National Industrial Security Program Policy Advisory Committee (NISPPAC), 6636-6637 [2011-2729]

Download as PDF emcdonald on DSK2BSOYB1PROD with NOTICES 6636 Federal Register / Vol. 76, No. 25 / Monday, February 7, 2011 / Notices containing copies of economic statistical information from contributing Federal agencies. Record copies of the information are maintained permanently in the agencies that created them. 6. Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (N1–567–11–2, 3 items, 3 temporary items). Master files of an electronic information system containing immigration surety bond submissions by bondsman and verifications of eligibility for release on bond. 7. Department of the Interior, National Business Center (N1–48–10–4, 4 items, 4 temporary items). Records relating to general management activities including vital records plans, memorandums of agreements, and continuity of operations plans. 8. Department of the Interior, Office of Insular Affairs (N1–48–10–5, 1 item, 1 temporary item). Grant case files relating to administrative activities in coordinating Federal policy in American Samoa, Guam, the Virgin Islands, and Northern Marianas. 9. Department of Justice, Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives (N1–436–11–1, 1 item, 1 temporary item). Certificates of Origin for new vehicles ordered by the agency. 10. Department of Labor, Executive Secretariat (N1–174–09–4, 1 item, 1 temporary item). Master files of an electronic information management system used to manage electronic images of internal and external correspondence. 11. Department of the Navy, Naval Criminal Investigative Service (DAA– 0526–2010–1, 1 item, 1 temporary item). Reports of assessments and surveys relating to the security of ports, bases, and other installations. 12. Department of State, Bureau of Administration (N1–59–10–22, 2 items, 1 temporary item). Records relating to administrative activities of the Deputy Assistant Secretary (DAS) for Global Information Services. Includes correspondence, reports, presentations, and background materials. Proposed for permanent retention are DAS Program Files. 13. Department of Transportation, Federal Aviation Administration (N1– 237–11–1, 3 items, 3 temporary items). Case files relating to fees imposed by public airport agencies to plan, design, and build airport infrastructure improvements and other related records. 14. Department of the Treasury, Internal Revenue Service (N1–58–10– 17, 1 item, 1 temporary item). Official forms used to apply to assist nonresident and resident aliens and foreign VerDate Mar<15>2010 17:16 Feb 04, 2011 Jkt 223001 investors in obtaining an Individual Taxpayer Identification Number. 15. Department of the Treasury, Internal Revenue Service (N1–58–10– 18, 4 items, 4 temporary items). Master file, outputs, and system documentation of and electronic information system used to reformat and transfer taxpayer information. 16. Department of the Treasury, Internal Revenue Service (N1–58–10– 19, 1 item, 1 temporary item). Copies of official forms used to report violations of financial recordkeeping and reporting regulations. 17. Department of the Treasury, Internal Revenue Service (N1–58–10– 20, 1 item, 1 temporary item). Records of the Adjusted Gross Income (AGI) Data Sharing Project, including consent forms authorizing the agency to compile and share data with the Department of Agriculture. 18. Department of the Treasury, Internal Revenue Service (N1–58–10– 22, 2 items, 2 temporary items). Master files and system documentation of an electronic information system used to detect potential unauthorized access to the agency’s systems. 19. Commodity Futures Trading Commission, Agency-wide (N1–180– 09–1, 6 items, 6 temporary items). Administrative policies, procedures, badging, and security system records. 20. Commodity Futures Trading Commission, Agency-wide (N1–180– 09–3, 15 items, 14 temporary items). Electronic data and other records associated with an electronic information system that enables the agency to analyze the composition of the market. Proposed for permanent retention are reports generated by the system. 21. National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Agency-wide (N1–255– 09–2, 1 item, 1 temporary item). Records relating to general employee suggestions, including background papers, suggestions, approvals, disapprovals, and review processes. 22. National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Agency-wide (N1–255– 09–3, 4 items, 3 temporary items). Records relating to NASA training activities, including calendars, schedules, announcements, course descriptions, test results, and certifications. Proposed for permanent retention are unique training materials related to NASA space missions. 23. National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Agency-wide (N1–255– 10–1, 8 items, 5 temporary items). Records relating to scientific and technical publications including background papers, local reports, and duplicate copies of reports and PO 00000 Frm 00041 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 publications. Proposed for permanent retention are original publications, scientific and technical databases, and public and internal awareness publications. 24. National Reconnaissance Office, Agency-wide (N1–525–10–3, 1 item, 1 temporary item). Records relating to administrative appeals to release or access information. 25. Pretrial Services Agency, Office of Operations (N1–562–10–2, 1 item, 1 temporary item). Administrative log sheets used to capture daily administration of processes for preparing defendants for court appearances. 26. U.S. International Trade Commission, Office of the Chief Information Officer (N1–81–10–1, 8 items, 4 temporary items). Records include investigative files, audit resolution files, inspection reports, work papers, and administrative documents. Proposed for permanent retention are investigative files with significant historical value, final audit and inspection reports with significant historical value, peer reviews, and semiannual management reports. 27. Department of the Army, Agencywide (N1–AU–11–17, 1 item, 1 temporary item). Master files of an electronic information system containing assignment information and personnel data of senior officer personnel and civilian executives. Dated: January 31, 2011. Michael J. Kurtz, Assistant Archivist for Records Services— Washington, DC. [FR Doc. 2011–2734 Filed 2–4–11; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 7515–01–P NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION Information Security Oversight Office National Industrial Security Program Policy Advisory Committee (NISPPAC) Information Security Oversight Office, National Archives and Records Administration. ACTION: Notice of meeting. AGENCY: In accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act (5 U.S.C. app 2) and implementing regulation 41 CFR 101–6, announcement is made for the following committee meeting. To discuss National Industrial Security Program policy matters. SUMMARY: The meeting will be held on March 3, 2011, from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. DATES: E:\FR\FM\07FEN1.SGM 07FEN1 Federal Register / Vol. 76, No. 25 / Monday, February 7, 2011 / Notices National Archives and Records Administration, 700 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW., Archivist’s Reception Room, Room 105, Washington, DC 20408. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: This meeting will be open to the public. However, due to space limitations and access procedures, the name and telephone number of individuals planning to attend must be submitted to the Information Security Oversight Office (ISOO) no later than Friday, February 25, 2011. ISOO will provide additional instructions for gaining access to the location of the meeting. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: David O. Best, Senior Program Analyst, ISOO, National Archives Building, 700 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW., Washington, DC 20408, telephone number (202) 357–5123, or at david.best@nara.gov. Contact ISOO at ISOO@nara.gov and the NISPPAC at NISPPAC@nara.gov. ADDRESS: Dated: February 2, 2011. Mary Ann Hadyka, Committee Management Officer. [FR Doc. 2011–2729 Filed 2–4–11; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 7515–01–P NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION Sunshine Act Notice; Cancellation of Meeting 5:30 p.m., Wednesday, February 2, 2011. PLACE: Board Room, 7th Floor, Room 7047, 1775 Duke Street, Alexandria, VA 22314–3428. STATUS: Closed. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Mary Rupp, Secretary of the Board, Telephone: 703–518–6304. TIME AND DATE: Mary Rupp, Board Secretary. [FR Doc. 2011–2697 Filed 2–3–11; 11:15 am] BILLING CODE P NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION emcdonald on DSK2BSOYB1PROD with NOTICES Assumption Buster Workshop: Defense-in-Depth Is a Smart Investment for Cyber Security The National Coordination Office (NCO) for the Networking and Information Technology Research and Development (NITRD) Program. ACTION: Call for participation. AGENCY: FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: assumptionbusters@nitrd.gov. VerDate Mar<15>2010 17:16 Feb 04, 2011 Jkt 223001 Workshop: March 22, 2011; Deadline: February 10, 2011. Apply via e-mail to assumptionbusters@nitrd.gov Travel expenses will be paid for selected participants who live more than 50 miles from Washington DC, up to the limits established by Federal Government travel regulations and restrictions. SUMMARY: The NCO, on behalf of the Special Cyber Operations Research and Engineering (SCORE) Committee, an interagency working group that coordinates cyber security research activities in support of national security systems, is seeking expert participants in a day-long workshop on the pros and cons of the Defense-in-Depth strategy for cyber security. The workshop will be held March 22, 2011 in the Washington DC area. Applications will be accepted until 5 p.m. EST February 10, 2011. Accepted participants will be notified by February 28, 2011. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Overview: This notice is issued by the National Coordination Office for the Networking and Information Technology Research and Development (NITRD) Program on behalf of the SCORE Committee. Background: There is a strong and often repeated call for research to provide novel cyber security solutions. The rhetoric of this call is to elicit new solutions that are radically different from existing solutions. Continuing research that achieves only incremental improvements is a losing proposition. We are lagging behind and need technological leaps to get, and keep, ahead of adversaries who are themselves rapidly improving attack technology. To answer this call, we must examine the key assumptions that underlie current security architectures. Challenging those assumptions both opens up the possibilities for novel solutions that are rooted in a fundamentally different understanding of the problem and provides an even stronger basis for moving forward on those assumptions that are well-founded. The SCORE Committee is conducting a series of four workshops to begin the assumption buster process. The assumptions that underlie this series are that cyber space is an adversarial domain, that the adversary is tenacious, clever, and capable, and that re-examining cyber security solutions in the context of these assumptions will result in key insights that will lead to the novel solutions we desperately need. To ensure that our discussion has the requisite adversarial flavor, we are inviting researchers who develop solutions of the type under discussion, and researchers who exploit DATES: PO 00000 Frm 00042 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 6637 these solutions. The goal is to engage in robust debate of topics generally believed to be true to determine to what extent that claim is warranted. The adversarial nature of these debates is meant to ensure the threat environment is reflected in the discussion in order to elicit innovative research concepts that will have a greater chance of having a sustained positive impact on our cyber security posture. The first topic to be explored in this series is ‘‘Defense-in-Depth Is a Smart Investment.’’ The workshop on this topic will be held in the Washington DC area on March 22, 2011. Assertion: ‘‘Defense-in-Depth is a smart investment because it provides an environment in which we can safely and securely conduct computing functions and achieve mission success.’’ This assertion reflects a commonly held viewpoint that Defense-in-Depth is a smart investment for achieving perfect safety/security in computing. To analyze this statement we must look at it from two perspectives. First, we need to determine how the cyber security community developed confidence in Defense-in-Depth despite mounting evidence of its limitations, and second, we must look at the mechanisms in place to evaluate the cost/benefit of implementing Defense-in-Depth that layers mechanisms of uncertain effectiveness. Initially developed by the military for perimeter protection, Defense-in-Depth was adopted by the National Security Agency (NSA) for main-frame computer system protection. The Defense-inDepth strategy was designed to provide multiple layers of security mechanisms focusing on people, technology, and operations (including physical security) in order to achieve robust information assurance (IA).1 Today’s highly networked computing environments, however, have significantly changed the cyber security calculus, and Defense-inDepth has struggled to keep pace with change. Over time, it became evident that Defense-in-Depth failed to provide information assurance against all but the most elementary threats, in the process putting at risk mission essential functions. The 2009 White House Cyberspace Policy Review called for ‘‘changes in technology’’ to protect cyberspace, and the 2010 DHS DOD MOA sought to ‘‘aid in preventing, detecting, mitigating and recovering from the effects of an attack,’’ suggesting 1 Defense-in-Depth: A practical strategy for achieving Information Assurance in today’s highly networked environments. E:\FR\FM\07FEN1.SGM 07FEN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 76, Number 25 (Monday, February 7, 2011)]
[Notices]
[Pages 6636-6637]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2011-2729]


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NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION

Information Security Oversight Office


National Industrial Security Program Policy Advisory Committee 
(NISPPAC)

AGENCY: Information Security Oversight Office, National Archives and 
Records Administration.

ACTION: Notice of meeting.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: In accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act (5 
U.S.C. app 2) and implementing regulation 41 CFR 101-6, announcement is 
made for the following committee meeting. To discuss National 
Industrial Security Program policy matters.

DATES: The meeting will be held on March 3, 2011, from 10 a.m. to 12 
p.m.

[[Page 6637]]


ADDRESS: National Archives and Records Administration, 700 Pennsylvania 
Avenue, NW., Archivist's Reception Room, Room 105, Washington, DC 
20408.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: This meeting will be open to the public. 
However, due to space limitations and access procedures, the name and 
telephone number of individuals planning to attend must be submitted to 
the Information Security Oversight Office (ISOO) no later than Friday, 
February 25, 2011. ISOO will provide additional instructions for 
gaining access to the location of the meeting.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: David O. Best, Senior Program Analyst, 
ISOO, National Archives Building, 700 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW., 
Washington, DC 20408, telephone number (202) 357-5123, or at 
david.best@nara.gov. Contact ISOO at ISOO@nara.gov and the NISPPAC at 
NISPPAC@nara.gov.

    Dated: February 2, 2011.
Mary Ann Hadyka,
Committee Management Officer.
[FR Doc. 2011-2729 Filed 2-4-11; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 7515-01-P