Business Development Mission to Egypt and Morocco, 58353-58356 [2010-23967]

Download as PDF Federal Register / Vol. 75, No. 185 / Friday, September 24, 2010 / Notices minimum mesh size for the Loligo fishery. This exemption was requested to allow completion of the project’s remaining four research trips using the previous minimum mesh size of 1 7/8 in. (48 mm). A change to the nets used to conduct field sampling at this stage of the project would undermine data analysis in support of the project’s objectives. Therefore, NMFS is reissuing the EFP in support of the drop chain study to facilitate the completion of the research project. The revised EFP includes an exemption from the Loligo Trimester III minimum mesh size of 2 1/8 in. (54 mm) at § 648.23(3). An exemption from the Loligo mesh size restriction will allow the completion of the project’s remaining research trips, using the previous minimum mesh size of 1 7/8 in. (48 mm). The exemption is within the scope and scale of the original approved EFP, and the overall impacts of research operations are unchanged from the initial review. The applicants may request minor modifications and extensions to the EFP throughout the course of research. EFP modifications and extensions may be granted without further public notice if they are deemed essential to facilitate completion of the proposed research and result in only a minimal change in the scope or impacts of the initially approved EFP request. Authority: 16 U.S.C. 1801 et seq. Dated: September 21, 2010. Carrie Selberg, Acting Director, Office of Sustainable Fisheries, National Marine Fisheries Service. [FR Doc. 2010–24022 Filed 9–23–10; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 3510–22–S DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Bureau of the Census 2010 Census Advisory Committee Bureau of the Census, Department of Commerce. ACTION: Notice of public meeting. AGENCY: The Bureau of the Census (Census Bureau) is giving notice of a meeting of the 2010 Census Advisory Committee. The Committee will address policy, research, and technical issues related to 2010 Decennial Census Programs and the American Community Survey. Last-minute changes to the agenda are possible, which could prevent giving advance notification of schedule changes. DATES: October 21–22, 2010. On October 21, the meeting will begin at approximately 8:30 a.m. and end at srobinson on DSKHWCL6B1PROD with NOTICES SUMMARY: VerDate Mar<15>2010 16:12 Sep 23, 2010 Jkt 220001 approximately 5 p.m. On October 22, the meeting will begin at approximately 8:30 a.m. and end at approximately 12:30 p.m. The meeting will be held at the U.S. Census Bureau Auditorium and Conference Center, 4600 Silver Hill Road, Suitland, Maryland 20746. ADDRESSES: Jeri Green, Committee Liaison Officer, Department of Commerce, U.S. Census Bureau, Room 8H182, 4600 Silver Hill Road, Suitland, MD 20746, telephone 301–763–6590. For TTY callers, please use the Federal Relay Service 1–800– 877–8339. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: The 2010 Census Advisory Committee is composed of a Chair, Vice-Chair, and 20-member organizations—all appointed by the Secretary of Commerce. The Committee considers the goals of the Decennial Census, including the American Community Survey and related programs, and users’ needs for information provided by the Decennial Census from the perspective of outside data users and other organizations having a substantial interest and expertise in the conduct and outcome of the Decennial Census. The Committee has been established in accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Title 5, United States Code, Appendix 2, Section10(a)(b)). The meeting is open to the public, and a brief period is set aside for public comments and questions. However, individuals with extensive statements for the record must submit them in writing to the Census Bureau Committee Liaison Officer named above at least three working days prior to the meeting. Seating is available to the public on a first-come, first-served basis. The meeting is physically accessible to people with disabilities. Requests for sign language interpretation or other auxiliary aids should be directed to the Census Bureau Committee Liaison Officer as soon as known, and preferably two weeks prior to the meeting. Due to increased security and for access to the meeting, please call 301– 763–9906 upon arrival at the Census Bureau on the day of the meeting. A photo ID must be presented in order to receive your visitor’s badge. Visitors are not allowed beyond the first floor. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Dated: September 20, 2010. Robert M. Groves, Director, Bureau of the Census. [FR Doc. 2010–23925 Filed 9–23–10; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 3510–07–P PO 00000 Frm 00007 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 58353 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration Business Development Mission to Egypt and Morocco Mission Description The U.S. Department of Commerce, International Trade Administration, and U.S. Commercial Service is organizing a Business Development Mission to explore ports and infrastructure development opportunities in Egypt (Cairo and Alexandria) and Morocco (Casablanca and Tangier), March 25— April 1, 2011. This mission, led by a Senior Official of the Department of Commerce or other U.S. agency, will focus on the opportunities in port logistics, infrastructure projects, safety and security, and energy infrastructure. The mission will include one-on-one business appointments with prescreened potential buyers, agents, distributors and joint venture partners; site visits to ports and free trade zones, meetings with government officials, and networking receptions for companies interested in expansion into the North African, Middle Eastern and Southern European markets. Commercial Setting Egypt Egypt is strategically located at the gateway of trade and commerce for Southern Europe as well as North Africa and the Middle East. It is a prime location for the transit of goods, as well as a key destination for American companies seeking to do business in Egypt and the region. With a population of over 80 million Egypt is the largest Arab country, and the fourth largest export market for U.S. products and services in the Middle East. The U.S. is Egypt’s largest bilateral trading partner, and the second largest investor. In 2010, bilateral trade is expected to exceed $7 billion. The Egyptian gross domestic product (GDP) grew over five percent from 2009 to 2010. The financial sector escaped many negative impacts of the global financial crisis, due to Egypt’s improved banking supervision, conservative lending practices and central bank guarantee of all bank deposits. In 2010 the Egyptian Ministry of Investment announced major plans for infrastructure development with 46 different projects valued at over $16 billion. The majority of these projects are available to be awarded based on the Egyptian Government’s ‘‘Public Private Partnership’’ (PPP) measures. The PPP is a multi-faceted initiative to attract private sector investment for E:\FR\FM\24SEN1.SGM 24SEN1 58354 Federal Register / Vol. 75, No. 185 / Friday, September 24, 2010 / Notices infrastructure projects and U.S. companies are eligible to bid on them. Trade Mission participants will be briefed by Egyptian Government officials on these projects and the PPP program. In addition, meetings will be arranged with companies that have already been awarded the designated infrastructure projects in order to identify supplier contacts. Morocco Morocco is the only African country to have a Free Trade Agreement (FTA) with the U.S. Since the FTA went into effect in 2006, U.S. exports to Morocco have tripled to $1.6 billion. Morocco has aggressively developed the infrastructure to become a gateway to North Africa and the European Union. The Port of Tanger-Med, soon to be Africa’s largest port, is located only eight miles from Europe, at the northern tip of Africa where the Mediterranean Sea meets the Atlantic Ocean. TangerMed already offers direct shipping from Houston, Mobile, Jacksonville, Miami, Savannah, Charleston, and Norfolk. This strategically located port offers free trade zones, including the Auto Zone dedicated to auto parts, and direct distribution systems onward to the European Union, the Middle East, and North Africa. The Trade Mission coincides with the Tanger Mediterranean Special Agency’s (TMSA) fourth annual MedLog Conference (Conference), March 31— April 1, 2011. TMSA is responsible for all Tanger-Med building projects, port operations, and management of the free trade zones. Mission participants will meet buyers of safety and security, and vessel management equipment, and conduct one-on-one business appointments with officials who purchase products and services for the port facilities. In addition, meetings will be arranged with companies that have already been awarded the designated infrastructure projects in order to identify supplier contacts. tons per year, which represents about 60 percent of Egypt’s trade. Port projects will include a new container terminal and container-handling piers, new storage facilities and handling equipment and improvements to wharfs and marinas. To address overall port efficiency, there is a growing demand for improved Management Information Systems and Terminal Operating Systems. These include systems for financial management, port engineering, cargo tracking, cargo and container tracking and transfer, gate control, and procurement. U.S. companies can also participate as providers for shipping agents, warehousing, stevedoring, container handling, port management and consulting. Additionally, there is a need for heavy equipment to handle bulk cargo for loading large shipments of minerals and other commodities. Morocco Construction of Tanger-Med II, an additional set of cargo terminals and storage, is currently underway and the port will begin issuing tenders for equipment and services in the next 12–18 months. As part of a national logistics program, the Moroccan government recently announced a 20-year, $13 billion project to build port, rail, highway, and airport logistics centers, with port management, vessel tracking and management, cold storage, warehousing, railways, bridges, and distribution centers. Government tenders are now being issued for these projects, and the plans are to spend $7 billion on the project by 2015. Examples of planned port projects include: • A $69 million project to convert the old port, located near the City of Tangier, into a tourist center and passenger terminal. • Nador West Med, a new industrial port for the coastal city of Nador. Infrastructure Projects Egypt Port Logistics srobinson on DSKHWCL6B1PROD with NOTICES Best Sector Prospects The Government of Egypt directed $2.6 billion to Egypt’s infrastructure in 2008, $1.4 billion in 2009, and $1.9 billion in 2010. With a growing number of tourists, there has been increased pressure on Egypt’s roads, bridges, railroads, power stations, water and sewage, hospitals, and schools. As a result, construction is one of the most active sectors of the Egyptian economy, contributing about six percent of GDP and accounting for eight percent of employment in 2009. Examples of planned infrastructure projects include: Egypt The mission will include briefings in Cairo by representatives of the major firms involved in port activities in Egypt, and a visit to the port of Alexandria. Egypt has 3,500 kilometers of navigable waterways and the Government considers the maintenance and expansion of its ports a top priority. The port of Alexandria, the largest of the country’s nine ports, was recently revamped, resulting in an increased cargo handling capacity of 44 million VerDate Mar<15>2010 16:12 Sep 23, 2010 Jkt 220001 PO 00000 Frm 00008 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 • The Rod El Farag-6th of October Highway, at $545 million. • The Cairo-10th of Ramadan City Railway Line, at $727 million. • A special economic zone in the Gulf of Suez, at $1.45 billion. • A water treatment station in the Red Sea, at $400 million. Morocco Morocco has multi-billion-dollar construction projects in many sectors. Opportunities exist in port construction and logistics facilities, hotels and resorts, road construction and equipment, airports, hospitals and clinics, municipal buildings, renewable power plants (particularly solar and wind), waste management plants, schools and universities, water management plants, and architecture. Examples of upcoming infrastructure projects include design and construction of: • A high-speed rail line from Tangier to Casablanca, with $4.5 billion to be spent by 2015. • An $830 million light rail line around Casablanca. • 60 dams at $1.47 billion. • Water desalination plants at $1.22 billion. • Highway systems in Rabat, Tit Mellil-Berrechid and El Jadida-Safi at $1.7 billion. • Low-cost housing of 130,000 units at $1.9 billion. • New passenger and cargo rail stations for Marrakesh and Casablanca. Safety/Security Egypt In addition to Alexandria, Egypt has eight major ports and three crosscountry borders that require significant security measures. In its fight against drug smuggling and counterfeit products, Egypt requires container scanning and shipment tracking devices. Egypt is also looking at container scanning upgrades and seafarer identification cards for more secure identification and synchronizing systems to coordinate security measures and responses. Accordingly, opportunities exist for U.S firms providing short-range radar systems, surveillance cameras, infrared and radiological detectors, and vessel tracking maritime information systems, biometric scanners, personnel databases, computer peripherals, and systems integration equipment. Morocco Tangier is the closest land access point between Africa and Europe, creating a need for cargo and passenger E:\FR\FM\24SEN1.SGM 24SEN1 Federal Register / Vol. 75, No. 185 / Friday, September 24, 2010 / Notices control/tracking systems, surveillance equipment including sonar and radar, biometric passport technologies, and other equipment used in the fight against drug trafficking, smuggling and counter terrorism. The military and police agencies are purchasing safety and security equipment for protecting Morocco’s two vast coastlines and remote national borders. Energy Infrastructure Egypt Egypt is one of the largest electrical energy producing countries in the Middle East. Over the next ten years, Egypt plans to expand its electricity capacity to 40,000 megawatts through a combination of traditional, renewable, and nuclear energy production to diversify energy resources and preserve the country’s limited oil and gas reserves. Opportunities exist for U.S. providers of wind turbines, blades, and other equipment, as well as development and project management. Best prospects in the energy sector include circuit breakers of more than 66kv, nuclear-related consultation and generation equipment and peripherals; power transformers of more than 25MVA–66kva; power transmission lines; turbine generator units with associated equipment; and vibration dampers. 25 26 27 28 29 30 Morocco As industry grows in Morocco, there is an increasing need for coal and gasfired energy plants. A $2.7 billion coal-fired power plant (1320 megawatts) is planned for the coastal city of Safi and $450 million will be used specifically for clean coal technology. Opportunities also exist for equipment and services in solar and wind energy. Five new wind farms will be built by 2020 to supply 2000 megawatts of electricity. In late 2009, Morocco announced a $9 billion solar energy program and established a Solar Energy Agency. Engineering, construction, procurement and, and management opportunities also exist. Mission Goals The goal of the trade mission is to provide U.S. participants with firsthand market information, access to government decision makers as appropriate and one-on-one meetings with business contacts, including potential agents, distributors and partners, so they can position themselves to enter or expand their presence in the Egyptian and Moroccan markets. Mission Scenario The Trade Mission will include four stops: Cairo and Alexandria, Egypt, Friday ........................... Saturday ....................... Sunday ......................... Monday ........................ Tuesday ....................... Wednesday .................. March March March March March March ..................... ..................... ..................... ..................... ..................... ..................... Thursday ...................... March 31 ..................... Friday ........................... Saturday ....................... April 1 .......................... April 2 .......................... srobinson on DSKHWCL6B1PROD with NOTICES Participation Requirements All parties interested in participating in the Trade Mission to Egypt and Morocco must complete and submit an application package for consideration by the U.S. Department of Commerce. All applicants will be evaluated on their ability to meet certain conditions and best satisfy the selection criteria as outlined below. This mission is designed for a minimum of 12 and a maximum of 25 companies to participate in the mission from the applicant pool. U.S. companies already doing business in the target markets as well as U.S. companies seeking to enter VerDate Mar<15>2010 16:12 Sep 23, 2010 Jkt 220001 Fees and Expenses After a company has been selected to participate on the mission, a payment to the U.S. Department of Commerce in the form of a participation fee is required. The participation fee will be $2,950 for a small or medium-sized enterprise (SME) * and $3,850 for large firms. The * An SME is defined as a firm with 500 or fewer employees or that otherwise qualifies as a small business under SBA regulations (see http:// www.sba.gov/services/contracting opportunities/ sizestandardstopics/index.html). Parent companies, affiliates, and subsidiaries will be considered when determining business size. The dual pricing reflects the Commercial Service’s user fee schedule that PO 00000 March 25–28, and Casablanca and Tangier, Morocco, March 29–April 1. Cairo is the capital of Egypt and the largest city in Africa. A majority of the nation’s commerce is generated in Cairo and regional headquarters of numerous businesses and organizations are located in the city. Alexandria is the second largest city and the largest port in Egypt as well as an important industrial center. The majority of Egypt’s trade goes through the port, with a cargo handling capacity of 44 million tons per year. Casablanca is Morocco’s largest city, the commercial center of Morocco and the headquarters and industrial facilities location for the leading Moroccan and international companies based in Morocco. Tangier is home to the Tanger-Med Port. In addition, Tangier is undergoing rapid development and modernization. Plans for the city include five-star hotels along the bay, a modern business district, an airport terminal and a soccer stadium. In each city, participants will meet with new business contacts, learn about the markets by participating in Embassy briefings, and explore additional opportunities at networking receptions. Activities will include one-on-one business appointments with prescreened business prospects. Proposed Timetable Arrival in Cairo. Visit to Alexandria to meet with port officials and return to Cairo. Orientation and market briefings in Cairo. One-on-one business appointments in Cairo. One-on-one business appointments; evening departure for Casablanca, Morocco. Orientation and market briefings, one-on-one business appointments, Evening transfer to Tangier. Attend the MedLog Conference, meetings with port and Moroccan Government officials and Ambassador’s reception. One-on-one business appointments. Depart Morocco for U.S. these markets for the first time are encouraged to apply. End of Mission 58355 Frm 00009 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 fee for each additional firm representative (SME or large firm) is $700. Expenses for travel, lodging, most meals, interpreters, and incidentals will be the responsibility of each mission participant. Delegation members will be able to take advantage of Embassy rates for hotel rooms. Conditions for Participation • An applicant must submit a completed and signed mission application and supplemental application materials, including adequate information on the company’s became effective May 1, 2008 (for additional information see http://www.export.gov/newsletter/ march2008/initiatives.html). E:\FR\FM\24SEN1.SGM 24SEN1 58356 Federal Register / Vol. 75, No. 185 / Friday, September 24, 2010 / Notices products and/or services, primary market objectives, and goals for participation. If the U.S. Department of Commerce receives an incomplete application, the Department may reject the application, request additional information, or take the lack of information into account when evaluating the applications. • Each applicant must also certify that the products and services it seeks to export through the mission are either produced in the United States, or, if not, marketed under the name of a U.S. firm and have at least 51 percent U.S. content. srobinson on DSKHWCL6B1PROD with NOTICES Selection Criteria for Participation Selection will be based on the following criteria: • Suitability of the company’s products or services to the targeted markets. • Applicant’s potential for business in the target markets, including likelihood of exports resulting from the mission. • Consistency of the applicant’s goals and objectives with the stated scope of the mission. Diversity of company size, sector or subsector, and location may also be considered during the review process. Referrals from political organizations and any documents containing references to partisan political activities (including political contributions) will be removed from an applicant’s submission and not considered during the selection process. Timeframe for Recruitment and Applications Mission recruitment will be conducted in an open and public manner, including posting on the U.S. Department of Commerce trade missions calendar—http://www.ita.doc.gov/ doctm/tmcal.html—and other Internet Web sites, publication in domestic trade publications and association newsletters, direct outreach to the Department’s clients and distribution lists, posting in the Federal Register, and announcements at industry meetings, symposia, conferences, and trade shows. Recruitment for the mission will begin September 20, 2010 and conclude no later than January 21, 2011. Applications received after January 21, 2011 will be considered only if space and scheduling constraints permit. We will inform applicants of selection decisions as soon as possible after January 21, 2011. Applications received after that date will be considered only if space and scheduling constraints permit. VerDate Mar<15>2010 16:12 Sep 23, 2010 Jkt 220001 Contacts U.S. Commercial Service Domestic Contacts Trade Promotion Programs Anne Novak, Tel: 202–482–8178, Fax: 202–482–9000, E-mail: EgyptMoroccoTM@trade.gov. Africa, Near East and South Asia Sal Tauhidi, Tel: 202–482–1322, Fax: 202–482–5179, E-mail: EgyptMoroccoTM@trade.gov. Dated: September 21, 2010. Anne Novak, Global Trade Programs, Commercial Service. [FR Doc. 2010–23967 Filed 9–23–10; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 3510–FP–P INTERNATIONAL TRADE ADMINISTRATION Mission Statement for Executive-Led Trade Mission to Jordan and Israel I. Mission Description The United States Department of Commerce, International Trade Administration, U.S. and Foreign Commercial Service is organizing a Trade Mission to Amman, Jordan, and Jerusalem and Tel-Aviv, Israel. A stop in Eilat, Israel, for companies involved in the renewable energies sector, is also scheduled. The mission will take place February 20–24, 2011. The delegation will be comprised of U.S. firms from a cross section of industries with market potential including, but not limited to, products, services, and technologies in the following sectors: healthcare technologies, and cleantech, (i.e. technologies that support increased productivity or profitability while also reducing resource consumption or pollution, otherwise referred to as clean technologies). The goal of the mission is to help U.S. companies launch or increase their export business in the markets of Jordan, Israel, and the West Bank. Participating firms will gain market information, make business and government contacts, solidify exporting strategies, and advance specific projects, towards the outcome of increasing U.S. exports. The mission, to be led by an executive level U.S. Department of Commerce official, will include business-to-business matchmaking appointments with local companies, networking events, and meetings and briefings with government and industry officials. The mission delegation will be comprised of U.S. firms that design, manufacture, supply, and/or integrate products, services, and technologies in PO 00000 Frm 00010 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 the targeted sectors and in other appropriate industries. II. Commercial Setting Jordan Jordan, with a 2009 GDP of $33 billion, and a per capita GDP of $5,300 continues to transform itself into an internationally competitive marketbased economy. Education and literacy rates, and measures of social well-being are relatively high compared to other countries with similar incomes. Regarding Jordan’s international trade position with the U.S., our exports to Jordan in 2009 were valued at $1.19 billion, representing nearly 16 percent of all Jordanian imports. Exports from Jordan to the U.S. for that same period were valued at $924 million, with twoway trade reaching $2.11 billion. Currently, under King Abdullah, Jordan has undertaken a major program of economic change, including the elimination of most fuel and agricultural subsidies, the passage of legislation targeting corruption, and the initiation of tax reforms. Key reforms have been undertaken in the information technology, pharmaceutical, tourism, and service sectors. In working toward trade liberalization, Jordan has also joined the World Trade Organization and, in 2001, it co-signed the first bilateral free trade agreement between the U.S. and an Arab country. In 2007 the United States and Jordan signed a Science and Technology Cooperation Agreement, bolstering efforts to help diversify Jordan’s economy and promote growth. To date, duties on nearly all our goods and services have been eliminated, providing for more open markets in communications, construction, finance, health, transportation, and services. In addition, Jordan maintains a strict application of international standards for the protection of intellectual property. These changes and agreements facilitate good trading conditions between the U.S. and Jordan. In the political arena, Jordan’s constitutional monarchy has consistently followed a pro-Western foreign policy, maintaining close relations with the United States. The U.S. has participated with Jordan and Israel in trilateral development discussions, key issues being watersharing and security; cooperation on Jordan Rift Valley development; infrastructure projects; and trade, finance, and banking issues. U. S. development efforts continue to address Jordan’s health indicators, road and water networks, education levels, resource conservation, and provide E:\FR\FM\24SEN1.SGM 24SEN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 75, Number 185 (Friday, September 24, 2010)]
[Notices]
[Pages 58353-58356]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2010-23967]


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DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE

International Trade Administration


Business Development Mission to Egypt and Morocco

Mission Description

    The U.S. Department of Commerce, International Trade 
Administration, and U.S. Commercial Service is organizing a Business 
Development Mission to explore ports and infrastructure development 
opportunities in Egypt (Cairo and Alexandria) and Morocco (Casablanca 
and Tangier), March 25--April 1, 2011. This mission, led by a Senior 
Official of the Department of Commerce or other U.S. agency, will focus 
on the opportunities in port logistics, infrastructure projects, safety 
and security, and energy infrastructure. The mission will include one-
on-one business appointments with pre-screened potential buyers, 
agents, distributors and joint venture partners; site visits to ports 
and free trade zones, meetings with government officials, and 
networking receptions for companies interested in expansion into the 
North African, Middle Eastern and Southern European markets.

Commercial Setting

Egypt

    Egypt is strategically located at the gateway of trade and commerce 
for Southern Europe as well as North Africa and the Middle East. It is 
a prime location for the transit of goods, as well as a key destination 
for American companies seeking to do business in Egypt and the region. 
With a population of over 80 million Egypt is the largest Arab country, 
and the fourth largest export market for U.S. products and services in 
the Middle East. The U.S. is Egypt's largest bilateral trading partner, 
and the second largest investor. In 2010, bilateral trade is expected 
to exceed $7 billion. The Egyptian gross domestic product (GDP) grew 
over five percent from 2009 to 2010. The financial sector escaped many 
negative impacts of the global financial crisis, due to Egypt's 
improved banking supervision, conservative lending practices and 
central bank guarantee of all bank deposits.
    In 2010 the Egyptian Ministry of Investment announced major plans 
for infrastructure development with 46 different projects valued at 
over $16 billion. The majority of these projects are available to be 
awarded based on the Egyptian Government's ``Public Private 
Partnership'' (PPP) measures. The PPP is a multi-faceted initiative to 
attract private sector investment for

[[Page 58354]]

infrastructure projects and U.S. companies are eligible to bid on them. 
Trade Mission participants will be briefed by Egyptian Government 
officials on these projects and the PPP program. In addition, meetings 
will be arranged with companies that have already been awarded the 
designated infrastructure projects in order to identify supplier 
contacts.

Morocco

    Morocco is the only African country to have a Free Trade Agreement 
(FTA) with the U.S. Since the FTA went into effect in 2006, U.S. 
exports to Morocco have tripled to $1.6 billion. Morocco has 
aggressively developed the infrastructure to become a gateway to North 
Africa and the European Union. The Port of Tanger-Med, soon to be 
Africa's largest port, is located only eight miles from Europe, at the 
northern tip of Africa where the Mediterranean Sea meets the Atlantic 
Ocean. Tanger-Med already offers direct shipping from Houston, Mobile, 
Jacksonville, Miami, Savannah, Charleston, and Norfolk. This 
strategically located port offers free trade zones, including the Auto 
Zone dedicated to auto parts, and direct distribution systems onward to 
the European Union, the Middle East, and North Africa.
    The Trade Mission coincides with the Tanger Mediterranean Special 
Agency's (TMSA) fourth annual MedLog Conference (Conference), March 
31--April 1, 2011. TMSA is responsible for all Tanger-Med building 
projects, port operations, and management of the free trade zones. 
Mission participants will meet buyers of safety and security, and 
vessel management equipment, and conduct one-on-one business 
appointments with officials who purchase products and services for the 
port facilities. In addition, meetings will be arranged with companies 
that have already been awarded the designated infrastructure projects 
in order to identify supplier contacts.

Best Sector Prospects

Port Logistics

Egypt
    The mission will include briefings in Cairo by representatives of 
the major firms involved in port activities in Egypt, and a visit to 
the port of Alexandria. Egypt has 3,500 kilometers of navigable 
waterways and the Government considers the maintenance and expansion of 
its ports a top priority. The port of Alexandria, the largest of the 
country's nine ports, was recently revamped, resulting in an increased 
cargo handling capacity of 44 million tons per year, which represents 
about 60 percent of Egypt's trade. Port projects will include a new 
container terminal and container-handling piers, new storage facilities 
and handling equipment and improvements to wharfs and marinas.
    To address overall port efficiency, there is a growing demand for 
improved Management Information Systems and Terminal Operating Systems. 
These include systems for financial management, port engineering, cargo 
tracking, cargo and container tracking and transfer, gate control, and 
procurement. U.S. companies can also participate as providers for 
shipping agents, warehousing, stevedoring, container handling, port 
management and consulting. Additionally, there is a need for heavy 
equipment to handle bulk cargo for loading large shipments of minerals 
and other commodities.
Morocco
    Construction of Tanger-Med II, an additional set of cargo terminals 
and storage, is currently underway and the port will begin issuing 
tenders for equipment and services in the next 12-18 months. As part of 
a national logistics program, the Moroccan government recently 
announced a 20-year, $13 billion project to build port, rail, highway, 
and airport logistics centers, with port management, vessel tracking 
and management, cold storage, warehousing, railways, bridges, and 
distribution centers. Government tenders are now being issued for these 
projects, and the plans are to spend $7 billion on the project by 2015.
    Examples of planned port projects include:
     A $69 million project to convert the old port, located 
near the City of Tangier, into a tourist center and passenger terminal.
     Nador West Med, a new industrial port for the coastal city 
of Nador.

Infrastructure Projects

Egypt
    The Government of Egypt directed $2.6 billion to Egypt's 
infrastructure in 2008, $1.4 billion in 2009, and $1.9 billion in 2010. 
With a growing number of tourists, there has been increased pressure on 
Egypt's roads, bridges, railroads, power stations, water and sewage, 
hospitals, and schools. As a result, construction is one of the most 
active sectors of the Egyptian economy, contributing about six percent 
of GDP and accounting for eight percent of employment in 2009.
    Examples of planned infrastructure projects include:
     The Rod El Farag-6th of October Highway, at $545 million.
     The Cairo-10th of Ramadan City Railway Line, at $727 
million.
     A special economic zone in the Gulf of Suez, at $1.45 
billion.
     A water treatment station in the Red Sea, at $400 million.
Morocco
    Morocco has multi-billion-dollar construction projects in many 
sectors. Opportunities exist in port construction and logistics 
facilities, hotels and resorts, road construction and equipment, 
airports, hospitals and clinics, municipal buildings, renewable power 
plants (particularly solar and wind), waste management plants, schools 
and universities, water management plants, and architecture.
    Examples of upcoming infrastructure projects include design and 
construction of:
     A high-speed rail line from Tangier to Casablanca, with 
$4.5 billion to be spent by 2015.
     An $830 million light rail line around Casablanca.
     60 dams at $1.47 billion.
     Water desalination plants at $1.22 billion.
     Highway systems in Rabat, Tit Mellil-Berrechid and El 
Jadida-Safi at $1.7 billion.
     Low-cost housing of 130,000 units at $1.9 billion.
     New passenger and cargo rail stations for Marrakesh and 
Casablanca.

Safety/Security

Egypt
    In addition to Alexandria, Egypt has eight major ports and three 
cross-country borders that require significant security measures. In 
its fight against drug smuggling and counterfeit products, Egypt 
requires container scanning and shipment tracking devices. Egypt is 
also looking at container scanning upgrades and seafarer identification 
cards for more secure identification and synchronizing systems to 
coordinate security measures and responses. Accordingly, opportunities 
exist for U.S firms providing short-range radar systems, surveillance 
cameras, infrared and radiological detectors, and vessel tracking 
maritime information systems, biometric scanners, personnel databases, 
computer peripherals, and systems integration equipment.
Morocco
    Tangier is the closest land access point between Africa and Europe, 
creating a need for cargo and passenger

[[Page 58355]]

control/tracking systems, surveillance equipment including sonar and 
radar, biometric passport technologies, and other equipment used in the 
fight against drug trafficking, smuggling and counter terrorism. The 
military and police agencies are purchasing safety and security 
equipment for protecting Morocco's two vast coastlines and remote 
national borders.

Energy Infrastructure

Egypt
    Egypt is one of the largest electrical energy producing countries 
in the Middle East. Over the next ten years, Egypt plans to expand its 
electricity capacity to 40,000 megawatts through a combination of 
traditional, renewable, and nuclear energy production to diversify 
energy resources and preserve the country's limited oil and gas 
reserves. Opportunities exist for U.S. providers of wind turbines, 
blades, and other equipment, as well as development and project 
management. Best prospects in the energy sector include circuit 
breakers of more than 66kv, nuclear-related consultation and generation 
equipment and peripherals; power transformers of more than 25MVA-66kva; 
power transmission lines; turbine generator units with associated 
equipment; and vibration dampers.
Morocco
    As industry grows in Morocco, there is an increasing need for coal 
and gas-fired energy plants.
    A $2.7 billion coal-fired power plant (1320 megawatts) is planned 
for the coastal city of Safi and $450 million will be used specifically 
for clean coal technology. Opportunities also exist for equipment and 
services in solar and wind energy. Five new wind farms will be built by 
2020 to supply 2000 megawatts of electricity. In late 2009, Morocco 
announced a $9 billion solar energy program and established a Solar 
Energy Agency. Engineering, construction, procurement and, and 
management opportunities also exist.

Mission Goals

    The goal of the trade mission is to provide U.S. participants with 
first-hand market information, access to government decision makers as 
appropriate and one-on-one meetings with business contacts, including 
potential agents, distributors and partners, so they can position 
themselves to enter or expand their presence in the Egyptian and 
Moroccan markets.

Mission Scenario

    The Trade Mission will include four stops: Cairo and Alexandria, 
Egypt, March 25-28, and Casablanca and Tangier, Morocco, March 29-April 
1.
    Cairo is the capital of Egypt and the largest city in Africa. A 
majority of the nation's commerce is generated in Cairo and regional 
headquarters of numerous businesses and organizations are located in 
the city.
    Alexandria is the second largest city and the largest port in Egypt 
as well as an important industrial center. The majority of Egypt's 
trade goes through the port, with a cargo handling capacity of 44 
million tons per year.
    Casablanca is Morocco's largest city, the commercial center of 
Morocco and the headquarters and industrial facilities location for the 
leading Moroccan and international companies based in Morocco.
    Tangier is home to the Tanger-Med Port. In addition, Tangier is 
undergoing rapid development and modernization. Plans for the city 
include five-star hotels along the bay, a modern business district, an 
airport terminal and a soccer stadium.
    In each city, participants will meet with new business contacts, 
learn about the markets by participating in Embassy briefings, and 
explore additional opportunities at networking receptions. Activities 
will include one-on-one business appointments with pre-screened 
business prospects.

Proposed Timetable

------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Friday........................  March 25.........  Arrival in Cairo.
Saturday......................  March 26.........  Visit to Alexandria
                                                    to meet with port
                                                    officials and return
                                                    to Cairo.
Sunday........................  March 27.........  Orientation and
                                                    market briefings in
                                                    Cairo.
Monday........................  March 28.........  One-on-one business
                                                    appointments in
                                                    Cairo.
Tuesday.......................  March 29.........  One-on-one business
                                                    appointments;
                                                    evening departure
                                                    for Casablanca,
                                                    Morocco.
Wednesday.....................  March 30.........  Orientation and
                                                    market briefings,
                                                    one-on-one business
                                                    appointments,
                                                    Evening transfer to
                                                    Tangier.
Thursday......................  March 31.........  Attend the MedLog
                                                    Conference, meetings
                                                    with port and
                                                    Moroccan Government
                                                    officials and
                                                    Ambassador's
                                                    reception.
Friday........................  April 1..........  One-on-one business
                                                    appointments.
Saturday......................  April 2..........  Depart Morocco for
                                                    U.S.
------------------------------------------------------------------------

End of Mission

Participation Requirements

    All parties interested in participating in the Trade Mission to 
Egypt and Morocco must complete and submit an application package for 
consideration by the U.S. Department of Commerce. All applicants will 
be evaluated on their ability to meet certain conditions and best 
satisfy the selection criteria as outlined below. This mission is 
designed for a minimum of 12 and a maximum of 25 companies to 
participate in the mission from the applicant pool. U.S. companies 
already doing business in the target markets as well as U.S. companies 
seeking to enter these markets for the first time are encouraged to 
apply.

Fees and Expenses

    After a company has been selected to participate on the mission, a 
payment to the U.S. Department of Commerce in the form of a 
participation fee is required. The participation fee will be $2,950 for 
a small or medium-sized enterprise (SME) \*\ and $3,850 for large 
firms. The fee for each additional firm representative (SME or large 
firm) is $700. Expenses for travel, lodging, most meals, interpreters, 
and incidentals will be the responsibility of each mission participant. 
Delegation members will be able to take advantage of Embassy rates for 
hotel rooms.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \*\ An SME is defined as a firm with 500 or fewer employees or 
that otherwise qualifies as a small business under SBA regulations 
(see http://www.sba.gov/services/contracting opportunities/
sizestandardstopics/index.html). Parent companies, affiliates, and 
subsidiaries will be considered when determining business size. The 
dual pricing reflects the Commercial Service's user fee schedule 
that became effective May 1, 2008 (for additional information see 
http://www.export.gov/newsletter/march2008/initiatives.html).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Conditions for Participation

     An applicant must submit a completed and signed mission 
application and supplemental application materials, including adequate 
information on the company's

[[Page 58356]]

products and/or services, primary market objectives, and goals for 
participation. If the U.S. Department of Commerce receives an 
incomplete application, the Department may reject the application, 
request additional information, or take the lack of information into 
account when evaluating the applications.
     Each applicant must also certify that the products and 
services it seeks to export through the mission are either produced in 
the United States, or, if not, marketed under the name of a U.S. firm 
and have at least 51 percent U.S. content.

Selection Criteria for Participation

    Selection will be based on the following criteria:
     Suitability of the company's products or services to the 
targeted markets.
     Applicant's potential for business in the target markets, 
including likelihood of exports resulting from the mission.
     Consistency of the applicant's goals and objectives with 
the stated scope of the mission.
    Diversity of company size, sector or subsector, and location may 
also be considered during the review process.
    Referrals from political organizations and any documents containing 
references to partisan political activities (including political 
contributions) will be removed from an applicant's submission and not 
considered during the selection process.

Timeframe for Recruitment and Applications

    Mission recruitment will be conducted in an open and public manner, 
including posting on the U.S. Department of Commerce trade missions 
calendar--http://www.ita.doc.gov/doctm/tmcal.html--and other Internet 
Web sites, publication in domestic trade publications and association 
newsletters, direct outreach to the Department's clients and 
distribution lists, posting in the Federal Register, and announcements 
at industry meetings, symposia, conferences, and trade shows.
    Recruitment for the mission will begin September 20, 2010 and 
conclude no later than January 21, 2011. Applications received after 
January 21, 2011 will be considered only if space and scheduling 
constraints permit. We will inform applicants of selection decisions as 
soon as possible after January 21, 2011. Applications received after 
that date will be considered only if space and scheduling constraints 
permit.

Contacts

U.S. Commercial Service Domestic Contacts

Trade Promotion Programs
    Anne Novak, Tel: 202-482-8178, Fax: 202-482-9000, E-mail: 
EgyptMoroccoTM@trade.gov.
Africa, Near East and South Asia
    Sal Tauhidi, Tel: 202-482-1322, Fax: 202-482-5179, E-mail: 
EgyptMoroccoTM@trade.gov.

    Dated: September 21, 2010.
Anne Novak,
Global Trade Programs, Commercial Service.
[FR Doc. 2010-23967 Filed 9-23-10; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 3510-FP-P