Proposed Collection; Comment Request, 70974-70975 [2013-28428]

Download as PDF 70974 Federal Register / Vol. 78, No. 229 / Wednesday, November 27, 2013 / Notices SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION Proposed Collection; Comment Request Upon Written Request, Copies Available From: Securities and Exchange Commission, Office of Investor Education and Advocacy, Washington, DC 20549–0213. emcdonald on DSK67QTVN1PROD with NOTICES Extension: Rule 12d3–1, OMB Control No. 3235–0561, SEC File No. 270–504. Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (44 U.S.C. 3501 et seq.), the Securities and Exchange Commission (the ‘‘Commission’’) is soliciting comments on the collections of information summarized below. The Commission plans to submit these existing collections of information to the Office of Management and Budget (‘‘OMB’’) for extension and approval. Section 12(d)(3) of the Investment Company Act of 1940 (15 U.S.C. 80a) generally prohibits registered investment companies (‘‘funds’’), and companies controlled by funds, from purchasing securities issued by a registered investment adviser, broker, dealer, or underwriter (‘‘securitiesrelated businesses’’). Rule 12d3–1 (‘‘Exemption of acquisitions of securities issued by persons engaged in securities related businesses’’ (17 CFR 270.12d3–1)) permits a fund to invest up to five percent of its assets in securities of an issuer deriving more than fifteen percent of its gross revenues from securities-related businesses, but a fund may not rely on rule 12d3–1 to acquire securities of its own investment adviser or any affiliated person of its own investment adviser. A fund may, however, rely on an exemption in rule 12d3–1 to acquire securities issued by its subadvisers in circumstances in which the subadviser would have little ability to take advantage of the fund, because it is not in a position to direct the fund’s securities purchases. The exemption in rule 12d3–1(c)(3) is available if (i) the subadviser is not, and is not an affiliated person of, an investment adviser that provides advice with respect to the portion of the fund that is acquiring the securities, and (ii) the advisory contracts of the subadviser, and any subadviser that is advising the purchasing portion of the fund, prohibit them from consulting with each other concerning securities transactions of the fund, and limit their responsibility in providing advice to providing advice with respect VerDate Mar<15>2010 17:02 Nov 26, 2013 Jkt 232001 to discrete portions of the fund’s portfolio. Based on an analysis of fund filings, the staff estimates that approximately 775 fund portfolios enter into subadvisory agreements each year.1 Based on discussions with industry representatives, the staff estimates that it will require approximately 3 attorney hours to draft and execute additional clauses in new subadvisory contracts in order for funds and subadvisers to be able to rely on the exemptions in rule 12d3–1. Because these additional clauses are identical to the clauses that a fund would need to insert in their subadvisory contracts to rely on rules 10f–3, 17a–10, and 17e–1 and because we believe that funds that use one such rule generally use all of these rules, we apportion this 3 hour time burden equally to all four rules. Therefore, we estimate that the burden allocated to rule 12d3–1 for this contract change would be 0.75 hours.2 Assuming that all 775 funds that enter into new subadvisory contracts each year make the modification to their contract required by the rule, we estimate that the rule’s contract modification requirement will result in 581 burden hours annually.3 An agency may not conduct or sponsor, and a person is not required to respond to, a collection of information unless it displays a currently valid control number. Written comments are invited on: (a) Whether the proposed collection of information is necessary for the proper performance of the functions of the agency, including whether the information will have practical utility; (b) the accuracy of the agency’s estimate of the burden of the collection of information; (c) ways to enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the information collected; and (d) ways to minimize the burden of the collection of information on respondents, including through the use of automated collection techniques or other forms of information technology. Consideration will be given to comments and suggestions submitted in writing within 60 days of this publication. Please direct your written comments to Thomas Bayer, Chief Information Officer, Securities and Exchange Commission, C/O Remi Pavlik-Simon, 100 F Street NE., Washington, DC 1 Based on information in Commission filings, we estimate that 44.4 percent of funds are advised by subadvisers. 2 This estimate is based on the following calculation (3 hours ÷ 4 rules = .75 hours). 3 This estimate is based on the following calculation: (0.75 hours × 775 portfolios = 581 burden hours). PO 00000 Frm 00060 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 20549; or send an email to: PRA_ Mailbox@sec.gov. Dated: November 21, 2013. Kevin M. O’Neill, Deputy Secretary. [FR Doc. 2013–28425 Filed 11–26–13; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 8011–01–P SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION Proposed Collection; Comment Request Upon Written Request, Copies Available From: Securities and Exchange Commission, Office of Investor Education and Advocacy, Washington, DC 20549–0213. Extension: Rule 206(4)–6, OMB Control No. 3235– 0571, SEC File No. 270–513. Notice is hereby given that pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (44 U.S.C. 3501 et seq.) the Securities and Exchange Commission (the ‘‘Commission’’) is soliciting comments on the collections of information summarized below. The Commission plans to submit these existing collections of information to the Office of Management and Budget (‘‘OMB’’) for extension and approval. The title for the collection of information is ‘‘Rule 206(4)–6’’ under the Investment Advisers Act of 1940 (15 U.S.C. 80b–1 et seq.) (‘‘Advisers Act’’) and the collection has been approved under OMB Control No. 3235–0571. The Commission adopted rule 206(4)–6 (17 CFR 275.206(4)–6), the proxy voting rule, to address an investment adviser’s fiduciary obligation to clients who have given the adviser authority to vote their securities. Under the rule, an investment adviser that exercises voting authority over client securities is required to: (i) Adopt and implement policies and procedures that are reasonably designed to ensure that the adviser votes securities in the best interest of clients, including procedures to address any material conflict that may arise between the interest of the adviser and the client; (ii) disclose to clients how they may obtain information on how the adviser has voted with respect to their securities; and (iii) describe to clients the adviser’s proxy voting policies and procedures and, on request, furnish a copy of the policies and procedures to the requesting client. The rule is designed to assure that advisers that vote proxies for their clients vote those proxies in their clients’ best interest and provide E:\FR\FM\27NON1.SGM 27NON1 emcdonald on DSK67QTVN1PROD with NOTICES Federal Register / Vol. 78, No. 229 / Wednesday, November 27, 2013 / Notices clients with information about how their proxies were voted. Rule 206(4)–6 contains ‘‘collection of information’’ requirements within the meaning of the Paperwork Reduction Act. The respondents are investment advisers registered with the Commission that vote proxies with respect to clients’ securities. Advisory clients of these investment advisers use the information required by the rule to assess investment advisers’ proxy voting policies and procedures and to monitor the advisers’ performance of their proxy voting activities. The information also is used by the Commission staff in its examination and oversight program. Without the information collected under the rules, advisory clients would not have information they need to assess the adviser’s services and monitor the adviser’s handling of their accounts, and the Commission would be less efficient and effective in its programs. The estimated number of investment advisers subject to the collection of information requirements under the rule is 9,650. It is estimated that each of these advisers is required to spend on average 10 hours annually documenting its proxy voting procedures under the requirements of the rule, for a total burden of 96,500 hours. We further estimate that on average, approximately 139 clients of each adviser would request copies of the underlying policies and procedures. We estimate that it would take these advisers 0.1 hours per client to deliver copies of the policies and procedures, for a total burden of 134,135 hours. Accordingly, we estimate that rule 206(4)–6 results in an annual aggregate burden of collection for SEC-registered investment advisers of a total of 230,635 hours. Written comments are invited on: (a) Whether the collections of information are necessary for the proper performance of the functions of the Commission, including whether the information has practical utility; (b) the accuracy of the Commission’s estimate of the burdens of the collections of information; (c) ways to enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the information collected; and (d) ways to minimize the burdens of the collections of information on respondents, including through the use of automated collection techniques or other forms of information technology. Consideration will be given to comments and suggestions submitted in writing within 60 days of this publication. An agency may not conduct or sponsor a collection of information unless it displays a currently valid OMB control number. No person shall be subject to any penalty for failing to comply with a VerDate Mar<15>2010 17:02 Nov 26, 2013 Jkt 232001 collection of information subject to the PRA that does not display a valid OMB control number. Please direct your written comments to Thomas Bayer, Chief Information Officer, Securities and Exchange Commission, C/O Remi Pavlik-Simon, 100 F Street NE., Washington, DC 20549; or send an email to: PRA_ Mailbox@sec.gov. Dated: November 21, 2013. Kevin M. O’Neill, Deputy Secretary. [FR Doc. 2013–28428 Filed 11–26–13; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 8011–01–P SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION Proposed Collection; Comment Request Upon Written Request, Copies Available From: Securities and Exchange Commission, Office of Investor Education and Advocacy, Washington, DC 20549–0213. Extension: Form N–17D–1; OMB Control No. 3235– 0229, SEC File No. 270–231. Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (44 U.S.C. 3501–3520), the Securities and Exchange Commission (‘‘Commission’’) is soliciting comments on the collections of information summarized below. The Commission plans to submit these existing collections of information to the Office of Management and Budget (‘‘OMB’’) for extension and approval. Section 17(d) (15 U.S.C. 80a–17(d)) of the Investment Company Act of 1940 (‘‘Act’’) authorizes the Commission to adopt rules that protect funds and their security holders from overreaching by affiliated persons when the fund and the affiliated person participate in any joint enterprise or other joint arrangement or profit-sharing plan. Rule 17d–1 under the Act (17 CFR 270.17d–1) prohibits funds and their affiliated persons from participating in a joint enterprise, unless an application regarding the transaction has been filed with and approved by the Commission. Paragraph (d)(3) of the rule provides an exemption from this requirement for any loan or advance of credit to, or acquisition of securities or other property of, a small business concern, or any agreement to do any of the foregoing (‘‘investments’’) made by a small business investment company (‘‘SBIC’’) and an affiliated bank, provided that reports about the investments are made on forms the Commission may prescribe. Rule 17d–2 PO 00000 Frm 00061 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 70975 (17 CFR 270.17d–2) designates Form N– 17D–1 (17 CFR 274.00) (‘‘form’’) as the form for reports required by rule 17d– 1. SBICs and their affiliated banks use form N–17D–1 to report any contemporaneous investments in a small business concern. The form provides shareholders and persons seeking to make an informed decision about investing in an SBIC an opportunity to learn about transactions of the SBIC that have the potential for self dealing and other forms of overreaching by affiliated persons at the expense of shareholders. Form N–17D–1 requires SBICs and their affiliated banks to report identifying information about the small business concern and the affiliated bank. The report must include, among other things, the SBIC’s and affiliated bank’s outstanding investments in the small business concern, the use of the proceeds of the investments made during the reporting period, any changes in the nature and amount of the affiliated bank’s investment, the name of any affiliated person of the SBIC or the affiliated bank (or any affiliated person of the affiliated person of the SBIC or the affiliated bank) who has any interest in the transactions, the basis of the affiliation, the nature of the interest, and the consideration the affiliated person has received or will receive. Up to three SBICs may file the form in any year.1 The Commission estimates the burden of filling out the form is approximately one hour per response and would likely be completed by an accountant or other professional. Based on past filings, the Commission estimates that no more than one SBIC is likely to use the form each year. Most of the information requested on the form should be readily available to the SBIC or the affiliated bank in records kept in the ordinary course of business, or with respect to the SBIC, pursuant to the recordkeeping requirements under the Act. Commission staff estimates that it should take approximately one hour for an accountant or other professional to complete the form.2 The estimated total annual burden of filling out the form is 1 hour, at an estimated total annual cost of $193.3 The Commission will not keep 1 As of September 23, 2013, three SBICs were registered with the Commission. 2 This estimate of hours is based on past conversations with representatives of SBICs and accountants that have filed the form. 3 Commission staff estimates that the annual burden would be incurred by a senior accountant with an average hourly wage rate of $193 per hour. See Securities Industry and Financial Markets Association, Report on Management and Professional Earnings in the Securities Industry E:\FR\FM\27NON1.SGM Continued 27NON1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 78, Number 229 (Wednesday, November 27, 2013)]
[Notices]
[Pages 70974-70975]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2013-28428]


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SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION


Proposed Collection; Comment Request

Upon Written Request, Copies Available From: Securities and Exchange 
Commission, Office of Investor Education and Advocacy, Washington, DC 
20549-0213.

Extension:
    Rule 206(4)-6, OMB Control No. 3235-0571, SEC File No. 270-513.

    Notice is hereby given that pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act 
of 1995 (44 U.S.C. 3501 et seq.) the Securities and Exchange Commission 
(the ``Commission'') is soliciting comments on the collections of 
information summarized below. The Commission plans to submit these 
existing collections of information to the Office of Management and 
Budget (``OMB'') for extension and approval.
    The title for the collection of information is ``Rule 206(4)-6'' 
under the Investment Advisers Act of 1940 (15 U.S.C. 80b-1 et seq.) 
(``Advisers Act'') and the collection has been approved under OMB 
Control No. 3235-0571. The Commission adopted rule 206(4)-6 (17 CFR 
275.206(4)-6), the proxy voting rule, to address an investment 
adviser's fiduciary obligation to clients who have given the adviser 
authority to vote their securities. Under the rule, an investment 
adviser that exercises voting authority over client securities is 
required to: (i) Adopt and implement policies and procedures that are 
reasonably designed to ensure that the adviser votes securities in the 
best interest of clients, including procedures to address any material 
conflict that may arise between the interest of the adviser and the 
client; (ii) disclose to clients how they may obtain information on how 
the adviser has voted with respect to their securities; and (iii) 
describe to clients the adviser's proxy voting policies and procedures 
and, on request, furnish a copy of the policies and procedures to the 
requesting client. The rule is designed to assure that advisers that 
vote proxies for their clients vote those proxies in their clients' 
best interest and provide

[[Page 70975]]

clients with information about how their proxies were voted.
    Rule 206(4)-6 contains ``collection of information'' requirements 
within the meaning of the Paperwork Reduction Act. The respondents are 
investment advisers registered with the Commission that vote proxies 
with respect to clients' securities. Advisory clients of these 
investment advisers use the information required by the rule to assess 
investment advisers' proxy voting policies and procedures and to 
monitor the advisers' performance of their proxy voting activities. The 
information also is used by the Commission staff in its examination and 
oversight program. Without the information collected under the rules, 
advisory clients would not have information they need to assess the 
adviser's services and monitor the adviser's handling of their 
accounts, and the Commission would be less efficient and effective in 
its programs.
    The estimated number of investment advisers subject to the 
collection of information requirements under the rule is 9,650. It is 
estimated that each of these advisers is required to spend on average 
10 hours annually documenting its proxy voting procedures under the 
requirements of the rule, for a total burden of 96,500 hours. We 
further estimate that on average, approximately 139 clients of each 
adviser would request copies of the underlying policies and procedures. 
We estimate that it would take these advisers 0.1 hours per client to 
deliver copies of the policies and procedures, for a total burden of 
134,135 hours. Accordingly, we estimate that rule 206(4)-6 results in 
an annual aggregate burden of collection for SEC-registered investment 
advisers of a total of 230,635 hours.
    Written comments are invited on: (a) Whether the collections of 
information are necessary for the proper performance of the functions 
of the Commission, including whether the information has practical 
utility; (b) the accuracy of the Commission's estimate of the burdens 
of the collections of information; (c) ways to enhance the quality, 
utility, and clarity of the information collected; and (d) ways to 
minimize the burdens of the collections of information on respondents, 
including through the use of automated collection techniques or other 
forms of information technology. Consideration will be given to 
comments and suggestions submitted in writing within 60 days of this 
publication. An agency may not conduct or sponsor a collection of 
information unless it displays a currently valid OMB control number. No 
person shall be subject to any penalty for failing to comply with a 
collection of information subject to the PRA that does not display a 
valid OMB control number.
    Please direct your written comments to Thomas Bayer, Chief 
Information Officer, Securities and Exchange Commission, C/O Remi 
Pavlik-Simon, 100 F Street NE., Washington, DC 20549; or send an email 
to: PRA_Mailbox@sec.gov.

    Dated: November 21, 2013.
Kevin M. O'Neill,
Deputy Secretary.
[FR Doc. 2013-28428 Filed 11-26-13; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 8011-01-P