Executive-Led Trade Mission to Colombia and Panama; November 15-18, 2010, 5761-5763 [2010-2365]

Download as PDF Federal Register / Vol. 75, No. 23 / Thursday, February 4, 2010 / Notices FWS to certify compliance with vessel monitoring system requirements, monument regulations and best management practices. On August 29, 2006, NOAA and FWS published a final rule codifying the provisions of the proclamation (71 FR 51134). II. Method of Collection BILLING CODE 3510–NK–P International Trade Administration Executive-Led Trade Mission to Colombia and Panama; November 15– 18, 2010 III. Data Department of Commerce. Notice. AGENCY: OMB Control Number: 0648–0548. Form Number: None. Type of Review: Regular submission. Affected Public: Individuals or households; non-profit institutions; Federal, state, or local government; Native Hawaiian organizations; business or other for-profit organizations. Estimated Number of Respondents: 411. Estimated Time per Response: Research, Conservation and Management and Education (‘‘general’’ permits), 5 hours; Special Ocean Use permits, 10 hours; Native Hawaiian Practices permits, 8 hours; Recreation permits, 6 hours; permit modification requests and final reports, 10 hours; and annual reports, 5 hours. Estimated Total Annual Burden Hours: 1,794. Estimated Total Annual Cost to Public: $26,280 in recordkeeping/ reporting costs and vessel monitoring system installation and maintenance. IV. Request for Comments srobinson on DSKHWCL6B1PROD with NOTICES [FR Doc. 2010–2404 Filed 2–3–10; 8:45 am] DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Respondents have a choice of either electronic or paper forms. Methods of submittal include e-mail of electronic forms, and mail and facsimile transmission of paper forms. Comments are invited on: (a) Whether the proposed collection of information is necessary for the proper performance of the functions of the agency, including whether the information shall have practical utility; (b) the accuracy of the agency’s estimate of the burden (including hours and cost) of the proposed collection of information; (c) ways to enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the information to be collected; and (d) ways to minimize the burden of the collection of information on respondents, including through the use of automated collection techniques or other forms of information technology. Comments submitted in response to this notice will be summarized and/or included in the request for OMB approval of this information collection; they also will become a matter of public record. VerDate Nov<24>2008 Dated: February 1, 2010. Gwellnar Banks, Management Analyst, Office of the Chief Information Officer. 17:31 Feb 03, 2010 Jkt 220001 ACTION: Mission Description The United States Department of Commerce, International Trade Administration, U.S. and Foreign Commercial Service is organizing a ´ Trade Mission to Bogota and Cartagena, Colombia and Panama City, Panama, November 15–18, 2010, to be led by a senior Commerce official. The mission will focus on helping U.S. companies launch or increase their export business in these promising markets. It will also help participating firms gain market information, make business and industry contacts, and solidify business strategies, towards the goal of increasing U.S. exports to the two markets. The mission will include business-tobusiness matchmaking appointments with local companies, as well as market briefings and networking events. The mission will be comprised of U.S. firms representing a cross section of U.S. industries with growing potential in the target markets, including, but not limited to the following sectors: Building products; computers; components and peripherals; construction equipment; electrical power systems; security and safety equipment; telecommunications equipment; and travel and tourism services. Commercial Setting Colombia Colombia ranks solidly with the group of progressive, industrializing countries worldwide that have diversified agriculture, resources, and productive capacities. Despite the global economic crisis, Colombia’s economic prospects are positive. Currently, it is the fifth largest market for U.S. exports in the region, after Mexico, Brazil, Venezuela, and Chile, and is ranked 26th as a market for U.S. exports globally. Since the election of President Alvaro Uribe in May 2002 (and subsequent re-election in PO 00000 Frm 00006 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 5761 2006), Colombia has become one of the most stable economies in the region. Improved security, sound government policies, steady economic growth, moderate inflation and a wide range of opportunities make it worthwhile for U.S. exporters to take a serious look at Colombia. Infrastructure development has fueled the growth of U.S. exports to Colombia, including opportunities generated by highway, hotel and housing ´ construction in Bogota and coastal cities such as Cartagena, San Andres, and Santa Marta. Developing the oil and gas industry and sea and river ports are also key priorities for the Uribe administration. An expanding list of emerging best prospects sectors includes computers and components, safety and security, and tourism, among others. Colombia’s increasingly democratic and transparent government and its traditional acceptance of U.S. and international standards, and U.S. brands provide a solid foundation for U.S. firms seeking to do business there. The U.S.Colombia Trade Promotion Agreement (TPA), signed in November 2006 and pending Congressional approval, would offer tremendous benefits to U.S. exporters. Upon entry into force, (following Colombia’s steps to ensure implementation of its obligations), the TPA would provide immediate dutyfree entry for 80 percent of U.S. consumer and industrial exports to Colombia, with remaining tariffs phased out over the next 10 years. The TPA would also open the market for remanufactured goods and provide greater protection for intellectual property rights (IPR). ´ Bogota, the capital of Colombia, generates approximately 30 percent of the country’s total gross domestic ´ product (GDP). Bogota offers diverse business opportunities in almost all economic sectors. Cartagena is the fifth largest city in Colombia concentrating business opportunities in ports, tourism, oil refinery and industries such as chemical plants, cement and beverages. Panama Panama has historically served as the crossroads of trade for the Americas. Its strategic location, bridging two oceans and two continents, has made Panama not only a maritime and air transport hub, but also an international trading, banking, and services center. Trade liberalization and privatization over the last several years, along with the hemispheric movement toward free trade agreements (the U.S.-Panama FTA is also pending), stand to increase Panama’s regional and global prominence. Panama’s dollar-based E:\FR\FM\04FEN1.SGM 04FEN1 5762 Federal Register / Vol. 75, No. 23 / Thursday, February 4, 2010 / Notices economy offers low inflation in comparison with neighboring countries, and zero foreign exchange risk. Its regulatory regimes are generally business friendly. Its government is stable, democratic, and reform minded, and actively seeks foreign investment in all sectors, especially services, tourism and retirement properties. The United States is Panama’s most important trading partner, claiming about 30 percent of the import market. Panama’s economy is based on a welldeveloped services sector, which accounts for about 80 percent of its gross domestic product (GDP). After reaching about nine percent in 2008, economic growth slowed to an estimated 4–6 percent in 2009 in light of global economic conditions and their impact on Panama’s service-based economy. The country’s major services sectors include the Panama Canal, banking, the Colon Free Zone, insurance, container ports, and flagship registry. The assembly and manufacturing sectors of Panama’s economy remain severely underdeveloped, with manufacturing and mining accounting for roughly 14 percent of GDP, and agriculture, forestry and fisheries making up the balance. Anchoring growth is the $5.25 billion multi-year Panama Canal expansion program already underway. While the global credit crunch threatens a number of big-ticket residential, commercial and tourism projects, select investment and construction continues, with approximately $1 billion slated for improvements in electrical generation and port facilities. Panama has potential for growth in the areas of electric power generation, health care services, port services, land development, road construction, water distribution and purification, telecommunications, and tourism. srobinson on DSKHWCL6B1PROD with NOTICES Mission Goals This trade mission is designed to help U.S. firms initiate or expand their exports to Colombia and Panama by providing business-to-business introductions and market access information. Mission Scenario ´ The mission will stop in Bogota, and Cartagena, Colombia, and Panama City, Panama. In each city, participants will meet with pre-screened potential buyers, agents, distributors, and other business partners. They will also attend market briefings by U.S. Embassy officials, as well as networking events offering further opportunities to speak with local business and industry decision-makers. VerDate Nov<24>2008 17:31 Feb 03, 2010 Jkt 220001 Proposed Mission Timetable ´ Monday, November 15, 2010, Bogota, Colombia Market briefing Matchmaking appointments Networking reception ´ Tuesday, November 16, 2010, Bogota and Cartagena, Colombia Travel to Cartagena Matchmaking appointments Wednesday, November 17, 2010, Cartagena, Colombia and Panama City, Panama Morning matchmaking appointments and/or site visits Late afternoon travel to Panama Thursday November 18, 2010, Panama City, Panama Market Briefing Matchmaking appointments Networking reception Participation Requirements All parties interested in participating in the Executive-led Trade Mission to Colombia and Panama must complete and submit an application package for consideration by the Department of Commerce. All applicants will be evaluated on their ability to meet certain conditions and best satisfy the selection criteria as outlined below. A minimum of seven U.S. companies and maximum of 15 companies will be selected to participate in the mission from the applicant pool. U.S. companies already doing business with Colombia and Panama as well as U.S. companies seeking to enter these countries for the first time may apply. Fees and Expenses After a company has been selected to participate on the mission, a payment to the Department of Commerce in the form of a participation fee is required. The participation fee will be $4,440 for large firms and $3,550 for a small or medium-sized enterprise (SME).1 The fee for each additional firm representative (large firm or SME) is $450. Expenses for travel, lodging, most meals, and incidentals will be the responsibility of each mission participant. The same fee structure 1 An SME is defined as a firm with 500 or fewer employees or that otherwise qualifies as a small business under SBA regulations (see http:// www.sba.gov/services/contracting opportunities/ sizestandardstopics/index.html). Parent companies, affiliates, and subsidiaries will be considered when determining business size. The dual pricing reflects the Commercial Service’s user fee schedule that became effective May 1, 2008 (see http:// www.export.gov/newsletter/march2008/ initiatives.html for additional information). PO 00000 Frm 00007 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 applies to representatives of U.S.-based firms stationed in Colombia, Panama, or neighboring countries. Conditions for Participation • An applicant must submit a completed and signed mission application and supplemental application materials, including adequate information on the company’s products and/or services, primary market objectives, and goals for participation. If the Department of Commerce receives an incomplete application, the Department may reject the application, request additional information, or take the lack of information into account when evaluating the applications. • Each applicant must also certify that the products and services it seeks to export through the mission are either produced in the United States, or, if not, marketed under the name of a U.S. firm and have at least 51 percent U.S. content of the value of the finished product or service. Selection Criteria for Participation Selection will be based on the following criteria, listed in decreasing order of importance: • Suitability of the company’s products or services for the Colombian and Panamanian markets. • Applicant’s potential for business in Colombia and Panama, including likelihood of exports resulting from the mission. • Consistency of the applicant’s goals and objectives with the stated scope of the trade mission. Referrals from political organizations and any documents containing references to partisan political activities (including political contributions) will be removed from an applicant’s submission and not considered during the selection process. Timeframe for Recruitment and Applications Mission recruitment will be conducted in an open and public manner. Outreach will include publication in the Federal Register, posting on the Commerce Department trade mission calendar (http:// www.ita.doc.gov/doctm/tmcal.html) and other Internet Web sites, press releases to general and trade media, broadcast fax, notices by industry trade associations and other multiplier groups, and publicity at industry meetings, symposia, conferences, and trade shows. Recruitment will begin immediately and conclude no later than Friday, September 17, 2010. The U.S. E:\FR\FM\04FEN1.SGM 04FEN1 Federal Register / Vol. 75, No. 23 / Thursday, February 4, 2010 / Notices Department of Commerce will review all applications immediately after the deadline. We will inform applicants of selection decisions as soon as possible after September 17, 2010. Applications received after the deadline will be considered only if space and scheduling constraints permit. Contacts Louis Quay, Commercial Service Trade Missions Program, Tel: 202–482– 3973, Fax: 202–482–9000, E-mail: Louis.Quay@mail.doc.gov. Jessica Arnold, Commercial Service Trade Missions Program, Tel: 202– 482–2026, Fax: 202–482–9000, Email: Jessica.Arnold@trade.gov. Sean Timmins, Global Trade Programs, Commercial Service Trade Missions Program. [FR Doc. 2010–2365 Filed 2–3–10; 8:45 am] In response to comments received from respondents,1 the Department hereby clarifies two areas of the Final Results. The Department inadvertently stated in the assessment rate section that we will instruct CBP to liquidate entries for all companies at the company specific rate required at the time of entry. The Department hereby clarifies that we will instruct CBP to liquidate entries at the company–specific rate set forth in the Final Results. Additionally, in the Final Results, the Department omitted the full name of the separate rate company, Far Eastern Industries, Ltd., (Shanghai) and Far Eastern Polychem Industries and only listed Far Eastern Polychem Industries. The Department hereby corrects the Final Notice to state Far Eastern Industries, Ltd., (Shanghai) and Far Eastern Polychem Industries. The Final Results remains in effect in all other respects. Dated: January 28, 2010. Ronald K. Lorentzen, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Import Administration. BILLING CODE P DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE [FR Doc. 2010–2317 Filed 2–3–10; 8:45 am] International Trade Administration BILLING CODE 3510–DS–S [A–570–905] DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Notice of Correction to the First Administrative Review of Certain Polyester Staple Fiber From the People’s Republic of China: Final Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review International Trade Administration [A–570–855] Certain Non–Frozen Apple Juice Concentrate from the People’s Republic of China: Initiation of Antidumping Duty New Shipper Review AGENCY: Import Administration, International Trade Administration, Department of Commerce. Correction to assessment rate section and separate rate company name. ACTION: srobinson on DSKHWCL6B1PROD with NOTICES SUMMARY: On January 11, 2010, the Department of Commerce (‘‘Department’’) published the final results of the administrative review of the antidumping duty order on certain polyester staple fiber from the People’s Republic of China (‘‘PRC’’). See First Administrative Review of Certain Polyester Staple Fiber From the People’s Republic of China: Final Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review, 75 FR 1336 (January 11, 2010) (‘‘Final Results’’). FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Emeka Chukwudebe, AD/CVD Operations, Office 9, Import Administration, International Trade Administration, U.S. Department of Commerce, 14th Street and Constitution Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20230; telephone: (202) 482–0219. VerDate Nov<24>2008 17:31 Feb 03, 2010 Jkt 220001 AGENCY: Import Administration, International Trade Administration, Department of Commerce. DATES: Effective Date: February 4, 2010. SUMMARY: The Department of Commerce (‘‘Department’’) has determined that a request for a new shipper review (‘‘NSR’’) of the antidumping duty order on certain non–frozen apple juice concentrate (‘‘apple juice’’) from the People’s Republic of China (‘‘PRC’’), received on December 15, 2009, meets the statutory and regulatory requirements for initiation. The period of review (‘‘POR’’) for this NSR is June 1, 2009, through January 20, 2010. In this instance, LXFI’s sale of subject merchandise was made during the POR specified by the Department’s regulations but the shipment entered within fifty–one days after the end of that POR. The Department finds that extending the POR to capture this entry would not prevent the completion of the 1 Ningbo Dafa Chemical Fiber Co., Ltd., and Cixi Santai Chemical Fiber Co., Ltd. PO 00000 Frm 00008 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 5763 review within the time limits set by the Department’s regulations. Therefore, the Department has extended the POR for the new shipper review of LXFI by 51 days. See ‘‘Memorandum to the File through Alex Villanueva, Program Manager, New Shipper Review: Certain Non–Frozen Apple Juice Concentrate from the People’s Republic of China (A– 570–855), Placing CBP data on the record,’’ dated concurrently with this notice. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Eliana Abreu, AD/CVD Operations, Office 9, Import Administration, International Trade Administration, U.S. Department of Commerce, 14th Street and Constitution Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20230; telephone: 202– 482–4849. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Background The notice announcing the antidumping duty order on apple juice from the PRC was published in the Federal Register on June 5, 2000. See Notice of Amended Final Determination of Sales at Less Than Fair Value and Antidumping Duty Order: Certain Non Frozen Apple Juice Concentrate From the People’s Republic of China, 65 FR 35606 (June 5, 2000) (‘‘Antidumping Duty Order’’). On December 15, 2009, pursuant to section 751(a)(2)(B)(i) of the Tariff Act of 1930, as amended (‘‘Act’’), and 19 CFR 351.214(c), the Department received a NSR request from Lingbao Xinyuan Fruit Industry Co. (‘‘LXFI’’). LXFI’s request was properly made during December 2009, which is the semi–annual anniversary of the Antidumping Duty Order. LXFI also submitted amendments to its initial NSR request on December 28, 2009. LXFI certified that it is a producer and exporter of the subject merchandise upon which the request was based. LXFI did not submit a public version, but instead adequately summarized proprietary information and provided explanations as to why certain proprietary information is not capable of summarization. Pursuant to section 751(a)(2)(B)(i)(I) of the Act and 19 CFR 351.214(b)(2)(i), LXFI certified that it did not export subject merchandise to the United States during the period of investigation (‘‘POI’’). In addition, pursuant to section 751(a)(2)(B)(i)(II) of the Act and 19 CFR 351.214(b)(2)(iii)(A), LXFI certified that, since the initiation of the investigation, it has never been affiliated with any Chinese exporter or producer who exported subject merchandise to the United States during the POI, including those respondents not individually E:\FR\FM\04FEN1.SGM 04FEN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 75, Number 23 (Thursday, February 4, 2010)]
[Notices]
[Pages 5761-5763]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2010-2365]


-----------------------------------------------------------------------

DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE

International Trade Administration


Executive-Led Trade Mission to Colombia and Panama; November 15-
18, 2010

AGENCY: Department of Commerce.

ACTION: Notice.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

Mission Description

    The United States Department of Commerce, International Trade 
Administration, U.S. and Foreign Commercial Service is organizing a 
Trade Mission to Bogot[aacute] and Cartagena, Colombia and Panama City, 
Panama, November 15-18, 2010, to be led by a senior Commerce official. 
The mission will focus on helping U.S. companies launch or increase 
their export business in these promising markets. It will also help 
participating firms gain market information, make business and industry 
contacts, and solidify business strategies, towards the goal of 
increasing U.S. exports to the two markets. The mission will include 
business-to-business matchmaking appointments with local companies, as 
well as market briefings and networking events. The mission will be 
comprised of U.S. firms representing a cross section of U.S. industries 
with growing potential in the target markets, including, but not 
limited to the following sectors: Building products; computers; 
components and peripherals; construction equipment; electrical power 
systems; security and safety equipment; telecommunications equipment; 
and travel and tourism services.

Commercial Setting

Colombia

    Colombia ranks solidly with the group of progressive, 
industrializing countries worldwide that have diversified agriculture, 
resources, and productive capacities. Despite the global economic 
crisis, Colombia's economic prospects are positive. Currently, it is 
the fifth largest market for U.S. exports in the region, after Mexico, 
Brazil, Venezuela, and Chile, and is ranked 26th as a market for U.S. 
exports globally. Since the election of President Alvaro Uribe in May 
2002 (and subsequent re-election in 2006), Colombia has become one of 
the most stable economies in the region. Improved security, sound 
government policies, steady economic growth, moderate inflation and a 
wide range of opportunities make it worthwhile for U.S. exporters to 
take a serious look at Colombia.
    Infrastructure development has fueled the growth of U.S. exports to 
Colombia, including opportunities generated by highway, hotel and 
housing construction in Bogot[aacute] and coastal cities such as 
Cartagena, San Andres, and Santa Marta. Developing the oil and gas 
industry and sea and river ports are also key priorities for the Uribe 
administration. An expanding list of emerging best prospects sectors 
includes computers and components, safety and security, and tourism, 
among others.
    Colombia's increasingly democratic and transparent government and 
its traditional acceptance of U.S. and international standards, and 
U.S. brands provide a solid foundation for U.S. firms seeking to do 
business there. The U.S.-Colombia Trade Promotion Agreement (TPA), 
signed in November 2006 and pending Congressional approval, would offer 
tremendous benefits to U.S. exporters. Upon entry into force, 
(following Colombia's steps to ensure implementation of its 
obligations), the TPA would provide immediate duty-free entry for 80 
percent of U.S. consumer and industrial exports to Colombia, with 
remaining tariffs phased out over the next 10 years. The TPA would also 
open the market for remanufactured goods and provide greater protection 
for intellectual property rights (IPR).
    Bogot[aacute], the capital of Colombia, generates approximately 30 
percent of the country's total gross domestic product (GDP). 
Bogot[aacute] offers diverse business opportunities in almost all 
economic sectors. Cartagena is the fifth largest city in Colombia 
concentrating business opportunities in ports, tourism, oil refinery 
and industries such as chemical plants, cement and beverages.

Panama

    Panama has historically served as the crossroads of trade for the 
Americas. Its strategic location, bridging two oceans and two 
continents, has made Panama not only a maritime and air transport hub, 
but also an international trading, banking, and services center. Trade 
liberalization and privatization over the last several years, along 
with the hemispheric movement toward free trade agreements (the U.S.-
Panama FTA is also pending), stand to increase Panama's regional and 
global prominence. Panama's dollar-based

[[Page 5762]]

economy offers low inflation in comparison with neighboring countries, 
and zero foreign exchange risk. Its regulatory regimes are generally 
business friendly. Its government is stable, democratic, and reform 
minded, and actively seeks foreign investment in all sectors, 
especially services, tourism and retirement properties. The United 
States is Panama's most important trading partner, claiming about 30 
percent of the import market.
    Panama's economy is based on a well-developed services sector, 
which accounts for about 80 percent of its gross domestic product 
(GDP). After reaching about nine percent in 2008, economic growth 
slowed to an estimated 4-6 percent in 2009 in light of global economic 
conditions and their impact on Panama's service-based economy. The 
country's major services sectors include the Panama Canal, banking, the 
Colon Free Zone, insurance, container ports, and flagship registry. The 
assembly and manufacturing sectors of Panama's economy remain severely 
underdeveloped, with manufacturing and mining accounting for roughly 14 
percent of GDP, and agriculture, forestry and fisheries making up the 
balance.
    Anchoring growth is the $5.25 billion multi-year Panama Canal 
expansion program already underway. While the global credit crunch 
threatens a number of big-ticket residential, commercial and tourism 
projects, select investment and construction continues, with 
approximately $1 billion slated for improvements in electrical 
generation and port facilities. Panama has potential for growth in the 
areas of electric power generation, health care services, port 
services, land development, road construction, water distribution and 
purification, telecommunications, and tourism.

Mission Goals

    This trade mission is designed to help U.S. firms initiate or 
expand their exports to Colombia and Panama by providing business-to-
business introductions and market access information.

Mission Scenario

    The mission will stop in Bogot[aacute], and Cartagena, Colombia, 
and Panama City, Panama. In each city, participants will meet with pre-
screened potential buyers, agents, distributors, and other business 
partners. They will also attend market briefings by U.S. Embassy 
officials, as well as networking events offering further opportunities 
to speak with local business and industry decision-makers.

Proposed Mission Timetable

Monday, November 15, 2010, Bogot[aacute], Colombia

Market briefing
Matchmaking appointments
Networking reception

Tuesday, November 16, 2010, Bogot[aacute] and Cartagena, Colombia

Travel to Cartagena
Matchmaking appointments

Wednesday, November 17, 2010, Cartagena, Colombia and Panama City, 
Panama

Morning matchmaking appointments and/or site visits
Late afternoon travel to Panama

Thursday November 18, 2010, Panama City, Panama

Market Briefing
Matchmaking appointments
Networking reception

Participation Requirements

    All parties interested in participating in the Executive-led Trade 
Mission to Colombia and Panama must complete and submit an application 
package for consideration by the Department of Commerce. All applicants 
will be evaluated on their ability to meet certain conditions and best 
satisfy the selection criteria as outlined below. A minimum of seven 
U.S. companies and maximum of 15 companies will be selected to 
participate in the mission from the applicant pool. U.S. companies 
already doing business with Colombia and Panama as well as U.S. 
companies seeking to enter these countries for the first time may 
apply.

Fees and Expenses

    After a company has been selected to participate on the mission, a 
payment to the Department of Commerce in the form of a participation 
fee is required. The participation fee will be $4,440 for large firms 
and $3,550 for a small or medium-sized enterprise (SME).\1\ The fee for 
each additional firm representative (large firm or SME) is $450. 
Expenses for travel, lodging, most meals, and incidentals will be the 
responsibility of each mission participant. The same fee structure 
applies to representatives of U.S.-based firms stationed in Colombia, 
Panama, or neighboring countries.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \1\ An SME is defined as a firm with 500 or fewer employees or 
that otherwise qualifies as a small business under SBA regulations 
(see http://www.sba.gov/services/contracting opportunities/
sizestandardstopics/index.html). Parent companies, affiliates, and 
subsidiaries will be considered when determining business size. The 
dual pricing reflects the Commercial Service's user fee schedule 
that became effective May 1, 2008 (see http://www.export.gov/newsletter/march2008/initiatives.html for additional information).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Conditions for Participation

     An applicant must submit a completed and signed mission 
application and supplemental application materials, including adequate 
information on the company's products and/or services, primary market 
objectives, and goals for participation. If the Department of Commerce 
receives an incomplete application, the Department may reject the 
application, request additional information, or take the lack of 
information into account when evaluating the applications.
     Each applicant must also certify that the products and 
services it seeks to export through the mission are either produced in 
the United States, or, if not, marketed under the name of a U.S. firm 
and have at least 51 percent U.S. content of the value of the finished 
product or service.

Selection Criteria for Participation

    Selection will be based on the following criteria, listed in 
decreasing order of importance:
     Suitability of the company's products or services for the 
Colombian and Panamanian markets.
     Applicant's potential for business in Colombia and Panama, 
including likelihood of exports resulting from the mission.
     Consistency of the applicant's goals and objectives with 
the stated scope of the trade mission.
    Referrals from political organizations and any documents containing 
references to partisan political activities (including political 
contributions) will be removed from an applicant's submission and not 
considered during the selection process.

Timeframe for Recruitment and Applications

    Mission recruitment will be conducted in an open and public manner. 
Outreach will include publication in the Federal Register, posting on 
the Commerce Department trade mission calendar (http://www.ita.doc.gov/doctm/tmcal.html) and other Internet Web sites, press releases to 
general and trade media, broadcast fax, notices by industry trade 
associations and other multiplier groups, and publicity at industry 
meetings, symposia, conferences, and trade shows.
    Recruitment will begin immediately and conclude no later than 
Friday, September 17, 2010. The U.S.

[[Page 5763]]

Department of Commerce will review all applications immediately after 
the deadline. We will inform applicants of selection decisions as soon 
as possible after September 17, 2010. Applications received after the 
deadline will be considered only if space and scheduling constraints 
permit.

Contacts

Louis Quay, Commercial Service Trade Missions Program, Tel: 202-482-
3973, Fax: 202-482-9000, E-mail: Louis.Quay@mail.doc.gov.
Jessica Arnold, Commercial Service Trade Missions Program, Tel: 202-
482-2026, Fax: 202-482-9000, E-mail: Jessica.Arnold@trade.gov.
Sean Timmins, Global Trade Programs, Commercial Service Trade Missions 
Program.

[FR Doc. 2010-2365 Filed 2-3-10; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE P