Final Priority; National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research-Rehabilitation Research and Training Centers, 43650-43653 [2014-17718]

Download as PDF 43650 Federal Register / Vol. 79, No. 144 / Monday, July 28, 2014 / Rules and Regulations we do discuss the effects of this rule elsewhere in this preamble. 8. Taking of Private Property This rule will not cause a taking of private property or otherwise have taking implications under Executive Order 12630, Governmental Actions and Interference with Constitutionally Protected Property Rights. 9. Civil Justice Reform This rule meets applicable standards in sections 3(a) and 3(b)(2) of Executive Order 12988, Civil Justice Reform, to minimize litigation, eliminate ambiguity, and reduce burden. 10. Protection of Children We have analyzed this rule under Executive Order 13045, Protection of Children from Environmental Health Risks and Safety Risks. This rule is not an economically significant rule and does not create an environmental risk to health or risk to safety that may disproportionately affect children. 11. Indian Tribal Governments This rule does not have tribal implications under Executive Order 13175, Consultation and Coordination with Indian Tribal Governments, because it does not have a substantial direct effect on one or more Indian tribes, on the relationship between the Federal Government and Indian tribes, or on the distribution of power and responsibilities between the Federal Government and Indian tribes. 12. Energy Effects This action is not a ‘‘significant energy action’’ under Executive Order 13211, Actions Concerning Regulations That Significantly Affect Energy Supply, Distribution, or Use. 13. Technical Standards This rule does not use technical standards. Therefore, we did not consider the use of voluntary consensus standards. pmangrum on DSK3VPTVN1PROD with RULES 14. Environment We have analyzed this rule under Department of Homeland Security Management Directive 023–01 and Commandant Instruction M16475.lD, which guide the Coast Guard in complying with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) (42 U.S.C. 4321–4370f), and have determined that this action is one of a category of actions that do not individually or cumulatively have a significant effect on the human environment. This rule involves the establishment of a safety zone and, VerDate Mar<15>2010 14:46 Jul 25, 2014 Jkt 232001 therefore it is categorically excluded from further review under paragraph 34(g) of Figure 2–1 of the Commandant Instruction. An environmental analysis checklist supporting this determination and a Categorical Exclusion Determination are available in the docket where indicated under ADDRESSES. We seek any comments or information that may lead to the discovery of a significant environmental impact from this rule. List of Subjects in 33 CFR Part 165 Harbors, Marine safety, Navigation (water), Reporting and recordkeeping requirements, Security measures, Waterways. For the reasons discussed in the preamble, the Coast Guard amends 33 CFR part 165 as follows: PART 165—REGULATED NAVIGATION AREAS AND LIMITED ACCESS AREAS 1. The authority citation for part 165 continues to read as follows: ■ Authority: 33 U.S.C. 1231; 46 U.S.C. Chapters 701, 3306, 3703; 50 U.S.C. 191, 195; 33 CFR 1.05–1, 6.04–1, 6.04–6, and 160.5; Pub. L. 107–295, 116 Stat. 2064; Department of Homeland Security Delegation No. 0170.1. the Captain of the Port Buffalo or his onscene representative to obtain permission to do so. The Captain of the Port Buffalo, or his on-scene representative may be contacted via VHF Channel 16. Vessel operators given permission to enter or operate in the safety zone must comply with all directions given to them by the Captain of the Port Buffalo, or his on-scene representative. Dated: July 10, 2014. B.W. Roche, Captain, U.S. Coast Guard, Captain of the Port Buffalo. [FR Doc. 2014–17686 Filed 7–25–14; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 9110–04–P DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 34 CFR Chapter III [Docket ID ED–2014–OSERS–0028] Final Priority; National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research—Rehabilitation Research and Training Centers [CFDA Number: 84.133B–1.] ■ Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services, Department of Education. ACTION: Final priority. § 165.T09–0556 Safety Zone; Columbus Road Bridge Installation, Cuyahoga River, Cleveland, OH. SUMMARY: 2. Add § 165.T09–0556 to read as follows: (a) Location. This safety zone will encompass all waters of the Cuyahoga River 1000 feet upriver and 1000 feet down river of the Columbus Road Bridge in position 41°29′16.4″ N, 081°42′01.7″ W, (NAD 83). (b) Enforcement period. This section will be enforced from 6 a.m. July 28, 2014 to 6 a.m. August 1, 2014. (c) Regulations. (1) Under general regulations in § 165.23, entry into, transiting, or anchoring within the safety zone described in paragraph (a) of this temporary section is prohibited unless authorized by the Captain of the Port Buffalo or his designated on-scene representative. (2) This safety zone is closed to all vessel traffic, except as may be permitted by the Captain of the Port Buffalo or his designated on-scene representative. (3) The ‘‘on-scene representative’’ of the Captain of the Port Buffalo is any Coast Guard commissioned, warrant or petty officer who has been designated by the Captain of the Port Buffalo to act on his behalf. (4) To seek permission to enter or operate within the safety zone, vessel operators or other persons must contact PO 00000 Frm 00058 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 AGENCY: The Assistant Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative Services announces a priority for the Rehabilitation Research and Training Center (RRTC) Program administered by the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR). Specifically, we announce a priority for an RRTC on Vocational Rehabilitation Practices for Youth and Young Adults. The Assistant Secretary may use this priority for competitions in fiscal year (FY) 2014 and later years. We take this action to focus research attention on an area of national need. We intend for this priority to contribute to improved outcomes for youth and young adults with disabilities in the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services program. DATES: Effective Date: This priority is effective August 27, 2014. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Patricia Barrett, U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue SW., room 5142, Potomac Center Plaza (PCP), Washington, DC 20202–2700. Telephone: (202) 245–6211 or by email: patricia.barrett@ed.gov. If you use a telecommunications device for the deaf (TDD) or a text telephone (TTY), call the Federal Relay Service (FRS), toll free, at 1–800–877– 8339. E:\FR\FM\28JYR1.SGM 28JYR1 Federal Register / Vol. 79, No. 144 / Monday, July 28, 2014 / Rules and Regulations Purpose of Program: The purpose of the Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program is to plan and conduct research, demonstration projects, training, and related activities, including international activities, to develop methods, procedures, and rehabilitation technology that maximize the full inclusion and integration into society, employment, independent living, family support, and economic and social self-sufficiency of individuals with disabilities, especially individuals with the most severe disabilities, and to improve the effectiveness of services authorized under the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended (Rehabilitation Act). SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Rehabilitation Research and Training Centers The purpose of the RRTCs, which are funded through the Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program, is to achieve the goals of, and improve the effectiveness of, services authorized under the Rehabilitation Act through welldesigned research, training, technical assistance, and dissemination activities in important topical areas. These activities are designed to benefit rehabilitation service providers, individuals with disabilities, family members, policymakers, and other research stakeholders. Additional information on the RRTC program can be found at: http://www2.ed.gov/ programs/rrtc/index.html. pmangrum on DSK3VPTVN1PROD with RULES Program Authority: 29 U.S.C. 762(g) and 764(b)(2)(A). Applicable Program Regulations: 34 CFR part 350. We published a notice of proposed priority (NPP) for this program in the Federal Register on May 27, 2014 (79 FR 30056). That notice contained background information and our reasons for proposing the particular priority. There are no differences between the proposed priority and this final priority. Public Comment: In response to our invitation in the notice of proposed priority, three parties submitted comments on the proposed priority. Generally, we do not address technical and other minor changes. In addition, we do not address general comments that raised concerns not directly related to the proposed priority. Analysis of the Comments and Changes: An analysis of the comments and of any changes in the priority since publication of the NPP follows. Comment: One commenter suggested that NIDRR modify the priority to require transition-related research on VerDate Mar<15>2010 14:46 Jul 25, 2014 Jkt 232001 best practices in the following areas: Engaging youth consumers in the VR process, engaging parents/families in the VR process, how motivational interviewing works best with youth consumers, and partnering with school staff in the career development of youth with disabilities. Discussion: As written, the priority specifies that the RRTC must conduct research on engaging youth consumers in the VR program. Paragraph (a) requires applicants to investigate factors that affect the likelihood that youth and young adults are fully engaged in the VR program. Paragraph (a)(1)(i) requires applicants to identify individual- and system-level factors (including practices of State VR agencies) that affect youth engagement in the VR program. We believe that, consistent with the proposed priority, the priority contains the transition-related research the commenter supports. Changes: None. Final Priority: The Assistant Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative Services establishes a priority for an RRTC to conduct research on Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) Practices for Youth and Young Adults. The RRTC must contribute to increased knowledge about effective VR practices that can improve employment outcomes of youth and young adults with disabilities by: (a) Generating new knowledge that builds the evidence base of VR practices, services, or models that improve the employment outcomes for youth and young adults. The center will conduct research to better understand the factors that affect the likelihood that youth and young adults are fully engaged in the VR program and achieve their vocational goals; i.e., completion of postsecondary education and training programs, and attainment of competitive employment, including research that— (i) Identifies individual- and systemlevel factors that affect engagement and attainment of an employment outcome. Individual-level factors include, but are not limited to, demographic characteristics and impairment types and severity. System-level factors include, but are not limited to, financial disincentives to obtaining employment associated with other public programs and systems, characteristics and practices of VR State agencies, employer practices and perceptions, and macroeconomic conditions; and (ii) Identifies the reasons for which youth and young adults with disabilities discontinue their participation in the VR program before achieving successful postsecondary goals (e.g., postsecondary PO 00000 Frm 00059 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 43651 education or training) or employment outcomes. (b) Conducting research to identify VR services and transition practices that increase the likelihood of youth and young adults with disabilities achieving successful employment outcomes. The research must also identify practices relevant to improving the outcomes of youth and young adults who are at particular risk for poor employment outcomes. Applicants must identify the specific at-risk group or groups of youth and young adults with disabilities they propose to include; provide evidence that the selected population or populations are, in fact, at risk for poor employment outcomes; and explain how the practices are expected to address the needs of the population or populations. (c) Focusing its research on one or more specific stages of research. If the RRTC is to conduct research that can be categorized under more than one of the research stages, or research that progresses from one stage to another, those research stages must be clearly specified. (These stages and their definitions are provided at the end of the background statement section of the notice of proposed priority published in the Federal Register on May 27, 2014 (79 FR 30056).) (d) Serving as a national resource center for youth and young adults with disabilities, their families, and other stakeholders, including other relevant grantees funded by the Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services. Specifically, this center must coordinate, as appropriate, with the Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP)-funded Parent Training and Information Centers, the OSEP-funded National Technical Assistance Center on Improving Transition, and the Rehabilitation Services Administration (RSA)-funded Parent Information and Training Projects, and other relevant entities by conducting knowledge translation activities related to improving employment outcomes of youth and young adults that must include, but are not limited to: (i) Providing information and technical assistance to VR State agencies and related service providers, educators, employers, youth and young adults with disabilities and their representatives, families, and other key stakeholders. (ii) Providing training, including graduate, pre-service, and in-service training, to educators, VR professionals, direct service professionals, and related service providers, to facilitate a seamless and effective transition service delivery system. Training may be offered through conferences, workshops, E:\FR\FM\28JYR1.SGM 28JYR1 43652 Federal Register / Vol. 79, No. 144 / Monday, July 28, 2014 / Rules and Regulations public education programs, in-service training programs, and similar activities. (iii) Disseminating research-based information and materials related to VR practices and services that increase employment for youth and young adults with disabilities. (iv) Involving key stakeholder groups in the activities conducted under paragraphs (a) through (d) of this priority in order to maximize the relevance and usability of the new knowledge generated by the RRTC. Types of Priorities: When inviting applications for a competition using one or more priorities, we designate the type of each priority as absolute, competitive preference, or invitational through a notice in the Federal Register. The effect of each type of priority follows: Absolute priority: Under an absolute priority, we consider only applications that meet the priority (34 CFR 75.105(c)(3)). Competitive preference priority: Under a competitive preference priority, we give competitive preference to an application by (1) awarding additional points, depending on the extent to which the application meets the priority (34 CFR 75.105(c)(2)(i)); or (2) selecting an application that meets the priority over an application of comparable merit that does not meet the priority (34 CFR 75.105(c)(2)(ii)). Invitational priority: Under an invitational priority, we are particularly interested in applications that meet the priority. However, we do not give an application that meets the priority a preference over other applications (34 CFR 75.105(c)(1)). This notice does not preclude us from proposing additional priorities, requirements, definitions, or selection criteria, subject to meeting applicable rulemaking requirements. Note: This notice does not solicit applications. In any year in which we choose to use this priority, we invite applications through a notice in the Federal Register. pmangrum on DSK3VPTVN1PROD with RULES Executive Orders 12866 and 13563 Regulatory Impact Analysis Under Executive Order 12866, the Secretary must determine whether this regulatory action is ‘‘significant’’ and, therefore, subject to the requirements of the Executive order and subject to review by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB). Section 3(f) of Executive Order 12866 defines a ‘‘significant regulatory action’’ as an action likely to result in a rule that may— (1) Have an annual effect on the economy of $100 million or more, or adversely affect a sector of the economy, VerDate Mar<15>2010 14:46 Jul 25, 2014 Jkt 232001 productivity, competition, jobs, the environment, public health or safety, or State, local, or tribal governments or communities in a material way (also referred to as an ‘‘economically significant’’ rule); (2) Create serious inconsistency or otherwise interfere with an action taken or planned by another agency; (3) Materially alter the budgetary impacts of entitlement grants, user fees, or loan programs or the rights and obligations of recipients thereof; or (4) Raise novel legal or policy issues arising out of legal mandates, the President’s priorities, or the principles stated in the Executive order. This final regulatory action is not a significant regulatory action subject to review by OMB under section 3(f) of Executive Order 12866. We have also reviewed this final regulatory action under Executive Order 13563, which supplements and explicitly reaffirms the principles, structures, and definitions governing regulatory review established in Executive Order 12866. To the extent permitted by law, Executive Order 13563 requires that an agency— (1) Propose or adopt regulations only upon a reasoned determination that their benefits justify their costs (recognizing that some benefits and costs are difficult to quantify); (2) Tailor its regulations to impose the least burden on society, consistent with obtaining regulatory objectives and taking into account—among other things and to the extent practicable—the costs of cumulative regulations; (3) In choosing among alternative regulatory approaches, select those approaches that maximize net benefits (including potential economic, environmental, public health and safety, and other advantages; distributive impacts; and equity); (4) To the extent feasible, specify performance objectives, rather than the behavior or manner of compliance a regulated entity must adopt; and (5) Identify and assess available alternatives to direct regulation, including economic incentives—such as user fees or marketable permits—to encourage the desired behavior, or provide information that enables the public to make choices. Executive Order 13563 also requires an agency ‘‘to use the best available techniques to quantify anticipated present and future benefits and costs as accurately as possible.’’ The Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs of OMB has emphasized that these techniques may include ‘‘identifying changing future compliance costs that might result from technological PO 00000 Frm 00060 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 innovation or anticipated behavioral changes.’’ We are issuing this final priority only on a reasoned determination that its benefits justify its costs. In choosing among alternative regulatory approaches, we selected those approaches that maximize net benefits. Based on the analysis that follows, the Department believes that this regulatory action is consistent with the principles in Executive Order 13563. We also have determined that this regulatory action does not unduly interfere with State, local, and tribal governments in the exercise of their governmental functions. In accordance with both Executive orders, the Department has assessed the potential costs and benefits, both quantitative and qualitative, of this regulatory action. The potential costs are those resulting from statutory requirements and those we have determined as necessary for administering the Department’s programs and activities. The benefits of the Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program have been well established over the years, as projects similar to the one envisioned by the final priority have been completed successfully, and the proposed priority will generate new knowledge through research. The new RRTCs will generate, disseminate, and promote the use of new information that would improve outcomes for individuals with disabilities in the areas of community living and participation, employment, and health and function. Accessible Format: Individuals with disabilities can obtain this document in an accessible format (e.g., braille, large print, audiotape, or compact disc) on request to the program contact person listed under FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT. Electronic Access to This Document: The official version of this document is the document published in the Federal Register. Free Internet access to the official edition of the Federal Register and the Code of Federal Regulations is available via the Federal Digital System at: www.gpo.gov/fdsys. At this site you can view this document, as well as all other documents of this Department published in the Federal Register, in text or Adobe Portable Document Format (PDF). To use PDF you must have Adobe Acrobat Reader, which is available free at the site. You may also access documents of the Department published in the Federal Register by using the article search feature at: www.federalregister.gov. Specifically, through the advanced E:\FR\FM\28JYR1.SGM 28JYR1 Federal Register / Vol. 79, No. 144 / Monday, July 28, 2014 / Rules and Regulations search feature at this site, you can limit your search to documents published by the Department. Dated: July 23, 2014. Melody Musgrove, Director, Office of Special Education Programs. [FR Doc. 2014–17718 Filed 7–25–14; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4000–01–P DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 34 CFR Chapter III [Docket ID ED–2014–OSERS–0041] Final Priority; National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research—Research Fellowships Program (Also Known as the Mary E. Switzer Research Fellowships) [CFDA Number: 84.133F–2.] Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services, Department of Education. ACTION: Final priority. AGENCY: The Assistant Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative Services announces a priority for the Research Fellowships Program administered by the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR). Specifically, this notice announces a priority for a Distinguished Residential Disability and Rehabilitation Policy Fellowship. We take this action to focus attention on an area of national need. We intend the priority to build research capacity by providing support to highly qualified, experienced researchers, including those who are individuals with disabilities, to conduct policy research in the areas of disability and rehabilitation. SUMMARY: Effective Date: This priority is effective August 27, 2014. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Patricia Barrett, U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue SW., Room 5142, Potomac Center Plaza (PCP), Washington, DC 20202–2700. Telephone: (202) 245–6211 or by email: patricia.barrett@ed.gov. If you use a telecommunications device for the deaf (TDD) or a text telephone (TTY), call the Federal Relay Service (FRS), toll free, at 1–800–877– 8339. pmangrum on DSK3VPTVN1PROD with RULES DATES: SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Purpose of Program: The purpose of the Research Fellowships Program is to build research capacity by providing support to experienced, highly qualified individuals, including those who are VerDate Mar<15>2010 14:46 Jul 25, 2014 Jkt 232001 individuals with disabilities, to perform research on the rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities. Fellows must conduct original research in an area authorized by section 204 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended (the Act). Section 204 of the Act authorizes research, demonstration projects, training, and related activities, the purposes of which are to develop methods, procedures, and rehabilitation technology that maximize the full inclusion and integration into society, employment, independent living, family support, and economic and social self-sufficiency of individuals with disabilities, especially individuals with the most significant disabilities, and to improve the effectiveness of services authorized under the Act. Program Authority: 29 U.S.C. 762(e). Applicable Program Regulations: 34 CFR part 350. We published a notice of proposed priority (NPP) for this program in the Federal Register on June 03, 2014 (79 FR 31898). That notice contained background information and our reasons for proposing the particular priority. There are no differences between the proposed priority and this final priority. Public Comment: In response to our invitation in the NPP we did not receive any comments on the proposed priority. Final Priority: The Assistant Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative Services proposes a new priority for a Distinguished Residential Disability and Rehabilitation Policy Fellowship as part of NIDRR’s Research Fellowship Program (also known as the Mary E. Switzer Research Fellowships). The goals of this proposed priority are: (1) To provide experienced disability and rehabilitation researchers with opportunities to enhance their knowledge and understanding of the public policy-making process and the effects of public policy on the outcomes of individuals with disabilities; (2) to enhance the capacity of disability and rehabilitation researchers to conduct and disseminate relevant disability policy research; (3) to increase the integration and use of research findings in shaping disability-related policy; and 4) to increase awareness of disabilityrelated issues in public policy discussions, formulations, and reviews. Consistent with the goals of this program, an applicant for a Distinguished Residential Disability and Rehabilitation Policy Fellowship must include: (a) An Eligibility Statement that demonstrates that you meet the eligibility requirements in 34 CFR part PO 00000 Frm 00061 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 43653 356.2(c)(1), including relevant publications and prior research experience; and that provides sufficient information in order to evaluate your qualifications consistent with 34 CFR part 356.30(a). (b) A plan for how you will fulfill the full-time equivalent requirement for a Distinguished Residential Disability and Rehabilitation Policy Fellowship and the requirement to work a minimum of 50 percent of the time in an agency or office within the Executive or Legislative branches of the Federal government, in the Washington, DC metropolitan area. Note: As described in 34 CFR 356.41, fellows will work full-time on authorized fellowship activities. The application package for this priority provides a thorough description of how NIDRR defines and administers the full-time equivalent requirement for this program, as well as the 50 percent residential requirement. (c) A letter of support from a potential mentor at an agency or office within the Executive or Legislative branches of the Federal Government where your fellowship will be based. The letter of support from the potential mentor should indicate the mentor’s capacity and willingness to facilitate your fellowship placement should you be awarded the Distinguished Residential Disability and Rehabilitation Policy Fellowship. (d) An assurance that you will commit to spending at least 50 percent of the time during the period of the fellowship at an agency or office within the Executive or Legislative branches of the Federal government in the Washington, DC metropolitan area, receiving orientation, conducting research, and providing expertise related to disability and rehabilitation research. (e) A description of a proposed Distinguished Residential Disability and Rehabilitation Policy Fellowship research project that includes the following: (1) A brief history or literature review of the disability issue, as appropriate; identification of the relevant recent legislative, regulatory, or administrative actions and the policy options related to this topic; and a rationale for the importance of the topic to improving the well-being of individuals with disabilities in one or more of NIDRR’s primary outcome domains: Community Living and Participation, Employment, and Health and Function. (2) Specific objectives and research questions or hypotheses that will guide the project, the methods you will use to conduct the research, and the proposed timeline for implementing the project. E:\FR\FM\28JYR1.SGM 28JYR1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 79, Number 144 (Monday, July 28, 2014)]
[Rules and Regulations]
[Pages 43650-43653]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2014-17718]


=======================================================================
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DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

34 CFR Chapter III

[Docket ID ED-2014-OSERS-0028]


Final Priority; National Institute on Disability and 
Rehabilitation Research--Rehabilitation Research and Training Centers

[CFDA Number: 84.133B-1.]

AGENCY: Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services, 
Department of Education.

ACTION: Final priority.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: The Assistant Secretary for Special Education and 
Rehabilitative Services announces a priority for the Rehabilitation 
Research and Training Center (RRTC) Program administered by the 
National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR). 
Specifically, we announce a priority for an RRTC on Vocational 
Rehabilitation Practices for Youth and Young Adults. The Assistant 
Secretary may use this priority for competitions in fiscal year (FY) 
2014 and later years. We take this action to focus research attention 
on an area of national need. We intend for this priority to contribute 
to improved outcomes for youth and young adults with disabilities in 
the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services program.

DATES: Effective Date: This priority is effective August 27, 2014.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Patricia Barrett, U.S. Department of 
Education, 400 Maryland Avenue SW., room 5142, Potomac Center Plaza 
(PCP), Washington, DC 20202-2700. Telephone: (202) 245-6211 or by 
email: patricia.barrett@ed.gov.
    If you use a telecommunications device for the deaf (TDD) or a text 
telephone (TTY), call the Federal Relay Service (FRS), toll free, at 1-
800-877-8339.

[[Page 43651]]


SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Purpose of Program: The purpose of the 
Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program is 
to plan and conduct research, demonstration projects, training, and 
related activities, including international activities, to develop 
methods, procedures, and rehabilitation technology that maximize the 
full inclusion and integration into society, employment, independent 
living, family support, and economic and social self-sufficiency of 
individuals with disabilities, especially individuals with the most 
severe disabilities, and to improve the effectiveness of services 
authorized under the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended 
(Rehabilitation Act).

Rehabilitation Research and Training Centers

    The purpose of the RRTCs, which are funded through the Disability 
and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program, is to achieve 
the goals of, and improve the effectiveness of, services authorized 
under the Rehabilitation Act through well-designed research, training, 
technical assistance, and dissemination activities in important topical 
areas. These activities are designed to benefit rehabilitation service 
providers, individuals with disabilities, family members, policymakers, 
and other research stakeholders. Additional information on the RRTC 
program can be found at: http://www2.ed.gov/programs/rrtc/index.html.

    Program Authority: 29 U.S.C. 762(g) and 764(b)(2)(A).

    Applicable Program Regulations: 34 CFR part 350.
    We published a notice of proposed priority (NPP) for this program 
in the Federal Register on May 27, 2014 (79 FR 30056). That notice 
contained background information and our reasons for proposing the 
particular priority.
    There are no differences between the proposed priority and this 
final priority.
    Public Comment: In response to our invitation in the notice of 
proposed priority, three parties submitted comments on the proposed 
priority.
    Generally, we do not address technical and other minor changes. In 
addition, we do not address general comments that raised concerns not 
directly related to the proposed priority.
    Analysis of the Comments and Changes: An analysis of the comments 
and of any changes in the priority since publication of the NPP 
follows.
    Comment: One commenter suggested that NIDRR modify the priority to 
require transition-related research on best practices in the following 
areas: Engaging youth consumers in the VR process, engaging parents/
families in the VR process, how motivational interviewing works best 
with youth consumers, and partnering with school staff in the career 
development of youth with disabilities.
    Discussion: As written, the priority specifies that the RRTC must 
conduct research on engaging youth consumers in the VR program. 
Paragraph (a) requires applicants to investigate factors that affect 
the likelihood that youth and young adults are fully engaged in the VR 
program. Paragraph (a)(1)(i) requires applicants to identify 
individual- and system-level factors (including practices of State VR 
agencies) that affect youth engagement in the VR program. We believe 
that, consistent with the proposed priority, the priority contains the 
transition-related research the commenter supports.
    Changes: None.
    Final Priority:
    The Assistant Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative 
Services establishes a priority for an RRTC to conduct research on 
Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) Practices for Youth and Young Adults. 
The RRTC must contribute to increased knowledge about effective VR 
practices that can improve employment outcomes of youth and young 
adults with disabilities by:
    (a) Generating new knowledge that builds the evidence base of VR 
practices, services, or models that improve the employment outcomes for 
youth and young adults. The center will conduct research to better 
understand the factors that affect the likelihood that youth and young 
adults are fully engaged in the VR program and achieve their vocational 
goals; i.e., completion of postsecondary education and training 
programs, and attainment of competitive employment, including research 
that--
    (i) Identifies individual- and system-level factors that affect 
engagement and attainment of an employment outcome. Individual-level 
factors include, but are not limited to, demographic characteristics 
and impairment types and severity. System-level factors include, but 
are not limited to, financial disincentives to obtaining employment 
associated with other public programs and systems, characteristics and 
practices of VR State agencies, employer practices and perceptions, and 
macroeconomic conditions; and
    (ii) Identifies the reasons for which youth and young adults with 
disabilities discontinue their participation in the VR program before 
achieving successful postsecondary goals (e.g., postsecondary education 
or training) or employment outcomes.
    (b) Conducting research to identify VR services and transition 
practices that increase the likelihood of youth and young adults with 
disabilities achieving successful employment outcomes. The research 
must also identify practices relevant to improving the outcomes of 
youth and young adults who are at particular risk for poor employment 
outcomes. Applicants must identify the specific at-risk group or groups 
of youth and young adults with disabilities they propose to include; 
provide evidence that the selected population or populations are, in 
fact, at risk for poor employment outcomes; and explain how the 
practices are expected to address the needs of the population or 
populations.
    (c) Focusing its research on one or more specific stages of 
research. If the RRTC is to conduct research that can be categorized 
under more than one of the research stages, or research that progresses 
from one stage to another, those research stages must be clearly 
specified. (These stages and their definitions are provided at the end 
of the background statement section of the notice of proposed priority 
published in the Federal Register on May 27, 2014 (79 FR 30056).)
    (d) Serving as a national resource center for youth and young 
adults with disabilities, their families, and other stakeholders, 
including other relevant grantees funded by the Office of Special 
Education and Rehabilitative Services. Specifically, this center must 
coordinate, as appropriate, with the Office of Special Education 
Programs (OSEP)-funded Parent Training and Information Centers, the 
OSEP-funded National Technical Assistance Center on Improving 
Transition, and the Rehabilitation Services Administration (RSA)-funded 
Parent Information and Training Projects, and other relevant entities 
by conducting knowledge translation activities related to improving 
employment outcomes of youth and young adults that must include, but 
are not limited to:
    (i) Providing information and technical assistance to VR State 
agencies and related service providers, educators, employers, youth and 
young adults with disabilities and their representatives, families, and 
other key stakeholders.
    (ii) Providing training, including graduate, pre-service, and in-
service training, to educators, VR professionals, direct service 
professionals, and related service providers, to facilitate a seamless 
and effective transition service delivery system. Training may be 
offered through conferences, workshops,

[[Page 43652]]

public education programs, in-service training programs, and similar 
activities.
    (iii) Disseminating research-based information and materials 
related to VR practices and services that increase employment for youth 
and young adults with disabilities.
    (iv) Involving key stakeholder groups in the activities conducted 
under paragraphs (a) through (d) of this priority in order to maximize 
the relevance and usability of the new knowledge generated by the RRTC.
    Types of Priorities:
    When inviting applications for a competition using one or more 
priorities, we designate the type of each priority as absolute, 
competitive preference, or invitational through a notice in the Federal 
Register. The effect of each type of priority follows:
    Absolute priority: Under an absolute priority, we consider only 
applications that meet the priority (34 CFR 75.105(c)(3)).
    Competitive preference priority: Under a competitive preference 
priority, we give competitive preference to an application by (1) 
awarding additional points, depending on the extent to which the 
application meets the priority (34 CFR 75.105(c)(2)(i)); or (2) 
selecting an application that meets the priority over an application of 
comparable merit that does not meet the priority (34 CFR 
75.105(c)(2)(ii)).
    Invitational priority: Under an invitational priority, we are 
particularly interested in applications that meet the priority. 
However, we do not give an application that meets the priority a 
preference over other applications (34 CFR 75.105(c)(1)).
    This notice does not preclude us from proposing additional 
priorities, requirements, definitions, or selection criteria, subject 
to meeting applicable rulemaking requirements.

    Note: This notice does not solicit applications. In any year in 
which we choose to use this priority, we invite applications through 
a notice in the Federal Register.

Executive Orders 12866 and 13563

Regulatory Impact Analysis

    Under Executive Order 12866, the Secretary must determine whether 
this regulatory action is ``significant'' and, therefore, subject to 
the requirements of the Executive order and subject to review by the 
Office of Management and Budget (OMB). Section 3(f) of Executive Order 
12866 defines a ``significant regulatory action'' as an action likely 
to result in a rule that may--
    (1) Have an annual effect on the economy of $100 million or more, 
or adversely affect a sector of the economy, productivity, competition, 
jobs, the environment, public health or safety, or State, local, or 
tribal governments or communities in a material way (also referred to 
as an ``economically significant'' rule);
    (2) Create serious inconsistency or otherwise interfere with an 
action taken or planned by another agency;
    (3) Materially alter the budgetary impacts of entitlement grants, 
user fees, or loan programs or the rights and obligations of recipients 
thereof; or
    (4) Raise novel legal or policy issues arising out of legal 
mandates, the President's priorities, or the principles stated in the 
Executive order.
    This final regulatory action is not a significant regulatory action 
subject to review by OMB under section 3(f) of Executive Order 12866.
    We have also reviewed this final regulatory action under Executive 
Order 13563, which supplements and explicitly reaffirms the principles, 
structures, and definitions governing regulatory review established in 
Executive Order 12866. To the extent permitted by law, Executive Order 
13563 requires that an agency--
    (1) Propose or adopt regulations only upon a reasoned determination 
that their benefits justify their costs (recognizing that some benefits 
and costs are difficult to quantify);
    (2) Tailor its regulations to impose the least burden on society, 
consistent with obtaining regulatory objectives and taking into 
account--among other things and to the extent practicable--the costs of 
cumulative regulations;
    (3) In choosing among alternative regulatory approaches, select 
those approaches that maximize net benefits (including potential 
economic, environmental, public health and safety, and other 
advantages; distributive impacts; and equity);
    (4) To the extent feasible, specify performance objectives, rather 
than the behavior or manner of compliance a regulated entity must 
adopt; and
    (5) Identify and assess available alternatives to direct 
regulation, including economic incentives--such as user fees or 
marketable permits--to encourage the desired behavior, or provide 
information that enables the public to make choices.
    Executive Order 13563 also requires an agency ``to use the best 
available techniques to quantify anticipated present and future 
benefits and costs as accurately as possible.'' The Office of 
Information and Regulatory Affairs of OMB has emphasized that these 
techniques may include ``identifying changing future compliance costs 
that might result from technological innovation or anticipated 
behavioral changes.''
    We are issuing this final priority only on a reasoned determination 
that its benefits justify its costs. In choosing among alternative 
regulatory approaches, we selected those approaches that maximize net 
benefits. Based on the analysis that follows, the Department believes 
that this regulatory action is consistent with the principles in 
Executive Order 13563.
    We also have determined that this regulatory action does not unduly 
interfere with State, local, and tribal governments in the exercise of 
their governmental functions.
    In accordance with both Executive orders, the Department has 
assessed the potential costs and benefits, both quantitative and 
qualitative, of this regulatory action. The potential costs are those 
resulting from statutory requirements and those we have determined as 
necessary for administering the Department's programs and activities.
    The benefits of the Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects 
and Centers Program have been well established over the years, as 
projects similar to the one envisioned by the final priority have been 
completed successfully, and the proposed priority will generate new 
knowledge through research. The new RRTCs will generate, disseminate, 
and promote the use of new information that would improve outcomes for 
individuals with disabilities in the areas of community living and 
participation, employment, and health and function.
    Accessible Format: Individuals with disabilities can obtain this 
document in an accessible format (e.g., braille, large print, 
audiotape, or compact disc) on request to the program contact person 
listed under FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT.
    Electronic Access to This Document: The official version of this 
document is the document published in the Federal Register. Free 
Internet access to the official edition of the Federal Register and the 
Code of Federal Regulations is available via the Federal Digital System 
at: www.gpo.gov/fdsys. At this site you can view this document, as well 
as all other documents of this Department published in the Federal 
Register, in text or Adobe Portable Document Format (PDF). To use PDF 
you must have Adobe Acrobat Reader, which is available free at the 
site.
    You may also access documents of the Department published in the 
Federal Register by using the article search feature at: 
www.federalregister.gov. Specifically, through the advanced

[[Page 43653]]

search feature at this site, you can limit your search to documents 
published by the Department.

    Dated: July 23, 2014.
Melody Musgrove,
Director, Office of Special Education Programs.
[FR Doc. 2014-17718 Filed 7-25-14; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4000-01-P