016.

ADDRESSES: Documents responsive to this notice should be filed with 
Lisa R. Barton, Secretary, preferably by electronic mail to 
secretary@usitc.gov. If electronic transmission is not available, 
documents can be mailed to the Secretary, United States International 
Trade Commission, 500 E Street SW., Washington, DC 20436.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Lisa R. Barton, Secretary, telephone 
(202) 205-2000, United States International Trade Commission. Hearing-
impaired individuals are advised that information on this matter can be 
obtained by contacting the Commission's TDD terminal at (202) 205-1810. 
General information concerning the Commission may also be obtained by 
accessing its Internet server at http://www.usitc.gov.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: 
    The Commission was created by Public Law 64-271 enacted on 
September 8, 1916. The Commission is planning to commemorate the 100th 
anniversary of its founding by publishing a Centennial History of the 
agency.
    The Commission's strategic plan describes the agency in the 
following terms: ``For decades, the Commission, an independent, 
nonpartisan agency, has fulfilled its mandate to provide Congress and 
the President with objective, thorough, and succinct analysis on the 
most critical trade issues of the day.'' The Commission seeks to place 
the agency and its mandate for

[[Page 813]]

independence, lack of partisanship, and objectivity in its historical 
context. The Commission intends to focus on this mandate as a theme of 
the book.
    The book is planned to include the following chapters:

Chapter 1. Introduction

The agency and its mission 100 years on
An independent, nonpartisan agency:
    A technical, not policy, mission
    aspects of independence (budget, litigation, etc.)
The framework of the book; summary of chapters

Chapter 2. The Creation of the Tariff Commission

The perceived need for an agency
President Wilson's initiative
Communications between Administration and Congress
Evolution of organic legislation
The Tariff Commission opens its doors

Chapter 3. Evolution of the Agency, 1917-2016

Early activities
Debates over the number of Commissioners
Tie-breaker provisions
Debate over the strong Chairmanship
Issues with Commissioner and Chairman appointments
Old DC and NYC offices, new building, libraries
Agency alumni strengthen the trade community

Chapter 4. Tariff-Related Proceedings

Tariffs before the creation of the Tariff Commission
Early Tariff Commission activities
Commission role in the drafting of the 1930, 1962 (TSUS), and 1988 
(HTS) tariff schedules
The Tariff Schedule of the United States
The Harmonized Tariff Schedule
World Customs Organization activities
The 484(f) Committee
Miscellaneous tariff bills
Recommendations to the President updating the HTS

Chapter 5. Antidumping and Countervailing Duty Investigations

The problems of dumping and subsidization
Antidumping and countervailing duty activities prior to the 1979 Act
Practice from the 1979 Act to the Uruguay Round Implementation Act
Practice since the URAA
Litigation

Chapter 6. Safeguards

Development of the concept under domestic law (the Reciprocal Trade 
Agreements Act and various extensions)
Inclusion of the concept in international agreements (the GATT and 
WTO Safeguards Agreement and in bilateral free trade agreements)
Commission investigations under executive orders and U.S. trade 
legislation (the 1951, 1962, 1974, 1988, and 1994 trade legislation)
Three prominent cases--footwear (1968), autos (1980), and steel 
(2001)
China safeguards
The lack of cases in recent years

Chapter 7. Intellectual Property Investigations

The problem of unfair imports
The first statute
Section 337
Patent infringement
Trademark infringement
Non-IP investigations
The evolution of the injury requirement
The surge of investigations
Presidential overrides; the Samsung/Apple case
Selected recent developments: e.g., domestic industry, public 
interest
Litigation

Chapter 8. Industry and Economic Analysis for Congress

Reports prepared for Congress vs. reports for the President
Fact-finding investigations under the 1916 act and section 332 of 
the Tariff Act
Fact-finding investigations under other authorities
Economic modeling

Chapter 9. Industry and Economic Analysis for the Executive Branch

Role prior to World War II, war time role, and supporting role in 
trade negotiations
Role in supporting STR and USTR with fact-finding reports and trade 
negotiation advice

Chapter 10. Conclusion

Summary of the book

    This table of contents is preliminary and has not yet been 
finalized. The Commission is willing to entertain suggestions from 
prospective authors for modifications to the table.
    The Commission is seeking authors to prepare chapters for the book 
(other than the Conclusion). Each submission for a chapter on one of 
the Commission's functions would need to address the following: Why 
Congress felt the need for legislation on the subject of the chapter 
(e.g., antidumping and countervailing duty determinations); why the 
Commission was selected to provide such determinations (such as the 
need for objectivity); and how the Commission has implemented the law. 
The Commission is willing to accept submissions that are a joint effort 
of two or more co-authors. Submissions should be consistent with the 
above-described mandate of non-partisanship and objectivity.
    Once filed, each submission will undergo an extensive review 
process. The Commission reserves the right to edit each submission for 
form, style, and content. The agency provides no guarantee that a 
submission will be published in the Centennial History. Publication of 
a chapter will not result in monetary remuneration.
    The Commission is considering convening a conference at which 
submissions for the Centennial History would be discussed. All authors 
whose contributions have been accepted for the book would have an 
opportunity to participate in the conference. In addition, authors 
whose contributions do not become part of the book may be permitted to 
participate. Their contributions would also be considered for inclusion 
in the proceedings of the conference.
    As stated above, a prospective author must provide written notice 
to the Commission by January 29, 2016, of the intent to file a 
submission. This intent to file must include the following information:

1. Name(s)
2. Institutional Affiliation(s)
3. Status (e.g., doctoral student, Assistant Professor, practitioners)
4. Email address(es)
5. Mailing Address(es)
6. One (1) page single-spaced abstract of the chapter(s) in Microsoft 
Word format.

    Once the Commission has received the notices, each author will 
receive a packet including: A tentative offer to publish, a voluntary 
services agreement, and guidelines on editorial styles and compliance 
with section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973.

    By order of the Commission.

    Issued: January 4, 2016.
William R. Bishop,
Supervisory Hearings and Information Officer.
[FR Doc. 2016-00005 Filed 1-6-16; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 7020-02-P