Request for Information on Business Practices To Reduce the Likelihood of Forced Labor or Child Labor in the Production of Goods, 19659-19661 [2010-8642]

Download as PDF Federal Register / Vol. 75, No. 72 / Thursday, April 15, 2010 / Notices hundred seven (5407) responded electronically at 1 hour a response, for nine thousand one hundred sixty-one (9161) annual responses. (6) An estimate of the total public burden (in hours) associated with the collection: It is estimated that there are 9161 annual burden hours associated with this collection. If additional information is required contact: Lynn Bryant, Department Clearance Officer, United States Department of Justice, Justice Management Division, Policy and Planning Staff, Patrick Henry Building, Suite 1600, 601 D Street, NW., Washington, DC 20530. Dated: April 12, 2010. Lynn Bryant, Department Clearance Officer, PRA, U.S. Department of Justice. [FR Doc. 2010–8633 Filed 4–14–10; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4410–09–P DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Office of Justice Programs [OMB Number 1121–NEW] Bureau of Justice Assistance; Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; Comments Requested mstockstill on DSKH9S0YB1PROD with NOTICES ACTION: 60-Day Notice of Information Collection Under Review: New Collection Bureau of Justice Assistance Application Form: Federal Law Enforcement Officers Congressional Badge of Bravery. The Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, Bureau of Justice Assistance, will be submitting the following information collection request to the Office of Management and Budget for review and clearance in accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995. This proposed information collection is published to obtain comments from the public and affected agencies. Comments are encouraged and will be accepted for ‘‘sixty days’’ until June 14, 2010. If you have additional comments, suggestions, or need a copy of the proposed information collection instrument with instructions or additional information, please contact M. Berry at 202–616–6500/1–866–268– 0079, Bureau of Justice Assistance, Office of Justice Programs, U.S. Department of Justice, 810 7th Street, NW., Washington, DC 20531 via facsimile at 202–305–1367 or by e-mail at M.A.Berry@ojp.usdoj.gov. Written comments and suggestions from the public and affected agencies concerning the proposed collection of VerDate Nov<24>2008 15:43 Apr 14, 2010 Jkt 220001 information are encouraged. Your comments should address one or more of the following four points: —Evaluate whether the proposed collection of information is necessary for the proper performance of the functions of the agency, including whether the information will have practical utility; —Evaluate the accuracy of the agency’s estimate of the burden of the proposed collection of information, including the validity of the methodology and assumptions used; —Enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the information to be collected; and —Minimize the burden of the collection of information on those who are to respond, including through the use of appropriate automated, electronic, mechanical, or other technological collection techniques or other forms of information technology, e.g., permitting electronic submission of responses. Overview of This Information Collection (1) Type of information collection: New collection. (2) The title of the form/collection: Federal Law Enforcement Officers Congressional Badge of Bravery. (3) The agency form number, if any, and the applicable component of the Department sponsoring the collection: None. Bureau of Justice Assistance, Office of Justice Programs, United States Department of Justice. (4) Affected public who will be asked or required to respond, as well as a brief abstract: Primary: Law Enforcement officials. Abstract: The information collected on this application will provide for the nomination of law enforcement officers for the Federal, and the State and Local Congressional Badge of Bravery awards. The awards will recognize law enforcement officers who (1) were injured while engaged in lawful duties and performing an act of bravery that put such officer at personal risk; or (2) though not injured; performed an act of bravery that placed such officer at risk of serious physical injury or death. Others: None. (5) An estimate of the total number of respondents and the amount of time needed for an average respondent to respond is as follows: An estimated 200 applications/nominations for each Board has been adopted from a similar awards program and will be used for the Federal Law Enforcement Officers Congressional Badge of Bravery. The applicant should take approximately 25 minutes to gather the required information and complete the form. PO 00000 Frm 00052 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 19659 Actual preparation time is dependent on the number of nominees per application. (5) An estimate of the total public burden (in hours) associated with the collection is 83 hours. Total Annual Reporting Burden: 200 × 25 minutes = 5,000 minutes/60 = 83.33 hours for each award category. If additional information is required, please contact, Clearance Officer, United States Department of Justice, Justice Management Division, Policy and Planning Staff, Patrick Henry Building, Suite 1600, 601 D Street, NW., Washington, DC 20530. Dated: April 12, 2010. Lynn Bryant, Department Clearance Officer, PRA, United States Department of Justice. [FR Doc. 2010–8635 Filed 4–14–10; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4410–18–P DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Office of the Secretary of Labor Request for Information on Business Practices To Reduce the Likelihood of Forced Labor or Child Labor in the Production of Goods AGENCY: Bureau of International Labor Affairs, Labor. ACTION: Request for information. SUMMARY: The Department of Labor (DOL) is seeking information on current practices of firms, business associations, and other private sector groups to reduce the likelihood of child labor and forced labor in the production of goods. This information will aid DOL in fulfilling its mandate under the Trafficking Victims Protection Reauthorization Act of 2005 to work with persons who are involved in the production of goods made with forced labor or child labor to create a standard set of practices that will reduce the likelihood that such persons will produce goods using such labor. DATES: Information should be submitted to the Office of Child Labor, Forced Labor and Human Trafficking (OCFT) within the Bureau of International Labor Affairs (ILAB) via one of the methods described below by 5 p.m., on June 14, 2010. To Submit Information, or for Further Information, Contact: ILAB/OCFT, U.S. Department of Labor, at (202) 693–4843 (this is not a toll free number). Comments, identified as ‘‘Docket No. DOL–2010–0002,’’ may be submitted by any of the following methods: • Federal eRulemaking Portal: http:// www.regulations.gov. The portal E:\FR\FM\15APN1.SGM 15APN1 19660 Federal Register / Vol. 75, No. 72 / Thursday, April 15, 2010 / Notices mstockstill on DSKH9S0YB1PROD with NOTICES includes instructions for submitting comments. Parties submitting responses electronically are encouraged not to submit paper copies. • Facsimile (fax): OCFT at 202–693– 4830. • Mail, Express Delivery, Hand Delivery, and Messenger Service (2 copies): Charita Castro or Rachel Rigby at U.S. Department of Labor, ILAB/ OCFT, 200 Constitution Avenue, NW., Room S–5317, Washington, DC 20210. Note that security-related screening may result in significant delays in receiving materials by regular mail. • E-mail: ilab-tvpra@dol.gov. All submissions should clearly identify the person and/or organization filing the submission and should be signed and dated. In addition to these formal submission methods, the public will be able to view this notice via DOL’s Facebook page at http:// www.facebook.com/departmentoflabor and Twitter account at http:// twitter.com/usdol. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Background Section 105(b)(1) of the Trafficking Victims Protection Reauthorization Act of 2005 (‘‘TVPRA of 2005’’), Public Law 109–164 (2006), directed the Secretary of Labor, acting through the Bureau of International Labor Affairs, to ‘‘carry out additional activities to monitor and combat forced labor and child labor in foreign countries.’’ Section 105(b)(2) of the TVPRA of 2005, 22 U.S.C. 7112(b)(2), listed these activities as: (A) Monitor the use of forced labor and child labor in violation of international standards; (B) Provide information regarding trafficking in persons for the purpose of forced labor to the Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking of the Department of State for inclusion in [the] trafficking in persons report required by section 110(b) of the Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 2000 (22 U.S.C. 7107(b)); (C) Develop and make available to the public a list of goods from countries that the Bureau of International Labor Affairs has reason to believe are produced by forced labor or child labor in violation of international standards; (D) Work with persons who are involved in the production of goods on the list described in subparagraph (C) to create a standard set of practices that will reduce the likelihood that such persons will produce goods using the labor described in such subparagraph; and (E) Consult with other departments and agencies of the United States VerDate Nov<24>2008 15:43 Apr 14, 2010 Jkt 220001 Government to reduce forced and child labor internationally and ensure that products made by forced labor and child labor in violation of international standards are not imported into the United States. Pursuant to part (D) of the TVPRA of 2005 mandate, ILAB is seeking information on current practices of firms, business associations, and other private sector groups to reduce the likelihood of child labor and forced labor in the production of goods. Many firms have policies, activities and/or systems in place to monitor labor rights in their supply chains and remediate violations. Such policies, activities and systems vary depending on location, industry, and many other factors. ILAB seeks to identify practices that have been effective in specific contexts, analyze their replicability, and disseminate those that have potential to be effective on a broader scale. For further details see the ‘‘Information Requested’’ section of this notice. II. Definitions of Forced Labor and Child Labor ‘‘Child Labor’’—‘‘Child labor’’ under international standards means all work performed by a person below the age of 15. It also includes all work performed by a person below the age of 18 in the following practices: (A) All forms of slavery or practices similar to slavery, such as the sale or trafficking of children, debt bondage and serfdom, or forced or compulsory labor, including forced or compulsory recruitment of children for use in armed conflict; (B) The use, procuring, or offering of a child for prostitution, for the production of pornography or for pornographic purposes; (C) The use, procuring, or offering of a child for illicit activities in particular for the production and trafficking of drugs; and (D) Work which, by its nature or the circumstances in which it is carried out, is likely to harm the health, safety, or morals of children. The work referred to in subparagraph (D) is determined by the laws, regulations, or competent authority of the country involved, after consultation with the organizations of employers and workers concerned, and taking into consideration relevant international standards. This definition will not apply to work specifically authorized by national laws, including work done by children in schools for general, vocational or technical education or in other training institutions, where such work is carried out in accordance with international standards under conditions prescribed PO 00000 Frm 00053 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 by the competent authority, and does not prejudice children’s attendance in school or their capacity to benefit from the instruction received. ‘‘Forced Labor’’—‘‘Forced labor’’ under international standards means all work or service which is exacted from any person under the menace of any penalty for its nonperformance and for which the worker does not offer himself voluntarily, and includes indentured labor. ‘‘Forced labor’’ includes work provided or obtained by force, fraud, or coercion, including: (1) By threats of serious harm to, or physical restraint against any person; (2) By means of any scheme, plan, or pattern intended to cause the person to believe that, if the person did not perform such labor or services, that person or another person would suffer serious harm or physical restraint; or (3) By means of the abuse or threatened abuse of law or the legal process. For purposes of this definition, forced labor does not include work specifically authorized by national laws where such work is carried out in accordance with conditions prescribed by the competent authority, including: any work or service required by compulsory military service laws for work of a purely military character; work or service which forms part of the normal civic obligations of the citizens of a fully self-governing country; work or service exacted from any person as a consequence of a conviction in a court of law, provided that the said work or service is carried out under the supervision and control of a public authority and that the said person is not hired to or placed at the disposal of private individuals, companies or associations; work or service required in cases of emergency, such as in the event of war or of a calamity or threatened calamity, fire, flood, famine, earthquake, violent epidemic or epizootic diseases, invasion by animal, insect or vegetable pests, and in general any circumstance that would endanger the existence or the well-being of the whole or part of the population; and minor communal services of a kind which, being performed by the members of the community in the direct interest of the said community, can therefore be considered as normal civic obligations incumbent upon the members of the community, provided that the members of the community or their direct representatives have the right to be consulted in regard to the need for such services. III. Information Requested ILAB is seeking general information on the practices of business entities to E:\FR\FM\15APN1.SGM 15APN1 mstockstill on DSKH9S0YB1PROD with NOTICES Federal Register / Vol. 75, No. 72 / Thursday, April 15, 2010 / Notices reduce the likelihood of child labor and forced labor in the production of goods. ILAB welcomes any and all information, which could include, e.g., codes of conduct, standards used to implement such codes of conduct, auditing/ monitoring systems, supply-chain management practices designed to monitor informal workplaces, homework, and other challenging work environments, training modules, reporting practices, collaborative practices and strategies, grassroots projects, or other relevant information. ILAB is also seeking information on government practices to collaborate with private sector entities to reduce child labor and forced labor in the production of goods. Submissions may include documents in various formats, such as policy statements, reports, and case studies. However, the specific format of any submission is not important provided that the document presents and/or evaluates practices implemented by business entities, or governments in partnership with business entities, to reduce the likelihood of child labor and forced labor in the production of goods. Information should be submitted to the addresses and within the time period set forth above. DOL seeks information that can be used to inform the development of tools and resources to be disseminated publicly on the DOL Web site and/or in other publications. Internal documents or confidential documents that cannot be shared with the public will not be used. Submissions containing confidential or personal information may be redacted by DOL before being made available to the public, in accordance with applicable laws and regulations. DOL does not intend to respond directly to a submission or to return a submission to a submitter, but DOL may communicate with the submitter regarding any matters relating to the submission. DOL will compile and analyze submissions pursuant to this Notice, and of many other practices as described above, in coordination with a contractor, the Center for Reflection, Education, and Action (CREA). For more information about CREA’s contract with DOL, or to discuss relevant practices directly with CREA, please contact Project Director Ruth Rosenbaum at ruth_rosenbaum@creainc.org. VerDate Nov<24>2008 15:43 Apr 14, 2010 Jkt 220001 Signed at Washington, DC this 12th day of April, 2010. Sandra Polaski, Deputy Undersecretary, Bureau of International Labor Affairs. [FR Doc. 2010–8642 Filed 4–14–10; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4510–28–P OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET Determination of Benchmark Compensation Amount for Certain Executives AGENCY: Office of Federal Procurement Policy, OMB. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Office of Management and Budget is publishing the attached memorandum to the Heads of Executive Departments and Agencies concerning the determination of the benchmark compensation amount for certain executives that will be allowable under Government contracts during contractors’ Fiscal Year 2010— $693,951. This determination is required under Section 39 of the Office of Federal Procurement Policy Act, 41 U.S.C. 435, as amended. The benchmark compensation amount applies equally to both defense and civilian procurement agencies. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Raymond Wong, Office of Federal Procurement Policy, Office of Management and Budget, telephone at 202–395–6805 and e-mail: rwong@omb.eop.gov. Daniel I. Gordon, Administrator, Office of Federal Procurement Policy. Memorandum for the Heads of Executive Departments and Agencies From: Daniel I. Gordon, Administrator, Office of Federal Procurement Policy. Subject: Determination of Benchmark Compensation Amount for Certain Executives, Pursuant to Section 39 of the Office of Federal Procurement Policy Act, 41 U.S.C. 435, as amended. This memorandum sets forth the benchmark compensation amount for certain executives as required by Section 39 of the Office of Federal Procurement Policy (OFPP) Act, as amended. Under Section 39, the benchmark compensation amount for certain executives is the median amount of the compensation provided for all senior executives of all benchmark corporations for the most recent year for which data is available. The benchmark PO 00000 Frm 00054 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 19661 compensation benchmark amount for certain executives established by Section 39 limits the allowability of compensation costs under Government contracts as implemented at FAR 31.205–6(p), limiting the amount of reimbursable executive compensation. The benchmark compensation amount for certain executives does not limit the compensation that an executive may otherwise receive. This amount is based upon a review of commercially available surveys of executive compensation that analyze the relevant data made available by the Securities and Exchange Commission. More specifically, as required by Section 39 of the OFPP Act, the determination is made on the median (50th percentile) amount of compensation over a recent 12-month period for the five most highly compensated employees in management positions at each home office and each segment of all publicly-owned companies with annual sales over $50 million. Compensation for the fiscal year means the total amount of wages, salary, bonuses and deferred compensation for the year, whether paid, earned, or otherwise accruing, as recorded in the employer’s cost accounting records for the year. After consultation with the Director of the Defense Contract Audit Agency, we have determined pursuant to the requirements of Section 39 that the benchmark compensation amount for certain executives for the contractors’ Fiscal Year (FY) 2010 is $693,951. This amount is for contractors’ FY 2010 and subsequent contractor fiscal years, unless and until revised by OFPP. The benchmark compensation amount for certain executives applies to contract costs incurred after January 1, 2010, under covered contracts of both the defense and civilian procurement agencies as specified in Section 39 of the OFPP Act, 41 U.S.C. 435, as amended. Questions concerning this memorandum may be addressed to Raymond Wong, OFPP, at 202–395– 6805. [FR Doc. 2010–8641 Filed 4–14–10; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE P NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice (10–044)] NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Planetary Protection Subcommittee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. E:\FR\FM\15APN1.SGM 15APN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 75, Number 72 (Thursday, April 15, 2010)]
[Notices]
[Pages 19659-19661]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2010-8642]


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DEPARTMENT OF LABOR

Office of the Secretary of Labor


Request for Information on Business Practices To Reduce the 
Likelihood of Forced Labor or Child Labor in the Production of Goods

AGENCY: Bureau of International Labor Affairs, Labor.

ACTION: Request for information.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: The Department of Labor (DOL) is seeking information on 
current practices of firms, business associations, and other private 
sector groups to reduce the likelihood of child labor and forced labor 
in the production of goods. This information will aid DOL in fulfilling 
its mandate under the Trafficking Victims Protection Reauthorization 
Act of 2005 to work with persons who are involved in the production of 
goods made with forced labor or child labor to create a standard set of 
practices that will reduce the likelihood that such persons will 
produce goods using such labor.

DATES: Information should be submitted to the Office of Child Labor, 
Forced Labor and Human Trafficking (OCFT) within the Bureau of 
International Labor Affairs (ILAB) via one of the methods described 
below by 5 p.m., on June 14, 2010.
    To Submit Information, or for Further Information, Contact: ILAB/
OCFT, U.S. Department of Labor, at (202) 693-4843 (this is not a toll 
free number). Comments, identified as ``Docket No. DOL-2010-0002,'' may 
be submitted by any of the following methods:
     Federal eRulemaking Portal: http://www.regulations.gov. 
The portal

[[Page 19660]]

includes instructions for submitting comments. Parties submitting 
responses electronically are encouraged not to submit paper copies.
     Facsimile (fax): OCFT at 202-693-4830.
     Mail, Express Delivery, Hand Delivery, and Messenger 
Service (2 copies): Charita Castro or Rachel Rigby at U.S. Department 
of Labor, ILAB/OCFT, 200 Constitution Avenue, NW., Room S-5317, 
Washington, DC 20210. Note that security-related screening may result 
in significant delays in receiving materials by regular mail.
     E-mail: ilab-tvpra@dol.gov.
    All submissions should clearly identify the person and/or 
organization filing the submission and should be signed and dated.
    In addition to these formal submission methods, the public will be 
able to view this notice via DOL's Facebook page at http://www.facebook.com/departmentoflabor and Twitter account at http://twitter.com/usdol.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:

I. Background

    Section 105(b)(1) of the Trafficking Victims Protection 
Reauthorization Act of 2005 (``TVPRA of 2005''), Public Law 109-164 
(2006), directed the Secretary of Labor, acting through the Bureau of 
International Labor Affairs, to ``carry out additional activities to 
monitor and combat forced labor and child labor in foreign countries.'' 
Section 105(b)(2) of the TVPRA of 2005, 22 U.S.C. 7112(b)(2), listed 
these activities as:
    (A) Monitor the use of forced labor and child labor in violation of 
international standards;
    (B) Provide information regarding trafficking in persons for the 
purpose of forced labor to the Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking 
of the Department of State for inclusion in [the] trafficking in 
persons report required by section 110(b) of the Trafficking Victims 
Protection Act of 2000 (22 U.S.C. 7107(b));
    (C) Develop and make available to the public a list of goods from 
countries that the Bureau of International Labor Affairs has reason to 
believe are produced by forced labor or child labor in violation of 
international standards;
    (D) Work with persons who are involved in the production of goods 
on the list described in subparagraph (C) to create a standard set of 
practices that will reduce the likelihood that such persons will 
produce goods using the labor described in such subparagraph; and
    (E) Consult with other departments and agencies of the United 
States Government to reduce forced and child labor internationally and 
ensure that products made by forced labor and child labor in violation 
of international standards are not imported into the United States.
    Pursuant to part (D) of the TVPRA of 2005 mandate, ILAB is seeking 
information on current practices of firms, business associations, and 
other private sector groups to reduce the likelihood of child labor and 
forced labor in the production of goods. Many firms have policies, 
activities and/or systems in place to monitor labor rights in their 
supply chains and remediate violations. Such policies, activities and 
systems vary depending on location, industry, and many other factors. 
ILAB seeks to identify practices that have been effective in specific 
contexts, analyze their replicability, and disseminate those that have 
potential to be effective on a broader scale. For further details see 
the ``Information Requested'' section of this notice.

II. Definitions of Forced Labor and Child Labor

    ``Child Labor''--``Child labor'' under international standards 
means all work performed by a person below the age of 15. It also 
includes all work performed by a person below the age of 18 in the 
following practices:
    (A) All forms of slavery or practices similar to slavery, such as 
the sale or trafficking of children, debt bondage and serfdom, or 
forced or compulsory labor, including forced or compulsory recruitment 
of children for use in armed conflict;
    (B) The use, procuring, or offering of a child for prostitution, 
for the production of pornography or for pornographic purposes;
    (C) The use, procuring, or offering of a child for illicit 
activities in particular for the production and trafficking of drugs; 
and
    (D) Work which, by its nature or the circumstances in which it is 
carried out, is likely to harm the health, safety, or morals of 
children. The work referred to in subparagraph (D) is determined by the 
laws, regulations, or competent authority of the country involved, 
after consultation with the organizations of employers and workers 
concerned, and taking into consideration relevant international 
standards. This definition will not apply to work specifically 
authorized by national laws, including work done by children in schools 
for general, vocational or technical education or in other training 
institutions, where such work is carried out in accordance with 
international standards under conditions prescribed by the competent 
authority, and does not prejudice children's attendance in school or 
their capacity to benefit from the instruction received.
    ``Forced Labor''--``Forced labor'' under international standards 
means all work or service which is exacted from any person under the 
menace of any penalty for its nonperformance and for which the worker 
does not offer himself voluntarily, and includes indentured labor. 
``Forced labor'' includes work provided or obtained by force, fraud, or 
coercion, including:
    (1) By threats of serious harm to, or physical restraint against 
any person;
    (2) By means of any scheme, plan, or pattern intended to cause the 
person to believe that, if the person did not perform such labor or 
services, that person or another person would suffer serious harm or 
physical restraint; or
    (3) By means of the abuse or threatened abuse of law or the legal 
process. For purposes of this definition, forced labor does not include 
work specifically authorized by national laws where such work is 
carried out in accordance with conditions prescribed by the competent 
authority, including: any work or service required by compulsory 
military service laws for work of a purely military character; work or 
service which forms part of the normal civic obligations of the 
citizens of a fully self-governing country; work or service exacted 
from any person as a consequence of a conviction in a court of law, 
provided that the said work or service is carried out under the 
supervision and control of a public authority and that the said person 
is not hired to or placed at the disposal of private individuals, 
companies or associations; work or service required in cases of 
emergency, such as in the event of war or of a calamity or threatened 
calamity, fire, flood, famine, earthquake, violent epidemic or 
epizootic diseases, invasion by animal, insect or vegetable pests, and 
in general any circumstance that would endanger the existence or the 
well-being of the whole or part of the population; and minor communal 
services of a kind which, being performed by the members of the 
community in the direct interest of the said community, can therefore 
be considered as normal civic obligations incumbent upon the members of 
the community, provided that the members of the community or their 
direct representatives have the right to be consulted in regard to the 
need for such services.

III. Information Requested

    ILAB is seeking general information on the practices of business 
entities to

[[Page 19661]]

reduce the likelihood of child labor and forced labor in the production 
of goods. ILAB welcomes any and all information, which could include, 
e.g., codes of conduct, standards used to implement such codes of 
conduct, auditing/monitoring systems, supply-chain management practices 
designed to monitor informal workplaces, homework, and other 
challenging work environments, training modules, reporting practices, 
collaborative practices and strategies, grassroots projects, or other 
relevant information. ILAB is also seeking information on government 
practices to collaborate with private sector entities to reduce child 
labor and forced labor in the production of goods. Submissions may 
include documents in various formats, such as policy statements, 
reports, and case studies. However, the specific format of any 
submission is not important provided that the document presents and/or 
evaluates practices implemented by business entities, or governments in 
partnership with business entities, to reduce the likelihood of child 
labor and forced labor in the production of goods.
    Information should be submitted to the addresses and within the 
time period set forth above. DOL seeks information that can be used to 
inform the development of tools and resources to be disseminated 
publicly on the DOL Web site and/or in other publications. Internal 
documents or confidential documents that cannot be shared with the 
public will not be used. Submissions containing confidential or 
personal information may be redacted by DOL before being made available 
to the public, in accordance with applicable laws and regulations. DOL 
does not intend to respond directly to a submission or to return a 
submission to a submitter, but DOL may communicate with the submitter 
regarding any matters relating to the submission.
    DOL will compile and analyze submissions pursuant to this Notice, 
and of many other practices as described above, in coordination with a 
contractor, the Center for Reflection, Education, and Action (CREA). 
For more information about CREA's contract with DOL, or to discuss 
relevant practices directly with CREA, please contact Project Director 
Ruth Rosenbaum at inc.org">ruth_rosenbaum@crea-inc.org.

    Signed at Washington, DC this 12th day of April, 2010.
Sandra Polaski,
Deputy Undersecretary, Bureau of International Labor Affairs.
[FR Doc. 2010-8642 Filed 4-14-10; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4510-28-P