Reports, Forms, and Record Keeping Requirements, 50034-50036 [2010-20162]

Download as PDF 50034 Federal Register / Vol. 75, No. 157 / Monday, August 16, 2010 / Notices sroberts on DSKD5P82C1PROD with NOTICES Application of Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures. Public Comment: Requirements for Submissions Interested persons are invited to submit written comments concerning the issues raised in this dispute. Persons may submit public comments electronically to http:// www.regulations.gov docket number USTR–2010–0013. If you are unable to provide submissions by http:// www.regulations.gov, please contact Sandy McKinzy at (202) 395–9483 to arrange for an alternative method of transmission. To submit comments via http:// www.regulations.gov, enter docket number USTR–2010–0013 on the home page and click ‘‘search’’. The site will provide a search-results page listing all documents associated with this docket. Find a reference to this notice by selecting ‘‘Notice’’ under ‘‘Document Type’’ on the left side of the searchresults page, and click on the link entitled ‘‘Submit a Comment.’’ (For further information on using the http:// www.regulations.gov Web site, please consult the resources provided on the Web site by clicking on ‘‘How to Use This Site’’ on the left side of the home page.) The http://www.regulations.gov site provides the option of providing comments by filling in a ‘‘Type Comment and Upload File’’ field, or by attaching a document. It is expected that most comments will be provided in an attached document. If a document is attached, it is sufficient to type ‘‘See attached’’ in the ‘‘Type Comment and Upload File’’ field. A person requesting that information contained in a comment submitted by that person be treated as confidential business information must certify that such information is business confidential and would not customarily be released to the public by the submitter. Confidential business information must be clearly designated as such and the submission must be marked ‘‘BUSINESS CONFIDENTIAL’’ at the top and bottom of the cover page and each succeeding page. Any comment containing business confidential information must be submitted by fax to Sandy McKinzy at (202) 395–3640. A non-confidential summary of the confidential information must be submitted to http:// www.regulations.gov. The nonconfidential summary will be placed in the docket and open to public inspection. Information or advice contained in a comment submitted, other than business VerDate Mar<15>2010 18:51 Aug 13, 2010 Jkt 220001 confidential information, may be determined by USTR to be confidential in accordance with section 135(g)(2) of the Trade Act of 1974 (19 U.S.C. 2155(g)(2)). If the submitter believes that information or advice may qualify as such, the submitter— (1) Must clearly so designate the information or advice; (2) Must clearly mark the material as ‘‘SUBMITTED IN CONFIDENCE’’ at the top and bottom of the cover page and each succeeding page; and (3) Must provide a non-confidential summary of the information or advice. Any comment containing confidential information must be submitted by fax. A non-confidential summary of the confidential information must be submitted to http:// www.regulations.gov. The nonconfidential summary will be placed in the docket and open to public inspection. USTR will maintain a docket on this dispute settlement proceeding accessible to the public. The public file will include non-confidential comments received by USTR from the public with respect to the dispute. If a dispute settlement panel is convened or in the event of an appeal from such a panel, the U.S. submissions, any nonconfidential submissions, or nonconfidential summaries of submissions, received from other participants in the dispute, will be made available to the public on USTR’s Web site at http:// www.ustr.gov, and the report of the panel, and, if applicable, the report of the Appellate Body, will be available on the Web site of the World Trade Organization, http://www.wto.org. Comments will be placed in the docket and open to public inspection pursuant to 15 CFR 2006.13, except confidential business information exempt from public inspection in accordance with 15 CFR 2006.15 or information determined by USTR to be confidential in accordance with 19 U.S.C. 2155(g)(2). Comments open to public inspection may be viewed on the www.regulations.gov Web site. Steven F. Fabry, Assistant United States Trade Representative for Monitoring and Enforcement. [FR Doc. 2010–20161 Filed 8–13–10; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 3190–W0–P PO 00000 Frm 00149 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION National Highway Traffic Safety Administration [U.S. DOT Docket No. NHTSA–2010–0109] Reports, Forms, and Record Keeping Requirements National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), DOT. ACTION: Request for public comment on proposed collection of information. AGENCY: Before a Federal agency can collect certain information from the public, it must receive approval from the Office of Management and Budget (OMB). Under procedures established by the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (44 U.S.C. 3501 et seq.), before seeking OMB approval, Federal agencies must solicit public comment on proposed collections of information, including extensions and reinstatements of previously approved collections. This document describes an Information Collection Request (ICR) for which NHTSA intends to seek OMB approval. SUMMARY: Comments must be submitted on or before October 15, 2010. ADDRESSES: Direct all written comments to the U.S. Department of Transportation Dockets, 1200 New Jersey Ave, SE., Washington, DC 20590. You may also submit comments electronically at http:// www.regulations.gov. All comments should refer to the Docket No. NHTSA– 2010–0109. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Jessica Cicchino, Ph.D, Contracting Officer’s Technical Representative, Office of Behavioral Safety Research (NTI–131), National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, 1200 New Jersey Ave, SE., W46–491, Washington, DC 20590. Dr. Cicchino’s phone number is 202–366–2752 and her e-mail address is jessica.cicchino@dot.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Under the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, before an agency submits a proposed collection of information to OMB for approval, it must publish a document in the Federal Register providing a 60-day comment period and otherwise consult with members of the public and affected agencies concerning each proposed collection of information. The OMB has promulgated regulations describing what must be included in such a document. Under OMB’s regulations (at 5 CFR 1320.8(d)), an agency must ask for public comment on the following: (i) Whether the proposed collection of information is necessary for the proper DATES: E:\FR\FM\16AUN1.SGM 16AUN1 sroberts on DSKD5P82C1PROD with NOTICES Federal Register / Vol. 75, No. 157 / Monday, August 16, 2010 / Notices performance of the functions of the agency, including whether the information will have practical utility; (ii) The accuracy of the agency’s estimate of the burden of the proposed collection of information, including the validity of the methodology and assumptions used; (iii) How to enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the information to be collected; and (iv) How to minimize the burden of the collection of information on those who are to respond, including the use of appropriate automated, electronic, mechanical, or other technological collection techniques or other forms of information technology, e.g., permitting electronic submission of responses. In compliance with these requirements, NHTSA asks public comment on the following proposed collection of information: Title: The Effect of Entry-Level Motorcycle Rider Training on Motorcycle Crashes. Type of Request: New information collection request. OMB Clearance Number: None. Form Number: This collection of information uses no standard forms. Requested Expiration Date of Approval: 3 years from date of approval. Summary of the Collection of Information: The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) plans on combining information from surveys, motorcycle riding skills tests, and archival records to examine the effect of entry-level motorcycle rider training on safe motorcycle riding. Participation by respondents will be voluntary. Surveys will be used to collect information from motorcycle riders on topics such as demographics, attitudes towards safety, miles and years of riding experience, purpose of riding, training history, alcohol use while riding, use of helmets and protective gear while riding, and riding experience under different conditions (for instance, in inclement weather or while fatigued). This information will be used to initially match riders that have received entry-level training with untrained riders at the start of the study to ensure that these groups are comparable in terms of demographics, safety attitudes, riding experience, and purpose of riding. Survey information will additionally supplement data from skills tests of riders’ on-motorcycle performance and archival data on riders’ crashes, injury severity, and motor vehicle citations. Data collected from motorcycle riders that have received entry-level rider training will be compared to data from untrained motorcycle riders. VerDate Mar<15>2010 18:51 Aug 13, 2010 Jkt 220001 Surveys will be conducted electronically over the internet when possible, with a pen-and-paper option available if preferred by the respondent. Need and Use of Information: NHTSA’s mission is to save lives, prevent injuries, and reduce healthcare and other economic costs associated with motor vehicle crashes. A total of 5,290 motorcycle riders lost their lives in traffic crashes in 2008. This represents a 150% increase in the number of motorcycle fatalities since 1997. In contrast, the number of fatalities from car crashes has decreased during this time. Motorcycle rider training is a part of most States’ motorcycle safety programs, and funds are set aside under Section 2010 of SAFETEA–LU in part to help States increase their motorcycle training. A study conducted by Billheimer (1998) found that trained riders with less than 500 miles of riding experience had a lower crash rate than untrained riders during the six months after training. Other studies conducted on the effectiveness of motorcycle rider training in the United States, however, have not found an effect of motorcycle rider training on crashes. Thus, the extent to which motorcycle rider training reduces crash involvement is unclear. In 2000, NHTSA and the Motorcycle Safety Foundation published the National Agenda for Motorcycle Safety (NAMS), which includes recommendations to improve motorcycle safety efforts in the United States. One of the recommendations in the NAMS is to ‘‘conduct uniform follow-up research into the effectiveness and impact of rider education and training.’’ NHTSA convened an expert panel in 2008 to discuss the best way to perform a comprehensive study of the effectiveness of motorcycle rider training (Brock, Robinson, Robinson & Percer, 2010). The panel concluded that such a study should examine the effect of rider training on the characteristics of a safe rider, which would encompass riders’ on-motorcycle skills in addition to the outcomes of their riding (crashes and injuries) and their preparation for riding (such as avoiding impairments). The proposed study will carry out the recommendations of the expert panel. Description of the Likely Respondents (Including Estimated Number, and Proposed Frequency of Response to the Collection of Information): Respondents will be motorcycle riders that have and have not completed an entry-level motorcycle rider training course, with an emphasis on novice riders with less than 500 miles of riding experience. Participation will be solicited through PO 00000 Frm 00150 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 50035 motorcycle rider training courses, Departments of Motor Vehicles, motorcycle dealerships, motorcycle accessory shops, and at motorcycle trade shows. Under this collection, up to 16,000 motorcycle riders (8,000 trained and 8,000 untrained) will participate in an initial screening survey. Of this initial sample, approximately 625 trained riders will be matched with 625 untrained riders on the basis of similarities in their demographics, safety attitudes, riding experience, and riding purpose for a total of 1,250 riders. These 1,250 motorcycle riders will participate in two additional follow-up surveys: One six months after the initial matching survey, and one 18 months after the initial matching survey. Consequently, of the initial 16,000 respondents, the 1,250 matched riders will be surveyed three times over 18 months, and the 14,750 unmatched riders will be surveyed once. The purpose of this matched pairs survey is to obtain information on how trained and untrained motorcycle riders prepare for riding and on their prior riding experience, which will supplement data from archival records on crashes, injury severity, and motor vehicle citations. An additional group of motorcycle riders will respond to surveys in conjunction with participating in a motorcycle riding skills test. Two hundred seventy motorcycle riders, 135 trained and 135 untrained, will complete a survey and an on-motorcycle skills test shortly after receiving training (for trained riders) or shortly after beginning the study (for untrained riders). The same number of riders will complete a follow-up survey and onmotorcycle skills test six months later. Estimate of the Total Annual Reporting and Record Keeping Burden Resulting from the Collection of Information: The initial screening survey will take approximately 15 minutes to complete, and all other surveys will take approximately 12 minutes to complete. The estimated burden for respondents that participate in the initial screening survey only is 3,687.5 hours (14,750 respondents at 15 minutes each). The additional estimated burden for the 1,250 riders that are matched from the screening survey is 812.5 hours (1,250 respondents, surveys at three time points, 15 minutes for the first survey, 12 minutes each for subsequent surveys). Finally, the estimated burden for the information collected from the skills test participants is 108 hours (270 respondents, surveys at two time points, 12 minutes each). E:\FR\FM\16AUN1.SGM 16AUN1 50036 Federal Register / Vol. 75, No. 157 / Monday, August 16, 2010 / Notices The total burden resulting from the collection of information is 4,608 hours. For the respondents that participate in the initial screening survey only, the annual estimated burden is 3,687.5 hours. For the 1,250 respondents matched from the screening survey, the estimated annual burden is 542 hours (812.5 hours total over a period of 18 months). For the riders that will participate in the on-motorcycle skills test, the estimated annual burden from information collection is 108 hours. Therefore, the total estimated annual burden is 4,337.5 hours. The respondents would not incur any recordkeeping burden or recordkeeping cost from the information collection. Authority: 44 U.S.C. Section 3506(c)(2)(A). Jeff Michael, Associate Administrator, Research and Program Development. [FR Doc. 2010–20162 Filed 8–13–10; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4910–59–P DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration Office of Commercial Space Transportation; Availability of Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) and Record of Decision (ROD) for Actions Related to Environmental Assessment for the Expansion of the Wallops Flight Facility Launch Range Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of Transportation. ACTION: Notice. AGENCY: In accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), 42 U.S.C. 4321–4347 (as amended), Council on Environmental Quality NEPA implementing regulations (40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) parts 1500 to 1508), and FAA Order 1050.1E, Change 1, the FAA is announcing the availability of a FONSI/ ROD, based on the analysis and findings of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s (NASA) August 2009 Environmental Assessment for the Expansion of the Wallops Flight Facility Launch Range (the EA). The FAA (Office of Commercial Space Transportation) participated as a cooperating agency with NASA in the preparation of the EA, which evaluates the potential environmental impacts of the proposed expansion of the MidAtlantic Regional Spaceport (MARS) at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center Wallops Flight Facility (WFF). As the MARS expansion would require Federal actions (as defined in 40 CFR Section sroberts on DSKD5P82C1PROD with NOTICES SUMMARY: VerDate Mar<15>2010 18:51 Aug 13, 2010 Jkt 220001 1508.18) involving both NASA and the FAA, the EA was prepared to satisfy the NEPA obligations of both agencies. NASA, as the WFF property owner and lead agency, is responsible for ensuring overall compliance with applicable environmental statutes, including NEPA. The FAA served as a cooperating agency in the preparation of the EA because of its role in (1) licensing the Virginia Commercial Space Flight Authority (VCSFA) which operates MARS as a commercial launch site and (2) issuing licenses or permits to operate commercial launch and reentry vehicles at MARS. The FAA has formally adopted the EA and is using the FONSI/ ROD to support the modification or renewal of VCSFA’s Launch Site Operator License and issuance of licenses or experimental permits for commercial launch and reentry vehicles at MARS. Under the Proposed Action in the EA, NASA and MARS facilities would be upgraded to support up to and including medium large class suborbital and orbital expendable launch vehicle (ELV) launch activities from WFF. NASA’s Preferred Alternative includes site improvements required to support launch operations (such as facility construction and infrastructure improvements); testing, fueling, and processing operations; up to two static fire tests per year; launching up to six orbital-class vehicles per year from Pad 0–A; and the reentry of associated crew or cargo capsules. Implementation of NASA’s Preferred Alternative would result in a maximum of 18 orbital-class vehicle launches from MARS Launch Complex 0 (twelve existing launches from Pad 0–B and six additional launches from Pad 0–A). As several different launch and reentry vehicles could launch from MARS Pad 0–A, the largest launch vehicle and payload (which could include a reentry vehicle), in terms of size, weight, and dimension, was chosen as the demonstration, or ‘‘envelope,’’ vehicle and payload to provide a benchmark for assessing impacts on resources at WFF and the surrounding environment. Orbital Sciences Corporation’s Taurus II would be the largest ELV expected to be launched from MARS Pad 0–A under the Proposed Action. Therefore, the Taurus II was selected as the envelope launch vehicle for purposes of the EA. Orbital Sciences Corporation’s Cygnus Capsule and Space Exploration Technologies Corporation’s Dragon Capsule were evaluated as potential reentry vehicles. The EA addresses the potential environmental impacts of implementing the EA’s Proposed Action PO 00000 Frm 00151 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 and the No Action Alternative. Under the No Action Alternative, NASA and MARS would not proceed with expansion activities at Pad 0–A. Based on its independent review and consideration, the FAA issued a FONSI/ ROD concurring with the analysis of impacts and findings in the EA and formally adopting the EA to support the modification or renewal of VCSFA’s Launch Site Operator License and issuance of launch and reentry licenses or experimental permits to operate commercial vehicles at MARS. After reviewing and analyzing available data and information on existing conditions, potential impacts, and measures to mitigate those impacts, the FAA has determined that neither modification or renewal of VCSFA’s Launch Site Operator License nor issuance of launch and reentry licenses or experimental permits to operate commercial vehicles at MARS are Federal actions that would significantly affect the quality of the human environment within the meaning of NEPA. Therefore, the preparation of an EIS is not required, and the FAA has issued a FONSI/ROD. The FAA made this determination in accordance with all applicable environmental laws and FAA regulations. NASA has posted the EA on the Internet at http://sites.wff.nasa.gov/ code250/expansion_ea.html. The FAA has posted the FONSI/ROD on the Internet at http://www.faa.gov/about/ office_org/headquarters_offices/ast/. Mr. Daniel Czelusniak, Environmental Specialist, Office of Commercial Space Transportation, Federal Aviation Administration, 800 Independence Avenue, SW., Room 331, Washington, DC 20591, telephone (202) 267–5924; E-mail daniel.czelusniak@faa.gov. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Issued in Washington, DC, on August 4, 2010. Michael McElligott, Manager, Space Systems Development Division. [FR Doc. 2010–19994 Filed 8–13–10; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4910–13–P DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION National Highway Traffic Safety Administration Petition To Modify an Exemption of a Previously Approved Antitheft Device; Ford Motor Company National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA); Department of Transportation (DOT). AGENCY: E:\FR\FM\16AUN1.SGM 16AUN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 75, Number 157 (Monday, August 16, 2010)]
[Notices]
[Pages 50034-50036]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2010-20162]


=======================================================================
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DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION

National Highway Traffic Safety Administration

[U.S. DOT Docket No. NHTSA-2010-0109]


Reports, Forms, and Record Keeping Requirements

AGENCY: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), DOT.

ACTION: Request for public comment on proposed collection of 
information.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: Before a Federal agency can collect certain information from 
the public, it must receive approval from the Office of Management and 
Budget (OMB). Under procedures established by the Paperwork Reduction 
Act of 1995 (44 U.S.C. 3501 et seq.), before seeking OMB approval, 
Federal agencies must solicit public comment on proposed collections of 
information, including extensions and reinstatements of previously 
approved collections.
    This document describes an Information Collection Request (ICR) for 
which NHTSA intends to seek OMB approval.

DATES: Comments must be submitted on or before October 15, 2010.

ADDRESSES: Direct all written comments to the U.S. Department of 
Transportation Dockets, 1200 New Jersey Ave, SE., Washington, DC 20590. 
You may also submit comments electronically at http://www.regulations.gov. All comments should refer to the Docket No. NHTSA-
2010-0109.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Jessica Cicchino, Ph.D, Contracting 
Officer's Technical Representative, Office of Behavioral Safety 
Research (NTI-131), National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, 
1200 New Jersey Ave, SE., W46-491, Washington, DC 20590. Dr. Cicchino's 
phone number is 202-366-2752 and her e-mail address is 
jessica.cicchino@dot.gov.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Under the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, 
before an agency submits a proposed collection of information to OMB 
for approval, it must publish a document in the Federal Register 
providing a 60-day comment period and otherwise consult with members of 
the public and affected agencies concerning each proposed collection of 
information. The OMB has promulgated regulations describing what must 
be included in such a document. Under OMB's regulations (at 5 CFR 
1320.8(d)), an agency must ask for public comment on the following:
    (i) Whether the proposed collection of information is necessary for 
the proper

[[Page 50035]]

performance of the functions of the agency, including whether the 
information will have practical utility;
    (ii) The accuracy of the agency's estimate of the burden of the 
proposed collection of information, including the validity of the 
methodology and assumptions used;
    (iii) How to enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the 
information to be collected; and
    (iv) How to minimize the burden of the collection of information on 
those who are to respond, including the use of appropriate automated, 
electronic, mechanical, or other technological collection techniques or 
other forms of information technology, e.g., permitting electronic 
submission of responses.
    In compliance with these requirements, NHTSA asks public comment on 
the following proposed collection of information:
    Title: The Effect of Entry-Level Motorcycle Rider Training on 
Motorcycle Crashes.
    Type of Request: New information collection request.
    OMB Clearance Number: None.
    Form Number: This collection of information uses no standard forms.
    Requested Expiration Date of Approval: 3 years from date of 
approval.
    Summary of the Collection of Information: The National Highway 
Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) plans on combining information 
from surveys, motorcycle riding skills tests, and archival records to 
examine the effect of entry-level motorcycle rider training on safe 
motorcycle riding. Participation by respondents will be voluntary. 
Surveys will be used to collect information from motorcycle riders on 
topics such as demographics, attitudes towards safety, miles and years 
of riding experience, purpose of riding, training history, alcohol use 
while riding, use of helmets and protective gear while riding, and 
riding experience under different conditions (for instance, in 
inclement weather or while fatigued).
    This information will be used to initially match riders that have 
received entry-level training with untrained riders at the start of the 
study to ensure that these groups are comparable in terms of 
demographics, safety attitudes, riding experience, and purpose of 
riding. Survey information will additionally supplement data from 
skills tests of riders' on-motorcycle performance and archival data on 
riders' crashes, injury severity, and motor vehicle citations. Data 
collected from motorcycle riders that have received entry-level rider 
training will be compared to data from untrained motorcycle riders.
    Surveys will be conducted electronically over the internet when 
possible, with a pen-and-paper option available if preferred by the 
respondent.
    Need and Use of Information: NHTSA's mission is to save lives, 
prevent injuries, and reduce healthcare and other economic costs 
associated with motor vehicle crashes. A total of 5,290 motorcycle 
riders lost their lives in traffic crashes in 2008. This represents a 
150% increase in the number of motorcycle fatalities since 1997. In 
contrast, the number of fatalities from car crashes has decreased 
during this time.
    Motorcycle rider training is a part of most States' motorcycle 
safety programs, and funds are set aside under Section 2010 of SAFETEA-
LU in part to help States increase their motorcycle training. A study 
conducted by Billheimer (1998) found that trained riders with less than 
500 miles of riding experience had a lower crash rate than untrained 
riders during the six months after training. Other studies conducted on 
the effectiveness of motorcycle rider training in the United States, 
however, have not found an effect of motorcycle rider training on 
crashes. Thus, the extent to which motorcycle rider training reduces 
crash involvement is unclear.
    In 2000, NHTSA and the Motorcycle Safety Foundation published the 
National Agenda for Motorcycle Safety (NAMS), which includes 
recommendations to improve motorcycle safety efforts in the United 
States. One of the recommendations in the NAMS is to ``conduct uniform 
follow-up research into the effectiveness and impact of rider education 
and training.'' NHTSA convened an expert panel in 2008 to discuss the 
best way to perform a comprehensive study of the effectiveness of 
motorcycle rider training (Brock, Robinson, Robinson & Percer, 2010). 
The panel concluded that such a study should examine the effect of 
rider training on the characteristics of a safe rider, which would 
encompass riders' on-motorcycle skills in addition to the outcomes of 
their riding (crashes and injuries) and their preparation for riding 
(such as avoiding impairments). The proposed study will carry out the 
recommendations of the expert panel.
    Description of the Likely Respondents (Including Estimated Number, 
and Proposed Frequency of Response to the Collection of Information): 
Respondents will be motorcycle riders that have and have not completed 
an entry-level motorcycle rider training course, with an emphasis on 
novice riders with less than 500 miles of riding experience. 
Participation will be solicited through motorcycle rider training 
courses, Departments of Motor Vehicles, motorcycle dealerships, 
motorcycle accessory shops, and at motorcycle trade shows.
    Under this collection, up to 16,000 motorcycle riders (8,000 
trained and 8,000 untrained) will participate in an initial screening 
survey. Of this initial sample, approximately 625 trained riders will 
be matched with 625 untrained riders on the basis of similarities in 
their demographics, safety attitudes, riding experience, and riding 
purpose for a total of 1,250 riders. These 1,250 motorcycle riders will 
participate in two additional follow-up surveys: One six months after 
the initial matching survey, and one 18 months after the initial 
matching survey. Consequently, of the initial 16,000 respondents, the 
1,250 matched riders will be surveyed three times over 18 months, and 
the 14,750 unmatched riders will be surveyed once. The purpose of this 
matched pairs survey is to obtain information on how trained and 
untrained motorcycle riders prepare for riding and on their prior 
riding experience, which will supplement data from archival records on 
crashes, injury severity, and motor vehicle citations.
    An additional group of motorcycle riders will respond to surveys in 
conjunction with participating in a motorcycle riding skills test. Two 
hundred seventy motorcycle riders, 135 trained and 135 untrained, will 
complete a survey and an on-motorcycle skills test shortly after 
receiving training (for trained riders) or shortly after beginning the 
study (for untrained riders). The same number of riders will complete a 
follow-up survey and on-motorcycle skills test six months later.
    Estimate of the Total Annual Reporting and Record Keeping Burden 
Resulting from the Collection of Information: The initial screening 
survey will take approximately 15 minutes to complete, and all other 
surveys will take approximately 12 minutes to complete. The estimated 
burden for respondents that participate in the initial screening survey 
only is 3,687.5 hours (14,750 respondents at 15 minutes each). The 
additional estimated burden for the 1,250 riders that are matched from 
the screening survey is 812.5 hours (1,250 respondents, surveys at 
three time points, 15 minutes for the first survey, 12 minutes each for 
subsequent surveys). Finally, the estimated burden for the information 
collected from the skills test participants is 108 hours (270 
respondents, surveys at two time points, 12 minutes each).

[[Page 50036]]

    The total burden resulting from the collection of information is 
4,608 hours. For the respondents that participate in the initial 
screening survey only, the annual estimated burden is 3,687.5 hours. 
For the 1,250 respondents matched from the screening survey, the 
estimated annual burden is 542 hours (812.5 hours total over a period 
of 18 months). For the riders that will participate in the on-
motorcycle skills test, the estimated annual burden from information 
collection is 108 hours. Therefore, the total estimated annual burden 
is 4,337.5 hours. The respondents would not incur any recordkeeping 
burden or recordkeeping cost from the information collection.

    Authority: 44 U.S.C. Section 3506(c)(2)(A).

Jeff Michael,
Associate Administrator, Research and Program Development.
[FR Doc. 2010-20162 Filed 8-13-10; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4910-59-P