Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; Comment Request, 36205-36211 [2013-14216]

Download as PDF 36205 Federal Register / Vol. 78, No. 116 / Monday, June 17, 2013 / Notices major topics will be covered: client level process data (client experience with project services and client flow through the project), project components and activities, costs, project services alignment with client need, program outputs and outcomes, training and quality assurance, and relationships with primary partners and stakeholders. The EBP Self-Assessment will provide data needed to assess and aggregate for analyses the resources and processes required for practice implementation, whether the EBP services are being delivered in accordance with their evidence-based components and how the practices are adapted for the projects’ target populations, if relevant. The EBP Self-Assessment includes two parts. The first part is a general overview of EBP implementation and will be administered to all GBHI, CABHI, and SSH grantees (n=127). The second part is an in-depth assessment for grantees who are implementing one or more of the following EBPs: Assertive Community Treatment (ACT), Integrated Dual Disorders Treatment (IDDT), Illness Management and Recovery (IMR), Supported Employment (SE) and Critical Time Intervention (CTI). The estimated number of grantees who will complete Part Two of the EBP Assessment is 87. The PSH Self-Assessment targets the subset of grantees implementing PSH models and aims to help identify the extent to which grantees with PSH models meet the relevant dimensions of PSH. The estimated number of grantees who will complete the PSH SelfAssessment is 100. Both the EBP and PSH Self-Assessment will be web-based questionnaires. TOTAL BURDEN HOURS FOR THE HOMELESS PROGRAMS EVALUATION GRANTEE DATA COLLECTION Number of respondents Instrument/activity Project Director Telephone Follow-Up ................................. Opening Session/Project Director Interview ........................ Case Manager, Treatment, Housing Staff/Provider Interview .................................................................................. Stakeholder Interview .......................................................... Evaluator Interview .............................................................. Client Focus Group .............................................................. Cost Interview ...................................................................... EBP Self-Assessment Part 1 ............................................... EBP Self-Assessment Part 2 ............................................... PSH Self-Assessment .......................................................... TOTAL .......................................................................... Responses per respondent 158 Total number of responses Hours per response Total burden hours 1 1 158 250 3.5 3.5 553 875 f 60 127 87 100 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 375 175 60 300 60 127 87 100 2 1.5 1 1.5 2 0.58 0.5 0.67 750 262.5 60 450 120 73.66 43.5 67 g 1,048 ........................ 1,692 ........................ a 250 b 375 c 175 d 60 e 300 3,255 respondents × 25 site visits per year = 250 total respondents. respondents × 25 site visits per year = 375 total respondents. c 7 respondents × 25 site visits per year = 175 respondents. d 3 respondents × 20 site visits per year = 60 respondents (will not be conducted with PATH grantees). e 12 respondents × 25 site visits per year = 300 respondents. f 3 respondents × 20 site visits = 60 respondents (will not be conducted with PATH grantees). g Estimated number of total unique respondents; some respondents, such as project directors, will overlap across the data collection activities. a 10 b 15 Send comments to Summer King, SAMHSA Reports Clearance Officer, Room 2–1057, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, MD 20857 or email her a copy at summer.king@samhsa.hhs.gov. Written comments should be received by August 16, 2013. Summer King, Statistician. [FR Doc. 2013–14181 Filed 6–14–13; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4162–20–P DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES mstockstill on DSK4VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; Comment Request In compliance with Section 3506(c)(2)(A) of the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 concerning opportunity for public comment on proposed collections of information, the VerDate Mar<15>2010 20:38 Jun 14, 2013 Jkt 229001 Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) will publish periodic summaries of proposed projects. To request more information on the proposed projects or to obtain a copy of the information collection plans, call the SAMHSA Reports Clearance Officer on (240) 276– 1243. Comments are invited on: (a) Whether the proposed collections of information are necessary for the proper performance of the functions of the agency, including whether the information shall have practical utility; (b) the accuracy of the agency’s estimate of the burden of the proposed collection of information; (c) ways to enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the information to be collected; and (d) ways to minimize the burden of the collection of information on respondents, including through the use of automated collection techniques or other forms of information technology. PO 00000 Frm 00046 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 Proposed Project: Cross-Site Evaluation of the Garrett Lee Smith Memorial Suicide Prevention and Early Intervention Programs (OMB No. 0930– 0286)—Revision The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration’s (SAMHSA) Center for Mental Health Services (CMHS) will continue to conduct the cross-site evaluation of the Garrett Lee Smith Memorial Youth Suicide Prevention and Early Intervention State/Tribal Programs and the Garrett Lee Smith Memorial Youth Suicide Prevention Campus Programs. The data collected through the cross-site evaluation addresses four stages of program activity: (1) The context stage includes a review of program plans, such as grantee’s target population, target region, service delivery mechanisms, service delivery setting, types of program activities to be funded and evaluation activities; (2) the product stage describes the prevention strategies that are developed and utilized by grantees; (3) the process stage assesses E:\FR\FM\17JNN1.SGM 17JNN1 36206 Federal Register / Vol. 78, No. 116 / Monday, June 17, 2013 / Notices mstockstill on DSK4VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES progress on key activities and milestones related to implementation of program plans; and (4) the impact 1 stage assesses the impact of the program on early identification, referral for services, and service follow-up of youth at risk. To date, 147 State/Tribal cooperative agreement awardees and 153 Campus grantees have participated in the crosssite evaluation since FY 2005. Currently, 61 State/Tribal cooperative agreement awardees and 60 Campus grantees are participating in the crosssite evaluation. Data will continue to be collected from suicide prevention program staff (e.g., project directors, evaluators), key program stakeholders (e.g., state/local officials, child-serving agency directors, gatekeepers, mental health providers, and campus administrators), training participants, college students, and campus faculty/ staff through FY2016. Since the State/Tribal grantees differ from the Campus grantees in programmatic approaches, specific data collection activities also vary by type of program. The following describes the specific data collection activities and data collection instruments to be used across State/Tribal and Campus grantees for the cross-site evaluation. While most of the data collection instruments described below are revised versions of instruments that have previously received Office of Management and Budget approval (OMB No. 0930–0286 with Expiration Date: August 2013) and are currently in use, new instruments include: • The Training Utilization and Preservation—Survey (TUP–S): 6Month Follow-up, Adolescent, and Campus Versions • The Life skills Activities Follow-up Interview (LAI) • The Coalition Survey • The Coalition Profile • The Short Message Service Survey (SMSS) • The Student Awareness Intercept Survey (SAIS) The addition of these new data collection activities does not increase the burden associated with the cross-site 1 The evaluation as designed includes four stages (context, content, process, and impact) each of which is hinged to the fundable activities of the grantees, the research questions outlined in the evaluation statement of work, and the state of the knowledge base in the field of suicide prevention. As such, while the evaluation design does not currently include rigorous impact assessment, it does include the comparative assessment of proximal outcomes as a part of the impact stage. Hereafter, the impact stage is used as an umbrella term to cover evaluation protocols designed and implemented to understand the outcomes of the program. VerDate Mar<15>2010 20:38 Jun 14, 2013 Jkt 229001 evaluation because several lengthy instruments, as well as campus case studies, have been removed from the data collection protocol. A summary table of the number of respondents and respondent burden has also been included. Previously approved instruments that have been removed include: • The Training Exit Survey (TES) Individual Form for States/Tribes • The Suicide Prevention, Exposure, Awareness and Knowledge Survey for Students (SPEAKS–S) • The Campus Infrastructure Interviews (CIFI) • Three instruments collected by a subset of Campus grantees • The Training Utilization and Preservation Interview (TUP–I) Data Collection Activities for State/ Tribal Grantees For State/Tribal grantees, the Prevention Strategies Inventory State/ Tribal (PSI–ST) Baseline and Follow-up, Referral Network Survey (RNS), and the Training Utilization and Preservation— Survey (TUP–S–ST): State/Tribal Version described below are revised versions of instruments that previously received OMB approval (OMB No. 0930–0286 with Expiration Date: August 2013) and are currently in use. The Training Activity Summary Page State/ Tribal (TASP–ST), Early Identification, Referral and Follow-up Screening Form (EIRF–S) and the Early Identification, Referral and Follow-up Analysis (EIRF) are data collection activities that utilize existing data sources. The Training Utilization and Preservation Survey (TUP–S): 6-Month Follow-up and Adolescent Versions, the Coalition Profile, and the Coalition Survey are proposed as new data collection instruments. Prevention Strategies Inventory-State/ Tribal (PSI–ST)—Revised: The Prevention Strategies Inventory will collect information on the suicide prevention strategies that grantees have developed and utilized. Prevention strategies include outreach and awareness, gatekeeper training, assessment and referral training for mental health professionals and hotline staff, life skills development programs, screening programs, hotlines and helplines, means restriction, policies and protocols for intervention and postvention, coalitions and partnerships, and direct services and traditional healing practices. Baseline data will be collected from the State/ Tribal grantees at the beginning of their grant cycle. Thereafter, they will complete the PSI–ST on a quarterly basis over the duration of their grant PO 00000 Frm 00047 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 period. Baseline data will be collected on information on the types of prevention strategies grantees have developed and utilized, and the followup data collection asks the grantees to update the information they have provided on a quarterly basis over the period of the grant. On average, 61 State/Tribal grantees will fill out the PSI–ST per year. One respondent from each site will be responsible for completing the survey. The survey will take approximately 45 minutes; however, the number of products, services and activities implemented under each strategy will determine the number of items each respondent will complete. The PSI has been revised to include response options that better capture subpopulations targeted for prevention strategies. Response options now include the following: American Indian/Alaska Native; Survivors of Suicide; Individuals who engage in nonsuicidal self-injury; Suicide attempters; Individuals with mental and/or substance abuse disorders; Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender populations; Veterans, active military, or military families; Hispanic or Latino population. Additional guidance has also been provided for categorizing prevention strategies that fit in multiple categories. These changes enhance the utility and accuracy of the data collected. The PSI–ST primarily has multiple choice questions with several open-ended questions. Respondents for the Prevention Strategies Inventory will be project evaluators and/or program staff. Each of the 61 State/Tribal grantees will be required to complete the inventory. Training Activity Summary Page State/Tribal Version (TASP–ST)— Revised: State and Tribal grantees are required to report aggregate training participant information for all training conducted as part of their suicide prevention programs. These data are aggregated from existing data sources, some of which are attendance sheets, management information systems, etc. Grantees are responsible for aggregating these data and submitting to the crosssite evaluation team using the TASP–ST on a quarterly basis. The TASP has been revised to collect information about the settings of trainings and the training goal, as well as the follow-up plans of grantees. It is estimated that abstracting this information will take 20 minutes. Training Utilization and Preservation Survey (TUP–S): 3-Month Follow-up Version—(Revision) and 6-Month Follow-up Version—(New). The Training Utilization and Preservation Survey (TUP–S) is a quantitative, computer-assisted telephone interview. E:\FR\FM\17JNN1.SGM 17JNN1 mstockstill on DSK4VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES Federal Register / Vol. 78, No. 116 / Monday, June 17, 2013 / Notices The previously approved 3-Month Follow-up Version will be administered to a random sample of trainees 3 months following the training. A new version of the survey, the 6-Month Follow-up Version, will be administered to participants 6 months following the training. Both versions will assess trainee knowledge retention and gatekeeper behavior, particularly behavior related to identifying youth at risk. The TUP–S will ask trainees to provide demographic information about individuals they have identified as being at risk, information about the subsequent referrals or supports provided by the trainee, and any available information about services accessed by the at-risk individual. The target population of TUP–S instruments is participants in GLS sponsored trainings. The different versions of the instrument target distinct strata within that population. The State/ Tribal 3-Month Follow-up TUP–S and the 6-Month Follow-up TUP–S will target adults (18 and older) who participated in State/Tribal sponsored trainings (about 900 per grantee in FY 2012). All adult participants of GLS sponsored trainings will be administered a consent-to-contact form by the training facilitator or grantee staff during a training event. Respondents to the State/Tribal TUP–S will be asked to consent to be contacted for a second time (in 3 months). The cross-site evaluation team will select a probabilistic sample of participants who consent to be contacted on an ongoing basis, as trainings are implemented and consents received, using systematic sampling. The sample fraction will be determined and updated yearly based on the projected number of consents so as to ensure the target sample sizes per year. Changes in the sample fraction will alter inclusion probabilities and must be taken into account in the analysis across years through the use of sampling weights Target sample sizes were determined so as to afford small standard errors for the estimates of the quantities of interest in a given year considering available resources. In addition, the sample size for each version is roughly proportional to the size of the stratum they represent in FY 2012. Key survey estimates will take the form of the percentage or proportions, such as the proportion of trainees who identified a youth at risk for suicide during the 3 months after the training. In the case of the TUP–S 6Month Follow-up, the main interest is the change between administrations in these proportions of interest. Results are presented for the maximum standard VerDate Mar<15>2010 20:38 Jun 14, 2013 Jkt 229001 36207 and updated yearly based on the projected number of consents so as to ensure the target sample sizes per year. Changes in the sample fraction will alter inclusion probabilities and must be taken into account in the analysis across Target Maximum years through the use of sampling Instrument sample standard weights. version size error % Target sample sizes were determined ST TUP–S ................ 2,000 1.1 so as to afford small standard errors for the estimates of the quantities of interest ST TUP–S 6-Month Follow-up (pilot)* ... 200 5.0 in a given year considering available resources. In addition, the sample size ST TUP–S 6-Month Follow-up* ............. 600 2.9 for the Adolescent Version is roughly proportional to the size of the stratum *Note the precision here is for a difference in proportions, instead of a single proportion, it represents in FY 2012. Key survey estimates will take the form of the assuming no correlation over time. percentage or proportions, such as the An average of 2,000 participants per proportion of trainees who identified a year will be sampled for completion of youth at risk for suicide during the 3 the 3-Month Follow-up Version. The 6months after the training. Month Follow-up Version will sample 200 participants the first year and will Target Maximum Instrument increase to 600 participants in sample standard version size error % subsequent years. The two versions of the TUP–S include 25 items each and Adolescent TUP–S will take approximately 10 minutes to (pilot) ..................... 100 5.0 complete. Adolescent TUP–S ... 400 2.5 Training Utilization and Preservation Survey (TUP–S): Adolescent Version— An average of 100 respondents will be New. The one-year pilot of the sampled during the pilot year; they will Adolescent version of the Training increase to 400 participants in Utilization and Preservation—Survey subsequent years. The Adolescent will be implemented with grantees Version of the TUP–S will take sponsoring trainings for youth as part of approximately 10 minutes to complete. their grant program. Two methods to Referral Network Survey (RNS)— reach adolescents to complete the TUP– Revised: The Referral Network Survey S will be piloted: One using a Web (RNS) will be administered to survey, and another using an SMSS, or representatives of youth-serving text message, survey. The Adolescent organizations or agencies that form Version of the TUP–S will assess referral networks supporting youth adolescent trainees’ knowledge identified at risk. The RNS examines retention and gatekeeper behavior. The how collaboration and integration are adolescent version of the survey used for sharing and transferring increases the comprehensiveness of the knowledge, resources, and technology evaluation, as it allows for the collection among State/Tribal Program agencies of training utilization and retention data and organizational stakeholders, how among adolescents under the age of 18, these networks influence referral who represent more than a fifth of the mechanisms and service availability, trainees from States and Tribes, but who policies and protocols regarding followheretofore have not participated in the up for youths who have attempted TUP–S. suicide and who are at risk for suicide, The Adolescent TUP–S will target and access to electronic databases. adolescents (12 to 17) who participated Using zip code data submitted by in State and Tribal sponsored trainings grantees on the Training Activity (approximately 170 per grantee in FY Summary Page forms, cross-site 2012). Consent to contact for the evaluation staff will determine the Adolescent TUP–S will be obtained county or region where the grantee has from parent/guardians by training the greatest impact. The grantee will facilitators and/or grantee staff in then be asked to provide contact conjunction with the consent to information for at least one and up to three organizations in this county or participate in the training itself. The cross-site evaluation team will region. Cross-site evaluation staff will select a probabilistic sample of make a preliminary phone call to ask participants who consent to be these primary organizations for their contacted on an ongoing basis, as referral network. Using snowball trainings are implemented and consents sampling to determine the entire referral received, using systematic sampling. network for the county or region, crossThe sample fraction will be determined site evaluation staff will contact all errors, i.e., for a proportion close to 50%—in which the variance is the largest—and for no correlation over time in the case of the TUP–S 6-month follow-up. PO 00000 Frm 00048 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 E:\FR\FM\17JNN1.SGM 17JNN1 mstockstill on DSK4VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES 36208 Federal Register / Vol. 78, No. 116 / Monday, June 17, 2013 / Notices organizations within the referral network to conduct the Referral Network Survey. Snowball sampling will be repeated until saturation is reached. However, in large networks, four waves with an average of three referrals per wave will be conducted, for a total of 27 respondents. For these large networks, protocol will be followed: • Wave 1—grantee identifies one respondent • Wave 2—1 agency provides 3 respondents • Wave 3—3 agencies each can provide 3 more respondents • Wave 4—9 agencies can each provide 3 respondents If the participant agrees to participate in the survey during the initial phone call, respondents will be asked to provide a current email address. Once the referral network has been established, respondents will be sent an online survey. This online survey will be prefilled with the entire list of the network so respondents may select which organizations are in their direct referral network. The RNS will be administered to referral networks in years 1 and 3 of the grant. On average, 1467 respondents per year will complete the RNS. Questions on the RNS are multiple-choice, Likertscale, and open-ended. The RNS includes 57 items and will take approximately 40 minutes to complete. The RNS has undergone several changes. It has been revised to gather more detail about the type, level, and quality of collaboration between agencies, including barriers, facilitators, and outcomes of the collaboration. The mode of administration for this survey will also be changed from phone to the Web to boost response rates. Coalition Profile—New: The Coalition Profile will be administered once during the grant period to States and Tribes that report engaging in coalition building activities on the Prevention Strategies Inventory (PSI). Grantees will be asked to identify up to ten members of their coalition to participate. The Coalition Profile is a brief survey that provides a summary of the coalition’s mission and structure, and will be used in conjunction with the Coalition Survey and the Referral Network Survey. On average, 33 respondents per year will complete the Coalition Profile. The Coalition Profile includes 10 items and will take approximately 20 minutes to complete. Coalition Survey—New: The Coalition Survey will be administered to all State/ Tribal grantees that indicate participation in coalition building activities in their Prevention Strategies Inventory (PSI) once in the first year of VerDate Mar<15>2010 20:38 Jun 14, 2013 Jkt 229001 the grant, and again during the third year of grant funding. Each grantee will be asked to provide the names and contact information of up to ten individuals identified as part of the suicide prevention coalition. Respondents will be sent a link to complete the survey online. The Coalition Survey measures an organization’s involvement in grantees’ suicide prevention coalition. On average, 426 respondents per year will complete the Coalition Survey. The Coalition Survey includes 29 questions and will take approximately 40 minutes to complete. Early Identification, Referral and Follow-up Screening Form (EIRF–S)— Revised: State/Tribal grantees are also required to report screening information for all youth screened as part of their suicide prevention programs. These data are compiled from existing data sources. Grantees are responsible for compiling these data and submitting to the crosssite evaluation team using the Early Identification, Referral and Follow-up Screening Form. Grantees are required to submit information on a quarterly basis, and it is estimated that abstracting this information will take 60 minutes. The form has been modified to collect the geographical location of screening events. Early Identification, Referral and Follow-up Analyses (EIRF)—Revised: State/Tribal grantees are required to share existing data with the cross-site evaluation team on the youth identified at risk as a result of early identification activities, the types of services these youth are referred for, and whether these youth receive services within 3 months of the referral. Grantees are required to submit information on a quarterly basis, and it is estimated that grantees spend 5 hours each quarter extracting this information. The form has been modified to collect the geographical location of the setting in which the youth was identified, and the setting in which the youth received services in an effort to track service availability and accessibility. Data Collection Activities for Campuses For Campus grantees, the Prevention Strategies Inventory-Campus Baseline and Follow-up (PSI–C) and the Training Exit Survey—Campus (TES–C), are revised versions of instruments that previously received OMB approval (OMB No. 0930–0286 with Expiration Date: August 2013) and are currently in use. The Training Activity Summary Page Campus (TASP–C) and the MIS Data Collection Activity utilize existing data sources. The Life skills Activity Follow-up Interview (LAI), the Short PO 00000 Frm 00049 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 Message Service Survey (SMSS), the Student Awareness Intercept Survey (SAIS), and the Training Utilization and Preservation—Survey (TUP–S): Campus Version are proposed as new data collection instruments. Prevention Strategies InventoryCampus (PSI–C)—Revised: The Prevention Strategies Inventory will collect information on the suicide prevention strategies that grantees have developed and utilized. Prevention strategies include outreach and awareness, gatekeeper training, assessment and referral training for mental health professionals and hotline staff, life skills development activities, screening programs, hotlines and helplines, means restriction, policies and protocols for intervention and postvention, and coalitions and partnerships. The Campus grantees will first collect baseline data. Thereafter, they will collect follow-up data on a quarterly basis over the duration of their grant period. Baseline data will be collected on information on the types of prevention strategies grantees have developed and utilized, and the followup data collection asks the grantees to update the information they have provided on a quarterly basis over the period of the grant. On average, 60 Campus grantees will complete the PSI– C each year. One respondent from each site will be responsible for completing the survey. The survey will take approximately 45 minutes. However, the number of products, services and activities implemented under each strategy will determine the number of items to complete. The PSI has been revised to include response options that better capture subpopulations targeted for prevention strategies. Response options now include the following: American Indian/Alaska Native; Survivors of Suicide; Individuals who engage in nonsuicidal self-injury; Suicide attempters; Individuals with mental and/or substance abuse disorders; Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender populations; Veterans, active military, or military families; Hispanic or Latino population. Additional guidance has also been provided for categorizing prevention strategies that fit in multiple categories. These changes enhance the utility and accuracy of the data collected. The survey primarily has multiple choice questions with several open-ended questions. Respondents for the Prevention Strategies Inventory will be project evaluators and/or program staff. Each of the 60 Campus grantees will be required to complete the inventory. Training Exit Survey Campus Version (TES–C): The TES–C will be E:\FR\FM\17JNN1.SGM 17JNN1 mstockstill on DSK4VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES Federal Register / Vol. 78, No. 116 / Monday, June 17, 2013 / Notices administered to all participants in suicide prevention training activities immediately following their training experience in order to assess the content of the training, the participants’ intended use of the skills and knowledge acquired, and satisfaction with the training experience. The survey will also contain modules with questions tailored to specific types of training. Respondents will include all individuals who participate in a training activity sponsored by the 60 Campus grantees. It is estimated that approximately 37,920 trainees per year will respond to the Training Exit Survey. This estimate is based on data previously collected which indicate that Campus sites train a mean of 632 participants per year. Because the respondents to the survey represent the entire trainee population in each grantee site, there is no need for calculation of precision of point estimates for survey responses. The number of respondents will be sufficient to conduct assessments of the psychometric properties of the scales developed for this study both within and across grantee sites. The questions on the TES– C are multiple-choice, Likert-scale, and open-ended. The survey includes about 33 items and will take approximately 10 minutes to complete. Training Activity Summary Page Campus Version (TASP–C)—Revised: State and Tribal grantees are required to report aggregate training participant information for all training conducted as part of their suicide prevention programs. These data are aggregated from existing data sources, some of which are attendance sheets, management information systems, etc. Grantees are responsible for aggregating these data and submitting to the crosssite evaluation team using the TASP–C data elements. Grantees are responsible for aggregating these data and submitting to the cross-site evaluation team using the TASP–C on a quarterly basis. The TASP has been revised to collect information about the settings of trainings and the training goal, as well as the follow-up plans of grantees. It is estimated that abstracting this information will take 20 minutes. Training Utilization and Preservation—Survey (TUP–S): Campus Version—New. The Training Utilization and Preservation—Survey (TUP–S): Campus Version collects information about the utilization and retention of participants’ knowledge, skills and/or techniques learned through trainings conducted on campuses. It will be administered to a random sample of training participants 3 months following the training to students who VerDate Mar<15>2010 20:38 Jun 14, 2013 Jkt 229001 36209 form indicating their willingness to be contacted to participate in the LAI and return the form to local program staff. Key informants for the LAI will be randomly selected from those individuals who consent to be contacted by the cross-site evaluation team. Local program staff will forward the consentto-contact forms to the cross-site evaluation team. Up to seven respondents from each of the five selected trainings will be randomly selected from among the potential respondents based on consent-to-contact information, for a total of up to 35 respondents per year. Interviews will be conducted within 3 months of completion of the training activity. It is estimated that seven respondents per grantee will be sufficient to ensure saturation of themes in the content analysis of results from the qualitative interviews. The LAI will take approximately 30 minutes to complete. This instrument will be administered to up to 7 trainees from up to 5 selected campus trainings per year, for a total of up to 35 respondents per year. The LAI will take approximately 30 minutes to complete. Short Message Service Survey (SMSS)—New: The Short Message Service Survey (SMSS) will be administered to a random sample of students, once in the first year of the grant, and again in the third year. The Maximum four-question text message survey will Target standard assess student exposure to and Instrument version sample error size participation in suicide prevention (%) activities on campus, and will collect information on suicidal ideation. The Campus TUP–S (pilot) ..................... 100 5.0 target population is students enrolled in Campus TUP–S ........ 500 2.2 each Campus at years 1 and 3 of the grant funding. Each year, the list of This version of the TUP–S will be mobile phone numbers for all students piloted for 1 year. During the first pilot will be obtained from each campus. A year, 100 respondents will participate. random sample of mobile phone On average, in subsequent years, 500 numbers will be selected. The target respondents will participate in the number of respondents will be 100 per TUP–S: Campus Version. This campus. It is expected that 1,000 mobile instrument includes 25 items and will phone numbers will be required to take approximately 10 minutes to achieve 100 responses. The list of complete. mobile phone numbers from year 3 will Life skills Activities Follow-up be compared to that of year 1 to identify Interview (LAI)—New: The Life skills a stratum of mobile phone numbers Activities Follow-up Interview (LAI) present both years and to determine its will be administered to randomly relative size. Respondents in year 1 will selected participants of selected Campus be contacted again in year 3 if their trainings. This qualitative interview will mobile phone number is still present in address how students apply the skills the year 3 list. Oversampling mobile and information learned through phone numbers present in both years campus life skills and wellness will result in a more precise estimate of activities aimed at enhancing protective change. On average, 5,200 students per factors. The cross-site evaluation team, year will participate in the SMSS, in consultation with local program staff, which takes approximately 5 minutes to will select five particular training complete. activities per year in which to Student Awareness Intercept Survey administer the LAI. Trainees will be (SAIS)—New: Respondents for the SAIS asked to complete consent-to-contact will represent a sample of the student participated in a GLS sponsored training (about 450 per grantee in FY 2012). All student (over the age of 18) participants of GLS sponsored trainings will be administered a consent-to-contact form by the training facilitator or grantee staff during a training event. The cross-site evaluation team will select a probabilistic sample of participants who consent to be contacted on an ongoing basis, as trainings are implemented and consents received, using systematic sampling. The sample fraction will be determined and updated yearly based on the projected number of consents so as to ensure the target sample sizes per year. Changes in the sample fraction will alter inclusion probabilities and must be taken into account in the analysis across years through the use of sampling weights. The target sample size was determined so as to afford small standard errors for the estimates of the quantities of interest in a given year considering available resources. In addition, the sample size for the Campus version is roughly proportional to the size of the stratum they represent in FY 2012. Key survey estimates will take the form of the percentage or proportions, such as the proportion of trainees who identified a youth at risk for suicide during the 3 months after the training. PO 00000 Frm 00050 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 E:\FR\FM\17JNN1.SGM 17JNN1 36210 Federal Register / Vol. 78, No. 116 / Monday, June 17, 2013 / Notices population at up to four selected campuses. Campuses implementing targeted suicide prevention campaigns will be identified and selected by reviewing grant applications and through technical assistance activities. A sampling plan to obtain 400 student respondents at up to four participating campuses will be developed by the cross-site evaluation team in conjunction with the campus project team using geographical and temporal sampling frames of student activity. Working with the campus grantee, the evaluation team will recruit respondents utilizing a systematic process that randomly selects campus locations and times. For the follow-up administration, the same sample size will be targeted. However, that sample will result from a combination of follow-up interviews with students from the initial sample, in combination with students newly recruited through an intercept procedure similar to the procedure. The SAIS will collect information about: Exposure to suicide prevention outreach and awareness initiatives with targeted student populations; awareness of appropriate crisis interventions, supports, services, and resources for mental health seeking; knowledge of myths and facts related to suicide and suicide prevention; and attitudes toward mental health seeking, access, and utilization of mental health services on campus. A follow-up version of the survey will be administered 3 months after baseline. On average, 1,600 students per year will participate in the SAIS, which takes approximately 60 minutes to complete. MIS Data Abstraction—Revised: For the cross-site evaluation of the Campus programs, existing program data related to student retention rates, student use of mental health services, and student use of emergency services will be requested from Campuses once a year. The form has been modified to allow grantees to capture data on the number of attempted or completed suicides among students who live on and off campus. It is estimated that abstracting this information will take 20 minutes. Internet-based technology will continue to be used for collecting data via Web-based surveys, and for data entry and management. The average annual respondent burden is estimated below. TABLE 1—ESTIMATES OF ANNUALIZED HOUR BURDEN State/Tribal Cross-Site Evaluation Instruments Instrument Project Evaluator ........ Adolescents (Trainees) Provider (Trainees) ..... Provider (Stakeholder) Project Evaluator ........ Provider (Stakeholder) Project Evaluator ........ Project Evaluator ........ Project Evaluator ........ mstockstill on DSK4VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES Responses per respondent 61 4 244 0.75 2,000 1 2000 300 1 467 Prevention Strategies Inventory—State Tribal (PSI–ST). Training Utilization and Preservation Survey (TUP–S). Training Utilization and Preservation Survey (TUP–S). Training Utilization and Preservation Survey (TUP–S): 6-Month Follow-up. Referral Network Survey (RNS). Coalition Profile (CP) .. Coalition Survey (CS) Early Identification, Referral and Followup Analysis (EIRF). Early Identification, Referral and Followup Screening Form (EIRF–S). Training Activity Summary Page (TASP– ST). Provider (Trainees) ..... VerDate Mar<15>2010 20:38 Jun 14, 2013 Jkt 229001 Total number of responses Number of respondents Type of respondent PO 00000 Hourly wage rate ($) Total cost ($) 183 37.82 6,922 0.16 320 21.35 6,832 300 0.16 48 7.25 348 1 1,467 0.16 75 21.35 1,602 1,426 1 1426 0.67 956 21.35 20,411 33 426 61 1 1 4 33 426 244 0.33 0.67 5 11 286 1,220 37.82 21.35 37.82 417 6,107 46,141 27 4 108 1 108 37.82 4,085 61 4 244 81 37.82 3,064 Frm 00051 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 9990 Burden per response (hours) E:\FR\FM\17JNN1.SGM .33 17JNN1 Annual burden (hours) Federal Register / Vol. 78, No. 116 / Monday, June 17, 2013 / Notices The estimate reflects the average annual number of respondents, the average annual number of responses, the time it will take for each response, and the average annual burden. While the different cohorts of grantees finish their grants at different times, it is assumed that new cohorts will replace previous cohorts. Therefore, the number of grantees in each year is assumed to be constant. Send comments to Summer King, SAMHSA Reports Clearance Officer, Room 2–1057, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, MD 20857 or email her a copy at summer.king@samhsa.hhs.gov. Written comments should be received by August 16, 2013. Summer King, Statistician. [FR Doc. 2013–14216 Filed 6–14–13; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4162–20–P DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY [DHS Docket No. ICEB–2013–0001] Extension of Employment Authorization for Syrian F–1 Nonimmigrant Students Experiencing Severe Economic Hardship as a Direct Result of Civil Unrest in Syria Since March 2011 U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), DHS. AGENCY: Notice. This notice informs the public of the extension of an earlier notice, which suspended certain requirements for F–1 nonimmigrant students whose country of citizenship is Syria and who are experiencing severe economic hardship as a direct result of the civil unrest in Syria since March 2011. This notice extends the effective date of that notice. SUMMARY: This notice is effective June 17, 2013 and will remain in effect through March 31, 2015. DATES: mstockstill on DSK4VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Louis Farrell, Director, Student and Exchange Visitor Program; MS 5600, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement; 500 12th Street SW., Washington, DC 20536–5600; (703) 603– 3400. This is not a toll-free number. Program information can be found at https://www.ice.gov/sevis/. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: VerDate Mar<15>2010 20:38 Jun 14, 2013 Jkt 229001 The Secretary of Homeland Security is exercising her authority under 8 CFR 214.2(f)(9) to extend the temporary suspension of the applicability of certain requirements governing oncampus and off-campus employment for F–1 nonimmigrant students whose country of citizenship is Syria and who are experiencing severe economic hardship as a direct result of the civil unrest in Syria since March 2011. See 77 FR 20038 (Apr. 3, 2012). The original notice was effective from April 3, 2012 until October 3, 2013. Effective with this publication, suspension of the requirements is extended for 18 months from October 3, 2013 through March 31, 2015. F–1 nonimmigrant students granted employment authorization through the notice will continue to be deemed to be engaged in a ‘‘full course of study’’ for the duration of their employment authorization, provided they satisfy the minimum course load requirement described in 77 FR 20038. See 8 CFR 214.2(f)(6)(i)(F). Who is covered under this action? RIN 1653–ZA05 ACTION: What action is DHS taking under this notice? This notice applies exclusively to F– 1 nonimmigrant students whose country of citizenship is Syria and who were lawfully present in the United States in F–1 nonimmigrant status on April 3, 2012 under section 101(a)(15)(F)(i) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA), 8 U.S.C. 1101(a)(15)(F)(i), and (1) are enrolled in an institution that is Student and Exchange Visitor Program (SEVP)-certified for enrollment of F–1 students, (2) are currently maintaining F–1 status, and (3) are experiencing severe economic hardship as a direct result of the civil unrest in Syria since March 2011. This notice applies to both undergraduate and graduate students, as well as elementary school, middle school, and high school students. The notice, however, applies differently to elementary school, middle school, and high school students (see the discussion published at 77 FR 20040 in the question, ‘‘Does this notice apply to elementary school, middle school, and high school students in F–1 status?’’). F–1 students covered by this notice who transfer to other academic institutions that are SEVP-certified for enrollment of F–1 students remain eligible for the relief provided by means of this notice. temporary relief to F–1 nonimmigrant students whose country of citizenship is Syria and who were experiencing severe economic hardship as a result of the civil unrest in Syria since March 2011. See 77 FR 20038. It enabled these F–1 students to obtain employment authorization, work an increased number of hours while school was in session, and reduce their course load, while continuing to maintain their F–1 student status. Syria continues to experience civil unrest, with many people still displaced as a result. Furthermore, economic sanctions imposed by the international community have negatively affected the whole of the Syrian economy. Given the current conditions in Syria, affected students whose primary means of financial support comes from Syria may need to be exempt from the normal student employment requirements to be able to continue their studies in the United States and meet basic living expenses. The United States is committed to continuing to assist the people of Syria. DHS is therefore extending this employment authorization for F–1 nonimmigrant students whose country of citizenship is Syria and who are experiencing severe economic hardship as a result of the civil unrest since March 2011. How do I apply for an employment authorization under the circumstances of this notice? F–1 nonimmigrant students whose country of citizenship is Syria who were lawfully present in the United States on April 3, 2012 and are experiencing severe economic hardship as a result of the civil unrest may apply for employment authorization under the guidelines described in 77 FR 20038. This notice extends the time period during which such F–1 students may seek employment authorization due to the civil unrest. It does not impose any new or additional policies or procedures beyond those listed in the original notice. All interested F–1 students should follow the instructions listed in the original notice. Janet Napolitano, Secretary. [FR Doc. 2013–14102 Filed 6–14–13; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 9111–28–P Why is DHS taking this action? The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) took action to provide PO 00000 Frm 00052 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 9990 36211 E:\FR\FM\17JNN1.SGM 17JNN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 78, Number 116 (Monday, June 17, 2013)]
[Notices]
[Pages 36205-36211]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2013-14216]


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DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration


Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; 
Comment Request

    In compliance with Section 3506(c)(2)(A) of the Paperwork Reduction 
Act of 1995 concerning opportunity for public comment on proposed 
collections of information, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health 
Services Administration (SAMHSA) will publish periodic summaries of 
proposed projects. To request more information on the proposed projects 
or to obtain a copy of the information collection plans, call the 
SAMHSA Reports Clearance Officer on (240) 276-1243.
    Comments are invited on: (a) Whether the proposed collections of 
information are necessary for the proper performance of the functions 
of the agency, including whether the information shall have practical 
utility; (b) the accuracy of the agency's estimate of the burden of the 
proposed collection of information; (c) ways to enhance the quality, 
utility, and clarity of the information to be collected; and (d) ways 
to minimize the burden of the collection of information on respondents, 
including through the use of automated collection techniques or other 
forms of information technology.

Proposed Project: Cross-Site Evaluation of the Garrett Lee Smith 
Memorial Suicide Prevention and Early Intervention Programs (OMB No. 
0930-0286)--Revision

    The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration's 
(SAMHSA) Center for Mental Health Services (CMHS) will continue to 
conduct the cross-site evaluation of the Garrett Lee Smith Memorial 
Youth Suicide Prevention and Early Intervention State/Tribal Programs 
and the Garrett Lee Smith Memorial Youth Suicide Prevention Campus 
Programs. The data collected through the cross-site evaluation 
addresses four stages of program activity: (1) The context stage 
includes a review of program plans, such as grantee's target 
population, target region, service delivery mechanisms, service 
delivery setting, types of program activities to be funded and 
evaluation activities; (2) the product stage describes the prevention 
strategies that are developed and utilized by grantees; (3) the process 
stage assesses

[[Page 36206]]

progress on key activities and milestones related to implementation of 
program plans; and (4) the impact \1\ stage assesses the impact of the 
program on early identification, referral for services, and service 
follow-up of youth at risk.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \1\ The evaluation as designed includes four stages (context, 
content, process, and impact) each of which is hinged to the 
fundable activities of the grantees, the research questions outlined 
in the evaluation statement of work, and the state of the knowledge 
base in the field of suicide prevention. As such, while the 
evaluation design does not currently include rigorous impact 
assessment, it does include the comparative assessment of proximal 
outcomes as a part of the impact stage. Hereafter, the impact stage 
is used as an umbrella term to cover evaluation protocols designed 
and implemented to understand the outcomes of the program.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    To date, 147 State/Tribal cooperative agreement awardees and 153 
Campus grantees have participated in the cross-site evaluation since FY 
2005. Currently, 61 State/Tribal cooperative agreement awardees and 60 
Campus grantees are participating in the cross-site evaluation. Data 
will continue to be collected from suicide prevention program staff 
(e.g., project directors, evaluators), key program stakeholders (e.g., 
state/local officials, child-serving agency directors, gatekeepers, 
mental health providers, and campus administrators), training 
participants, college students, and campus faculty/staff through 
FY2016.
    Since the State/Tribal grantees differ from the Campus grantees in 
programmatic approaches, specific data collection activities also vary 
by type of program. The following describes the specific data 
collection activities and data collection instruments to be used across 
State/Tribal and Campus grantees for the cross-site evaluation. While 
most of the data collection instruments described below are revised 
versions of instruments that have previously received Office of 
Management and Budget approval (OMB No. 0930-0286 with Expiration Date: 
August 2013) and are currently in use, new instruments include:

 The Training Utilization and Preservation--Survey (TUP-S): 6-
Month Follow-up, Adolescent, and Campus Versions
 The Life skills Activities Follow-up Interview (LAI)
 The Coalition Survey
 The Coalition Profile
 The Short Message Service Survey (SMSS)
 The Student Awareness Intercept Survey (SAIS)

    The addition of these new data collection activities does not 
increase the burden associated with the cross-site evaluation because 
several lengthy instruments, as well as campus case studies, have been 
removed from the data collection protocol. A summary table of the 
number of respondents and respondent burden has also been included.
    Previously approved instruments that have been removed include:
     The Training Exit Survey (TES) Individual Form for States/
Tribes
     The Suicide Prevention, Exposure, Awareness and Knowledge 
Survey for Students (SPEAKS-S)
     The Campus Infrastructure Interviews (CIFI)
     Three instruments collected by a subset of Campus grantees
     The Training Utilization and Preservation Interview (TUP-
I)

Data Collection Activities for State/Tribal Grantees

    For State/Tribal grantees, the Prevention Strategies Inventory 
State/Tribal (PSI-ST) Baseline and Follow-up, Referral Network Survey 
(RNS), and the Training Utilization and Preservation--Survey (TUP-S-
ST): State/Tribal Version described below are revised versions of 
instruments that previously received OMB approval (OMB No. 0930-0286 
with Expiration Date: August 2013) and are currently in use. The 
Training Activity Summary Page State/Tribal (TASP-ST), Early 
Identification, Referral and Follow-up Screening Form (EIRF-S) and the 
Early Identification, Referral and Follow-up Analysis (EIRF) are data 
collection activities that utilize existing data sources. The Training 
Utilization and Preservation Survey (TUP-S): 6-Month Follow-up and 
Adolescent Versions, the Coalition Profile, and the Coalition Survey 
are proposed as new data collection instruments.
    Prevention Strategies Inventory-State/Tribal (PSI-ST)--Revised: The 
Prevention Strategies Inventory will collect information on the suicide 
prevention strategies that grantees have developed and utilized. 
Prevention strategies include outreach and awareness, gatekeeper 
training, assessment and referral training for mental health 
professionals and hotline staff, life skills development programs, 
screening programs, hotlines and helplines, means restriction, policies 
and protocols for intervention and postvention, coalitions and 
partnerships, and direct services and traditional healing practices. 
Baseline data will be collected from the State/Tribal grantees at the 
beginning of their grant cycle. Thereafter, they will complete the PSI-
ST on a quarterly basis over the duration of their grant period. 
Baseline data will be collected on information on the types of 
prevention strategies grantees have developed and utilized, and the 
follow-up data collection asks the grantees to update the information 
they have provided on a quarterly basis over the period of the grant. 
On average, 61 State/Tribal grantees will fill out the PSI-ST per year. 
One respondent from each site will be responsible for completing the 
survey. The survey will take approximately 45 minutes; however, the 
number of products, services and activities implemented under each 
strategy will determine the number of items each respondent will 
complete. The PSI has been revised to include response options that 
better capture subpopulations targeted for prevention strategies. 
Response options now include the following: American Indian/Alaska 
Native; Survivors of Suicide; Individuals who engage in nonsuicidal 
self-injury; Suicide attempters; Individuals with mental and/or 
substance abuse disorders; Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender 
populations; Veterans, active military, or military families; Hispanic 
or Latino population. Additional guidance has also been provided for 
categorizing prevention strategies that fit in multiple categories. 
These changes enhance the utility and accuracy of the data collected. 
The PSI-ST primarily has multiple choice questions with several open-
ended questions. Respondents for the Prevention Strategies Inventory 
will be project evaluators and/or program staff. Each of the 61 State/
Tribal grantees will be required to complete the inventory.
    Training Activity Summary Page State/Tribal Version (TASP-ST)--
Revised: State and Tribal grantees are required to report aggregate 
training participant information for all training conducted as part of 
their suicide prevention programs. These data are aggregated from 
existing data sources, some of which are attendance sheets, management 
information systems, etc. Grantees are responsible for aggregating 
these data and submitting to the cross-site evaluation team using the 
TASP-ST on a quarterly basis. The TASP has been revised to collect 
information about the settings of trainings and the training goal, as 
well as the follow-up plans of grantees. It is estimated that 
abstracting this information will take 20 minutes.
    Training Utilization and Preservation Survey (TUP-S): 3-Month 
Follow-up Version--(Revision) and 6-Month Follow-up Version--(New). The 
Training Utilization and Preservation Survey (TUP-S) is a quantitative, 
computer-assisted telephone interview.

[[Page 36207]]

The previously approved 3-Month Follow-up Version will be administered 
to a random sample of trainees 3 months following the training. A new 
version of the survey, the 6-Month Follow-up Version, will be 
administered to participants 6 months following the training. Both 
versions will assess trainee knowledge retention and gatekeeper 
behavior, particularly behavior related to identifying youth at risk. 
The TUP-S will ask trainees to provide demographic information about 
individuals they have identified as being at risk, information about 
the subsequent referrals or supports provided by the trainee, and any 
available information about services accessed by the at-risk 
individual.
    The target population of TUP-S instruments is participants in GLS 
sponsored trainings. The different versions of the instrument target 
distinct strata within that population. The State/Tribal 3-Month 
Follow-up TUP-S and the 6-Month Follow-up TUP-S will target adults (18 
and older) who participated in State/Tribal sponsored trainings (about 
900 per grantee in FY 2012). All adult participants of GLS sponsored 
trainings will be administered a consent-to-contact form by the 
training facilitator or grantee staff during a training event. 
Respondents to the State/Tribal TUP-S will be asked to consent to be 
contacted for a second time (in 3 months).
    The cross-site evaluation team will select a probabilistic sample 
of participants who consent to be contacted on an ongoing basis, as 
trainings are implemented and consents received, using systematic 
sampling. The sample fraction will be determined and updated yearly 
based on the projected number of consents so as to ensure the target 
sample sizes per year. Changes in the sample fraction will alter 
inclusion probabilities and must be taken into account in the analysis 
across years through the use of sampling weights
    Target sample sizes were determined so as to afford small standard 
errors for the estimates of the quantities of interest in a given year 
considering available resources. In addition, the sample size for each 
version is roughly proportional to the size of the stratum they 
represent in FY 2012. Key survey estimates will take the form of the 
percentage or proportions, such as the proportion of trainees who 
identified a youth at risk for suicide during the 3 months after the 
training. In the case of the TUP-S 6-Month Follow-up, the main interest 
is the change between administrations in these proportions of interest. 
Results are presented for the maximum standard errors, i.e., for a 
proportion close to 50%--in which the variance is the largest--and for 
no correlation over time in the case of the TUP-S 6-month follow-up.

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                      Target    Maximum
                Instrument  version                   sample    standard
                                                       size     error %
------------------------------------------------------------------------
ST TUP-S..........................................      2,000        1.1
ST TUP-S 6-Month Follow-up (pilot)*...............        200        5.0
ST TUP-S 6-Month Follow-up*.......................        600        2.9
------------------------------------------------------------------------
*Note the precision here is for a difference in proportions, instead of
  a single proportion, assuming no correlation over time.

    An average of 2,000 participants per year will be sampled for 
completion of the 3-Month Follow-up Version. The 6-Month Follow-up 
Version will sample 200 participants the first year and will increase 
to 600 participants in subsequent years. The two versions of the TUP-S 
include 25 items each and will take approximately 10 minutes to 
complete.
    Training Utilization and Preservation Survey (TUP-S): Adolescent 
Version--New. The one-year pilot of the Adolescent version of the 
Training Utilization and Preservation--Survey will be implemented with 
grantees sponsoring trainings for youth as part of their grant program. 
Two methods to reach adolescents to complete the TUP-S will be piloted: 
One using a Web survey, and another using an SMSS, or text message, 
survey. The Adolescent Version of the TUP-S will assess adolescent 
trainees' knowledge retention and gatekeeper behavior. The adolescent 
version of the survey increases the comprehensiveness of the 
evaluation, as it allows for the collection of training utilization and 
retention data among adolescents under the age of 18, who represent 
more than a fifth of the trainees from States and Tribes, but who 
heretofore have not participated in the TUP-S.
    The Adolescent TUP-S will target adolescents (12 to 17) who 
participated in State and Tribal sponsored trainings (approximately 170 
per grantee in FY 2012). Consent to contact for the Adolescent TUP-S 
will be obtained from parent/guardians by training facilitators and/or 
grantee staff in conjunction with the consent to participate in the 
training itself.
    The cross-site evaluation team will select a probabilistic sample 
of participants who consent to be contacted on an ongoing basis, as 
trainings are implemented and consents received, using systematic 
sampling. The sample fraction will be determined and updated yearly 
based on the projected number of consents so as to ensure the target 
sample sizes per year. Changes in the sample fraction will alter 
inclusion probabilities and must be taken into account in the analysis 
across years through the use of sampling weights.
    Target sample sizes were determined so as to afford small standard 
errors for the estimates of the quantities of interest in a given year 
considering available resources. In addition, the sample size for the 
Adolescent Version is roughly proportional to the size of the stratum 
it represents in FY 2012. Key survey estimates will take the form of 
the percentage or proportions, such as the proportion of trainees who 
identified a youth at risk for suicide during the 3 months after the 
training.

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                      Target    Maximum
                Instrument  version                   sample    standard
                                                       size     error %
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Adolescent TUP-S (pilot)..........................        100        5.0
Adolescent TUP-S..................................        400        2.5
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    An average of 100 respondents will be sampled during the pilot 
year; they will increase to 400 participants in subsequent years. The 
Adolescent Version of the TUP-S will take approximately 10 minutes to 
complete.
    Referral Network Survey (RNS)--Revised: The Referral Network Survey 
(RNS) will be administered to representatives of youth-serving 
organizations or agencies that form referral networks supporting youth 
identified at risk. The RNS examines how collaboration and integration 
are used for sharing and transferring knowledge, resources, and 
technology among State/Tribal Program agencies and organizational 
stakeholders, how these networks influence referral mechanisms and 
service availability, policies and protocols regarding follow-up for 
youths who have attempted suicide and who are at risk for suicide, and 
access to electronic databases. Using zip code data submitted by 
grantees on the Training Activity Summary Page forms, cross-site 
evaluation staff will determine the county or region where the grantee 
has the greatest impact. The grantee will then be asked to provide 
contact information for at least one and up to three organizations in 
this county or region. Cross-site evaluation staff will make a 
preliminary phone call to ask these primary organizations for their 
referral network. Using snowball sampling to determine the entire 
referral network for the county or region, cross-site evaluation staff 
will contact all

[[Page 36208]]

organizations within the referral network to conduct the Referral 
Network Survey. Snowball sampling will be repeated until saturation is 
reached. However, in large networks, four waves with an average of 
three referrals per wave will be conducted, for a total of 27 
respondents. For these large networks, protocol will be followed:
     Wave 1--grantee identifies one respondent
     Wave 2--1 agency provides 3 respondents
     Wave 3--3 agencies each can provide 3 more respondents
     Wave 4--9 agencies can each provide 3 respondents
    If the participant agrees to participate in the survey during the 
initial phone call, respondents will be asked to provide a current 
email address. Once the referral network has been established, 
respondents will be sent an online survey. This online survey will be 
prefilled with the entire list of the network so respondents may select 
which organizations are in their direct referral network.
    The RNS will be administered to referral networks in years 1 and 3 
of the grant. On average, 1467 respondents per year will complete the 
RNS. Questions on the RNS are multiple-choice, Likert-scale, and open-
ended. The RNS includes 57 items and will take approximately 40 minutes 
to complete. The RNS has undergone several changes. It has been revised 
to gather more detail about the type, level, and quality of 
collaboration between agencies, including barriers, facilitators, and 
outcomes of the collaboration. The mode of administration for this 
survey will also be changed from phone to the Web to boost response 
rates.
    Coalition Profile--New: The Coalition Profile will be administered 
once during the grant period to States and Tribes that report engaging 
in coalition building activities on the Prevention Strategies Inventory 
(PSI). Grantees will be asked to identify up to ten members of their 
coalition to participate. The Coalition Profile is a brief survey that 
provides a summary of the coalition's mission and structure, and will 
be used in conjunction with the Coalition Survey and the Referral 
Network Survey. On average, 33 respondents per year will complete the 
Coalition Profile. The Coalition Profile includes 10 items and will 
take approximately 20 minutes to complete.
    Coalition Survey--New: The Coalition Survey will be administered to 
all State/Tribal grantees that indicate participation in coalition 
building activities in their Prevention Strategies Inventory (PSI) once 
in the first year of the grant, and again during the third year of 
grant funding. Each grantee will be asked to provide the names and 
contact information of up to ten individuals identified as part of the 
suicide prevention coalition. Respondents will be sent a link to 
complete the survey online. The Coalition Survey measures an 
organization's involvement in grantees' suicide prevention coalition. 
On average, 426 respondents per year will complete the Coalition 
Survey. The Coalition Survey includes 29 questions and will take 
approximately 40 minutes to complete.
    Early Identification, Referral and Follow-up Screening Form (EIRF-
S)--Revised: State/Tribal grantees are also required to report 
screening information for all youth screened as part of their suicide 
prevention programs. These data are compiled from existing data 
sources. Grantees are responsible for compiling these data and 
submitting to the cross-site evaluation team using the Early 
Identification, Referral and Follow-up Screening Form. Grantees are 
required to submit information on a quarterly basis, and it is 
estimated that abstracting this information will take 60 minutes. The 
form has been modified to collect the geographical location of 
screening events.
    Early Identification, Referral and Follow-up Analyses (EIRF)--
Revised: State/Tribal grantees are required to share existing data with 
the cross-site evaluation team on the youth identified at risk as a 
result of early identification activities, the types of services these 
youth are referred for, and whether these youth receive services within 
3 months of the referral. Grantees are required to submit information 
on a quarterly basis, and it is estimated that grantees spend 5 hours 
each quarter extracting this information. The form has been modified to 
collect the geographical location of the setting in which the youth was 
identified, and the setting in which the youth received services in an 
effort to track service availability and accessibility.

Data Collection Activities for Campuses

    For Campus grantees, the Prevention Strategies Inventory-Campus 
Baseline and Follow-up (PSI-C) and the Training Exit Survey--Campus 
(TES-C), are revised versions of instruments that previously received 
OMB approval (OMB No. 0930-0286 with Expiration Date: August 2013) and 
are currently in use. The Training Activity Summary Page Campus (TASP-
C) and the MIS Data Collection Activity utilize existing data sources. 
The Life skills Activity Follow-up Interview (LAI), the Short Message 
Service Survey (SMSS), the Student Awareness Intercept Survey (SAIS), 
and the Training Utilization and Preservation--Survey (TUP-S): Campus 
Version are proposed as new data collection instruments.
    Prevention Strategies Inventory-Campus (PSI-C)--Revised: The 
Prevention Strategies Inventory will collect information on the suicide 
prevention strategies that grantees have developed and utilized. 
Prevention strategies include outreach and awareness, gatekeeper 
training, assessment and referral training for mental health 
professionals and hotline staff, life skills development activities, 
screening programs, hotlines and helplines, means restriction, policies 
and protocols for intervention and postvention, and coalitions and 
partnerships. The Campus grantees will first collect baseline data. 
Thereafter, they will collect follow-up data on a quarterly basis over 
the duration of their grant period. Baseline data will be collected on 
information on the types of prevention strategies grantees have 
developed and utilized, and the follow-up data collection asks the 
grantees to update the information they have provided on a quarterly 
basis over the period of the grant. On average, 60 Campus grantees will 
complete the PSI-C each year. One respondent from each site will be 
responsible for completing the survey. The survey will take 
approximately 45 minutes. However, the number of products, services and 
activities implemented under each strategy will determine the number of 
items to complete. The PSI has been revised to include response options 
that better capture subpopulations targeted for prevention strategies. 
Response options now include the following: American Indian/Alaska 
Native; Survivors of Suicide; Individuals who engage in nonsuicidal 
self-injury; Suicide attempters; Individuals with mental and/or 
substance abuse disorders; Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender 
populations; Veterans, active military, or military families; Hispanic 
or Latino population. Additional guidance has also been provided for 
categorizing prevention strategies that fit in multiple categories. 
These changes enhance the utility and accuracy of the data collected. 
The survey primarily has multiple choice questions with several open-
ended questions. Respondents for the Prevention Strategies Inventory 
will be project evaluators and/or program staff. Each of the 60 Campus 
grantees will be required to complete the inventory.
    Training Exit Survey Campus Version (TES-C): The TES-C will be

[[Page 36209]]

administered to all participants in suicide prevention training 
activities immediately following their training experience in order to 
assess the content of the training, the participants' intended use of 
the skills and knowledge acquired, and satisfaction with the training 
experience. The survey will also contain modules with questions 
tailored to specific types of training. Respondents will include all 
individuals who participate in a training activity sponsored by the 60 
Campus grantees. It is estimated that approximately 37,920 trainees per 
year will respond to the Training Exit Survey. This estimate is based 
on data previously collected which indicate that Campus sites train a 
mean of 632 participants per year. Because the respondents to the 
survey represent the entire trainee population in each grantee site, 
there is no need for calculation of precision of point estimates for 
survey responses. The number of respondents will be sufficient to 
conduct assessments of the psychometric properties of the scales 
developed for this study both within and across grantee sites. The 
questions on the TES-C are multiple-choice, Likert-scale, and open-
ended. The survey includes about 33 items and will take approximately 
10 minutes to complete.
    Training Activity Summary Page Campus Version (TASP-C)--Revised: 
State and Tribal grantees are required to report aggregate training 
participant information for all training conducted as part of their 
suicide prevention programs. These data are aggregated from existing 
data sources, some of which are attendance sheets, management 
information systems, etc. Grantees are responsible for aggregating 
these data and submitting to the cross-site evaluation team using the 
TASP-C data elements. Grantees are responsible for aggregating these 
data and submitting to the cross-site evaluation team using the TASP-C 
on a quarterly basis. The TASP has been revised to collect information 
about the settings of trainings and the training goal, as well as the 
follow-up plans of grantees. It is estimated that abstracting this 
information will take 20 minutes.
    Training Utilization and Preservation--Survey (TUP-S): Campus 
Version--New. The Training Utilization and Preservation--Survey (TUP-
S): Campus Version collects information about the utilization and 
retention of participants' knowledge, skills and/or techniques learned 
through trainings conducted on campuses. It will be administered to a 
random sample of training participants 3 months following the training 
to students who participated in a GLS sponsored training (about 450 per 
grantee in FY 2012). All student (over the age of 18) participants of 
GLS sponsored trainings will be administered a consent-to-contact form 
by the training facilitator or grantee staff during a training event. 
The cross-site evaluation team will select a probabilistic sample of 
participants who consent to be contacted on an ongoing basis, as 
trainings are implemented and consents received, using systematic 
sampling. The sample fraction will be determined and updated yearly 
based on the projected number of consents so as to ensure the target 
sample sizes per year. Changes in the sample fraction will alter 
inclusion probabilities and must be taken into account in the analysis 
across years through the use of sampling weights.
    The target sample size was determined so as to afford small 
standard errors for the estimates of the quantities of interest in a 
given year considering available resources. In addition, the sample 
size for the Campus version is roughly proportional to the size of the 
stratum they represent in FY 2012. Key survey estimates will take the 
form of the percentage or proportions, such as the proportion of 
trainees who identified a youth at risk for suicide during the 3 months 
after the training.

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                      Target    Maximum
                Instrument version                    sample    standard
                                                       size    error (%)
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Campus TUP-S (pilot)..............................        100        5.0
Campus TUP-S......................................        500        2.2
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    This version of the TUP-S will be piloted for 1 year. During the 
first pilot year, 100 respondents will participate. On average, in 
subsequent years, 500 respondents will participate in the TUP-S: Campus 
Version. This instrument includes 25 items and will take approximately 
10 minutes to complete.
    Life skills Activities Follow-up Interview (LAI)--New: The Life 
skills Activities Follow-up Interview (LAI) will be administered to 
randomly selected participants of selected Campus trainings. This 
qualitative interview will address how students apply the skills and 
information learned through campus life skills and wellness activities 
aimed at enhancing protective factors. The cross-site evaluation team, 
in consultation with local program staff, will select five particular 
training activities per year in which to administer the LAI. Trainees 
will be asked to complete consent-to-contact form indicating their 
willingness to be contacted to participate in the LAI and return the 
form to local program staff. Key informants for the LAI will be 
randomly selected from those individuals who consent to be contacted by 
the cross-site evaluation team. Local program staff will forward the 
consent-to-contact forms to the cross-site evaluation team. Up to seven 
respondents from each of the five selected trainings will be randomly 
selected from among the potential respondents based on consent-to-
contact information, for a total of up to 35 respondents per year. 
Interviews will be conducted within 3 months of completion of the 
training activity. It is estimated that seven respondents per grantee 
will be sufficient to ensure saturation of themes in the content 
analysis of results from the qualitative interviews. The LAI will take 
approximately 30 minutes to complete.
    This instrument will be administered to up to 7 trainees from up to 
5 selected campus trainings per year, for a total of up to 35 
respondents per year. The LAI will take approximately 30 minutes to 
complete.
    Short Message Service Survey (SMSS)--New: The Short Message Service 
Survey (SMSS) will be administered to a random sample of students, once 
in the first year of the grant, and again in the third year. The four-
question text message survey will assess student exposure to and 
participation in suicide prevention activities on campus, and will 
collect information on suicidal ideation. The target population is 
students enrolled in each Campus at years 1 and 3 of the grant funding. 
Each year, the list of mobile phone numbers for all students will be 
obtained from each campus. A random sample of mobile phone numbers will 
be selected. The target number of respondents will be 100 per campus. 
It is expected that 1,000 mobile phone numbers will be required to 
achieve 100 responses. The list of mobile phone numbers from year 3 
will be compared to that of year 1 to identify a stratum of mobile 
phone numbers present both years and to determine its relative size. 
Respondents in year 1 will be contacted again in year 3 if their mobile 
phone number is still present in the year 3 list. Oversampling mobile 
phone numbers present in both years will result in a more precise 
estimate of change. On average, 5,200 students per year will 
participate in the SMSS, which takes approximately 5 minutes to 
complete.
    Student Awareness Intercept Survey (SAIS)--New: Respondents for the 
SAIS will represent a sample of the student

[[Page 36210]]

population at up to four selected campuses. Campuses implementing 
targeted suicide prevention campaigns will be identified and selected 
by reviewing grant applications and through technical assistance 
activities. A sampling plan to obtain 400 student respondents at up to 
four participating campuses will be developed by the cross-site 
evaluation team in conjunction with the campus project team using 
geographical and temporal sampling frames of student activity. Working 
with the campus grantee, the evaluation team will recruit respondents 
utilizing a systematic process that randomly selects campus locations 
and times. For the follow-up administration, the same sample size will 
be targeted. However, that sample will result from a combination of 
follow-up interviews with students from the initial sample, in 
combination with students newly recruited through an intercept 
procedure similar to the procedure. The SAIS will collect information 
about: Exposure to suicide prevention outreach and awareness 
initiatives with targeted student populations; awareness of appropriate 
crisis interventions, supports, services, and resources for mental 
health seeking; knowledge of myths and facts related to suicide and 
suicide prevention; and attitudes toward mental health seeking, access, 
and utilization of mental health services on campus. A follow-up 
version of the survey will be administered 3 months after baseline. On 
average, 1,600 students per year will participate in the SAIS, which 
takes approximately 60 minutes to complete.
    MIS Data Abstraction--Revised: For the cross-site evaluation of the 
Campus programs, existing program data related to student retention 
rates, student use of mental health services, and student use of 
emergency services will be requested from Campuses once a year. The 
form has been modified to allow grantees to capture data on the number 
of attempted or completed suicides among students who live on and off 
campus. It is estimated that abstracting this information will take 20 
minutes.
    Internet-based technology will continue to be used for collecting 
data via Web-based surveys, and for data entry and management. The 
average annual respondent burden is estimated below.

                                                      Table 1--Estimates of Annualized Hour Burden
                                                     State/Tribal Cross-Site Evaluation Instruments
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                   Responses      Total      Burden per    Annual     Hourly
           Type of respondent                    Instrument           Number of       per       number of     response     burden   wage rate    Total
                                                                     respondents   respondent   responses     (hours)     (hours)      ($)      cost ($)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Project Evaluator......................  Prevention Strategies                61            4          244         0.75        183      37.82      6,922
                                          Inventory--State Tribal
                                          (PSI-ST).
Provider (Trainees)....................  Training Utilization and          2,000            1         2000         0.16        320      21.35      6,832
                                          Preservation Survey (TUP-
                                          S).
Adolescents (Trainees).................  Training Utilization and            300            1          300         0.16         48       7.25        348
                                          Preservation Survey (TUP-
                                          S).
Provider (Trainees)....................  Training Utilization and            467            1        1,467         0.16         75      21.35      1,602
                                          Preservation Survey (TUP-
                                          S): 6-Month Follow-up.
Provider (Stakeholder).................  Referral Network Survey           1,426            1         1426         0.67        956      21.35     20,411
                                          (RNS).
Project Evaluator......................  Coalition Profile (CP)....           33            1           33         0.33         11      37.82        417
Provider (Stakeholder).................  Coalition Survey (CS).....          426            1          426         0.67        286      21.35      6,107
Project Evaluator......................  Early Identification,                61            4          244         5         1,220      37.82     46,141
                                          Referral and Follow-up
                                          Analysis (EIRF).
Project Evaluator......................  Early Identification,                27            4          108         1           108      37.82      4,085
                                          Referral and Follow-up
                                          Screening Form (EIRF-S).
Project Evaluator......................  Training Activity Summary            61            4          244          .33         81      37.82      3,064
                                          Page (TASP-ST).
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


[[Page 36211]]

    The estimate reflects the average annual number of respondents, the 
average annual number of responses, the time it will take for each 
response, and the average annual burden. While the different cohorts of 
grantees finish their grants at different times, it is assumed that new 
cohorts will replace previous cohorts. Therefore, the number of 
grantees in each year is assumed to be constant.
    Send comments to Summer King, SAMHSA Reports Clearance Officer, 
Room 2-1057, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, MD 20857 or email her a 
copy at summer.king@samhsa.hhs.gov. Written comments should be received 
by August 16, 2013.

Summer King,
Statistician.
[FR Doc. 2013-14216 Filed 6-14-13; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4162-20-P