Limitation of Duty-Free Imports of Apparel Articles Assembled in Haiti Under the Haitian Hemispheric Opportunity Through Partnership for Encouragement Act (HOPE), 76817-76818 [2013-30261]

Download as PDF Federal Register / Vol. 78, No. 244 / Thursday, December 19, 2013 / Notices Preliminary Determination and Suspension of Liquidation We preliminarily determine the countervailable subsidy rates to be: Company Subsidy rate (percent) Mangal Steel Enterprises Ltd. (‘‘Mangal’’) ............................. Babu Exports (‘‘Babu’’) ............. All Others .................................. 8.13 38.98 8.13 In accordance with sections 703(d)(1)(B) and (2) of the Act, we are directing U.S. Customs and Border Protection to suspend liquidation of all entries of steel threaded rod from India that are entered, or withdrawn from warehouse, for consumption on or after the date of the publication of this notice in the Federal Register, and to require a cash deposit for such entries of the merchandise in the amounts indicated above. Disclosure and Public Comment The Department intends to disclose to interested parties the calculations performed in connection with this preliminary determination within five days of public announcement of this determination.7 Interested parties may submit case and rebuttals briefs.8 For a schedule of the deadlines for filing case briefs, rebuttal briefs, and hearing request, see the Preliminary Determination Memorandum. This determination is issued and published pursuant to sections 703(f) and 777(i) of the Act. Dated: December 11, 2013. Paul Piquado, Assistant Secretary for Enforcement and Compliance. emcdonald on DSK67QTVN1PROD with NOTICES Appendix 1 Scope of the Investigation The merchandise covered by this investigation is steel threaded rod. Steel threaded rod is certain threaded rod, bar, or studs, of carbon quality steel, having a solid, circular cross section, of any diameter, in any straight length, that have been forged, turned, cold-drawn, cold-rolled, machine straightened, or otherwise cold-finished, and into which threaded grooves have been applied. In addition, the steel threaded rod, bar, or studs subject to this investigation are nonheaded and threaded along greater than 25 percent of their total length. A variety of finishes or coatings, such as plain oil finish as a temporary rust protectant, zinc coating (i.e., galvanized, whether by electroplating or hot-dipping), paint, and other similar finishes and coatings, may be applied to the merchandise. Included in the scope of this investigation are steel threaded rod, bar, or studs, in which: (1) Iron predominates, by weight, over each of the other contained elements; (2) the carbon content is 2 percent or less, by weight; and (3) none of the elements listed below exceeds the quantity, by weight, respectively indicated: • 1.80 percent of manganese, or • 1.50 percent of silicon, or • 1.00 percent of copper, or • 0.50 percent of aluminum, or • 1.25 percent of chromium, or • 0.30 percent of cobalt, or • 0.40 percent of lead, or • 1.25 percent of nickel, or • 0.30 percent of tungsten, or • 0.012 percent of boron, or • 0.10 percent of molybdenum, or • 0.10 percent of niobium, or • 0.41 percent of titanium, or • 0.15 percent of vanadium, or • 0.15 percent of zirconium. Steel threaded rod is currently classifiable under subheadings 7318.15.5051, 7318.15.5056, 7318.15.5090 and 7318.15.2095 of the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States (‘‘HTSUS’’). Although the HTSUS subheadings are provided for convenience and customs purposes, the written description of the merchandise is dispositive. Excluded from the scope of this investigation are: (a) Threaded rod, bar, or studs which are threaded only on one or both ends and the threading covers 25 percent or less of the total length; and (b) threaded rod, bar, or studs made to American Society for Testing and Materials (‘‘ASTM’’) A193 Grade B7, ASTM A193 Grade B7M, ASTM A193 Grade B16, and ASTM A320 Grade L7. Appendix 2 List of Topics Discussed in the Preliminary Decision Memorandum 1. Scope Comments 2. Scope of the Investigation 3. Injury Test 4. Subsidies Valuation 5. Use of Facts Otherwise Available 6. Analysis of Programs 7. Calculation of the All Others Rate 8. ITC Notification 9. Disclosure and Public Comment 10. Verification [FR Doc. 2013–30113 Filed 12–18–13; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 3510–DS–P DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration Limitation of Duty-Free Imports of Apparel Articles Assembled in Haiti Under the Haitian Hemispheric Opportunity Through Partnership for Encouragement Act (HOPE) International Trade Administration, Department of Commerce. AGENCY: 7 See 19 CFR 351.224(b). 8 See 19 CFR 351.309. VerDate Mar<15>2010 16:41 Dec 18, 2013 Jkt 232001 PO 00000 Frm 00008 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 76817 Notification of Annual Quantitative Limit on Certain Apparel under HOPE. ACTION: DATES: Effective Date: December 20, 2013. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Maria Dybczak, International Trade Specialist, Office of Textiles and Apparel, U.S. Department of Commerce, (202) 482–3651. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Authority: The Caribbean Basin Recovery Act (‘‘CBERA’’), as amended by the Haitian Hemispheric Opportunity Through Partnership for Encouragement Act of 2006 (‘‘HOPE’’), Title V of the Tax Relief and Health Care Act of 2006 and the Food, Conservation, and Energy Act of 2008 (‘‘HOPE II’’); the Haiti Economic Lift Program Act of 2010 (‘‘HELP’’); and implemented by Presidential Proclamations No. 8114, 72 FR 13655, 13659 (March 22, 2007), and No. 8596, 75 FR 68,153 (November 4, 2010). HOPE provides for duty-free treatment for certain apparel articles imported directly from Haiti. Section 213A(b)(1)(B) of HOPE outlines the requirements for certain apparel articles to qualify for duty-free treatment under a ‘‘value-added’’ program. In order to qualify for duty-free treatment, apparel articles must be wholly assembled, or knit-to-shape, in Haiti from any combination of fabrics, fabric components, components knit-to-shape, and yarns, as long as the sum of the cost or value of materials produced in Haiti or one or more countries, as described in HOPE, or any combination thereof, plus the direct costs of processing operations performed in Haiti or one or more countries, as described in HOPE, or any combination thereof, is not less than an applicable percentage of the declared customs value of such apparel articles. Pursuant to HELP, the applicable percentage for the period December 20, 2013 through December 19, 2014, is 50 percent or more. For every twelve month period following the effective date of HOPE, duty-free treatment under the valueadded program is subject to a quantitative limitation. HOPE provides that the quantitative limitation will be recalculated for each subsequent 12month period. Section 213A(b)(1)(C) of HOPE, as amended by HOPE II and HELP, requires that, for the twelvemonth period beginning on December 20, 2013, the quantitative limitation for qualifying apparel imported from Haiti under the value-added program will be an amount equivalent to 1.25 percent of the aggregate square meter equivalent of all apparel articles imported into the United States in the most recent 12month period for which data are E:\FR\FM\19DEN1.SGM 19DEN1 76818 Federal Register / Vol. 78, No. 244 / Thursday, December 19, 2013 / Notices available. The aggregate square meters equivalent of all apparel articles imported into the United States is derived from the set of Harmonized System lines listed in the Annex to the World Trade Organization Agreement on Textiles and Clothing (‘‘ATC’’), and the conversion factors for units of measure into square meter equivalents used by the United States in implementing the ATC. For purposes of this notice, the most recent 12-month period for which data are available as of December 20, 2013 is the 12-month period ending on October 31, 2013. Therefore, for the one-year period beginning on December 20, 2013 and extending through December 19, 2014, the quantity of imports eligible for preferential treatment under the valueadded program is 322,629,971 square meters equivalent. Apparel articles entered in excess of these quantities will be subject to otherwise applicable tariffs. Dated: December 11, 2013. Janet E. Heinzen, Acting, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Textiles, Consumer Goods and Materials. [FR Doc. 2013–30261 Filed 12–18–13; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE P DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration U.S. Healthcare Education Trade Mission to New Delhi, Hyderabad, and Ahmedabad, India, January 27– February 1, 2014; Correction International Trade Administration, Department of Commerce. ACTION: Notice cancellation. AGENCY: The United States Department of Commerce, International Trade Administration, U.S. and Foreign Commercial Service published a document in the Federal Register of November 13, 2013 regarding the U.S. Healthcare Education Trade Mission to New Delhi, Hyderabad, and Ahmedabad, India, January 27–February 1, 2014. This mission has been cancelled. Please update the existing notice with a note that this mission is cancelled as of December 10, 2013. emcdonald on DSK67QTVN1PROD with NOTICES SUMMARY: Cancellation Notice In the Federal Register of July 16, 2013, in 78 FR 42505, title, note a top of page, correct the subject heading of the notice to read: U.S. Healthcare Education Trade Mission to New Delhi, Hyderabad, and VerDate Mar<15>2010 16:41 Dec 18, 2013 Jkt 232001 Ahmedabad, India, January 27–February 1, 2014 has been cancelled. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Koreen M. Grube, International Trade Specialist, Milwaukee U.S. Export Assistance Center, International Trade Administration, U.S. Department of Commerce Tel: 414–297–1853 Koreen.Grube@trade.gov. Elnora Moye, Trade Program Assistant. [FR Doc. 2013–30239 Filed 12–18–13; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 3510–DS–P well as networking events offering further opportunities to speak with local business and industry decision-makers. The delegation will be composed of representatives from 20–25 U.S. firms in the mission’s target sectors. Representatives of the Export-Import Bank of the United States (Ex-Im) and the Overseas Private Investment Corporation (OPIC) will be invited to participate to provide information and counseling regarding their suite of programs, services, and interests in the Middle East. Commercial Setting DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE The United Arab Emirates International Trade Administration The US-UAE trade relationship is undergoing a period of rapid expansion as the UAE seeks to undertake major investment in its infrastructure and transport systems. U.S. exports to the UAE totaled almost $23 billion in 2012. U.S. exports to the UAE increased by 36% in 2011, 42% in 2012 and are poised to grow an additional 15% in 2013. Key market opportunities for U.S. firms will continue to be present in project management and design work on urban transport, rail, oil & gas and power generation (including alternative energy). Demand for imports is being fueled by economic growth rates of 3– 4%, and bolstered by strong oil revenues as the UAE implements a onethird increase in its petroleum production. In addition to accounting for virtually all UAE oil production and defense sector acquisitions, the Emirate of Abu Dhabi is also moving forward to develop a $10 billion urban transit system, a national railroad network and a nuclear energy industry. Dubai continues to expand its role as the major regional trade hub and has begun development of one the world’s largest new airport projects. On November 27, 2013, the Emirate won the award to host the 2020 World Expo which will result in the undertaking of major infrastructure and hospitality development. Specific projects in these sectors include an urban transit project in Abu Dhabi (light rail and below ground subway); development of the Etihad Rail network to link the UAE’s major ports and cities; development of Dubai’s new Al Maktoum airport and adjacent logistics, commercial, residential and recreational sites; and the anticipated design and construction of over 100 new hotels and multiple venues for the 2020 World Expo with an estimated project value of $40 billion. Additionally, there are many major clean energy opportunities for U.S. firms. Dubai plans to develop a 1,000 Secretarial Infrastructure Business Development Mission to the United Arab Emirates, the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia and Qatar March 8–14, 2014. International Trade Administration, Department of Commerce. ACTION: Notice. AGENCY: Mission Description The United States Secretary of Commerce will lead an Infrastructure Business Development Mission to the United Arab Emirates, the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia and Qatar from March 8– 14, 2014. This business development mission will promote U.S. exports to the Gulf region by helping U.S. companies launch or increase their business in the infrastructure sector. The mission will include government and business-tobusiness meetings, market briefings and networking events. In all three countries, the governments and private sector are investing significant money in infrastructure projects. As a result, the mission will focus on export-ready U.S. firms with product and services in a broad range of leading U.S. infrastructure sectors with an emphasis on project management and engineering (including construction, architecture and design), renewable energy (solar, wind, waste-to-energy), smart grid and energy efficiency, and environmental technologies (including water/ wastewater; air pollution control; and waste management). The mission will stop in the United Arab Emirates, the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia and Qatar. In each country, participants will meet with pre-screened potential agents, distributors, and representatives, as well as other business partners and government officials. They will also attend market briefings by U.S. Embassy officials, as PO 00000 Frm 00009 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 E:\FR\FM\19DEN1.SGM 19DEN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 78, Number 244 (Thursday, December 19, 2013)]
[Notices]
[Pages 76817-76818]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2013-30261]


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DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE

International Trade Administration


Limitation of Duty-Free Imports of Apparel Articles Assembled in 
Haiti Under the Haitian Hemispheric Opportunity Through Partnership for 
Encouragement Act (HOPE)

AGENCY: International Trade Administration, Department of Commerce.

ACTION: Notification of Annual Quantitative Limit on Certain Apparel 
under HOPE.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

DATES: Effective Date: December 20, 2013.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Maria Dybczak, International Trade 
Specialist, Office of Textiles and Apparel, U.S. Department of 
Commerce, (202) 482-3651.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:

    Authority: The Caribbean Basin Recovery Act (``CBERA''), as 
amended by the Haitian Hemispheric Opportunity Through Partnership 
for Encouragement Act of 2006 (``HOPE''), Title V of the Tax Relief 
and Health Care Act of 2006 and the Food, Conservation, and Energy 
Act of 2008 (``HOPE II''); the Haiti Economic Lift Program Act of 
2010 (``HELP''); and implemented by Presidential Proclamations No. 
8114, 72 FR 13655, 13659 (March 22, 2007), and No. 8596, 75 FR 
68,153 (November 4, 2010).

    HOPE provides for duty-free treatment for certain apparel articles 
imported directly from Haiti. Section 213A(b)(1)(B) of HOPE outlines 
the requirements for certain apparel articles to qualify for duty-free 
treatment under a ``value-added'' program. In order to qualify for 
duty-free treatment, apparel articles must be wholly assembled, or 
knit-to-shape, in Haiti from any combination of fabrics, fabric 
components, components knit-to-shape, and yarns, as long as the sum of 
the cost or value of materials produced in Haiti or one or more 
countries, as described in HOPE, or any combination thereof, plus the 
direct costs of processing operations performed in Haiti or one or more 
countries, as described in HOPE, or any combination thereof, is not 
less than an applicable percentage of the declared customs value of 
such apparel articles. Pursuant to HELP, the applicable percentage for 
the period December 20, 2013 through December 19, 2014, is 50 percent 
or more.
    For every twelve month period following the effective date of HOPE, 
duty-free treatment under the value-added program is subject to a 
quantitative limitation. HOPE provides that the quantitative limitation 
will be recalculated for each subsequent 12-month period. Section 
213A(b)(1)(C) of HOPE, as amended by HOPE II and HELP, requires that, 
for the twelve-month period beginning on December 20, 2013, the 
quantitative limitation for qualifying apparel imported from Haiti 
under the value-added program will be an amount equivalent to 1.25 
percent of the aggregate square meter equivalent of all apparel 
articles imported into the United States in the most recent 12-month 
period for which data are

[[Page 76818]]

available. The aggregate square meters equivalent of all apparel 
articles imported into the United States is derived from the set of 
Harmonized System lines listed in the Annex to the World Trade 
Organization Agreement on Textiles and Clothing (``ATC''), and the 
conversion factors for units of measure into square meter equivalents 
used by the United States in implementing the ATC. For purposes of this 
notice, the most recent 12-month period for which data are available as 
of December 20, 2013 is the 12-month period ending on October 31, 2013.
    Therefore, for the one-year period beginning on December 20, 2013 
and extending through December 19, 2014, the quantity of imports 
eligible for preferential treatment under the value-added program is 
322,629,971 square meters equivalent. Apparel articles entered in 
excess of these quantities will be subject to otherwise applicable 
tariffs.

    Dated: December 11, 2013.
Janet E. Heinzen,
Acting, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Textiles, Consumer Goods and 
Materials.
[FR Doc. 2013-30261 Filed 12-18-13; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE P