Trade Mission to Colombia, Peru, Chile, Panama, and Ecuador in Conjunction With Trade Winds-The Americas, May 15-23, 2014, 70276-70278 [2013-28169]

Download as PDF sroberts on DSK5SPTVN1PROD with NOTICES 70276 Federal Register / Vol. 78, No. 227 / Monday, November 25, 2013 / Notices personal expenses. Meetings will be held regularly and, to the extent practical, not less than twice annually, usually in Washington, DC. To be considered for membership, please provide the following information by 5 p.m. EST on December 18 to the email address listed in the ADDRESSES section: 1. Name and title of the individual requesting consideration. 2. A sponsor letter from the applicant on his or her company/organization/ entity letterhead or, if the applicant is to represent a company/organization/ entity other than his or her employer, a letter from the company/organization/ entity to be represented, containing a brief statement of why the applicant should be considered for membership on the Board. This sponsor letter should also address the applicant’s travel and tourism-related experience. 3. The applicant’s personal resume. 4. An affirmative statement that the applicant is not required to register as a foreign agent under the Foreign Agents Registration Act of 1938, as amended. 5. An affirmative statement by the applicant that he or she is not a federally registered lobbyist, and that the applicant understands that he or she, if appointed, will not be allowed to continue to serve as a Board member if the applicant becomes a federally registered lobbyist. 6. If the applicant is to represent a company, information regarding the control of the company, including the stock holdings as appropriate, signifying compliance with the criteria set forth above. 7. If the applicant is to represent an organization, information regarding the control of the organization, including the governing structure, members, and revenue sources as appropriate, signifying compliance with the criteria set forth above. 8. If the applicant is to represent a tourism-related entity, the functions and responsibilities of the entity, and information regarding the entity’s U.S. ownership or control, signifying compliance with the criteria set forth above. 9. The company’s, organization’s, or entity’s size and ownership, product or service line and major markets in which the company, organization, or entity operates. 10. Brief statement describing how the applicant will contribute to the work of the Board based on his or her unique experience and perspective (not to exceed 100 words). VerDate Mar<15>2010 17:53 Nov 22, 2013 Jkt 232001 Dated: November 19, 2013. Jennifer Pilat, Executive Secretary, United States Travel and Tourism Advisory Board. [FR Doc. 2013–28207 Filed 11–22–13; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 3510–DR–P DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration Trade Mission to Colombia, Peru, Chile, Panama, and Ecuador in Conjunction With Trade Winds—The Americas, May 15–23, 2014 International Trade Administration, Department of Commerce. ACTION: Notice. AGENCY: Mission Description The United States Department of Commerce, International Trade Administration is organizing a trade mission to Colombia, Peru, Chile, Panama and Ecuador that will include the Trade Winds—The Americas ´ business forum in Bogota, Colombia, May 19–21, 2014. U.S. trade mission members will participate in the Trade Winds—The Americas business forum ´ in Bogota, Colombia (which is also open to U.S. companies not participating in the trade mission). Trade mission participants may also choose to participate in their choice of trade mission stops based on recommendations from the USFCS, including in Colombia, Peru, Chile, Panama and Ecuador. Each trade mission stop will include one-on-one business appointments with prescreened potential buyers, agents, distributors and joint-venture partners. Trade mission participants participating in the Trade Winds—The Americas business forum may attend regional and industry-specific sessions and consultations with USFCS Senior Commercial Officers from the Western Hemisphere during the business forum. This mission is open to U.S. companies and trade associations from a cross-section of industries with growth potential in Colombia, Peru, Chile, Panama and Ecuador, including but not limited to mining and construction equipment, information technology and telecommunications equipment, building products, medical equipment, healthcare products and services, consumer products and safety and security industries. Commercial Setting The United States has implemented bilateral or multilateral reciprocal trade PO 00000 Frm 00020 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 agreements with 12 countries in the Western Hemisphere, including the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), the Dominican RepublicCentral America-United States Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA–DR), and bilateral FTAs with Chile, Peru, Colombia and Panama. In 2012, U.S. exports to South and Central America plus the Caribbean totaled $205 billion. Market Overview and Top Prospects for U.S. Goods and Service Exports Colombia Colombia houses the 3rd largest market in Latin America, with 47 million inhabitants. Five cities in Colombia boast a consumer base of more than a million people. Colombia is the fastest growing market in Latin America for oil and gas production. Best prospects include oil and gas machinery and services, transportation and infrastructure, mining and construction equipment, information technology and communications, military equipment, auto parts and accessories, electrical power systems, travel and tourism, food beverage processing and packaging equipment and medical equipment. Peru Peru’s long-term economic stability and very low inflation rate help to make it one of the highest ranked countries in Latin America for U.S. companies to conduct business. GDP growth in 2012 was around 6.2%, and has been at this high level for the last 10 years, with only a brief break in 2009. Growth is driven by a growing middle class, and supported by continued growth in the mining and gas industries. Lima, the commercial center and capital, is home to nearly 8 million people, and is the largest city in this country of almost 30 million. Best prospects include mining industry equipment, plastic materials and resins, construction equipment, industrial chemicals, telecommunications equipment, oil and gas field machinery, pumps, valves, and compressors. Chile Chile is the third largest export market in Latin America for the United States. Driven by mining, forestry, agriculture, and fishing, Chile imported nearly $20 billion in U.S. products in 2012. Known for its political and economic stability, Chile has posted average GDP growth of 5 percent per year for more than 20 years running. Doing business in Chile has never been easier as the World Banks’s ‘‘Ease of Doing Business’’ index ranks Chile #1 E:\FR\FM\25NON1.SGM 25NON1 Federal Register / Vol. 78, No. 227 / Monday, November 25, 2013 / Notices among Latin American and Caribbean economies. With limited domestic production, and free trade agreements with 60 countries, including the United States, Chile imports most all needed equipment, supplies, and inputs for key industries including, agriculture, construction, energy and electric power, food processing and packaging, healthcare, mining (open pit and underground), safety and security equipment, and telecommunications. Panama Panama sits as the crossroads of the world, connecting Central and South America and home to a population of 3.5 million people. The many advantages of Panama include its position as the logistics hub for Americas, canal operations, direct air routes, dollarized economy, sophisticated banking sector, finance and credit availability, stable economic and political environment, affinity for U.S. goods and services and a high level of personal security. Opportunities for U.S companies include projects related to the construction of the Panama Canal, ports, the Colon Free Trade Zone, infrastructure improvement projects, energy industry growth, mining and consumer retail. sroberts on DSK5SPTVN1PROD with NOTICES Ecuador The United States is Ecuador’s largest trading partner by all measures. The dollarized economy eliminates currency risk, and Ecuador offers many industry sectors potential for sales, including infrastructure development, mining and construction equipment, medical equipment, and healthcare products and services. Mission Goals The goal of the trade mission is to help participating firms gain market insights, make industry contacts, solidify business strategies, and advance specific projects, with the goal of increasing U.S. exports to Colombia, Peru, Chile, Panama, Ecuador and the region. The delegation will have access to USFCS Senior Commercial Officers and Commercial Specialists during the mission, learn about the many business opportunities in the Americas, and gain first-hand market exposure. U.S. trade mission participants already doing business in the Americas will have opportunities to further advance business relationships and projects in those markets. Scenario and Timetable May 14, 2014 Arrive in Panama or Ecuador (if electing to participate in one of these mission stops) VerDate Mar<15>2010 17:53 Nov 22, 2013 Jkt 232001 May 15–16, 2014 Panama City, Panama or Quito, Ecuador: (choice of one mission stop) Market Briefings, Business to Business meetings and networking with government and business officials May 17–18, 2014 Travel to Bogota, Colombia May 19–21, 2014 Bogota, Colombia: Trade Winds Business Forum and SCO Consultations Market Briefings, Business to Business meetings, Consultations with U.S. government trade representatives and networking with U.S. and foreign government and business officials May 22–23, 2014 Lima, Peru or Santiago, Chile: (choice of one mission stop) Market Briefings, Business to Business meetings and networking with government and business officials Participation Requirements All parties interested in participating in the trade mission to Colombia, Peru, Chile, Panama and Ecuador must complete and submit an application package for consideration by the Department of Commerce. All applicants will be evaluated on their ability to meet certain conditions and best satisfy the selection criteria as outlined below. A minimum of 35 companies and/or trade associations will be selected to participate in the mission from the applicant pool on a first-come, firstserved basis. Additional delegates will be accepted based on available space. U.S. companies and/or trade associations already doing business in or seeking business in Colombia, Peru, Chile, Panama and Ecuador for the first time may apply. Fees and Expenses After a company has been selected to participate in the mission, a payment to the Department of Commerce in the form of a participation fee is required. • For one mission stop, the participation fee will be $1,900 for a small or medium-sized enterprise (SME)/trade associations and $2,900 for large firms. • For two mission stops, the participation fee will be $2,900 for a small or medium-sized enterprise (SME) trade associations/and $3,900 for large firms. • For three mission stops, the participation fee will be $3,900 for a small or medium-sized enterprise (SME)/trade associations and $4,900 for large firms. PO 00000 Frm 00021 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 70277 The above trade mission fees include the $400 participation fee for the Trade Winds business forum to be held in Bogota, Colombia on May 19–21, 2014. An additional representative for both SMEs, trade associations and large firms will require an additional fee of $400 for one mission stop, $800 for two mission stops, or $1200 for three mission stops. Expenses for travel, lodging, meals, and incidentals such as local transportation and interpreters will be the responsibility of each mission participant. Conditions for Participation • An applicant must submit a completed and signed mission application and supplemental application materials, including adequate information on the company’s products and/or services, primary market objectives, and goals for participation. Applicant should specify in their application and supplemental materials which trade mission stops they are interested in participating in. If the Department of Commerce receives an incomplete application, the Department may reject the application, request additional information, or take the lack of information into account when evaluating the applications. • Each applicant must also certify that the products and services it seeks to export through the mission are either produced in the U.S., or, if not, marketed under the name of a U.S. firm and have at least 51% U.S. content of the value of the finished product or service. In the case of a trade association or trade organization, the applicant must certify that, for each company to be represented by the trade association or trade organization, the products and services the represented company seeks to export are either produced in the United States, or, if not, marketed under the name of a U.S. firm and have at least 51% U.S. content. Selection Criteria for Participation Selection will be based on the following criteria: • Suitability of the company’s (or, in the case of a trade association or trade organization, represented companies’) products or services to each of the markets the company or trade association/organization has expressed an interest in visiting as part of this trade mission. • Company’s (or, in the case of a trade association or trade organization, represented companies’) potential for business in each of the markets the company or trade association/ organization has expressed an interest in visiting as part of this trade mission. E:\FR\FM\25NON1.SGM 25NON1 70278 Federal Register / Vol. 78, No. 227 / Monday, November 25, 2013 / Notices • Consistency of the applicant’s goals and objectives with the stated scope of the mission. Diversity of company size, sector or subsector, and location may also be considered during the review process. Referrals from political organizations and any documents containing references to partisan political activities (including political contributions) will be removed from an applicant’s submission and not considered during the selection process. Timeframe for Recruitment and Applications Mission recruitment will be conducted in an open and public manner, including publication in the Federal Register, posting on the Commerce Department trade mission calendar, and other Internet Web sites, press releases to the general and trade media, direct mail and broadcast fax, notices by industry trade associations and other multiplier groups and announcements at industry meetings, symposia, conferences, and trade shows. Recruitment for the mission will begin immediately and conclude no later than April 15, 2014. The U.S. Department of Commerce will review applications and make selection decisions on a rolling basis beginning 14 days after publication of the Federal Register notice, until the minimum of 35 participants is selected. After April 15, 2014, applications will be considered only if space and scheduling constraints permit. U.S. Contact Information Bill Burwell, Director, U.S. Export Assistance Center—Baltimore, Bill.Burwell@trade.gov, Tel: 410–962– 4539. Leslie Drake, Director, U.S. Export Assistance Center—Charleston, WV, Leslie.Drake@trade.gov, Tel: 304– 347–5123. William Fanjoy, Director, U.S. Export Assistance Center—Arlington, VA, William.Fanjoy@trade.gov, Tel: 703– 235–0327. sroberts on DSK5SPTVN1PROD with NOTICES International Contact Information Cameron Werker, Senior Commercial Officer, U.S. Embassy Bogota, Colombia, Cameron.Werker@ trade.gov. ´ Nicole A. DeSilvis, Commercial Attache, U.S. Embassy Bogota, Colombia, Nicole.DeSilvis@trade.gov. Elnora Moye, Trade Program Assistant. [FR Doc. 2013–28169 Filed 11–22–13; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 3510–DR–P VerDate Mar<15>2010 17:53 Nov 22, 2013 Jkt 232001 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration Automotive Trade Mission to New Delhi, Pune and Chennai, India April 24–April 30, 2014. International Trade Administration, Department of Commerce. ACTION: Notice. AGENCY: Mission Description The United States Department of Commerce, International Trade Administration, is organizing an automotive trade mission to India (New Delhi, Pune and Chennai), April 24–30, 2014. The purpose of the mission is to introduce U.S. firms to India’s rapidly expanding automotive market. Many global automotive manufacturing companies such as Ford, GM, BMW, AUDI, Volvo, Renault, Hyundai, Daimler, and Nissan, among others, have established operations in India. The mission will assist U.S. companies to explore and pursue export opportunities in the Indian automotive sector. The mission to India will include representatives from leading U.S. companies that provide aftermarket, auto components, vehicle performance enhancement, automotive care, maintenance, service parts, accessories, testing and garage equipment product and services, and U.S. trade associations representing companies in these sectors. The mission will visit three cities, New Delhi, Pune and Chennai, where participants will receive market briefings and participate in customized meetings with key officials, trade and chamber associations, and prospective partners. Commercial Setting The automotive industry is one of the most significant and growing sectors of the Indian economy. In 2012, India produced 20 million vehicles, making its passenger car and commercial vehicle manufacturing industry the sixth largest in the world. India’s growth is driven by a young population and an expanding middle class with an extremely low rate of motor vehicle ownership. India is ranked 157th in the world in terms of vehicles per capita. Therefore, opportunities in automotive industries will continue to grow, and it is estimated that by 2016 the automotive market will reach the $145 billion mark. To support and sustain the anticipated growth in the automotive industry, the Government of India (GOI) launched the ‘‘Automotive Mission Plan (AMP), 2006–2016.’’ In the plan, the GOI has PO 00000 Frm 00022 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 accorded the highest priority for the automobile and components industry sector. The AMP envisions that India will emerge as the worldwide destination of choice for the design and manufacture of automobiles and auto components by 2016. The plan also projects the sales revenue of the automotive sector reaching $122–159 billion by 2016 from $34 billion in 2006. The GOI allows 100% foreign investment in the automobile and parts industry. The AMP is also a clear sign that the GOI considers the automotive sector to be very significant. U.S. companies could benefit from the unprecedented growth of this industry. U.S. firms successfully compete in the maturing Indian automotive industry. Main domestic competitors are Tata Motors, Maruti-Suzuki, Mahindra and Mahindra, Eicher Motors, Force, Hindustan Motors, Premier, and Asia Motor Works. Competing non-U.S. brands in the Indian automotive manufacturing market include Hyundai, Suzuki, Mitsubishi, Toyota, BMW, Nissan, Volkswagen, Skoda, Mercedes Benz, Fiat, Renault, and Volvo. As the automotive manufacturing market matures, it is expected that the areas of opportunities for U.S. companies will be in the automotive aftermarket, green technologies and automotive components and accessories. The Indian auto components industry sector has been recording an average annual growth of over 20% in the past few years. According to a McKinsey study, the auto components industry sector has the potential to reach $40 billion by 2016. Technology-focused products for the original equipment manufacturer segment offer best prospects in the Indian auto components sector. These include gears and components, clutch components, brakes and components, valves, axles, shafts, engine parts, electrical components, suspension, and body building parts. Indian agents and distributors actively seek opportunities to market U.S. technologies in the domestic market. New Delhi New Delhi is the capital of India, and the seat of the executive, legislative, and judiciary branches of the Government of India. It also serves as the center of the Government of the National Capital Territory of Delhi. New Delhi is situated within the metropolis of Delhi and is one of the eleven districts of Delhi National Capital Territory. The majority of India’s car manufacturing industry is based around three clusters to the north, west, and south of New Delhi. Gurgaon and Manesar in Haryana form the E:\FR\FM\25NON1.SGM 25NON1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 78, Number 227 (Monday, November 25, 2013)]
[Notices]
[Pages 70276-70278]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2013-28169]


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DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE

International Trade Administration


Trade Mission to Colombia, Peru, Chile, Panama, and Ecuador in 
Conjunction With Trade Winds--The Americas, May 15-23, 2014

AGENCY: International Trade Administration, Department of Commerce.

ACTION: Notice.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

Mission Description

    The United States Department of Commerce, International Trade 
Administration is organizing a trade mission to Colombia, Peru, Chile, 
Panama and Ecuador that will include the Trade Winds--The Americas 
business forum in Bogot[aacute], Colombia, May 19-21, 2014. U.S. trade 
mission members will participate in the Trade Winds--The Americas 
business forum in Bogot[aacute], Colombia (which is also open to U.S. 
companies not participating in the trade mission). Trade mission 
participants may also choose to participate in their choice of trade 
mission stops based on recommendations from the USFCS, including in 
Colombia, Peru, Chile, Panama and Ecuador. Each trade mission stop will 
include one-on-one business appointments with pre-screened potential 
buyers, agents, distributors and joint-venture partners. Trade mission 
participants participating in the Trade Winds--The Americas business 
forum may attend regional and industry-specific sessions and 
consultations with USFCS Senior Commercial Officers from the Western 
Hemisphere during the business forum.
    This mission is open to U.S. companies and trade associations from 
a cross-section of industries with growth potential in Colombia, Peru, 
Chile, Panama and Ecuador, including but not limited to mining and 
construction equipment, information technology and telecommunications 
equipment, building products, medical equipment, healthcare products 
and services, consumer products and safety and security industries.

Commercial Setting

    The United States has implemented bilateral or multilateral 
reciprocal trade agreements with 12 countries in the Western 
Hemisphere, including the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), 
the Dominican Republic-Central America-United States Free Trade 
Agreement (CAFTA-DR), and bilateral FTAs with Chile, Peru, Colombia and 
Panama. In 2012, U.S. exports to South and Central America plus the 
Caribbean totaled $205 billion.

Market Overview and Top Prospects for U.S. Goods and Service Exports

Colombia
    Colombia houses the 3rd largest market in Latin America, with 47 
million inhabitants. Five cities in Colombia boast a consumer base of 
more than a million people. Colombia is the fastest growing market in 
Latin America for oil and gas production. Best prospects include oil 
and gas machinery and services, transportation and infrastructure, 
mining and construction equipment, information technology and 
communications, military equipment, auto parts and accessories, 
electrical power systems, travel and tourism, food beverage processing 
and packaging equipment and medical equipment.
Peru
    Peru's long-term economic stability and very low inflation rate 
help to make it one of the highest ranked countries in Latin America 
for U.S. companies to conduct business. GDP growth in 2012 was around 
6.2%, and has been at this high level for the last 10 years, with only 
a brief break in 2009. Growth is driven by a growing middle class, and 
supported by continued growth in the mining and gas industries. Lima, 
the commercial center and capital, is home to nearly 8 million people, 
and is the largest city in this country of almost 30 million.
    Best prospects include mining industry equipment, plastic materials 
and resins, construction equipment, industrial chemicals, 
telecommunications equipment, oil and gas field machinery, pumps, 
valves, and compressors.
Chile
    Chile is the third largest export market in Latin America for the 
United States. Driven by mining, forestry, agriculture, and fishing, 
Chile imported nearly $20 billion in U.S. products in 2012. Known for 
its political and economic stability, Chile has posted average GDP 
growth of 5 percent per year for more than 20 years running. Doing 
business in Chile has never been easier as the World Banks's ``Ease of 
Doing Business'' index ranks Chile 1

[[Page 70277]]

among Latin American and Caribbean economies. With limited domestic 
production, and free trade agreements with 60 countries, including the 
United States, Chile imports most all needed equipment, supplies, and 
inputs for key industries including, agriculture, construction, energy 
and electric power, food processing and packaging, healthcare, mining 
(open pit and underground), safety and security equipment, and 
telecommunications.
Panama
    Panama sits as the crossroads of the world, connecting Central and 
South America and home to a population of 3.5 million people. The many 
advantages of Panama include its position as the logistics hub for 
Americas, canal operations, direct air routes, dollarized economy, 
sophisticated banking sector, finance and credit availability, stable 
economic and political environment, affinity for U.S. goods and 
services and a high level of personal security. Opportunities for U.S 
companies include projects related to the construction of the Panama 
Canal, ports, the Colon Free Trade Zone, infrastructure improvement 
projects, energy industry growth, mining and consumer retail.
Ecuador
    The United States is Ecuador's largest trading partner by all 
measures. The dollarized economy eliminates currency risk, and Ecuador 
offers many industry sectors potential for sales, including 
infrastructure development, mining and construction equipment, medical 
equipment, and healthcare products and services.

Mission Goals

    The goal of the trade mission is to help participating firms gain 
market insights, make industry contacts, solidify business strategies, 
and advance specific projects, with the goal of increasing U.S. exports 
to Colombia, Peru, Chile, Panama, Ecuador and the region. The 
delegation will have access to USFCS Senior Commercial Officers and 
Commercial Specialists during the mission, learn about the many 
business opportunities in the Americas, and gain first-hand market 
exposure. U.S. trade mission participants already doing business in the 
Americas will have opportunities to further advance business 
relationships and projects in those markets.

Scenario and Timetable

May 14, 2014 Arrive in Panama or Ecuador (if electing to participate in 
one of these mission stops)
May 15-16, 2014 Panama City, Panama or Quito, Ecuador: (choice of one 
mission stop)
    Market Briefings, Business to Business meetings and networking with 
government and business officials
May 17-18, 2014 Travel to Bogota, Colombia
May 19-21, 2014 Bogota, Colombia: Trade Winds Business Forum and SCO 
Consultations
    Market Briefings, Business to Business meetings, Consultations with 
U.S. government trade representatives and networking with U.S. and 
foreign government and business officials
May 22-23, 2014 Lima, Peru or Santiago, Chile: (choice of one mission 
stop)
    Market Briefings, Business to Business meetings and networking with 
government and business officials

Participation Requirements

    All parties interested in participating in the trade mission to 
Colombia, Peru, Chile, Panama and Ecuador must complete and submit an 
application package for consideration by the Department of Commerce. 
All applicants will be evaluated on their ability to meet certain 
conditions and best satisfy the selection criteria as outlined below.
    A minimum of 35 companies and/or trade associations will be 
selected to participate in the mission from the applicant pool on a 
first-come, first-served basis. Additional delegates will be accepted 
based on available space. U.S. companies and/or trade associations 
already doing business in or seeking business in Colombia, Peru, Chile, 
Panama and Ecuador for the first time may apply.

Fees and Expenses

    After a company has been selected to participate in the mission, a 
payment to the Department of Commerce in the form of a participation 
fee is required.
     For one mission stop, the participation fee will be $1,900 
for a small or medium-sized enterprise (SME)/trade associations and 
$2,900 for large firms.
     For two mission stops, the participation fee will be 
$2,900 for a small or medium-sized enterprise (SME) trade associations/
and $3,900 for large firms.
     For three mission stops, the participation fee will be 
$3,900 for a small or medium-sized enterprise (SME)/trade associations 
and $4,900 for large firms.
    The above trade mission fees include the $400 participation fee for 
the Trade Winds business forum to be held in Bogota, Colombia on May 
19-21, 2014.
    An additional representative for both SMEs, trade associations and 
large firms will require an additional fee of $400 for one mission 
stop, $800 for two mission stops, or $1200 for three mission stops.
    Expenses for travel, lodging, meals, and incidentals such as local 
transportation and interpreters will be the responsibility of each 
mission participant.

Conditions for Participation

     An applicant must submit a completed and signed mission 
application and supplemental application materials, including adequate 
information on the company's products and/or services, primary market 
objectives, and goals for participation. Applicant should specify in 
their application and supplemental materials which trade mission stops 
they are interested in participating in. If the Department of Commerce 
receives an incomplete application, the Department may reject the 
application, request additional information, or take the lack of 
information into account when evaluating the applications.
     Each applicant must also certify that the products and 
services it seeks to export through the mission are either produced in 
the U.S., or, if not, marketed under the name of a U.S. firm and have 
at least 51% U.S. content of the value of the finished product or 
service. In the case of a trade association or trade organization, the 
applicant must certify that, for each company to be represented by the 
trade association or trade organization, the products and services the 
represented company seeks to export are either produced in the United 
States, or, if not, marketed under the name of a U.S. firm and have at 
least 51% U.S. content.

Selection Criteria for Participation

    Selection will be based on the following criteria:
     Suitability of the company's (or, in the case of a trade 
association or trade organization, represented companies') products or 
services to each of the markets the company or trade association/
organization has expressed an interest in visiting as part of this 
trade mission.
     Company's (or, in the case of a trade association or trade 
organization, represented companies') potential for business in each of 
the markets the company or trade association/organization has expressed 
an interest in visiting as part of this trade mission.

[[Page 70278]]

     Consistency of the applicant's goals and objectives with 
the stated scope of the mission.
    Diversity of company size, sector or subsector, and location may 
also be considered during the review process.
    Referrals from political organizations and any documents containing 
references to partisan political activities (including political 
contributions) will be removed from an applicant's submission and not 
considered during the selection process.

Timeframe for Recruitment and Applications

    Mission recruitment will be conducted in an open and public manner, 
including publication in the Federal Register, posting on the Commerce 
Department trade mission calendar, and other Internet Web sites, press 
releases to the general and trade media, direct mail and broadcast fax, 
notices by industry trade associations and other multiplier groups and 
announcements at industry meetings, symposia, conferences, and trade 
shows.
    Recruitment for the mission will begin immediately and conclude no 
later than April 15, 2014. The U.S. Department of Commerce will review 
applications and make selection decisions on a rolling basis beginning 
14 days after publication of the Federal Register notice, until the 
minimum of 35 participants is selected. After April 15, 2014, 
applications will be considered only if space and scheduling 
constraints permit.

U.S. Contact Information

Bill Burwell, Director, U.S. Export Assistance Center--Baltimore, 
Bill.Burwell@trade.gov, Tel: 410-962-4539.
Leslie Drake, Director, U.S. Export Assistance Center--Charleston, WV, 
Leslie.Drake@trade.gov, Tel: 304-347-5123.
William Fanjoy, Director, U.S. Export Assistance Center--Arlington, VA, 
William.Fanjoy@trade.gov, Tel: 703-235-0327.

International Contact Information

Cameron Werker, Senior Commercial Officer, U.S. Embassy Bogota, 
Colombia, Cameron.Werker@trade.gov.
Nicole A. DeSilvis, Commercial Attach[eacute], U.S. Embassy Bogota, 
Colombia, Nicole.DeSilvis@trade.gov.

Elnora Moye,
Trade Program Assistant.
[FR Doc. 2013-28169 Filed 11-22-13; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 3510-DR-P