Single Application Option, 38843-38845 [2013-15545]

Download as PDF Federal Register / Vol. 78, No. 125 / Friday, June 28, 2013 / Rules and Regulations definition of a ski area on NFS lands. Therefore, the Department has determined that this interim final rule will not have a significant economic impact on a substantial number of small entities as defined by the Regulatory Flexibility Act because this interim final rule will not impose record-keeping requirements on them; it will not affect their competitive position in relation to large entities; and it will not affect their cash flow, liquidity, or ability to remain in the market. Federalism and Consultation and Coordination With Indian Tribal Governments The Department has considered this interim final rule under the requirements of E.O. 13132 on federalism. The Department has determined that this interim final rule conforms to the federalism principles set out in this E.O.; will not impose any compliance costs on the States; and will not have substantial direct effects on the states, on the relationship between the Federal Government and the States, or on the distribution of power and responsibilities among the various levels of government. Therefore, the Department has determined that no further determination of federalism implications is necessary at this time. This interim final rule does not have tribal implications per E.O. 13175, Consultation and Coordination with Indian Tribal Governments. Therefore, advance consultation with tribes is not required in connection with the interim final rule. tkelley on DSK3SPTVN1PROD with RULES No Takings Implications The Department has analyzed the interim final rule in accordance with the principles and criteria in E.O. 12630 and has determined that his interim final rule will not pose the risk of a taking of private property. Civil Justice Reform The Department has reviewed this interim final rule under E.O. 12988 on civil justice reform. After adoption of this interim final rule, (1) All State and local laws and regulations that conflict with this interim final rule or that impede its full implementation will be preempted; (2) no retroactive effect will be given to this interim final rule; and (3) it will not require administrative proceedings before parties may file suit in court challenging its provisions. Unfunded Mandates Pursuant to Title II of the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act of 1995 (2 U.S.C. 1531–1538), the Department has assessed the effects of this interim final VerDate Mar<15>2010 15:54 Jun 27, 2013 Jkt 229001 rule on State, local, and tribal governments and the private sector. This interim final rule will not compel the expenditure of $100 million or more by any State, local, or tribal government or anyone in the private sector. Therefore, a statement under section 202 of the Act is not required. Energy Effects The Department has reviewed this interim final rule under E.O. 13211 of May 18, 2001, Actions Concerning Regulations That Significantly Affect Energy Supply. The Department has determined that this interim final rule does not constitute a significant energy action as defined in the E.O. Controlling Paperwork Burdens on the Public This interim final rule does not contain any record-keeping or reporting requirements or other information collection requirements as defined in 5 CFR part 1320 that are not already required by law or not already approved for use. Accordingly, the review provisions of the Paperwork Reduction Act (44 U.S.C. 3501 et seq.) and its implementing regulations at 5 CFR part 1320 do not apply to this interim final rule. List of Subjects in 36 CFR Part 251 Administrative practice and procedure, Electric power, National forests, Public lands–rights-of-way, Reporting and recordkeeping requirements, Water resources. Therefore, for the reasons set forth in the preamble, the Forest Service is amending subpart B of part 251 of Title 36 of the Code of Federal Regulations to read as follows: PART 251–LAND USES Subpart B–Special Uses 1. The authority citation for part 251, subpart B, continues to read as follows: ■ Authority: 16 U.S.C. 4601–6a, 4601–6d, 472, 497b, 497c, 551, 580d, 1134, 3210; 30 U.S.C. 185; 43 U.S.C. 1740, 1761–1771. 2. Amend § 251.51 by revising the definition of ‘‘ski area’’ to read as follows: ■ § 251.51 Definitions. * * * * * Ski area—a site and associated facilities that has been primarily developed for alpine or Nordic skiing and other snow sports, but may also include, in appropriate circumstances, facilities necessary for other seasonal or year-round natural resource-based recreation activities, provided that a PO 00000 Frm 00033 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 38843 preponderance of revenue generated by the ski area derives from the sale of alpine and Nordic ski area passes and lift tickets, revenue from alpine, Nordic, and other snow sport instruction, and gross revenue from ancillary facilities that support alpine or Nordic skiing and other snow sports. * * * * * Dated: June 20, 2013. Ann C. Mills, Acting Under Secretary. [FR Doc. 2013–15476 Filed 6–27–13; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 3410–11–P LIBRARY OF CONGRESS United States Copyright Office 37 CFR Part 202 [Docket No. 2013–6] Single Application Option U.S. Copyright Office, Library of Congress. ACTION: Interim final rule. AGENCY: The U.S. Copyright Office is amending its regulations on an interim basis in order to establish a new registration option called the ‘‘single application.’’ This application is being introduced in order to provide an additional option for individual authors/claimants registering a single (one) work that is not a work made for hire via the Copyright Office’s electronic registration system (‘‘eCO’’). Such applications are the most administratively simple for the Copyright Office to process and may make copyright registration more attractive to individual authors of single works. This application option will be available on June 28, 2013, and the Copyright Office is inviting public comments during the first 60 days of its implementation. The single application option will cost the same—$35—as a standard electronic application. DATES: Effective date: June 28, 2013. Comments date: Comments must be received by the Copyright Office of the General Counsel no later than August 28, 2013. ADDRESSES: The Copyright Office strongly prefers that comments be submitted electronically. A comment page containing a comment form is posted on the Copyright Office Web site at http://www.copyright.gov/comments/ single-application/commentsubmission.html. The Web site interface requires submitters to complete a form specifying name and organization, as SUMMARY: E:\FR\FM\28JNR1.SGM 28JNR1 38844 Federal Register / Vol. 78, No. 125 / Friday, June 28, 2013 / Rules and Regulations applicable, and to upload comments as an attachment via a browse button. To meet accessibility standards, all comments must be uploaded in a single file not to exceed six megabytes (MB) in one of the following formats: The Portable Document File (PDF) format that contains searchable, accessible text (not an image); Microsoft Word; WordPerfect; Rich Text Format (RTF); or ASCII text file format (not a scanned document). The form and face of the comments must include both the name of the submitter and the organization. All comments will be posted publicly on the Copyright Office Web site exactly as they are received, along with names and organizations. If electronic submission of comments is not feasible, please contact the Copyright Office at (202) 707–8380 for special instructions. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Robert Kasunic, Associate Register of Copyrights and Director of Registration Policy & Practice, or Chris Weston, Attorney-Advisor, Office of the General Counsel, at (202) 707–8380. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: tkelley on DSK3SPTVN1PROD with RULES I. Background Prior Federal Register publications. On January 24, 2012, the Copyright Office (the ‘‘Office’’) published a notice of inquiry in the Federal Register seeking public comment on several issues (the ‘‘NOI’’). 77 FR 3507 (Jan. 24, 2012). One—which is the subject of the present interim rule—was whether special consideration should be provided to registration of single works where the author is also the copyright owner and the work is not a work made for hire. (This is the ‘‘single application,’’ as distinguished from the ‘‘standard application.’’) This question was asked in the context of an ongoing fee study by the Office. The Office received four comments to this notice responding to the question of a single application, all of them positive. On March 28, 2012, the Office published a comprehensive notice of proposed rulemaking proposing a new schedule of fees as well as proposing to offer a separate, easier application for ‘‘a single author who is also the claimant for the online filing of a claim in a single work that is not a work made for hire’’ (the ‘‘NPR’’). 77 FR 18743 (Mar. 28, 2012). The notice also stated that the Office would provide more details on the single author/single work registration option in a later proposed rulemaking. The Office received 10 comments directed at the proposed single application. The issues raised in these comments are addressed below. VerDate Mar<15>2010 15:54 Jun 27, 2013 Jkt 229001 Why an interim rule? As noted above, the Office previously stated that more details regarding the single author/ single work registration option would be forthcoming. The present notice, then, serves the function of both a notice of proposed rulemaking—in that it seeks public comment on the rules governing the single application—and an interim rule—in that it simultaneously promulgates the single application. The Office believes that it received sufficient comment pursuant to its NPR that it is justified in publishing an interim rule regarding the implementation of the single application option. However, because only a description in the text of the NPR was provided, the Office is here providing the opportunity for the interested public to comment on the actual proposed text of the rule in the context of having the single application option available for public use and review. Because the rule covering this application is interim in nature, this allows the Office to modify it should such an action be warranted. II. Discussion The reasons for establishing a separate single registration application option are spelled out in detail in the NOI. Briefly, the Office believes that those registration applications that take the least time to process should enjoy a simpler online application. The Office hopes that providing a simplified application option will encourage more individual creators to register their works. As initially proposed, the single application would only be available for ‘‘an application to register a single work when the application is submitted by a person who is the sole author and the sole copyright owner of the work, the work is not a work made for hire, and the work does not contain material that was previously published or registered.’’ 77 FR 3507 (Jan. 24, 2012). It was also suggested initially that the single application be available only via eCO, and that it may be used to register collections of works by the same authorclaimant. As restated in the NPR, the single application was proposed to apply only to ‘‘a single author who is also the claimant for the online filing of a claim in a single work that is not a work made for hire.’’ 77 FR 18743 (Mar. 28, 2012). Although the single application was initially conceived to require that the author, claimant, and remitter had to be the same individual, the Office has determined to allow a third party to remit a claim on behalf of an authorclaimant, provided that the third party is also listed as the correspondent, and PO 00000 Frm 00034 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 provided the claim meets the single registration requirements. The Office also determined that a claim for a single application may contain—but will not cover—material that was previously published or registered, so as to allow for the registration of certain derivative works. Based on the comments received the Office has determined that the following will be the boundaries of the types of claims that are eligible for submission using the single application to be implemented on June 28, 2013: • Electronic registration only. • Single author (does not include joint works). • Single claimant/owner (does not include works made for hire or works where the claimant/owner is different from the author, i.e., transferred ownership). • Single work (e.g., one song, one poem, one photograph. Does not include collective works, unpublished collections, units of publication, group registrations, databases, or Web sites). Regarding the requirement of one work per registration, while the Office is aware that many individual authors, particularly photographers, create multiple works that they may want to register at one time, registering multiple works creates a more complex application. A single electronic application will provide a more simplified registration option that would benefit the many individual applicants who submit such claims for registration. Any expansion beyond the limits listed above creates more complex applications, which take additional time to process, and are thus poor candidates for an application based on simplicity. This rationale applies as well to those commenters who argued that the single application should be available both to individual creators who incorporate for business reasons (e.g., an author who seeks to register a manuscript through a self-created corporate entity for tax or liability reasons) and to individuals or small businesses who commission works made for hire. Why, ask these commenters, are such authors—who are as much a part of the independent creative community as individuals who register their works as themselves—not also offered the benefit of a single application option? There should be no doubt that the Copyright Office agrees that works registered through a corporate entity or created for hire are worthy of copyright protection. It also recognizes that the business of creating and licensing creative works can be a complex one, even (or especially) for individuals and small businesses. E:\FR\FM\28JNR1.SGM 28JNR1 Federal Register / Vol. 78, No. 125 / Friday, June 28, 2013 / Rules and Regulations However, every deviation from the most simplified application, whether it be that the claimant is a corporation where the author is an individual, or the work is made for hire, creates, as noted above, more complexity for the registration process, and frustrates the goal of simplicity. In addition to adding regulations governing the single application, the Copyright Office is proposing minor technical amendments to the current regulation governing electronic registration in general, in order to clarify the requirements for sending physical copies or phonorecords as deposit copies. These changes appear in the new sub-paragraph 202.3(b)(2)(i)(D). It is important to the Copyright Office that registration be as simple, equitable, and economical as possible. The Office believes that providing an easier option for registration for those authors who file the simplest kind of application is worthwhile, and may encourage registration and foster the development of a more robust public record. III. Request for Comments tkelley on DSK3SPTVN1PROD with RULES The new online single registration application will appear as an option in eCO on June 28, 2013. The Office is providing the public an opportunity to comment on this implementation. The interim status of this rule means that it is likely to be revisited by the Copyright Office in the near future, which will offer the Office an opportunity to VerDate Mar<15>2010 15:54 Jun 27, 2013 Jkt 229001 consider and act upon comments received. List of Subjects in 37 CFR Part 202 Preregistration and Registration of Claims to Copyright. Interim Regulations In consideration of the foregoing, the Copyright Office amends part 202 of 37 CFR as follows: PART 202—PREREGISTRATION AND REGISTRATION OF CLAIMS TO COPYRIGHT 1. The authority section for part 202 continues to read as follows: ■ Authority: 17 U.S.C. 408(f), 702 2. Amend § 202.3 by revising paragraph (b)(2)(i) to read as follows: ■ § 202.3 Registration of copyright. * * * * * (b) * * * (2) * * * (i) Electronic applications. (A) An applicant may submit an application electronically through the Copyright Office Web site [www.copyright.gov] For non-group registrations, an applicant may submit a standard electronic application, or an applicant may submit a ‘‘single’’ application. (B) A ‘‘single’’ application can be made only for a single work by a single author that is owned by the person who created it, and is not a work made for hire. The claimant and the author must be the same. A third party may remit a PO 00000 Frm 00035 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 9990 38845 ‘‘single’’ application on behalf of the author/claimant, provided that party lists itself as the correspondent. The following categories of work may not be registered using the ‘‘single’’ application: collective works, unpublished collections, units of publication, group registration options, databases, Web sites, works by more than one author, and works with more than one owner. The designation of a work as eligible for a ‘‘single’’ registration does not include work characterized as a ‘‘single work’’ under paragraph (b)(4) of this section. (C) An online submission requires a payment of the application fee through an electronic fund transfer, credit or debit card, or through a Copyright Office deposit account. (D) Deposit materials in support of an online application may be submitted electronically in a digital format (if eligible) along with the application and payment, or a remitter may send physical copies or phonorecords as necessary to satisfy the best edition requirements, by mail to the Copyright Office, using the required shipping slip generated during the online registration process. * * * * * Dated: June 24, 2013. Maria Strong, Acting General Counsel, U.S. Copyright Office. [FR Doc. 2013–15545 Filed 6–27–13; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4110–30–P E:\FR\FM\28JNR1.SGM 28JNR1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 78, Number 125 (Friday, June 28, 2013)]
[Rules and Regulations]
[Pages 38843-38845]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2013-15545]


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LIBRARY OF CONGRESS

United States Copyright Office

37 CFR Part 202

[Docket No. 2013-6]


Single Application Option

AGENCY: U.S. Copyright Office, Library of Congress.

ACTION: Interim final rule.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: The U.S. Copyright Office is amending its regulations on an 
interim basis in order to establish a new registration option called 
the ``single application.'' This application is being introduced in 
order to provide an additional option for individual authors/claimants 
registering a single (one) work that is not a work made for hire via 
the Copyright Office's electronic registration system (``eCO''). Such 
applications are the most administratively simple for the Copyright 
Office to process and may make copyright registration more attractive 
to individual authors of single works. This application option will be 
available on June 28, 2013, and the Copyright Office is inviting public 
comments during the first 60 days of its implementation. The single 
application option will cost the same--$35--as a standard electronic 
application.

DATES: Effective date: June 28, 2013. Comments date: Comments must be 
received by the Copyright Office of the General Counsel no later than 
August 28, 2013.

ADDRESSES: The Copyright Office strongly prefers that comments be 
submitted electronically. A comment page containing a comment form is 
posted on the Copyright Office Web site at http://www.copyright.gov/comments/single-application/comment-submission.html. The Web site 
interface requires submitters to complete a form specifying name and 
organization, as

[[Page 38844]]

applicable, and to upload comments as an attachment via a browse 
button. To meet accessibility standards, all comments must be uploaded 
in a single file not to exceed six megabytes (MB) in one of the 
following formats: The Portable Document File (PDF) format that 
contains searchable, accessible text (not an image); Microsoft Word; 
WordPerfect; Rich Text Format (RTF); or ASCII text file format (not a 
scanned document). The form and face of the comments must include both 
the name of the submitter and the organization. All comments will be 
posted publicly on the Copyright Office Web site exactly as they are 
received, along with names and organizations. If electronic submission 
of comments is not feasible, please contact the Copyright Office at 
(202) 707-8380 for special instructions.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Robert Kasunic, Associate Register of 
Copyrights and Director of Registration Policy & Practice, or Chris 
Weston, Attorney-Advisor, Office of the General Counsel, at (202) 707-
8380.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:

I. Background

    Prior Federal Register publications. On January 24, 2012, the 
Copyright Office (the ``Office'') published a notice of inquiry in the 
Federal Register seeking public comment on several issues (the 
``NOI''). 77 FR 3507 (Jan. 24, 2012). One--which is the subject of the 
present interim rule--was whether special consideration should be 
provided to registration of single works where the author is also the 
copyright owner and the work is not a work made for hire. (This is the 
``single application,'' as distinguished from the ``standard 
application.'') This question was asked in the context of an ongoing 
fee study by the Office. The Office received four comments to this 
notice responding to the question of a single application, all of them 
positive.
    On March 28, 2012, the Office published a comprehensive notice of 
proposed rulemaking proposing a new schedule of fees as well as 
proposing to offer a separate, easier application for ``a single author 
who is also the claimant for the online filing of a claim in a single 
work that is not a work made for hire'' (the ``NPR''). 77 FR 18743 
(Mar. 28, 2012). The notice also stated that the Office would provide 
more details on the single author/single work registration option in a 
later proposed rulemaking. The Office received 10 comments directed at 
the proposed single application. The issues raised in these comments 
are addressed below.
    Why an interim rule? As noted above, the Office previously stated 
that more details regarding the single author/single work registration 
option would be forthcoming. The present notice, then, serves the 
function of both a notice of proposed rulemaking--in that it seeks 
public comment on the rules governing the single application--and an 
interim rule--in that it simultaneously promulgates the single 
application. The Office believes that it received sufficient comment 
pursuant to its NPR that it is justified in publishing an interim rule 
regarding the implementation of the single application option. However, 
because only a description in the text of the NPR was provided, the 
Office is here providing the opportunity for the interested public to 
comment on the actual proposed text of the rule in the context of 
having the single application option available for public use and 
review. Because the rule covering this application is interim in 
nature, this allows the Office to modify it should such an action be 
warranted.

II. Discussion

    The reasons for establishing a separate single registration 
application option are spelled out in detail in the NOI. Briefly, the 
Office believes that those registration applications that take the 
least time to process should enjoy a simpler online application. The 
Office hopes that providing a simplified application option will 
encourage more individual creators to register their works.
    As initially proposed, the single application would only be 
available for ``an application to register a single work when the 
application is submitted by a person who is the sole author and the 
sole copyright owner of the work, the work is not a work made for hire, 
and the work does not contain material that was previously published or 
registered.'' 77 FR 3507 (Jan. 24, 2012). It was also suggested 
initially that the single application be available only via eCO, and 
that it may be used to register collections of works by the same 
author-claimant.
    As restated in the NPR, the single application was proposed to 
apply only to ``a single author who is also the claimant for the online 
filing of a claim in a single work that is not a work made for hire.'' 
77 FR 18743 (Mar. 28, 2012). Although the single application was 
initially conceived to require that the author, claimant, and remitter 
had to be the same individual, the Office has determined to allow a 
third party to remit a claim on behalf of an author-claimant, provided 
that the third party is also listed as the correspondent, and provided 
the claim meets the single registration requirements. The Office also 
determined that a claim for a single application may contain--but will 
not cover--material that was previously published or registered, so as 
to allow for the registration of certain derivative works.
    Based on the comments received the Office has determined that the 
following will be the boundaries of the types of claims that are 
eligible for submission using the single application to be implemented 
on June 28, 2013:
     Electronic registration only.
     Single author (does not include joint works).
     Single claimant/owner (does not include works made for 
hire or works where the claimant/owner is different from the author, 
i.e., transferred ownership).
     Single work (e.g., one song, one poem, one photograph. 
Does not include collective works, unpublished collections, units of 
publication, group registrations, databases, or Web sites).
    Regarding the requirement of one work per registration, while the 
Office is aware that many individual authors, particularly 
photographers, create multiple works that they may want to register at 
one time, registering multiple works creates a more complex 
application. A single electronic application will provide a more 
simplified registration option that would benefit the many individual 
applicants who submit such claims for registration. Any expansion 
beyond the limits listed above creates more complex applications, which 
take additional time to process, and are thus poor candidates for an 
application based on simplicity.
    This rationale applies as well to those commenters who argued that 
the single application should be available both to individual creators 
who incorporate for business reasons (e.g., an author who seeks to 
register a manuscript through a self-created corporate entity for tax 
or liability reasons) and to individuals or small businesses who 
commission works made for hire. Why, ask these commenters, are such 
authors--who are as much a part of the independent creative community 
as individuals who register their works as themselves--not also offered 
the benefit of a single application option? There should be no doubt 
that the Copyright Office agrees that works registered through a 
corporate entity or created for hire are worthy of copyright 
protection. It also recognizes that the business of creating and 
licensing creative works can be a complex one, even (or especially) for 
individuals and small businesses.

[[Page 38845]]

However, every deviation from the most simplified application, whether 
it be that the claimant is a corporation where the author is an 
individual, or the work is made for hire, creates, as noted above, more 
complexity for the registration process, and frustrates the goal of 
simplicity.
    In addition to adding regulations governing the single application, 
the Copyright Office is proposing minor technical amendments to the 
current regulation governing electronic registration in general, in 
order to clarify the requirements for sending physical copies or 
phonorecords as deposit copies. These changes appear in the new sub-
paragraph 202.3(b)(2)(i)(D).
    It is important to the Copyright Office that registration be as 
simple, equitable, and economical as possible. The Office believes that 
providing an easier option for registration for those authors who file 
the simplest kind of application is worthwhile, and may encourage 
registration and foster the development of a more robust public record.

III. Request for Comments

    The new online single registration application will appear as an 
option in eCO on June 28, 2013. The Office is providing the public an 
opportunity to comment on this implementation. The interim status of 
this rule means that it is likely to be revisited by the Copyright 
Office in the near future, which will offer the Office an opportunity 
to consider and act upon comments received.

List of Subjects in 37 CFR Part 202

    Preregistration and Registration of Claims to Copyright.

Interim Regulations

    In consideration of the foregoing, the Copyright Office amends part 
202 of 37 CFR as follows:

PART 202--PREREGISTRATION AND REGISTRATION OF CLAIMS TO COPYRIGHT

0
1. The authority section for part 202 continues to read as follows:

    Authority: 17 U.S.C. 408(f), 702


0
2. Amend Sec.  202.3 by revising paragraph (b)(2)(i) to read as 
follows:


Sec.  202.3  Registration of copyright.

* * * * *
    (b) * * *
    (2) * * *
    (i) Electronic applications. (A) An applicant may submit an 
application electronically through the Copyright Office Web site 
[www.copyright.gov] For non-group registrations, an applicant may 
submit a standard electronic application, or an applicant may submit a 
``single'' application.
    (B) A ``single'' application can be made only for a single work by 
a single author that is owned by the person who created it, and is not 
a work made for hire. The claimant and the author must be the same. A 
third party may remit a ``single'' application on behalf of the author/
claimant, provided that party lists itself as the correspondent. The 
following categories of work may not be registered using the ``single'' 
application: collective works, unpublished collections, units of 
publication, group registration options, databases, Web sites, works by 
more than one author, and works with more than one owner. The 
designation of a work as eligible for a ``single'' registration does 
not include work characterized as a ``single work'' under paragraph 
(b)(4) of this section.
    (C) An online submission requires a payment of the application fee 
through an electronic fund transfer, credit or debit card, or through a 
Copyright Office deposit account.
    (D) Deposit materials in support of an online application may be 
submitted electronically in a digital format (if eligible) along with 
the application and payment, or a remitter may send physical copies or 
phonorecords as necessary to satisfy the best edition requirements, by 
mail to the Copyright Office, using the required shipping slip 
generated during the online registration process.
* * * * *

    Dated: June 24, 2013.
Maria Strong,
Acting General Counsel, U.S. Copyright Office.
[FR Doc. 2013-15545 Filed 6-27-13; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4110-30-P