Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; Comment Request, 40765-40769 [2014-16337]

Download as PDF mstockstill on DSK4VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES Federal Register / Vol. 79, No. 134 / Monday, July 14, 2014 / Notices T.W. Alexander Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709. Meeting Web page: The preliminary agenda, registration, and other meeting materials are at http://ntp.niehs.nih.gov/ go/32822. Webcast: The meeting will be webcast; the URL will be provided to those who register for viewing. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Dr. Lori White, Designated Federal Officer for SACATM, Office of Liaison, Policy and Review, Division of NTP, NIEHS, P.O. Box 12233, K2–03, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709. Phone: 919– 541–9834, fax: (301) 480–3272, email: whiteld@niehs.nih.gov. Hand Deliver/ Courier address: 530 Davis Drive, Room K2136, Morrisville, NC 27560. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Preliminary Agenda and Other Meeting Information: A preliminary agenda, roster of SACATM members, background materials, public comments, and any additional information, when available, will be posted on the SACATM meeting Web site (http:// ntp.niehs.nih.gov/go/32822) or is available upon request from the Designated Federal Officer. Following the meeting, summary minutes will be prepared and available on the SACATM Web site or upon request. Meeting and Registration: This meeting is open to the public with time scheduled for oral public comments. The public may attend the meeting at NIEHS, where attendance is limited only by the space available, or view the webcast. Registration is required to view the webcast; the URL for the webcast will be provided in the email confirming registration. Individuals who plan to attend and/or provide comments are encouraged to register at http:// ntp.niehs.nih.gov/go/32822 by September 9, 2014, to facilitate planning for the meeting. Individuals interested in the meeting are encouraged to access this Web site to stay abreast of the most current information regarding the meeting. Visitor and security information for those attending in person is available at niehs.nih.gov/ about/visiting/index.cfm. Individuals with disabilities who need accommodation to participate in this event should contact Ms. Robbin Guy at phone: (919) 541–4363 or email: guyr2@ niehs.nih.gov. TTY users should contact the Federal TTY Relay Service at 800– 877–8339. Requests should be made at least five business days in advance of the event. Request for Comments: Both written and oral public input on the agenda topics is invited. Written comments received in response to this notice will VerDate Mar<15>2010 19:25 Jul 11, 2014 Jkt 232001 be posted on the meeting Web site and persons submitting them will be identified by their name and affiliation and/or sponsoring organization, if applicable. Persons submitting written comments should include their name, affiliation (if applicable), and sponsoring organization (if any) with the document. Time is allotted during the meeting for presentation of oral comments and each organization (sponsoring organization or affiliation) is allowed one time slot per topic. At least 7 minutes will be allotted for each speaker, and if time permits, may be extended up to 10 minutes at the discretion of the chair. Registration for oral comments will also be available onsite, although time allowed for presentation by on-site registrants may be less than for registered speakers and will be determined by the number of persons who register at the meeting. In addition to in-person oral comments at the meeting, public comments can be presented by teleconference line. There will be 50 lines for this call; availability will be on a first-come, first-served basis. The lines will be open from 8:30 a.m. until approximately 5:00 p.m., although public comments will be received only during the formal public comment periods, which will be indicated on the preliminary agenda. The access number for the teleconference line will be provided to registrants by email prior to the meeting. Persons wishing to present oral comments are encouraged to register using the SACATM meeting registration form (http://ntp.niehs.nih.gov/go/ 32822), indicate the topic(s) on which they plan to comment, and, if possible, send a copy of their statement to whiteld@niehs.nih.gov by September 9, to enable review by SACATM, NICEATM, ICCVAM, and NIEHS/NTP staff prior to the meeting. Written statements can supplement and may expand the oral presentation. If registering on-site and reading from written text, please bring 30 copies of the statement for distribution and to supplement the record. Background Information on ICCVAM, NICEATM, and SACATM: ICCVAM is an interagency committee composed of representatives from 15 Federal regulatory and research agencies that require, use, generate, or disseminate toxicological and safety testing information. ICCVAM conducts technical evaluations of new, revised, and alternative safety testing methods with regulatory applicability and promotes the scientific validation and regulatory acceptance of toxicological and safety-testing methods that more accurately assess the safety and hazards PO 00000 Frm 00061 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 40765 of chemicals and products and that reduce, refine (decrease or eliminate pain and distress), or replace animal use. The ICCVAM Authorization Act of 2000 (42 U.S.C. 285l–3) established ICCVAM as a permanent interagency committee of the NIEHS under NICEATM. NICEATM administers ICCVAM, provides scientific and operational support for ICCVAM-related activities, and conducts independent validation studies to assess the usefulness and limitations of new, revised, and alternative test methods and strategies. NICEATM and ICCVAM work collaboratively to evaluate new and improved test methods and strategies applicable to the needs of U.S. Federal agencies. NICEATM and ICCVAM welcome the public nomination of new, revised, and alternative test methods and strategies for validation studies and technical evaluations. Additional information about ICCVAM and NICEATM can be found at http:// ntp.niehs.nih.gov/go/iccvam and http:// ntp.niehs.nih.gov/go/niceatm. SACATM was established in response to the ICCVAM Authorization Act [Section 285l–3(d)] and is composed of scientists from the public and private sectors. SACATM advises ICCVAM, NICEATM, and the Director of the NIEHS and NTP regarding statutorily mandated duties of ICCVAM and activities of NICEATM. SACATM provides advice on priorities and activities related to the development, validation, scientific review, regulatory acceptance, implementation, and national and international harmonization of new, revised, and alternative toxicological test methods. Additional information about SACATM, including the charter, roster, and records of past meetings, can be found at http://ntp.niehs.nih.gov/go/167. Dated: July 7, 2014. John R. Bucher, Associate Director, National Toxicology Program. [FR Doc. 2014–16452 Filed 7–11–14; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4140–01–P DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; Comment Request In compliance with Section 3506(c)(2)(A) of the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 concerning E:\FR\FM\14JYN1.SGM 14JYN1 40766 Federal Register / Vol. 79, No. 134 / Monday, July 14, 2014 / Notices mstockstill on DSK4VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES opportunity for public comment on proposed collections of information, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) will publish periodic summaries of proposed projects. To request more information on the proposed projects or to obtain a copy of the information collection plans, call the SAMHSA Reports Clearance Officer on (240) 276– 1243. Comments are invited on: (a) Whether the proposed collections of information are necessary for the proper performance of the functions of the agency, including whether the information shall have practical utility; (b) the accuracy of the agency’s estimate of the burden of the proposed collection of information; (c) ways to enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the information to be collected; and (d) ways to minimize the burden of the collection of information on respondents, including through the use of automated collection techniques or other forms of information technology. Proposed Project: Common Data Platform (CDP)—NEW The Common Data Platform (CDP) includes new instruments for the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). The CDP will replace separate data collection instruments used for reporting Government Performance and Results Act of 1993 (GPRA) measures: the TRansformation ACcountability (TRAC) Reporting System (OMB No. 0930–0285) used by the Center for Mental Health Services (CMHS); the Prevention Management Reporting and Training System (PMRTS—OMB No. 0930–0279) used by the Center for Substance Abuse Prevention (CSAP); and the Services Accountability and Improvement System (SAIS—OMB No. 0930–0208) used by the Center for Substance Abuse Treatment (CSAT). The CDP will also include an Infrastructure, Prevention, and Mental Health Promotion (IPP) Form and elements approved by consensus of offices and Centers within SAMHSA as well as the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). Approval of this information collection will allow SAMHSA to continue to meet Government Performance and Results Modernization Act of 2010 (GPRAMA) reporting requirements and analyses of the data will help SAMHSA determine whether progress is being made in achieving its mission. The primary purpose of this data collection system is to promote the use of common data elements among SAMHSA grantees and contractors. The VerDate Mar<15>2010 19:25 Jul 11, 2014 Jkt 232001 common elements were recommended by consensus among SAMHSA Centers and Offices. Analyses of these data will allow SAMHSA to quantify effects and accomplishments of its discretionary grant programs which are consistent with the OMB-approved GPRA measures and address goals and objectives outlined in the Office of National Drug Control Policy’s Performance Measures of Effectiveness and the SAMHSA Strategic Initiatives. The CDP will be a real-time, performance management system that captures information on substance abuse treatment and prevention and mental health services delivered in the United States. A wide range of client and program information will be captured through CDP for approximately 3,000 grants (2,224 for CMHS; 642 for CSAT; 122 for CSAP; and 33 for HIV Continuum of Care). Substance abuse treatment facilities, mental health service providers, and substance abuse prevention programs will submit their data in real-time or on a monthly or a weekly basis to ensure that the CDP is an accurate, up-to-date reflection on the scope of services delivered and characteristics of the clients. In order to carry out section 1105(a) (29) of GPRA, SAMHSA is required to prepare a performance plan for its major programs of activity. This plan must: • Establish performance goals to define the level of performance to be achieved by a program activity; • Express such goals in an objective, quantifiable, and measurable form; • Briefly describe the operational processes, skills and technology, and the human, capital, information, or other resources required to meet the performance goals; • Establish performance indicators to be used in measuring or assessing the relevant outputs, service levels, and outcomes of each program activity; • Provide a basis for comparing actual program results with the established performance goals; and • Describe the means to be used to verify and validate measured values. This CDP data collection supports the GPRAMA, which requires overall organization management to improve agency performance and achieve the mission and goals of the agency through the use of strategic and performance planning, measurement, analysis, regular assessment of progress, and use of performance information to improve the results achieved. Specifically, this data collection will allow SAMHSA to have the capacity to report on a consistent set of performance measures PO 00000 Frm 00062 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 across its various grant programs that conduct each of these activities. SAMHSA’s legislative mandate is to increase access to high quality substance abuse and mental health prevention and treatment services and to improve outcomes. Its mission is to reduce the impact of substance abuse and mental illness on America’s communities. SAMHSA’s vision is to provide leadership and devote its resources—programs, policies, information and data, contracts and grants—toward helping the Nation act on the knowledge that: • Behavioral health is essential for health; • Prevention works; • Treatment is effective; and • People recover from mental and substance use disorders. In order to improve the lives of people within communities, SAMHSA has many roles: • Providing Leadership and Voice by developing policies; convening stakeholders; collaborating with people in recovery and their families, providers, localities, Tribes, Territories, and States; collecting best practices and developing expertise around behavioral health services; advocating for the needs of persons with mental and substance use disorders; and emphasizing the importance of behavioral health in partnership with other agencies, systems, and the public. • Promoting change through Funding and Service Capacity Development. Supporting States, Territories, and Tribes to build and improve basic and proven practices and system capacity; helping local governments, providers, communities, coalitions, schools, universities, and peer-run and other organizations to innovate and address emerging issues; building capacity across grantees; and strengthening States’, Territories’, Tribes’, and communities’ emergency response to disasters. • Supporting the field with Information/Communications by conducting and sharing information from national surveys and surveillance (e.g., National Survey on Drug Use and Health [NSDUH], Drug Abuse Warning Network [DAWN], Drug and Alcohol Service Information System [DASIS]); vetting and sharing information about evidence-based practices (e.g., National Registry of Evidence-based Programs and Practices [NREPP]); using the Web, print, social media, public appearances, and the press to reach the public, providers (e.g., primary, specialty, guilds, peers), and other stakeholders; and listening to and reflecting the voices of people in recovery and their families. E:\FR\FM\14JYN1.SGM 14JYN1 mstockstill on DSK4VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES Federal Register / Vol. 79, No. 134 / Monday, July 14, 2014 / Notices • Protecting and promoting behavioral health through Regulation and Standard Setting by preventing tobacco sales to minors (Synar Program); administering Federal drug-free workplace and drug-testing programs; overseeing opioid treatment programs and accreditation bodies; informing physicians’ office-based opioid treatment prescribing practices; and partnering with other HHS agencies in regulation development and review. • Improving Practice (i.e., community-based, primary care, and specialty care) by holding State, Territorial, and Tribal policy academies; providing technical assistance to States, Territories, Tribes, communities, grantees, providers, practitioners, and stakeholders; convening conferences to disseminate practice information and facilitate communication; providing guidance to the field; developing and disseminating evidence-based practices and successful frameworks for service provision; supporting innovation in evaluation and services research; moving innovations and evidence-based approaches to scale; and cooperating with international partners to identify promising approaches to supporting behavioral health. Each of these roles complements SAMHSA’s legislative mandate. All of SAMHSA’s programs and activities are geared toward the achievement of its mission, and performance monitoring is a collaborative and cooperative aspect of this process. SAMHSA will strive to coordinate its efforts to further its mission with ongoing performance measurement development activities. Reports, to be made available on the SAMHSA Web site and by request, will inform staff on the grantees’ ability to serve their target populations and meet their client and budget targets. SAMHSA CDP data will also provide grantees with information that can guide modifications to their service array. Approval of this information collection will allow SAMHSA to continue to meet Government Performance and Results Act of 1993 (GPRA) reporting requirements that quantify the effects and accomplishments of its discretionary grant programs which are consistent with OMB guidance. Based on current funding and planned fiscal year 2015 notice of funding announcements (NOFA), SAMHSA programs will use these measures in fiscal years 2015 through 2017. CSAP will use the CDP measures for the HIV Minority AIDS Initiative (MAI), VerDate Mar<15>2010 19:25 Jul 11, 2014 Jkt 232001 Strategic Prevention Framework State Incentive Grants (SPF SIG), and Partnerships for Success (PFS). CMHS programs that will collect client-level data include: Comprehensive Community Mental Health Services for Children and their Families (CMHI); Healthy Transitions (HT); National Child Traumatic Stress Initiative (NCTSI) Community Treatment Centers; Mental Health Transformation State Incentive Grants (MH SIG); Minority AIDS/HIV Services Collaborative Program; Primary and Behavioral Health Care Integration (PBHCI); Services in Supportive Housing (SSH); Systems of Care (SoC); and Transforming Lives Through Supportive Employment. CMHS programs that will use the CDP to collect grantee-level IPP indicators include: Advancing Wellness and Resiliency in Education (Project AWARE); Circles of Care; Comprehensive Community Mental Health Services for Children and their Families (CMHI); Garrett Lee Smith Campus Suicide Prevention Program; Garrett Lee Smith State/Tribal Suicide Prevention Program; Healthy Transitions Program; Linking Actions for Unmet Needs in Children’s Mental Health (LAUNCH); National Suicide Prevention Lifeline; NCTSI Treatment and Service Centers; NCTSI Community Treatment Centers; NCTSI National Coordinating Center; Mental Health Transformation Grant Program; Minority AIDS/HIV Services Collaborative Program; Minority Fellowship Program; PBHCI; Safe Schools/Healthy Students; Services in Supportive Housing; State Mental Health Data Infrastructure Grants for Quality Improvement; Statewide Consumer Network Grants; Statewide Family Network Grants; Suicide Lifeline Crisis Center Follow Up; Systems of Care; Transforming Lives Through Supported Employment; Native Connections; Now is the Time: Minority Fellowship Program—Youth; Cooperative Agreements to Implement the National Strategy for Suicide Prevention, Historically Black Colleges and Universities Center for Excellence in Behavioral Health; and Statewide Peer Networks for Recovery and Resilience. CSAT programs that will use the CDP include: Assertive Adolescent and Family Treatment (AAFT); Access to Recovery 3 (ATR3); Adult Treatment Court Collaboratives (ATCC); Enhancing Adult Drug Court Services, Coordination and Treatment (EADCS); Offender Reentry Program (ORP); PO 00000 Frm 00063 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 40767 Treatment Drug Court (TDC); Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention—Juvenile Drug Courts (OJJDP–JDC); Teen Court Program (TCP); HIV/AIDS Outreach Program; Targeted Capacity Expansion Program for Substance Abuse Treatment and HIV/ AIDS Services (TCE–HIV); Addictions Treatment for the Homeless (AT–HM); Cooperative Agreements to Benefit Homeless Individuals (CABHI); Cooperative Agreements to Benefit Homeless Individuals—States (CABHI— States); Recovery-Oriented Systems of Care (ROSC); Targeted Capacity Expansion—Peer to Peer (TCE–PTP); Pregnant and Postpartum Women (PPW); Screening, Brief Intervention and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT); Targeted Capacity Expansion (TCE); Targeted Capacity Expansion—Health Information Technology (TCE–HIT); Targeted Capacity Expansion Technology Assisted Care (TCE–TAC); Addiction Technology Transfer Centers (ATTC); International Addiction Technology Transfer Centers (I–ATTC); State Adolescent Treatment Enhancement and Dissemination (SAT– ED); Grants to Expand Substance Abuse Treatment Capacity in Adult Tribal Healing to Wellness Courts and Juvenile Drug Courts; and Grants for the Benefit of Homeless Individuals—Services in Supportive Housing (GBHI). SAMHSA will also use the CDP to collect client-level and IPP information from the HIV Continuum of Care program, which is funded by CSAP, CMHS, and CSAT. SAMHSA uses performance measures to report on the performance of its discretionary services grant programs. The performance measures are used by individuals at three different levels: The SAMHSA administrator and staff, the Center administrators and government project officers, and grantees. SAMHSA and its Centers will use the data for annual reporting required by GPRA, for grantee performance monitoring, for SAMHSA reports and presentations, and for analyses comparing baseline with discharge and follow-up data. GPRA requires that SAMHSA’s report for each fiscal year include actual results of performance monitoring. The information collected through the CDP will allow SAMHSA to report on the results of these performance outcomes. Reporting will be consistent with specific SAMHSA performance domains to assess the accountability and performance of its discretionary grant programs. E:\FR\FM\14JYN1.SGM 14JYN1 40768 Federal Register / Vol. 79, No. 134 / Monday, July 14, 2014 / Notices ESTIMATES OF ANNUALIZED HOUR BURDEN—COMMON DATA PLATFORM CLIENT OUTCOME MEASURES FOR DISCRETIONARY PROGRAMS Number of respondents SAMHSA Program title HIV Continuum of Care (CSAP, CMHS, CSAT funding)— specific Form .................................................................. Responses per respondent 200 Total number of responses Burden hours per response Total burden hours 2 400 0.67 268 18,041 122 510 550 111 4 4 4 4 4 72,164 488 2,040 2,200 444 0.38 0.38 0.38 0.38 0.38 27,422 185 775 836 169 3,431 1,500 1,600 1,856 2 2 2 1 6,862 3,000 3,200 1,856 0.45 0.45 0.45 0.45 3,088 1,350 1,440 835 2,975 2,844 1 2 2,975 5,688 0.45 0.45 1,339 2,560 14,000 4,975 1,164 1,500 2 2 1 2 28,000 9,950 1,164 3,000 0.50 0.45 0.45 0.45 14,000 4,478 524 1,350 303 239,186 1,078 3 1 3 909 239,186 3,234 0.47 0.47 0.47 427 112,417 1,520 4,664 1,843 5,996 3 3 3 13,992 5,529 17,988 0.47 0.47 0.47 6,576 2,599 8,454 392 5,996 4,352 3 3 3 1,176 17,988 13,056 0.47 0.47 0.47 553 8,454 6,136 4,885 10,636 3 3 14,655 31,908 0.47 0.47 6,888 14,997 2,702 3 8,106 0.47 3,810 142 846 3 3 426 2,538 0.47 0.47 200 1,193 827 1,719 3 3 2,481 5,157 0.47 0.47 1,166 2,424 59,419 3 178,257 0.47 83,781 5,295 3 15,885 0.47 7,466 346 32,676 3 3 1,038 98,028 0.47 0.47 488 46,073 1,789 3 5,367 0.47 2,522 925 3 2,775 0.47 1,304 240 3 720 0.47 338 1,960 3 5,880 0.47 2,764 443,596 ........................ 829,710 .......................... 383,169 mstockstill on DSK4VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES Client-Level Services Forms CSAP: HIV—Minority AIDS Initiative (MAI) ............................ SPF SIG/Community Level ......................................... SPF SIG/Program Level ............................................. PFS/Community Level ................................................ PFS/Program Level .................................................... CMHS: Comprehensive Community Mental Health Services for Children and their Families Program (CMHI) .... HIV Continuum of Care (CoC) ................................... Healthy Transitions (HT) ............................................. NCTSI Community Treatment Centers (NCTSI) ........ Mental Health Transformation State Incentive Grant (MH SIG) ................................................................. Minority AIDS/HIV Services Collaborative Program ... Primary and Behavioral Health Care Integration (PBHCI) ................................................................... Services in Supportive Housing (SSH) ...................... Systems of Care (SoC) .............................................. Transforming Lives Through Supported Employment CSAT: Assertive Adolescent and Family Treatment (AAFT) Access to Recovery 3 (ATR3) .................................... Adult Treatment Court Collaboratives (ATCC) ........... Enhancing Adult Drug Court Services, Coordination, and Treatment (EADCS CT) ................................... Offender Reentry Program (ORP) .............................. Treatment Drug Court (TDC) ...................................... Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention—Juvenile Drug Courts (OJJDP–JDC) ............. Teen Court Program (TCP) ........................................ HIV/AIDS Outreach Program (HIV-Outreach) ............ Targeted Capacity Expansion Program for Substance Abuse Treatment and HIV/AIDS Services (TCE–HIV) ............................................................... Addictions Treatment for Homeless (AT–HM) ........... Cooperative Agreements to Benefit Homeless Individuals (CABHI) ....................................................... Cooperative Agreements to Benefit Homeless Individuals—States (CABHI-States) ............................. Recovery-Oriented Systems of Care (ROSC) ............ Targeted Capacity Expansion—Peer to Peer (TCE– PTP) ........................................................................ Pregnant and Postpartum Women (PPW) ................. Screening Brief Intervention Referral and Treatment* (SBIRT) ................................................................... Targeted Capacity Expansion—Health Information Technology (TCE–HIT) ........................................... Targeted Capacity Expansion Technology Assisted Care (TCE–TAC) ..................................................... Addiction Technology Transfer Centers (ATTC) ........ International Addiction Technology Transfer Centers (I–ATTC) .................................................................. State Adolescent Treatment Enhancement and Dissemination (SAT–ED) ............................................. Grants to Expand Substance Abuse Treatment Capacity In Adult Tribal Healing to Wellness Courts and Juvenile Drug Courts ....................................... Grants for the Benefit of Homeless Individuals— Services in Supportive Housing (GBHI) ................. Total Services—Client Level Instruments ........... Infrastructure, Prevention, and Mental Health Promotion (IPP) Form: VerDate Mar<15>2010 19:25 Jul 11, 2014 Jkt 232001 PO 00000 Frm 00064 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 E:\FR\FM\14JYN1.SGM 14JYN1 40769 Federal Register / Vol. 79, No. 134 / Monday, July 14, 2014 / Notices ESTIMATES OF ANNUALIZED HOUR BURDEN—COMMON DATA PLATFORM CLIENT OUTCOME MEASURES FOR DISCRETIONARY PROGRAMS—Continued Responses per respondent Number of respondents SAMHSA Program title Total number of responses Burden hours per response Total burden hours Project AWARE .......................................................... Circles of Care ............................................................ Comprehensive Community Mental Health Services for Children and their Families Program (CMHI) .... Garrett Lee Smith Campus Suicide Prevention Grant Program ................................................................... HIV Continuum of Care .............................................. Garrett Lee Smith State/Tribal Suicide Prevention Grant Program ........................................................ Healthy Transitions (HT) ............................................. Historically Black Colleges and Universities Center for Excellence in Behavioral Health ........................ Linking Actions for Unmet Needs in Children’s Mental Health (LAUNCH) ............................................... National Suicide Prevention Lifeline ........................... NCTSI Treatment & Service Centers ......................... NCTSI Community Treatment Centers ...................... NCTSI National Coordinating Center ......................... Mental Health Transformation Grant .......................... Minority AIDS/HIV Services Collaborative Program ... Minority Fellowship Program ...................................... Primary and Behavioral Health Care Integration ....... Safe Schools/Healthy Students Initiative .................... Services in Supportive Housing ................................. State Mental Health Data Infrastructure Grants for Quality Improvement ............................................... Statewide Consumer Network Grants ........................ Statewide Family Network Grants .............................. Suicide Lifeline Crisis Center FUP Grants ................. Systems of Care ......................................................... Transforming Lives Through Supported Employment Native Connections ..................................................... Now Is the Time: Minority Fellowship Program— Youth ....................................................................... Cooperative Agreements to Implement the National Strategy for Suicide Prevention .............................. Statewide Peer Networks for Recovery and Resiliency ........................................................................ 120 11 4 4 480 44 2 2 960 88 69 4 276 2 552 123 33 4 4 492 132 2 2 984 264 102 16 4 4 408 64 2 2 816 128 1 4 4 2 8 54 2 32 81 2 30 17 9 70 7 5 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 216 8 128 324 8 120 68 36 280 28 20 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 432 16 256 648 16 240 136 72 560 56 40 2 42 53 27 31 6 20 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 8 168 212 108 124 24 80 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 16 336 424 216 248 48 160 5 4 20 2 40 4 4 16 2 32 8 4 32 2 64 TOTAL IPP .......................................................... 982 ........................ 3,928 .......................... 7,856 TOTAL SAMHSA .......................................... 444,578 ........................ 833,638 .......................... 389,895 Notes: 1. Screening, Brief Intervention, Treatment and Referral (SBIRT) grant program: The estimated number of respondents is 10% of the total respondents, 742,740. 2. Numbers may not add to the totals due to rounding. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Summer King, Statistician. mstockstill on DSK4VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES Send comments to Summer King, SAMHSA Reports Clearance Officer, Room 2–1057, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, MD 20857 OR email her a copy at summer.king@samhsa.hhs.gov. Written comments should be received by September 12, 2014. Pursuant to Public Law 92–463, notice is hereby given that the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration’s (SAMHSA) Center for Substance Abuse Treatment (CSAT) National Advisory Council will meet July 24, 2014, 2:00–3:30 p.m. in a closed teleconference meeting. The meeting will include discussions and evaluations of grant applications [FR Doc. 2014–16337 Filed 7–11–14; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4162–20–P VerDate Mar<15>2010 19:25 Jul 11, 2014 Jkt 232001 Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration Center for Substance Abuse Treatment; Notice of Meeting PO 00000 Frm 00065 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 reviewed by SAMHSA’s Initial Review Groups, and involve an examination of confidential financial and business information as well as personal information concerning the applicants. Therefore, the meeting will be closed to the public as determined by the SAMHSA Administrator, in accordance with Title 5 U.S.C. 552b(c)(4) and (6) and (c)(9)(B) and 5 U.S.C. App. 2, Section 10(d). Meeting information and a roster of Council members may be obtained by accessing the SAMHSA Committee Web site at http://beta.samhsa.gov/about-us/ advisory-councils/csat-nationaladvisory-council or by contacting the CSAT National Advisory Council E:\FR\FM\14JYN1.SGM 14JYN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 79, Number 134 (Monday, July 14, 2014)]
[Notices]
[Pages 40765-40769]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2014-16337]


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DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration


Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; 
Comment Request

    In compliance with Section 3506(c)(2)(A) of the Paperwork Reduction 
Act of 1995 concerning

[[Page 40766]]

opportunity for public comment on proposed collections of information, 
the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) 
will publish periodic summaries of proposed projects. To request more 
information on the proposed projects or to obtain a copy of the 
information collection plans, call the SAMHSA Reports Clearance Officer 
on (240) 276-1243.
    Comments are invited on: (a) Whether the proposed collections of 
information are necessary for the proper performance of the functions 
of the agency, including whether the information shall have practical 
utility; (b) the accuracy of the agency's estimate of the burden of the 
proposed collection of information; (c) ways to enhance the quality, 
utility, and clarity of the information to be collected; and (d) ways 
to minimize the burden of the collection of information on respondents, 
including through the use of automated collection techniques or other 
forms of information technology.

Proposed Project: Common Data Platform (CDP)--NEW

    The Common Data Platform (CDP) includes new instruments for the 
Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). The 
CDP will replace separate data collection instruments used for 
reporting Government Performance and Results Act of 1993 (GPRA) 
measures: the TRansformation ACcountability (TRAC) Reporting System 
(OMB No. 0930-0285) used by the Center for Mental Health Services 
(CMHS); the Prevention Management Reporting and Training System 
(PMRTS--OMB No. 0930-0279) used by the Center for Substance Abuse 
Prevention (CSAP); and the Services Accountability and Improvement 
System (SAIS--OMB No. 0930-0208) used by the Center for Substance Abuse 
Treatment (CSAT).
    The CDP will also include an Infrastructure, Prevention, and Mental 
Health Promotion (IPP) Form and elements approved by consensus of 
offices and Centers within SAMHSA as well as the Department of Health 
and Human Services (HHS).
    Approval of this information collection will allow SAMHSA to 
continue to meet Government Performance and Results Modernization Act 
of 2010 (GPRAMA) reporting requirements and analyses of the data will 
help SAMHSA determine whether progress is being made in achieving its 
mission. The primary purpose of this data collection system is to 
promote the use of common data elements among SAMHSA grantees and 
contractors. The common elements were recommended by consensus among 
SAMHSA Centers and Offices. Analyses of these data will allow SAMHSA to 
quantify effects and accomplishments of its discretionary grant 
programs which are consistent with the OMB-approved GPRA measures and 
address goals and objectives outlined in the Office of National Drug 
Control Policy's Performance Measures of Effectiveness and the SAMHSA 
Strategic Initiatives.
    The CDP will be a real-time, performance management system that 
captures information on substance abuse treatment and prevention and 
mental health services delivered in the United States. A wide range of 
client and program information will be captured through CDP for 
approximately 3,000 grants (2,224 for CMHS; 642 for CSAT; 122 for CSAP; 
and 33 for HIV Continuum of Care). Substance abuse treatment 
facilities, mental health service providers, and substance abuse 
prevention programs will submit their data in real-time or on a monthly 
or a weekly basis to ensure that the CDP is an accurate, up-to-date 
reflection on the scope of services delivered and characteristics of 
the clients.
    In order to carry out section 1105(a) (29) of GPRA, SAMHSA is 
required to prepare a performance plan for its major programs of 
activity. This plan must:
     Establish performance goals to define the level of 
performance to be achieved by a program activity;
     Express such goals in an objective, quantifiable, and 
measurable form;
     Briefly describe the operational processes, skills and 
technology, and the human, capital, information, or other resources 
required to meet the performance goals;
     Establish performance indicators to be used in measuring 
or assessing the relevant outputs, service levels, and outcomes of each 
program activity;
     Provide a basis for comparing actual program results with 
the established performance goals; and
     Describe the means to be used to verify and validate 
measured values.
    This CDP data collection supports the GPRAMA, which requires 
overall organization management to improve agency performance and 
achieve the mission and goals of the agency through the use of 
strategic and performance planning, measurement, analysis, regular 
assessment of progress, and use of performance information to improve 
the results achieved. Specifically, this data collection will allow 
SAMHSA to have the capacity to report on a consistent set of 
performance measures across its various grant programs that conduct 
each of these activities.
    SAMHSA's legislative mandate is to increase access to high quality 
substance abuse and mental health prevention and treatment services and 
to improve outcomes. Its mission is to reduce the impact of substance 
abuse and mental illness on America's communities. SAMHSA's vision is 
to provide leadership and devote its resources--programs, policies, 
information and data, contracts and grants--toward helping the Nation 
act on the knowledge that:
     Behavioral health is essential for health;
     Prevention works;
     Treatment is effective; and
     People recover from mental and substance use disorders.
In order to improve the lives of people within communities, SAMHSA has 
many roles:

     Providing Leadership and Voice by developing policies; 
convening stakeholders; collaborating with people in recovery and their 
families, providers, localities, Tribes, Territories, and States; 
collecting best practices and developing expertise around behavioral 
health services; advocating for the needs of persons with mental and 
substance use disorders; and emphasizing the importance of behavioral 
health in partnership with other agencies, systems, and the public.
     Promoting change through Funding and Service Capacity 
Development. Supporting States, Territories, and Tribes to build and 
improve basic and proven practices and system capacity; helping local 
governments, providers, communities, coalitions, schools, universities, 
and peer-run and other organizations to innovate and address emerging 
issues; building capacity across grantees; and strengthening States', 
Territories', Tribes', and communities' emergency response to 
disasters.
     Supporting the field with Information/Communications by 
conducting and sharing information from national surveys and 
surveillance (e.g., National Survey on Drug Use and Health [NSDUH], 
Drug Abuse Warning Network [DAWN], Drug and Alcohol Service Information 
System [DASIS]); vetting and sharing information about evidence-based 
practices (e.g., National Registry of Evidence-based Programs and 
Practices [NREPP]); using the Web, print, social media, public 
appearances, and the press to reach the public, providers (e.g., 
primary, specialty, guilds, peers), and other stakeholders; and 
listening to and reflecting the voices of people in recovery and their 
families.

[[Page 40767]]

     Protecting and promoting behavioral health through 
Regulation and Standard Setting by preventing tobacco sales to minors 
(Synar Program); administering Federal drug-free workplace and drug-
testing programs; overseeing opioid treatment programs and 
accreditation bodies; informing physicians' office-based opioid 
treatment prescribing practices; and partnering with other HHS agencies 
in regulation development and review.
     Improving Practice (i.e., community-based, primary care, 
and specialty care) by holding State, Territorial, and Tribal policy 
academies; providing technical assistance to States, Territories, 
Tribes, communities, grantees, providers, practitioners, and 
stakeholders; convening conferences to disseminate practice information 
and facilitate communication; providing guidance to the field; 
developing and disseminating evidence-based practices and successful 
frameworks for service provision; supporting innovation in evaluation 
and services research; moving innovations and evidence-based approaches 
to scale; and cooperating with international partners to identify 
promising approaches to supporting behavioral health.
    Each of these roles complements SAMHSA's legislative mandate. All 
of SAMHSA's programs and activities are geared toward the achievement 
of its mission, and performance monitoring is a collaborative and 
cooperative aspect of this process. SAMHSA will strive to coordinate 
its efforts to further its mission with ongoing performance measurement 
development activities.
    Reports, to be made available on the SAMHSA Web site and by 
request, will inform staff on the grantees' ability to serve their 
target populations and meet their client and budget targets. SAMHSA CDP 
data will also provide grantees with information that can guide 
modifications to their service array. Approval of this information 
collection will allow SAMHSA to continue to meet Government Performance 
and Results Act of 1993 (GPRA) reporting requirements that quantify the 
effects and accomplishments of its discretionary grant programs which 
are consistent with OMB guidance.
    Based on current funding and planned fiscal year 2015 notice of 
funding announcements (NOFA), SAMHSA programs will use these measures 
in fiscal years 2015 through 2017.
    CSAP will use the CDP measures for the HIV Minority AIDS Initiative 
(MAI), Strategic Prevention Framework State Incentive Grants (SPF SIG), 
and Partnerships for Success (PFS).
    CMHS programs that will collect client-level data include: 
Comprehensive Community Mental Health Services for Children and their 
Families (CMHI); Healthy Transitions (HT); National Child Traumatic 
Stress Initiative (NCTSI) Community Treatment Centers; Mental Health 
Transformation State Incentive Grants (MH SIG); Minority AIDS/HIV 
Services Collaborative Program; Primary and Behavioral Health Care 
Integration (PBHCI); Services in Supportive Housing (SSH); Systems of 
Care (SoC); and Transforming Lives Through Supportive Employment.
    CMHS programs that will use the CDP to collect grantee-level IPP 
indicators include: Advancing Wellness and Resiliency in Education 
(Project AWARE); Circles of Care; Comprehensive Community Mental Health 
Services for Children and their Families (CMHI); Garrett Lee Smith 
Campus Suicide Prevention Program; Garrett Lee Smith State/Tribal 
Suicide Prevention Program; Healthy Transitions Program; Linking 
Actions for Unmet Needs in Children's Mental Health (LAUNCH); National 
Suicide Prevention Lifeline; NCTSI Treatment and Service Centers; NCTSI 
Community Treatment Centers; NCTSI National Coordinating Center; Mental 
Health Transformation Grant Program; Minority AIDS/HIV Services 
Collaborative Program; Minority Fellowship Program; PBHCI; Safe 
Schools/Healthy Students; Services in Supportive Housing; State Mental 
Health Data Infrastructure Grants for Quality Improvement; Statewide 
Consumer Network Grants; Statewide Family Network Grants; Suicide 
Lifeline Crisis Center Follow Up; Systems of Care; Transforming Lives 
Through Supported Employment; Native Connections; Now is the Time: 
Minority Fellowship Program--Youth; Cooperative Agreements to Implement 
the National Strategy for Suicide Prevention, Historically Black 
Colleges and Universities Center for Excellence in Behavioral Health; 
and Statewide Peer Networks for Recovery and Resilience.
    CSAT programs that will use the CDP include: Assertive Adolescent 
and Family Treatment (AAFT); Access to Recovery 3 (ATR3); Adult 
Treatment Court Collaboratives (ATCC); Enhancing Adult Drug Court 
Services, Coordination and Treatment (EADCS); Offender Reentry Program 
(ORP); Treatment Drug Court (TDC); Office of Juvenile Justice and 
Delinquency Prevention--Juvenile Drug Courts (OJJDP-JDC); Teen Court 
Program (TCP); HIV/AIDS Outreach Program; Targeted Capacity Expansion 
Program for Substance Abuse Treatment and HIV/AIDS Services (TCE-HIV); 
Addictions Treatment for the Homeless (AT-HM); Cooperative Agreements 
to Benefit Homeless Individuals (CABHI); Cooperative Agreements to 
Benefit Homeless Individuals--States (CABHI--States); Recovery-Oriented 
Systems of Care (ROSC); Targeted Capacity Expansion--Peer to Peer (TCE-
PTP); Pregnant and Postpartum Women (PPW); Screening, Brief 
Intervention and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT); Targeted Capacity 
Expansion (TCE); Targeted Capacity Expansion--Health Information 
Technology (TCE-HIT); Targeted Capacity Expansion Technology Assisted 
Care (TCE-TAC); Addiction Technology Transfer Centers (ATTC); 
International Addiction Technology Transfer Centers (I-ATTC); State 
Adolescent Treatment Enhancement and Dissemination (SAT-ED); Grants to 
Expand Substance Abuse Treatment Capacity in Adult Tribal Healing to 
Wellness Courts and Juvenile Drug Courts; and Grants for the Benefit of 
Homeless Individuals--Services in Supportive Housing (GBHI).
    SAMHSA will also use the CDP to collect client-level and IPP 
information from the HIV Continuum of Care program, which is funded by 
CSAP, CMHS, and CSAT.
    SAMHSA uses performance measures to report on the performance of 
its discretionary services grant programs. The performance measures are 
used by individuals at three different levels: The SAMHSA administrator 
and staff, the Center administrators and government project officers, 
and grantees.
    SAMHSA and its Centers will use the data for annual reporting 
required by GPRA, for grantee performance monitoring, for SAMHSA 
reports and presentations, and for analyses comparing baseline with 
discharge and follow-up data. GPRA requires that SAMHSA's report for 
each fiscal year include actual results of performance monitoring. The 
information collected through the CDP will allow SAMHSA to report on 
the results of these performance outcomes. Reporting will be consistent 
with specific SAMHSA performance domains to assess the accountability 
and performance of its discretionary grant programs.

[[Page 40768]]



  Estimates of Annualized Hour Burden--Common Data Platform Client Outcome Measures for Discretionary Programs
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                     Number of     Responses per   Total number    Burden hours    Total burden
      SAMHSA Program title          respondents     respondent     of responses    per response        hours
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
HIV Continuum of Care (CSAP,                 200               2             400            0.67             268
 CMHS, CSAT funding)--specific
 Form...........................
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                           Client-Level Services Forms
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
CSAP:
    HIV--Minority AIDS                    18,041               4          72,164            0.38          27,422
     Initiative (MAI)...........
    SPF SIG/Community Level.....             122               4             488            0.38             185
    SPF SIG/Program Level.......             510               4           2,040            0.38             775
    PFS/Community Level.........             550               4           2,200            0.38             836
    PFS/Program Level...........             111               4             444            0.38             169
CMHS:
    Comprehensive Community                3,431               2           6,862            0.45           3,088
     Mental Health Services for
     Children and their Families
     Program (CMHI).............
    HIV Continuum of Care (CoC).           1,500               2           3,000            0.45           1,350
    Healthy Transitions (HT)....           1,600               2           3,200            0.45           1,440
    NCTSI Community Treatment              1,856               1           1,856            0.45             835
     Centers (NCTSI)............
    Mental Health Transformation           2,975               1           2,975            0.45           1,339
     State Incentive Grant (MH
     SIG).......................
    Minority AIDS/HIV Services             2,844               2           5,688            0.45           2,560
     Collaborative Program......
    Primary and Behavioral                14,000               2          28,000            0.50          14,000
     Health Care Integration
     (PBHCI)....................
    Services in Supportive                 4,975               2           9,950            0.45           4,478
     Housing (SSH)..............
    Systems of Care (SoC).......           1,164               1           1,164            0.45             524
    Transforming Lives Through             1,500               2           3,000            0.45           1,350
     Supported Employment.......
CSAT:
    Assertive Adolescent and                 303               3             909            0.47             427
     Family Treatment (AAFT)....
    Access to Recovery 3 (ATR3).         239,186               1         239,186            0.47         112,417
    Adult Treatment Court                  1,078               3           3,234            0.47           1,520
     Collaboratives (ATCC)......
    Enhancing Adult Drug Court             4,664               3          13,992            0.47           6,576
     Services, Coordination, and
     Treatment (EADCS CT).......
    Offender Reentry Program               1,843               3           5,529            0.47           2,599
     (ORP)......................
    Treatment Drug Court (TDC)..           5,996               3          17,988            0.47           8,454
    Office of Juvenile Justice               392               3           1,176            0.47             553
     and Delinquency Prevention--
     Juvenile Drug Courts (OJJDP-
     JDC).......................
    Teen Court Program (TCP)....           5,996               3          17,988            0.47           8,454
    HIV/AIDS Outreach Program              4,352               3          13,056            0.47           6,136
     (HIV-Outreach).............
    Targeted Capacity Expansion            4,885               3          14,655            0.47           6,888
     Program for Substance Abuse
     Treatment and HIV/AIDS
     Services (TCE-HIV).........
    Addictions Treatment for              10,636               3          31,908            0.47          14,997
     Homeless (AT-HM)...........
    Cooperative Agreements to              2,702               3           8,106            0.47           3,810
     Benefit Homeless
     Individuals (CABHI)........
    Cooperative Agreements to                142               3             426            0.47             200
     Benefit Homeless
     Individuals--States (CABHI-
     States)....................
    Recovery-Oriented Systems of             846               3           2,538            0.47           1,193
     Care (ROSC)................
    Targeted Capacity Expansion--            827               3           2,481            0.47           1,166
     Peer to Peer (TCE-PTP).....
    Pregnant and Postpartum                1,719               3           5,157            0.47           2,424
     Women (PPW)................
    Screening Brief Intervention          59,419               3         178,257            0.47          83,781
     Referral and Treatment*
     (SBIRT)....................
    Targeted Capacity Expansion--          5,295               3          15,885            0.47           7,466
     Health Information
     Technology (TCE-HIT).......
    Targeted Capacity Expansion              346               3           1,038            0.47             488
     Technology Assisted Care
     (TCE-TAC)..................
    Addiction Technology                  32,676               3          98,028            0.47          46,073
     Transfer Centers (ATTC)....
    International Addiction                1,789               3           5,367            0.47           2,522
     Technology Transfer Centers
     (I-ATTC)...................
    State Adolescent Treatment               925               3           2,775            0.47           1,304
     Enhancement and
     Dissemination (SAT-ED).....
    Grants to Expand Substance               240               3             720            0.47             338
     Abuse Treatment Capacity In
     Adult Tribal Healing to
     Wellness Courts and
     Juvenile Drug Courts.......
    Grants for the Benefit of              1,960               3           5,880            0.47           2,764
     Homeless Individuals--
     Services in Supportive
     Housing (GBHI).............
                                 -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Total Services--Client           443,596  ..............         829,710  ..............         383,169
         Level Instruments......
Infrastructure, Prevention, and
 Mental Health Promotion (IPP)
 Form:

[[Page 40769]]

 
    Project AWARE...............             120               4             480            2                960
    Circles of Care.............              11               4              44            2                 88
    Comprehensive Community                   69               4             276            2                552
     Mental Health Services for
     Children and their Families
     Program (CMHI).............
    Garrett Lee Smith Campus                 123               4             492            2                984
     Suicide Prevention Grant
     Program....................
    HIV Continuum of Care.......              33               4             132            2                264
    Garrett Lee Smith State/                 102               4             408            2                816
     Tribal Suicide Prevention
     Grant Program..............
    Healthy Transitions (HT)....              16               4              64            2                128
    Historically Black Colleges                1               4               4            2                  8
     and Universities Center for
     Excellence in Behavioral
     Health.....................
    Linking Actions for Unmet                 54               4             216            2                432
     Needs in Children's Mental
     Health (LAUNCH)............
    National Suicide Prevention                2               4               8            2                 16
     Lifeline...................
    NCTSI Treatment & Service                 32               4             128            2                256
     Centers....................
    NCTSI Community Treatment                 81               4             324            2                648
     Centers....................
    NCTSI National Coordinating                2               4               8            2                 16
     Center.....................
    Mental Health Transformation              30               4             120            2                240
     Grant......................
    Minority AIDS/HIV Services                17               4              68            2                136
     Collaborative Program......
    Minority Fellowship Program.               9               4              36            2                 72
    Primary and Behavioral                    70               4             280            2                560
     Health Care Integration....
    Safe Schools/Healthy                       7               4              28            2                 56
     Students Initiative........
    Services in Supportive                     5               4              20            2                 40
     Housing....................
    State Mental Health Data                   2               4               8            2                 16
     Infrastructure Grants for
     Quality Improvement........
    Statewide Consumer Network                42               4             168            2                336
     Grants.....................
    Statewide Family Network                  53               4             212            2                424
     Grants.....................
    Suicide Lifeline Crisis                   27               4             108            2                216
     Center FUP Grants..........
    Systems of Care.............              31               4             124            2                248
    Transforming Lives Through                 6               4              24            2                 48
     Supported Employment.......
    Native Connections..........              20               4              80            2                160
    Now Is the Time: Minority                  5               4              20            2                 40
     Fellowship Program--Youth..
    Cooperative Agreements to                  4               4              16            2                 32
     Implement the National
     Strategy for Suicide
     Prevention.................
    Statewide Peer Networks for                8               4              32            2                 64
     Recovery and Resiliency....
                                 -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        TOTAL IPP...............             982  ..............           3,928  ..............           7,856
                                 -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
            TOTAL SAMHSA........         444,578  ..............         833,638  ..............         389,895
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Notes:
1. Screening, Brief Intervention, Treatment and Referral (SBIRT) grant program: The estimated number of
  respondents is 10% of the total respondents, 742,740.
2. Numbers may not add to the totals due to rounding.

    Send comments to Summer King, SAMHSA Reports Clearance Officer, 
Room 2-1057, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, MD 20857 OR email her a 
copy at summer.king@samhsa.hhs.gov. Written comments should be received 
by September 12, 2014.

Summer King,
Statistician.
[FR Doc. 2014-16337 Filed 7-11-14; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4162-20-P