Virtual Trade Mission to Canada's North, October 6-8, 2014, 15569-15571 [2014-06111]

Download as PDF Federal Register / Vol. 79, No. 54 / Thursday, March 20, 2014 / Notices mission to Moscow and St. Petersburg, Russia with an optional stop in Yekaterinburg, Russia, to be held September 15–19, 2014. The notice provided that recruitment for the mission would begin immediately and would conclude July 15, 2014. This notice suspends recruitment for the mission until further notice. Applications received during the period in which recruitment is suspended will be returned to the applicants. Frank Spector, Senior International Trade Specialist. [FR Doc. 2014–06110 Filed 3–19–14; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 3510–DR–P DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration Virtual Trade Mission to Canada’s North, October 6–8, 2014 International Trade Administration, Department of Commerce. ACTION: Notice. ehiers on DSK2VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES AGENCY: Mission Description The United States Department of Commerce, in partnership with the Minority Business Development Agency is organizing two-prong virtual and traditional trade mission to Canada that will include the Aboriginal Entrepreneurs Conference and Trade Show 2014 in the Northern Canadian Region. The Virtual Trade Mission (VTM) will include country and market/ sector briefings and one-on-one virtual business appointments with prescreened potential buyers, agents, distributors and joint-venture partners from throughout Canada, including those not attending the Conference and Trade Show. Traditional trade mission members physically in Canada will participate in the Aboriginal Entrepreneurs Conference and Trade Show 2014 (that is also open to U.S. companies not participating in the traditional trade mission). Similar to the VTM, this will include one-on-one business appointments with pre-screened potential buyers, agents, distributors and joint-venture partners, and networking event. Trade mission participants electing to participate in Aboriginal Entrepreneurs Conference and Trade Show 2014 may attend regional and industry-specific sessions and consultations. The cost of participating in the Conference and Trade Show is not included in the USCS package cost. VerDate Mar<15>2010 14:48 Mar 19, 2014 Jkt 232001 This mission is open to U.S. companies and trade associations from a cross section of industries with potential to provided needed and appropriate services in the more remote regions of Canada. These sectors include: Energy (both new and renewable), environmental technologies and services, remote healthcare related technology and services, distance education, and infrastructure (including architecture/engineering, master planning, and construction management). The benefits of a Virtual Trade Mission (VTM): • High-value virtual web meeting between American sellers and Canadian buyers in real time; • Virtual delegates do not have to leave their own home or office to benefit from the VTM; reducing the cost of travel and time required by our traditional trade mission; • VTMs have the capability to utilize technology above and beyond a simple audio; conference call. By adding web cameras and visual content in the form of presentations; you engage participants in an active setting and worthwhile experience; • One-on-one private virtual meeting (break-out sessions) to allow for more individualized and catered discussions between potential prospects; and I. Commercial Setting Canada The U.S. and Canada enjoy the world’s largest and most comprehensive trading relationship, which supports millions of jobs in each country. Since the implementation of the North American Free Trade Agreement in 1994, trade between the United States and Canada has more than doubled. In 2012, U.S.-Canada two-way trade in goods and services totaled more than $715 billion; over $1.9 billion in goods and services daily. Also in 2012, U.S. and Canadian bilateral investment stock totaled $612 billion. In addition, U.S. exports to Canada surpassed $355 billion—that’s 16 percent of total U.S. exports. Canada is the number one export market for 38 U.S. states. Remote Territories Northern Canada is comprised of three territories; Northwest Territories, Nunavut and the Yukon. For hundreds of years, these territories, for the most part, have been left undeveloped. However, within the last 5 years, Northern Canada has started to boom with the rest of the country. On January 8, 2014, Prime Minster Stephen Harper broke ground on the PO 00000 Frm 00011 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 15569 construction of a highway that will provide the first year-round land link between the Arctic Ocean coast and the rest of Canada. This is a long-promised plank in Mr. Harper’s northern strategy to assert Canadian sovereignty in the Arctic. This road is not only symbolic of Canada’s claims to the north, but is the beginning of expanding economic activity that is set to take place across Canada’s north. In fact, billions of dollars’ worth of projects are already in the pre-planning, planning and implementation phases, covering a full gambit of business sectors, including; mining (iron ore, uranium, ‘heavy’ rare earth elements, diamonds, etc.), infrastructure (roads, ports, airports, buildings), water and sewer, and energy. This booming area of Canada is ripe with opportunities for U.S. companies. Best market prospects for U.S. companies in Canada’s North include: Energy (both new and renewable), environmental technologies and services, remote healthcare related technology and services, and infrastructure (including architecture/ engineering, master planning, and construction management). Procurement Process in Aboriginal Communities Canada remains among the most accessible markets in the world. Nevertheless, doing business in Canada is not the same as doing business in the United States. Canadian customs documentation, bilingual labeling, packaging requirements, International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR), and Canadian federal and provincial sales tax accounting can be surprisingly challenging. In the North, there are other things to consider, including aboriginal set-asides for public sector projects as well as preference for doing business with local businesses with private sector. U.S. companies can do well in this market providing they are aware of these circumstances. For all public sector projects, procurement for Aboriginal communities takes place at the federal level, with individual companies bidding on available contracts through Public Works and Government Services Canada. The federal government has established programs to promote Aboriginal economic development and a Procurement Strategy for Aboriginal Business (PSAB). Through this program: • In 2009, more than 5000 contracts were awarded to Aboriginal-owned businesses. • The 5,000 contracts amounted to over $450M in government money E:\FR\FM\20MRN1.SGM 20MRN1 15570 Federal Register / Vol. 79, No. 54 / Thursday, March 20, 2014 / Notices awarded to private sector Aboriginal businesses. • Procurement from Aboriginal business made up 2% of total contract despite representing only 4% of the population. Joint ventures that are majority owned by an Aboriginal business are also encouraged when bidding for federal contracts. Private sector businesses do not have to abide by any procurement regulations. However, due to the importance investing in the local Monday, October 6, 2014 ................................... community, there are preferences to doing business with companies who put back into the community or partner with other local businesses. II. Mission Goals The goal of the Canada Far North virtual and traditional trade missions is to help participating firms gain market insights, make industry contacts, solidify business strategies, and advance specific projects, with the goal of increasing U.S. exports in largely underrepresented regions in Canada. The delegation will have access to CS Senior Commercial Officers and Commercial Specialists during the VTM and the traditional trade mission, and learn about the many business opportunities and gain first-hand market exposure. U.S. trade mission participants already doing business in Canada will have opportunities to further advance business relationships and projects in those markets. III. Virtual Trade Mission—Scenario & Timetable —Welcome briefings on programs and opportunities in the northern regions of Canada. —Briefing on energy and environmental and infrastructure, remote health markets, or distance education. —One-on-one Virtual Business Meetings. —Conclusion of VTM. IV. Traditional Trade Mission— Scenario & Timetable Monday, October 6, 2014 ................................... Tuesday, October 7, 2014 .................................. V. Participation Requirements Virtual Trade Mission All applicants will be evaluated on their ability to meet certain conditions and best satisfy the selection criteria as outlined below. The mission is designed for a minimum of 3 and a maximum of 5 to participate in the mission from the applicant pool. Companies not able to the attend our traditional trade mission but are interested in these specified target markets as U.S. companies seeking to enter these markets for the first time are encouraged to apply. ehiers on DSK2VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES Traditional Trade Mission All applicants will be evaluated on their ability to meet certain conditions and best satisfy the selection criteria as outlined below. The mission is designed for a minimum of 7 and a maximum of 10 to participate in the mission from the applicant pool. U.S. companies already doing business in the target markets as well as U.S. companies seeking to enter these markets for the first time are encouraged to apply. Fees and Expenses After a company has been selected to participate in the mission, a payment to the Department of Commerce in the form of a participation fee is required. VerDate Mar<15>2010 14:48 Mar 19, 2014 Jkt 232001 —Welcome briefings on programs and opportunities in the northern regions of Canada. —Briefing on energy and environmental and infrastructure, remote health markets, or distance education. —Individual Business Meetings. —Networking reception for business and government contacts. —Visit trade show. —Conclusion of Traditional Trade Mission. —U.S. Delegation return to U.S. on own itinerary. For the virtual trade mission • The participation fee will be $500 for SMEs and $750 for large companies. • The provisions for each firm’s required technology to participate in the virtual mission (computer, webcam and internet, and telephone) will be the responsibility of each mission participant. For traditional trade mission • The participation fee will be $1000 for SMEs and $1400 for large companies. • Expenses for travel, lodging, meals, and incidentals (e.g., local transportation) will be the responsibility of each mission participant. Conditions for Participation • An applicant must submit a completed and signed mission application and supplemental application materials, including adequate information on the company’s products and/or services, primary market objectives, and goals for participation. Applicant should specify in their application and supplemental materials whether they are applying for the virtual trade mission or the traditional trade mission. If the Department of Commerce receives an incomplete application, the Department may reject the application, request PO 00000 Frm 00012 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 additional information, or take the lack of information into account when evaluating the applications. • Each applicant must also certify that the products and services it seeks to export through the mission are either produced in the U.S., or, if not, marketed under the name of a U.S. firm and have at least 51% U.S. content of the value of the finished product or service. In the case of a trade association or trade organization, the applicant must certify that, for each company to be represented by the trade association or trade organization, the products and services the represented company seeks to export are either produced in the United States, or, if not, marketed under the name of a U.S. firm and have at least 51% U.S. content. Selection Criteria for Participation: Suitability of the company’s (or, in the case of a trade association or trade organization, represented companies’) products or services to Canada. • Company’s (or, in the case of a trade association or trade organization, represented companies’) potential for business in Canada. • Consistency of the applicant’s goals and objectives with the stated scope of the mission. E:\FR\FM\20MRN1.SGM 20MRN1 Federal Register / Vol. 79, No. 54 / Thursday, March 20, 2014 / Notices Diversity of company size, sector or subsector, and location may also be considered during the review process. Referrals from political organizations and any documents containing references to partisan political activities (including political contributions) will be removed from an applicant’s submission and not considered during the selection process. VI. Timeframe for Recruitment and Applications Mission recruitment will be conducted in an open and public manner, including publication in the Federal Register, posting on the Commerce Department trade mission calendar, and other Internet Web sites, press releases to the general and trade media, direct mail and broadcast fax, notices by industry trade associations and other multiplier groups and announcements at industry meetings, symposia, conferences, and trade shows. Recruitment for both the virtual trade mission and the traditional trade mission will begin immediately and conclude no later than August 15, 2014. The U.S. Department of Commerce will review applications and make selection decisions on a rolling basis beginning April 2014, until the minimum of 7 and a maximum of 10 to participate are selected for the traditional trade mission and a minimum of 3 and a maximum of 5 to participate are selected for the virtual trade mission. After August 15, 2014, companies will be considered only if space and scheduling constraints permit. Contact Information: Tracey Ford, Commercial Specialist, U.S. Commercial Service Ottawa, Canada, 613–688–5406, Tracey.Ford@trade.gov. Elnora Moye, Trade Program Assistant. BILLING CODE 3510–DR–P DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648–XD192 ehiers on DSK2VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meetings National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of public meetings. The Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council (Council) will SUMMARY: VerDate Mar<15>2010 14:48 Mar 19, 2014 Jkt 232001 Administrative Policy Committee Agenda, Monday, April 7, 2014, 8:30 a.m. Until 11 a.m. 1. Review and Approval of Regional Operating Agreement 2. Review of Draft Revised Administrative Handbook 3. Review of House Magnuson-Stevens Act Amendment Budget/Personnel Committee Agenda, Monday, April 7, 2014, 11 a.m. Until 12 Noon 1. Review of CY 2014 Budget Sustainable Fisheries/Ecosystem Committee Agenda, Monday April 7, 2014, 1:30 p.m. Until 2:30 p.m. 1. Discussion of Proposed SEDAR Stock Assessment Prioritization Process 2. Discussion of Framework Action— Define For-Hire Fishing in the Gulf of Mexico 3. SSC Update on ABC control rule revisions [FR Doc. 2014–06111 Filed 3–19–14; 8:45 am] AGENCY: hold meetings of the: Administrative Policy, Budget/Personnel, Sustainable Fisheries/Ecosystem, Mackerel, Reef Fish, Joint Shrimp/Artificial Reef/ Habitat Protection, Shrimp, Red Drum and Data Collection Management Committees; and a meeting of the Full Council. DATES: The Council meeting will be held from 8:30 a.m. on Monday, April 7 until 3:45 p.m. on Thursday, April 10, 2014. ADDRESSES: Meeting address: The meeting will be held at the Embassy Suites located at 4914 Constitution Avenue, Baton Rouge, LA 70808; telephone: (225) 924–6566. Council address: Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council, 2203 North Lois Avenue, Suite 1100, Tampa, FL 33607. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Mr. Douglas Gregory, Executive Director, Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; telephone: (813) 348–1630; fax: (813) 348–1711; email: doug.gregory@ gulfcouncil.org. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The items of discussion for each individual management committee agenda are as follows: Mackerel Management Committee Agenda, Monday, April 7, 2:30 p.m. Until 4:30 p.m. 1. Final Action on Mackerel Amendment 20B—Boundaries and Transit Provisions 2. Final Action on Framework Amendment 1 to Modify Spanish Mackerel ACL/ACT 3. Discussion of Cost-Benefit Analysis for CMP Amendment 24— PO 00000 Frm 00013 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 15571 Reallocation of Gulf King Mackerel and Atlantic Spanish Mackerel Full Council—CLOSED SESSION, Monday, April 7, 2014, 4:30 p.m. Until 5:30 p.m. 1. Discussion of Appointments to the Socioeconomic Scientific and Statistical Committee —Recess— Reef Fish Management Committee Agenda, Tuesday, April 8, 2014, 8:30 a.m. Until 5:30 p.m. 1. Discussion of Red Snapper IFQ Modifications (potential Amendment 36) 2. Review of Amendment 40—Sector Separation Options Paper 3. Discussion of Framework Action— Modifications to IFQ Species Quotas 4. Review of Legal and Policy Aspects of Allocation 5. Discussion of Final Draft of Amendment 28—Red Snapper Allocation 6. Presentation on Cooperative SEAMAP Fishery-Independent Gulf-wide Sampling Methods and Information 7. Update on Progress of Joint South Florida Management Committee 8. Discussion on Exempted Fishing Permits Related to Reef Fish Shrimp Management Committee Agenda, Wednesday, April 9, 2014, 8:30 a.m. Until 10 a.m. 1. Discussion of Texas Shrimp Closure for 2014 2. Review of Draft Options for Shrimp Amendment 16—Adjustment to ACL and Accountability Measures for Royal Red Shrimp 3. Discussion of Kemp’s Ridley Stock Assessment 4. Review of the summary of the SSC Recommendations 5. Review of the March 5, 2014, Shrimp AP Summary 6. Discussion of Timeline for Shrimp Permit Moratorium Red Drum Management Committee Agenda, Wednesday, April 9, 2014, 10 a.m. Until 10:30 a.m. 1. Report of the Red Drum Scientific and Statistical Committee Meeting 2. Review of the SEAMAP Red Drum Working Group Proceedings Data Collection Management Committee Agenda, Wednesday, April 9, 2014, 10:30 a.m. Until 11 a.m. 1. Update on the Commercial Logbook Pilot Project 2. Development of a For-Hire Electronic Data Reporting Program: Outline of Priorities and Principles E:\FR\FM\20MRN1.SGM 20MRN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 79, Number 54 (Thursday, March 20, 2014)]
[Notices]
[Pages 15569-15571]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2014-06111]


-----------------------------------------------------------------------

DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE

International Trade Administration


Virtual Trade Mission to Canada's North, October 6-8, 2014

AGENCY: International Trade Administration, Department of Commerce.

ACTION: Notice.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

Mission Description

    The United States Department of Commerce, in partnership with the 
Minority Business Development Agency is organizing two-prong virtual 
and traditional trade mission to Canada that will include the 
Aboriginal Entrepreneurs Conference and Trade Show 2014 in the Northern 
Canadian Region. The Virtual Trade Mission (VTM) will include country 
and market/sector briefings and one-on-one virtual business 
appointments with pre-screened potential buyers, agents, distributors 
and joint-venture partners from throughout Canada, including those not 
attending the Conference and Trade Show.
    Traditional trade mission members physically in Canada will 
participate in the Aboriginal Entrepreneurs Conference and Trade Show 
2014 (that is also open to U.S. companies not participating in the 
traditional trade mission). Similar to the VTM, this will include one-
on-one business appointments with pre-screened potential buyers, 
agents, distributors and joint-venture partners, and networking event. 
Trade mission participants electing to participate in Aboriginal 
Entrepreneurs Conference and Trade Show 2014 may attend regional and 
industry-specific sessions and consultations. The cost of participating 
in the Conference and Trade Show is not included in the USCS package 
cost.
    This mission is open to U.S. companies and trade associations from 
a cross section of industries with potential to provided needed and 
appropriate services in the more remote regions of Canada. These 
sectors include: Energy (both new and renewable), environmental 
technologies and services, remote healthcare related technology and 
services, distance education, and infrastructure (including 
architecture/engineering, master planning, and construction 
management).
    The benefits of a Virtual Trade Mission (VTM):
     High-value virtual web meeting between American sellers 
and Canadian buyers in real time;
     Virtual delegates do not have to leave their own home or 
office to benefit from the VTM; reducing the cost of travel and time 
required by our traditional trade mission;
     VTMs have the capability to utilize technology above and 
beyond a simple audio; conference call. By adding web cameras and 
visual content in the form of presentations; you engage participants in 
an active setting and worthwhile experience;
     One-on-one private virtual meeting (break-out sessions) to 
allow for more individualized and catered discussions between potential 
prospects; and

I. Commercial Setting

Canada

    The U.S. and Canada enjoy the world's largest and most 
comprehensive trading relationship, which supports millions of jobs in 
each country. Since the implementation of the North American Free Trade 
Agreement in 1994, trade between the United States and Canada has more 
than doubled.
    In 2012, U.S.-Canada two-way trade in goods and services totaled 
more than $715 billion; over $1.9 billion in goods and services daily. 
Also in 2012, U.S. and Canadian bilateral investment stock totaled $612 
billion. In addition, U.S. exports to Canada surpassed $355 billion--
that's 16 percent of total U.S. exports. Canada is the number one 
export market for 38 U.S. states.

Remote Territories

    Northern Canada is comprised of three territories; Northwest 
Territories, Nunavut and the Yukon. For hundreds of years, these 
territories, for the most part, have been left undeveloped. However, 
within the last 5 years, Northern Canada has started to boom with the 
rest of the country.
    On January 8, 2014, Prime Minster Stephen Harper broke ground on 
the construction of a highway that will provide the first year-round 
land link between the Arctic Ocean coast and the rest of Canada. This 
is a long-promised plank in Mr. Harper's northern strategy to assert 
Canadian sovereignty in the Arctic. This road is not only symbolic of 
Canada's claims to the north, but is the beginning of expanding 
economic activity that is set to take place across Canada's north.
    In fact, billions of dollars' worth of projects are already in the 
pre-planning, planning and implementation phases, covering a full 
gambit of business sectors, including; mining (iron ore, uranium, 
`heavy' rare earth elements, diamonds, etc.), infrastructure (roads, 
ports, airports, buildings), water and sewer, and energy. This booming 
area of Canada is ripe with opportunities for U.S. companies.
    Best market prospects for U.S. companies in Canada's North include: 
Energy (both new and renewable), environmental technologies and 
services, remote healthcare related technology and services, and 
infrastructure (including architecture/engineering, master planning, 
and construction management).

Procurement Process in Aboriginal Communities

    Canada remains among the most accessible markets in the world. 
Nevertheless, doing business in Canada is not the same as doing 
business in the United States. Canadian customs documentation, 
bilingual labeling, packaging requirements, International Traffic in 
Arms Regulations (ITAR), and Canadian federal and provincial sales tax 
accounting can be surprisingly challenging. In the North, there are 
other things to consider, including aboriginal set-asides for public 
sector projects as well as preference for doing business with local 
businesses with private sector. U.S. companies can do well in this 
market providing they are aware of these circumstances.
    For all public sector projects, procurement for Aboriginal 
communities takes place at the federal level, with individual companies 
bidding on available contracts through Public Works and Government 
Services Canada. The federal government has established programs to 
promote Aboriginal economic development and a Procurement Strategy for 
Aboriginal Business (PSAB). Through this program:
     In 2009, more than 5000 contracts were awarded to 
Aboriginal-owned businesses.
     The 5,000 contracts amounted to over $450M in government 
money

[[Page 15570]]

awarded to private sector Aboriginal businesses.
     Procurement from Aboriginal business made up 2% of total 
contract despite representing only 4% of the population.
    Joint ventures that are majority owned by an Aboriginal business 
are also encouraged when bidding for federal contracts.
    Private sector businesses do not have to abide by any procurement 
regulations. However, due to the importance investing in the local 
community, there are preferences to doing business with companies who 
put back into the community or partner with other local businesses.

II. Mission Goals

    The goal of the Canada Far North virtual and traditional trade 
missions is to help participating firms gain market insights, make 
industry contacts, solidify business strategies, and advance specific 
projects, with the goal of increasing U.S. exports in largely 
underrepresented regions in Canada. The delegation will have access to 
CS Senior Commercial Officers and Commercial Specialists during the VTM 
and the traditional trade mission, and learn about the many business 
opportunities and gain first-hand market exposure. U.S. trade mission 
participants already doing business in Canada will have opportunities 
to further advance business relationships and projects in those 
markets.

III. Virtual Trade Mission--Scenario & Timetable

------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Monday, October 6, 2014......  --Welcome briefings on programs and
                                opportunities in the northern regions of
                                Canada.
                               --Briefing on energy and environmental
                                and infrastructure, remote health
                                markets, or distance education.
                               --One-on-one Virtual Business Meetings.
                               --Conclusion of VTM.
------------------------------------------------------------------------

IV. Traditional Trade Mission--Scenario & Timetable

------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Monday, October 6, 2014......  --Welcome briefings on programs and
                                opportunities in the northern regions of
                                Canada.
                               --Briefing on energy and environmental
                                and infrastructure, remote health
                                markets, or distance education.
                               --Individual Business Meetings.
                               --Networking reception for business and
                                government contacts.
Tuesday, October 7, 2014.....  --Visit trade show.
                               --Conclusion of Traditional Trade
                                Mission.
                               --U.S. Delegation return to U.S. on own
                                itinerary.
------------------------------------------------------------------------

V. Participation Requirements

Virtual Trade Mission

    All applicants will be evaluated on their ability to meet certain 
conditions and best satisfy the selection criteria as outlined below. 
The mission is designed for a minimum of 3 and a maximum of 5 to 
participate in the mission from the applicant pool. Companies not able 
to the attend our traditional trade mission but are interested in these 
specified target markets as U.S. companies seeking to enter these 
markets for the first time are encouraged to apply.

Traditional Trade Mission

    All applicants will be evaluated on their ability to meet certain 
conditions and best satisfy the selection criteria as outlined below. 
The mission is designed for a minimum of 7 and a maximum of 10 to 
participate in the mission from the applicant pool. U.S. companies 
already doing business in the target markets as well as U.S. companies 
seeking to enter these markets for the first time are encouraged to 
apply.

Fees and Expenses

    After a company has been selected to participate in the mission, a 
payment to the Department of Commerce in the form of a participation 
fee is required.
    For the virtual trade mission
     The participation fee will be $500 for SMEs and $750 for 
large companies.
     The provisions for each firm's required technology to 
participate in the virtual mission (computer, webcam and internet, and 
telephone) will be the responsibility of each mission participant.
    For traditional trade mission
     The participation fee will be $1000 for SMEs and $1400 for 
large companies.
     Expenses for travel, lodging, meals, and incidentals 
(e.g., local transportation) will be the responsibility of each mission 
participant.

Conditions for Participation

     An applicant must submit a completed and signed mission 
application and supplemental application materials, including adequate 
information on the company's products and/or services, primary market 
objectives, and goals for participation. Applicant should specify in 
their application and supplemental materials whether they are applying 
for the virtual trade mission or the traditional trade mission. If the 
Department of Commerce receives an incomplete application, the 
Department may reject the application, request additional information, 
or take the lack of information into account when evaluating the 
applications.
     Each applicant must also certify that the products and 
services it seeks to export through the mission are either produced in 
the U.S., or, if not, marketed under the name of a U.S. firm and have 
at least 51% U.S. content of the value of the finished product or 
service. In the case of a trade association or trade organization, the 
applicant must certify that, for each company to be represented by the 
trade association or trade organization, the products and services the 
represented company seeks to export are either produced in the United 
States, or, if not, marketed under the name of a U.S. firm and have at 
least 51% U.S. content.
    Selection Criteria for Participation: Suitability of the company's 
(or, in the case of a trade association or trade organization, 
represented companies') products or services to Canada.
     Company's (or, in the case of a trade association or trade 
organization, represented companies') potential for business in Canada.
     Consistency of the applicant's goals and objectives with 
the stated scope of the mission.

[[Page 15571]]

    Diversity of company size, sector or subsector, and location may 
also be considered during the review process.
    Referrals from political organizations and any documents containing 
references to partisan political activities (including political 
contributions) will be removed from an applicant's submission and not 
considered during the selection process.

VI. Timeframe for Recruitment and Applications

    Mission recruitment will be conducted in an open and public manner, 
including publication in the Federal Register, posting on the Commerce 
Department trade mission calendar, and other Internet Web sites, press 
releases to the general and trade media, direct mail and broadcast fax, 
notices by industry trade associations and other multiplier groups and 
announcements at industry meetings, symposia, conferences, and trade 
shows.
    Recruitment for both the virtual trade mission and the traditional 
trade mission will begin immediately and conclude no later than August 
15, 2014. The U.S. Department of Commerce will review applications and 
make selection decisions on a rolling basis beginning April 2014, until 
the minimum of 7 and a maximum of 10 to participate are selected for 
the traditional trade mission and a minimum of 3 and a maximum of 5 to 
participate are selected for the virtual trade mission. After August 
15, 2014, companies will be considered only if space and scheduling 
constraints permit.
    Contact Information: Tracey Ford, Commercial Specialist, U.S. 
Commercial Service Ottawa, Canada, 613-688-5406, Tracey.Ford@trade.gov.

Elnora Moye,
Trade Program Assistant.
[FR Doc. 2014-06111 Filed 3-19-14; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 3510-DR-P