Request for Information on Quantum Information Science and the Needs of U.S. Industry, 18819 [2015-08011]

Download as PDF Federal Register / Vol. 80, No. 67 / Wednesday, April 8, 2015 / Notices DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Institute of Standards and Technology [Docket Number: 150218152–5152–01] Request for Information on Quantum Information Science and the Needs of U.S. Industry National Institute of Standards and Technology, U.S. Department of Commerce. ACTION: Notice; Request for Information (RFI). AGENCY: The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) requests information about the broader needs of the industrial community in the area of quantum information science (QIS). NIST requests this information through its role in the Interagency Working Group on Quantum Information Science of the National Science and Technology Council (NSTC) Committee on Science (CoS) Subcommittee on Physical Sciences (PSSC). NIST seeks input from stakeholders regarding opportunities for research and development, emerging market areas, barriers to near-term and future applications, and workforce needs. The information received in response to this RFI will inform and be considered by the Interagency Working Group making recommendations for the development and coordination of U.S. Government policies, programs, and budgets to advance U.S. competitiveness in QIS. DATES: Comments must be received by 5:00 p.m. Eastern time on May 8, 2015. Written comments in response to the RFI should be submitted according to the instructions in the SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION section below. ADDRESSES: Written comments may be submitted only by email to Dr. Claire Cramer at claire.cramer@nist.gov in any of the following formats: ASCII; Word; RTF; or PDF. Please include your name, organization’s name (if any), and cite ‘‘Quantum Information Science Industry RFI’’ in the subject line of all correspondence. All comments will be made publicly available at http:// www.nist.gov/pml/div684/postedcomments-for-rfi.cfm as submitted. Accordingly, proprietary or confidential information should not be included in any comments, as they will be posted without change. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: For further information contact Gail Newrock, Carl Williams, or Claire Cramer by email at qisiwg@nist.gov, or Gail Newrock by phone at (301) 975– asabaliauskas on DSK5VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES SUMMARY: VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:55 Apr 07, 2015 Jkt 235001 3200. Please direct media inquiries to NIST’s Office of Public Affairs at (301) 975–2762. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Twenty years of research and development work in QIS is producing the first niche applications, and there is an increasing level of international activity in the field. The Interagency Working Group in QIS was chartered in October 2014 to develop and coordinate policies, programs, and budgets for QIS research and development to create the scientific basis, infrastructure, future technical workforce, and intellectual property that will be required to address agency missions and secure future U.S. competitiveness in quantum information science. The Interagency Working Group includes participants from the Departments of Commerce, Defense, and Energy; the Office of the Director of National Intelligence; and the National Science Foundation. NIST seeks input from stakeholders regarding opportunities for research and development, emerging market areas, barriers to near-term and future applications, and workforce needs. The information received in response to this RFI will inform and be considered by the Interagency Working Group making recommendations for the development and coordination of U.S. Government policies, programs, and budgets to advance U.S. competitiveness in QIS. Written comments may be submitted only by email to Dr. Claire Cramer at claire.cramer@nist.gov in any of the following formats: ASCII; Word; RTF; or PDF. Please include your name, organization’s name (if any), and cite ‘‘Quantum Information Science Industry RFI’’ in the subject line of all correspondence. Request for Information: The objective of this request for information is to inform the Interagency Working Group making recommendations for the development and coordination of U. S. Government policies, programs, and budgets to advance U.S. competitiveness in QIS. The questions below are intended to assist in the formulation of comments and should not be construed as a limitation on the number of comments that interested persons may submit or as a limitation on the issues that may be addressed in such comments. Comments containing references, studies, research, and other empirical data that are not widely published should include copies of the referenced materials. Again, note that all comments will be made publicly available as submitted; therefore proprietary or confidential information should not be included. NIST is PO 00000 Frm 00014 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 9990 18819 specifically interested in receiving input pertaining to one or more of the following questions: (1) Opportunities Quantum information science includes, for example, quantum computing and processing, quantum algorithms and programming languages, quantum communications, quantum sensors, quantum devices, single photon sources, and detectors. What areas of pre-competitive QIS research and development appear most promising? What areas should be the highest priorities for Federal investment? What are the emerging frontiers? What methods of monitoring new developments are most effective? (2) Market Areas and Applications The 2009 ‘‘Federal Vision for Quantum Information Science’’ 1 identified exciting new possibilities for QIS impact, including mineral exploration, medical imaging, and quantum computing. Now, six years later, what market areas do you think would most benefit from quantum information science? (3) Barriers Funding levels and mechanisms, technology, dissemination of information, and technology transfer are some of the potential barriers to adoption of QIS technology. What do you see as the greatest barriers to advancing important near-term and future applications of QIS? What should be done to address these barriers? (4) Workforce Needs Addressing opportunities in QIS and barriers to applications requires a workforce spanning many disciplines, ranging from computer science and information theory to atomic scale manipulation of materials, and possessing a range of knowledge and skills. What knowledge and skills are most important for a workforce capable of addressing the opportunities and barriers? In what areas is the current workforce strong, and in what areas is it weak? What are the best mechanisms for equipping workers with the needed knowledge and skills? Richard R. Cavanagh, Acting Associate Director for Laboratory Programs. [FR Doc. 2015–08011 Filed 4–7–15; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 3510–13–P 1 http://www.nist.gov/pml/div684/upload/ FederalVisionQIS.pdf. E:\FR\FM\08APN1.SGM 08APN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 80, Number 67 (Wednesday, April 8, 2015)]
[Notices]
[Page 18819]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2015-08011]



[[Page 18819]]

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DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE

National Institute of Standards and Technology

[Docket Number: 150218152-5152-01]


Request for Information on Quantum Information Science and the 
Needs of U.S. Industry

AGENCY: National Institute of Standards and Technology, U.S. Department 
of Commerce.

ACTION: Notice; Request for Information (RFI).

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) 
requests information about the broader needs of the industrial 
community in the area of quantum information science (QIS). NIST 
requests this information through its role in the Interagency Working 
Group on Quantum Information Science of the National Science and 
Technology Council (NSTC) Committee on Science (CoS) Subcommittee on 
Physical Sciences (PSSC). NIST seeks input from stakeholders regarding 
opportunities for research and development, emerging market areas, 
barriers to near-term and future applications, and workforce needs. The 
information received in response to this RFI will inform and be 
considered by the Interagency Working Group making recommendations for 
the development and coordination of U.S. Government policies, programs, 
and budgets to advance U.S. competitiveness in QIS.

DATES: Comments must be received by 5:00 p.m. Eastern time on May 8, 
2015. Written comments in response to the RFI should be submitted 
according to the instructions in the SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION section 
below.

ADDRESSES: Written comments may be submitted only by email to Dr. 
Claire Cramer at claire.cramer@nist.gov in any of the following 
formats: ASCII; Word; RTF; or PDF. Please include your name, 
organization's name (if any), and cite ``Quantum Information Science 
Industry RFI'' in the subject line of all correspondence. All comments 
will be made publicly available at http://www.nist.gov/pml/div684/posted-comments-for-rfi.cfm as submitted. Accordingly, proprietary or 
confidential information should not be included in any comments, as 
they will be posted without change.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: For further information contact Gail 
Newrock, Carl Williams, or Claire Cramer by email at qisiwg@nist.gov, 
or Gail Newrock by phone at (301) 975-3200. Please direct media 
inquiries to NIST's Office of Public Affairs at (301) 975-2762.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Twenty years of research and development 
work in QIS is producing the first niche applications, and there is an 
increasing level of international activity in the field. The 
Interagency Working Group in QIS was chartered in October 2014 to 
develop and coordinate policies, programs, and budgets for QIS research 
and development to create the scientific basis, infrastructure, future 
technical workforce, and intellectual property that will be required to 
address agency missions and secure future U.S. competitiveness in 
quantum information science. The Interagency Working Group includes 
participants from the Departments of Commerce, Defense, and Energy; the 
Office of the Director of National Intelligence; and the National 
Science Foundation.
    NIST seeks input from stakeholders regarding opportunities for 
research and development, emerging market areas, barriers to near-term 
and future applications, and workforce needs. The information received 
in response to this RFI will inform and be considered by the 
Interagency Working Group making recommendations for the development 
and coordination of U.S. Government policies, programs, and budgets to 
advance U.S. competitiveness in QIS.
    Written comments may be submitted only by email to Dr. Claire 
Cramer at claire.cramer@nist.gov in any of the following formats: 
ASCII; Word; RTF; or PDF. Please include your name, organization's name 
(if any), and cite ``Quantum Information Science Industry RFI'' in the 
subject line of all correspondence.
    Request for Information: The objective of this request for 
information is to inform the Interagency Working Group making 
recommendations for the development and coordination of U. S. 
Government policies, programs, and budgets to advance U.S. 
competitiveness in QIS. The questions below are intended to assist in 
the formulation of comments and should not be construed as a limitation 
on the number of comments that interested persons may submit or as a 
limitation on the issues that may be addressed in such comments. 
Comments containing references, studies, research, and other empirical 
data that are not widely published should include copies of the 
referenced materials. Again, note that all comments will be made 
publicly available as submitted; therefore proprietary or confidential 
information should not be included. NIST is specifically interested in 
receiving input pertaining to one or more of the following questions:

(1) Opportunities

    Quantum information science includes, for example, quantum 
computing and processing, quantum algorithms and programming languages, 
quantum communications, quantum sensors, quantum devices, single photon 
sources, and detectors. What areas of pre-competitive QIS research and 
development appear most promising? What areas should be the highest 
priorities for Federal investment? What are the emerging frontiers? 
What methods of monitoring new developments are most effective?

(2) Market Areas and Applications

    The 2009 ``Federal Vision for Quantum Information Science'' \1\ 
identified exciting new possibilities for QIS impact, including mineral 
exploration, medical imaging, and quantum computing. Now, six years 
later, what market areas do you think would most benefit from quantum 
information science?
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \1\ http://www.nist.gov/pml/div684/upload/FederalVisionQIS.pdf.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

(3) Barriers

    Funding levels and mechanisms, technology, dissemination of 
information, and technology transfer are some of the potential barriers 
to adoption of QIS technology. What do you see as the greatest barriers 
to advancing important near-term and future applications of QIS? What 
should be done to address these barriers?

(4) Workforce Needs

    Addressing opportunities in QIS and barriers to applications 
requires a workforce spanning many disciplines, ranging from computer 
science and information theory to atomic scale manipulation of 
materials, and possessing a range of knowledge and skills. What 
knowledge and skills are most important for a workforce capable of 
addressing the opportunities and barriers? In what areas is the current 
workforce strong, and in what areas is it weak? What are the best 
mechanisms for equipping workers with the needed knowledge and skills?

Richard R. Cavanagh,
Acting Associate Director for Laboratory Programs.
[FR Doc. 2015-08011 Filed 4-7-15; 8:45 am]
 BILLING CODE 3510-13-P