Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) Carry-Over Funds, 17313-17315 [2010-7530]

Download as PDF Federal Register / Vol. 75, No. 65 / Tuesday, April 6, 2010 / Rules and Regulations sroberts on DSKD5P82C1PROD with RULES Chapter 44, ‘‘Hazardous Waste Management’’, published in 2002 by the Michie Company, Law Publishers: sections 39–4403(6) & (14); 39–4428 and 39–4429. (ii) 2004 Cumulative Pocket Supplement to the Idaho Code (I.C.), Volume 39, Title 44, ‘‘Hazardous Waste Management’’, published in 2004 by the Michie Company, Law Publishers, Charlottesville, Virginia: section 39– 4427. (iii) Idaho Code containing the General Laws of Idaho Annotated, Title 39, Chapter 58, ‘‘Hazardous Waste Siting Act’’, published in 2002 by the Michie Company, Law Publishers: section 39– 5813(3). (iv) Idaho Department of Environmental Quality Rules and Regulations, Idaho Administrative Code, IDAPA 58, Title 1, Chapter 5, ‘‘Rules and Standards for Hazardous Waste’’, as published July 2008: sections 58.01.05.355; and 58.01.05.500. (4) Memorandum of Agreement. The Memorandum of Agreement between EPA Region 10 and the State of Idaho (IDEQ), signed by the EPA Regional Administrator on August 1, 2001, although not incorporated by reference, is referenced as part of the authorized hazardous waste management program under subtitle C of RCRA, 42 U.S.C. 6921, et seq. (5) Statement of Legal Authority. The ‘‘Attorney General’s Statement for Final Authorization,’’ signed by the Attorney General of Idaho on July 5, 1988, and revisions, supplements and addenda to that Statement, dated July 3, 1989, February 13, 1992, December 29, 1994, September 16, 1996, October 3, 1997, April 6, 2001, September 11, 2002, September 22, 2004, June 13, 2006, September 29, 2006 and June 23, 2008, although not incorporated by reference, are referenced as part of the authorized hazardous waste management program under subtitle C of RCRA, 42 U.S.C. 6921, et seq. (6) Program Description. The Program Description and any other materials submitted as part of the original application or as supplements thereto, although not incorporated by reference, are referenced as part of the authorized hazardous waste management program under subtitle C of RCRA, 42 U.S.C. 6921 et seq. 3. Appendix A to part 272 is amended by revising the listing for ‘‘Idaho’’ to read as follows: ■ Appendix A to Part 272—State Requirements * * * VerDate Nov<24>2008 * * 16:13 Apr 05, 2010 Jkt 220001 Idaho (a) The statutory provisions include: Idaho Code containing the General Laws of Idaho Annotated, Title 39, Chapter 44, ‘‘Hazardous Waste Management’’, 2002: sections 39–4402; 39–4403 (except 39– 4403(6) & (14)); 39–4408(1)–(3); 39–4409(1) (except fourth and fifth sentences); 39–4409(2) (only the first sentence); 39– 4409(4) (except first sentence); 39–4409(5); 39–4409(6); 39– 4409(7); 39–4409(8); 39– 4411(2); 39–4411(4); 39–4411(5); 39–4423 (except 39–4423(3)(a) & (b)); and 39–4424. Idaho Code containing the General Laws of Idaho Annotated, Title 39, Chapter 58, ‘‘Hazardous Waste Facility Siting Act’’, published in 2002 by the Michie Company, Law Publishers: sections 39–5802; 39–5803; 39–5808; 39–5811; 39–5813(1); and 39– 5818(2). Copies of the Idaho statutes that are incorporated by reference are available from Michie Company, Law Publishers, 1 Town Hall Square, Charlottesville, VA 22906–7587. (b) The regulatory provisions include: Idaho Department of Environmental Quality Rules and Regulations, Idaho Administrative Code, IDAPA 58, Title 1, Chapter 5, ‘‘Rules and Standards for Hazardous Waste’’, as published on July 2008: sections 58.01.05.001; 58.01.05.002; 58.01.05.003; 58.01.05.004; 58.01.05.005; 58.01.05.006; 58.01.05.007; 58.01.05.008; 58.01.05.009; 58.01.05.010; 58.01.05.011; 58.01.05.012; 58.01.05.013; 58.01.05.014; 58.01.05.015; 58.01.05.016; 58.01.05.018; 58.01.05.356.01; and 58.01.05.998. * * * * * [FR Doc. 2010–7647 Filed 4–5–10; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 6560–50–P DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Administration for Children and Families 45 CFR Part 286 RIN 0970–AC40 Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) Carry-Over Funds AGENCY: Administration for Children and Families (ACF), Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: This final rule implements the statutory change to section 404(e) of the Social Security Act as enacted by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. This change allows States, Tribes and Territories to use Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program funds carried over from a prior year for any allowable TANF benefit, service or activity. Previously these funds could be used only to provide assistance. This final rule applies to States, local PO 00000 Frm 00033 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 17313 governments, and Tribes that administer the TANF program. DATES: Effective April 6, 2010, the interim final rule amending 45 CFR part 286 which was published at 74 FR 25161 on May 27, 2009, is adopted as a final rule without change. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Robert Shelbourne, Director, Division of State TANF Policy and Acting Director, Division of Tribal TANF Management, Office of Family Assistance, ACF, at (202) 401–5150. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Statutory Authority Section 417 of the Social Security Act (42 U.S.C. 617) limits the authority of the Federal government to regulate State conduct or enforce the TANF provisions of the Social Security Act, except as expressly provided. We have interpreted this provision to allow us to regulate where Congress has charged HHS with enforcing certain TANF provisions by assessing penalties. Because the improper use of Federal TANF carryover funds can result in a financial penalty pursuant to 42 U.S.C. 609(a)(1), we have the authority to regulate in this instance. II. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 On February 17, 2009, the President signed the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Pub. L. 111– 5), which included a provision to lift the restriction on unspent Federal TANF funds reserved or ‘‘carried over’’ into a succeeding fiscal year. Prior to Public Law 111–5, carry-over funds could only be used to provide assistance (i.e., ongoing basic needs payments, and supportive services such as transportation and child care to families who are not employed). Section 2103 of Division B of Public Law 111–5 amends section 404(e) of the Social Security Act (Act) by allowing States, District of Columbia, the Territories and Tribes to use the carry-over funds for any allowable TANF benefit, service, or activity (such as job skills training or retraining activities, employment counseling services, parental counseling services, teen pregnancy prevention activities, services for victims of domestic violence, after-school programs)—and not just assistance. III. Response to Public Comment and Regulatory Provisions The interim final rule was published May 27, 2009, and provided a 60-day comment period. Only one comment was received from an advocacy organization that simply expressed E:\FR\FM\06APR1.SGM 06APR1 17314 Federal Register / Vol. 75, No. 65 / Tuesday, April 6, 2010 / Rules and Regulations support for the regulation; thus, no changes have been made to the provisions of the interim final rule in the final rule. As discussed below, section 2103 of Public Law 111–5 requires a change in the Tribal TANF regulation at 45 CFR 286.60. The TANF regulations at 45 CFR Part 263, applicable to States and Territories, require no change. sroberts on DSKD5P82C1PROD with RULES PART 286—TRIBAL TANF PROVISIONS Section 286.60: Must Tribes obligate all Tribal Family Assistance Grant funds by the end of the fiscal year in which they are awarded? Under prior law, section 404(e) of the Act, entitled ‘‘Authority to Reserve Certain Amounts for Assistance,’’ allowed States and Indian Tribes operating approved Tribal TANF programs (Tribes) to reserve Federal TANF funds that they receive ‘‘for any fiscal year for the purpose of providing, without fiscal year limitation, assistance under the State or tribal program funded under this part’’ (Title IV, Part A of the Act). Based on the reading of this section, we concluded that States and Tribes could only use reserve or ‘‘carryover’’ funds to provide TANF assistance, defined in 45 CFR 260.31 for States and in 45 CFR 286.10 for Tribes, and to pay for the administrative expenses associated with providing the assistance. The statutory wording also precluded States from transferring ‘‘carry-over’’ funds to either the Social Services Block Grant Program (SSBG) under title XX of the Act or the Child Care and Development Block Grant Program (also known as the Child Care Discretionary Fund within the Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF)). (The transfer provision in section 404(d) of the Act does not apply to Tribes.) Section 2103 of Division B of Public Law 111–5 (American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009) amended section 404(e) of the Social Security Act. The amendment allows States and Tribes to use unspent Federal TANF funds carried over from prior fiscal years ‘‘to provide, without fiscal year limitation, any benefit or service that may be provided under the State or tribal program funded under this part.’’ Thus, States and Tribes are no longer restricted to using carry-over TANF funds to provide benefits that specifically meet the definition of assistance. States and Tribes may expend carry-over funds for any allowable TANF benefit, service, or activity. Because the amended section 404(e) continues to specify that carryover funds may only be used ‘‘under this VerDate Nov<24>2008 16:13 Apr 05, 2010 Jkt 220001 part’’—i.e., in the TANF program, States may not transfer any carry-over funds to either CCDF or the SSBG program. States may only transfer current year Federal TANF funds (up to the statutory limit) to these programs. Accordingly, we have amended § 286.60 because the limitation on the use of carry-over funds explicitly appears in this section. We have deleted paragraph (b) which previously read, ‘‘A Tribe may expend funds beyond the fiscal year in which awarded only on benefits that meet the definition of assistance at § 286.10 or on the administrative costs directly associated with providing that assistance.’’ This sentence is no longer accurate because the law removes the restriction. We have revised the remaining language to provide that a Tribe may reserve amounts awarded to it, without fiscal year limitation, to provide assistance, benefits, and services in accordance with the requirements under § 286.35 or § 286.40, if applicable. No change in the regulations related to the State TANF program is necessary, as those regulations speak more broadly to improper uses of TANF funds. Specifically, § 263.11(b) currently states that ‘‘We will consider use of funds in violation of * * * sections 404 and 408 and other provisions of the Act * * * to be misuse of funds.’’ This statement is not impacted by the change to section 404(e) of the Act. VI. Regulatory Impact Analysis Executive Order 12866 requires the review of regulations to ensure that they are consistent with the priorities and principles set forth in the Executive Order. The Department has determined that this final rule is consistent with these priorities and principles. This regulation implements a statutory change in the use of Federal TANF block grant funds carried over from a prior fiscal year included in the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Pub. L. 111–5). Further, we certify that this change is not an ‘‘economically significant regulatory action’’ under Section 3(f)(1) of Executive Order 12866. It will not have an annual effect on the economy of $100 million or more or adversely affect in a material way the economy, a sector of the economy, productivity, competition, jobs, the environment, public health or safety, or State, local, or tribal governments or communities. TANF block grant awards remain the same; this change in statute simply allows carry-over funds under the TANF program to be used for broader purposes. The Department, however, has determined that this rule is significant for the purposes of review under Section 3(f)(4) of Executive Order 12866; accordingly, it was reviewed by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB). IV. Paperwork Reduction Act VII. Unfunded Mandates Reform Act of 1995 Section 202 of the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act of 1995 requires that a covered agency prepare a budgetary impact statement before promulgating a rule that includes any Federal mandate that may result in the expenditure by State, local, and Tribal governments, in the aggregate, or by the private sector, of $133 million or more in any one year. The Department has determined that this rule would not impose a mandate that will result in the expenditure by State, local, and Tribal governments, in the aggregate, or by the private sector, of more than $133 million in any one year. There are no information collection activities imposed by this regulation, nor are any existing requirements changed as a result of their promulgation. Therefore, the requirements of the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (44 U.S.C. 3507) regarding reporting and recordkeeping, do not apply. V. Regulatory Flexibility Analysis The Regulatory Flexibility Act (5 U.S.C. 605(b)) requires the Federal government to anticipate and reduce the impact of rules and paperwork requirements on small businesses and other small entities. Small entities are defined in this Act to include small businesses as defined by the Small Business Administration, non-profit organizations that are not dominant in their markets, and small governmental jurisdictions. This rule will affect primarily the 50 States, the District of Columbia, certain Territories, and Indian Tribes operating approved Tribal TANF programs. Therefore, we certify that this rule will not have a significant impact on small entities. PO 00000 Frm 00034 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 VIII. Congressional Review This regulation is not a major rule as defined in 5 U.S.C. Chapter 8. IX. Assessment of Federal Regulation and Policies on Families Section 654 of the Treasury and General Government Appropriations Act of 1999 requires Federal agencies to determine whether a proposed policy or regulation may negatively affect family well-being. If the agency’s E:\FR\FM\06APR1.SGM 06APR1 Federal Register / Vol. 75, No. 65 / Tuesday, April 6, 2010 / Rules and Regulations determination is affirmative, then the agency must prepare an impact assessment addressing seven criteria specified in the law. The Department has determined that this regulation does not negatively affect family well-being. The purpose of the TANF program is to strengthen the economic and social stability of families. This rule lifts the restriction on the use of Federal TANF carry-over funds so that States and Tribes may provide the services that families need to attain and maintain self-sufficiency. X. Executive Order 13132 Executive Order 13132, Federalism, requires that Federal agencies consult with State and local government officials in the development of regulatory policies with Federalism implications. Consistent with this Executive Order, we solicited comments from State and local government officials on the interim final rule. XI. List of Subjects in 45 CFR Part 286 Carry-over, Reserve, Prior fiscal years, Federal TANF funds. (Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance Program Number 93.558, Temporary Assistance for Needy Families Program) Dated: November 20, 2009. Carmen R. Nazario, Assistant Secretary for Children and Families. Approved: January 19, 2010. Kathleen Sebelius, Secretary, Department of Health and Human Services. PART 286—TRIBAL TANF PROVISIONS Accordingly, the interim final rule amending 45 CFR part 286 which was published at 74 FR 25161 on May 27, 2009, is adopted as a final rule without change. ■ [FR Doc. 2010–7530 Filed 4–5–10; 8:45 am] sroberts on DSKD5P82C1PROD with RULES BILLING CODE P VerDate Nov<24>2008 16:13 Apr 05, 2010 Jkt 220001 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 50 CFR Part 679 [Docket No. 0910131363–0087–02] RIN 0648–XV66 Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod for American Fisheries Act Catcher Processors Using Trawl Gear in the Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands Management Area AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Temporary rule; closure. NMFS is prohibiting directed fishing for Pacific cod by American Fisheries Act (AFA) trawl catcher processors in the Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands management area (BSAI). This action is necessary to prevent exceeding the B season allowance of the 2010 Pacific cod total allowable catch (TAC) specified for AFA trawl catcher processors in the BSAI. DATES: Effective 1200 hrs, Alaska local time (A.l.t.), April 1, 2010, through 1200 hrs, A.l.t., June 10, 2010. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Josh Keaton, 907–586–7228. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: NMFS manages the groundfish fishery in the BSAI exclusive economic zone according to the Fishery Management Plan for Groundfish of the Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands Management Area (FMP) prepared by the North Pacific Fishery Management Council under authority of the Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act. Regulations governing fishing by U.S. vessels in accordance with the FMP appear at subpart H of 50 CFR part 600 and 50 CFR part 679. The B season allowance of the 2010 Pacific cod TAC allocated to AFA trawl catcher processors in the BSAI is 867 metric tons (mt) as established by the final 2010 and 2011 harvest specifications for groundfish in the BSAI (75 FR 11788, March 12, 2010). In accordance with § 679.20(d)(1)(i), the Administrator, Alaska Region, NMFS, has determined that the B season SUMMARY: PO 00000 Frm 00035 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 9990 17315 allowance of the 2010 Pacific cod TAC allocated to AFA trawl catcher processors in the BSAI will soon be reached. Therefore, the Regional Administrator is establishing a directed fishing allowance of 100 mt, and is setting aside the remaining 767 mt as bycatch to support other anticipated groundfish fisheries. In accordance with § 679.20(d)(1)(iii), the Regional Administrator finds that this directed fishing allowance has been reached. Consequently, NMFS is prohibiting directed fishing for Pacific cod by AFA trawl catcher processors in the BSAI. After the effective date of this closure the maximum retainable amounts at § 679.20(e) and (f) apply at any time during a trip. Classification This action responds to the best available information recently obtained from the fishery. The Assistant Administrator for Fisheries, NOAA, (AA), finds good cause to waive the requirement to provide prior notice and opportunity for public comment pursuant to the authority set forth at 5 U.S.C. 553(b)(B) as such requirement is impracticable and contrary to the public interest. This requirement is impracticable and contrary to the public interest as it would prevent NMFS from responding to the most recent fisheries data in a timely fashion and would delay the closure of Pacific cod by AFA trawl catcher processors in the BSAI. NMFS was unable to publish a notice providing time for public comment because the most recent, relevant data only became available as of March 31, 2010. The AA also finds good cause to waive the 30–day delay in the effective date of this action under 5 U.S.C. 553(d)(3). This finding is based upon the reasons provided above for waiver of prior notice and opportunity for public comment. This action is required by § 679.20 and is exempt from review under Executive Order 12866. Authority: 16 U.S.C. 1801 et seq. Dated: April 1, 2010. James P. Burgess, Acting Director, Office of Sustainable Fisheries, National Marine Fisheries Service. [FR Doc. 2010–7760 Filed 4–1–10; 4:15 pm] BILLING CODE 3510–22–S E:\FR\FM\06APR1.SGM 06APR1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 75, Number 65 (Tuesday, April 6, 2010)]
[Rules and Regulations]
[Pages 17313-17315]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2010-7530]


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DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

Administration for Children and Families

45 CFR Part 286

RIN 0970-AC40


Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) Carry-Over Funds

AGENCY: Administration for Children and Families (ACF), Department of 
Health and Human Services (HHS).

ACTION: Final rule.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: This final rule implements the statutory change to section 
404(e) of the Social Security Act as enacted by the American Recovery 
and Reinvestment Act of 2009. This change allows States, Tribes and 
Territories to use Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) 
program funds carried over from a prior year for any allowable TANF 
benefit, service or activity. Previously these funds could be used only 
to provide assistance. This final rule applies to States, local 
governments, and Tribes that administer the TANF program.

DATES: Effective April 6, 2010, the interim final rule amending 45 CFR 
part 286 which was published at 74 FR 25161 on May 27, 2009, is adopted 
as a final rule without change.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Robert Shelbourne, Director, Division 
of State TANF Policy and Acting Director, Division of Tribal TANF 
Management, Office of Family Assistance, ACF, at (202) 401-5150.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:

I. Statutory Authority

    Section 417 of the Social Security Act (42 U.S.C. 617) limits the 
authority of the Federal government to regulate State conduct or 
enforce the TANF provisions of the Social Security Act, except as 
expressly provided. We have interpreted this provision to allow us to 
regulate where Congress has charged HHS with enforcing certain TANF 
provisions by assessing penalties. Because the improper use of Federal 
TANF carry-over funds can result in a financial penalty pursuant to 42 
U.S.C. 609(a)(1), we have the authority to regulate in this instance.

II. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009

    On February 17, 2009, the President signed the American Recovery 
and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Pub. L. 111-5), which included a 
provision to lift the restriction on unspent Federal TANF funds 
reserved or ``carried over'' into a succeeding fiscal year. Prior to 
Public Law 111-5, carry-over funds could only be used to provide 
assistance (i.e., ongoing basic needs payments, and supportive services 
such as transportation and child care to families who are not 
employed). Section 2103 of Division B of Public Law 111-5 amends 
section 404(e) of the Social Security Act (Act) by allowing States, 
District of Columbia, the Territories and Tribes to use the carry-over 
funds for any allowable TANF benefit, service, or activity (such as job 
skills training or re-training activities, employment counseling 
services, parental counseling services, teen pregnancy prevention 
activities, services for victims of domestic violence, after-school 
programs)--and not just assistance.

III. Response to Public Comment and Regulatory Provisions

    The interim final rule was published May 27, 2009, and provided a 
60-day comment period. Only one comment was received from an advocacy 
organization that simply expressed

[[Page 17314]]

support for the regulation; thus, no changes have been made to the 
provisions of the interim final rule in the final rule. As discussed 
below, section 2103 of Public Law 111-5 requires a change in the Tribal 
TANF regulation at 45 CFR 286.60. The TANF regulations at 45 CFR Part 
263, applicable to States and Territories, require no change.

PART 286--TRIBAL TANF PROVISIONS

Section 286.60: Must Tribes obligate all Tribal Family Assistance Grant 
funds by the end of the fiscal year in which they are awarded?

    Under prior law, section 404(e) of the Act, entitled ``Authority to 
Reserve Certain Amounts for Assistance,'' allowed States and Indian 
Tribes operating approved Tribal TANF programs (Tribes) to reserve 
Federal TANF funds that they receive ``for any fiscal year for the 
purpose of providing, without fiscal year limitation, assistance under 
the State or tribal program funded under this part'' (Title IV, Part A 
of the Act). Based on the reading of this section, we concluded that 
States and Tribes could only use reserve or ``carry-over'' funds to 
provide TANF assistance, defined in 45 CFR 260.31 for States and in 45 
CFR 286.10 for Tribes, and to pay for the administrative expenses 
associated with providing the assistance. The statutory wording also 
precluded States from transferring ``carry-over'' funds to either the 
Social Services Block Grant Program (SSBG) under title XX of the Act or 
the Child Care and Development Block Grant Program (also known as the 
Child Care Discretionary Fund within the Child Care and Development 
Fund (CCDF)). (The transfer provision in section 404(d) of the Act does 
not apply to Tribes.)
    Section 2103 of Division B of Public Law 111-5 (American Recovery 
and Reinvestment Act of 2009) amended section 404(e) of the Social 
Security Act. The amendment allows States and Tribes to use unspent 
Federal TANF funds carried over from prior fiscal years ``to provide, 
without fiscal year limitation, any benefit or service that may be 
provided under the State or tribal program funded under this part.'' 
Thus, States and Tribes are no longer restricted to using carry-over 
TANF funds to provide benefits that specifically meet the definition of 
assistance. States and Tribes may expend carry-over funds for any 
allowable TANF benefit, service, or activity. Because the amended 
section 404(e) continues to specify that carry-over funds may only be 
used ``under this part''--i.e., in the TANF program, States may not 
transfer any carry-over funds to either CCDF or the SSBG program. 
States may only transfer current year Federal TANF funds (up to the 
statutory limit) to these programs.
    Accordingly, we have amended Sec.  286.60 because the limitation on 
the use of carry-over funds explicitly appears in this section. We have 
deleted paragraph (b) which previously read, ``A Tribe may expend funds 
beyond the fiscal year in which awarded only on benefits that meet the 
definition of assistance at Sec.  286.10 or on the administrative costs 
directly associated with providing that assistance.'' This sentence is 
no longer accurate because the law removes the restriction. We have 
revised the remaining language to provide that a Tribe may reserve 
amounts awarded to it, without fiscal year limitation, to provide 
assistance, benefits, and services in accordance with the requirements 
under Sec.  286.35 or Sec.  286.40, if applicable.
    No change in the regulations related to the State TANF program is 
necessary, as those regulations speak more broadly to improper uses of 
TANF funds. Specifically, Sec.  263.11(b) currently states that ``We 
will consider use of funds in violation of * * * sections 404 and 408 
and other provisions of the Act * * * to be misuse of funds.'' This 
statement is not impacted by the change to section 404(e) of the Act.

IV. Paperwork Reduction Act

    There are no information collection activities imposed by this 
regulation, nor are any existing requirements changed as a result of 
their promulgation. Therefore, the requirements of the Paperwork 
Reduction Act of 1995 (44 U.S.C. 3507) regarding reporting and 
recordkeeping, do not apply.

V. Regulatory Flexibility Analysis

    The Regulatory Flexibility Act (5 U.S.C. 605(b)) requires the 
Federal government to anticipate and reduce the impact of rules and 
paperwork requirements on small businesses and other small entities. 
Small entities are defined in this Act to include small businesses as 
defined by the Small Business Administration, non-profit organizations 
that are not dominant in their markets, and small governmental 
jurisdictions. This rule will affect primarily the 50 States, the 
District of Columbia, certain Territories, and Indian Tribes operating 
approved Tribal TANF programs. Therefore, we certify that this rule 
will not have a significant impact on small entities.

VI. Regulatory Impact Analysis

    Executive Order 12866 requires the review of regulations to ensure 
that they are consistent with the priorities and principles set forth 
in the Executive Order. The Department has determined that this final 
rule is consistent with these priorities and principles. This 
regulation implements a statutory change in the use of Federal TANF 
block grant funds carried over from a prior fiscal year included in the 
American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Pub. L. 111-5). 
Further, we certify that this change is not an ``economically 
significant regulatory action'' under Section 3(f)(1) of Executive 
Order 12866. It will not have an annual effect on the economy of $100 
million or more or adversely affect in a material way the economy, a 
sector of the economy, productivity, competition, jobs, the 
environment, public health or safety, or State, local, or tribal 
governments or communities. TANF block grant awards remain the same; 
this change in statute simply allows carry-over funds under the TANF 
program to be used for broader purposes.
    The Department, however, has determined that this rule is 
significant for the purposes of review under Section 3(f)(4) of 
Executive Order 12866; accordingly, it was reviewed by the Office of 
Management and Budget (OMB).

VII. Unfunded Mandates Reform Act of 1995

    Section 202 of the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act of 1995 requires 
that a covered agency prepare a budgetary impact statement before 
promulgating a rule that includes any Federal mandate that may result 
in the expenditure by State, local, and Tribal governments, in the 
aggregate, or by the private sector, of $133 million or more in any one 
year. The Department has determined that this rule would not impose a 
mandate that will result in the expenditure by State, local, and Tribal 
governments, in the aggregate, or by the private sector, of more than 
$133 million in any one year.

VIII. Congressional Review

    This regulation is not a major rule as defined in 5 U.S.C. Chapter 
8.

IX. Assessment of Federal Regulation and Policies on Families

    Section 654 of the Treasury and General Government Appropriations 
Act of 1999 requires Federal agencies to determine whether a proposed 
policy or regulation may negatively affect family well-being. If the 
agency's

[[Page 17315]]

determination is affirmative, then the agency must prepare an impact 
assessment addressing seven criteria specified in the law.
    The Department has determined that this regulation does not 
negatively affect family well-being. The purpose of the TANF program is 
to strengthen the economic and social stability of families. This rule 
lifts the restriction on the use of Federal TANF carry-over funds so 
that States and Tribes may provide the services that families need to 
attain and maintain self-sufficiency.

X. Executive Order 13132

    Executive Order 13132, Federalism, requires that Federal agencies 
consult with State and local government officials in the development of 
regulatory policies with Federalism implications. Consistent with this 
Executive Order, we solicited comments from State and local government 
officials on the interim final rule.

XI. List of Subjects in 45 CFR Part 286

    Carry-over, Reserve, Prior fiscal years, Federal TANF funds.

(Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance Program Number 93.558, 
Temporary Assistance for Needy Families Program)

    Dated: November 20, 2009.
Carmen R. Nazario,
Assistant Secretary for Children and Families.
    Approved: January 19, 2010.
Kathleen Sebelius,
Secretary, Department of Health and Human Services.

PART 286--TRIBAL TANF PROVISIONS

0
Accordingly, the interim final rule amending 45 CFR part 286 which was 
published at 74 FR 25161 on May 27, 2009, is adopted as a final rule 
without change.

[FR Doc. 2010-7530 Filed 4-5-10; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE P