Reports, Forms, and Recordkeeping Requirements, 11992-11993 [E9-6116]

Download as PDF 11992 Federal Register / Vol. 74, No. 53 / Friday, March 20, 2009 / Notices objectives of 49 U.S.C. 31136(e) and 31315. Basis for Renewing Exemptions Under 49 U.S.C. 31315(b)(1), an exemption may be granted for no longer than two years from its approval date and may be renewed upon application for additional two year periods. In accordance with 49 U.S.C. 31136(e) and 31315, each of the 23 applicants has satisfied the entry conditions for obtaining an exemption from the vision requirements (63 FR 66226; 64 FR 16517; 66 FR 17994; 68 FR 15037; 70 FR 16886; 72 FR 18726; 65 FR 66286; 66 FR 13825; 68 FR 10300; 70 FR 7546; 72 FR 7111; 67 FR 68719; 68 FR 2629; 70 FR 14747; 67 FR 76439; 68 FR 10298; 70 FR 7545; 72 FR 18727; 68 FR 10301; 68 FR 19596; 70 FR 2701; 70 FR 16887; 71 FR 63379; 72 FR 1050; 72 FR 180; 72 FR 9397). Each of these 23 applicants has requested renewal of the exemption and has submitted evidence showing that the vision in the better eye continues to meet the standard specified at 49 CFR 391.41(b)(10) and that the vision impairment is stable. In addition, a review of each record of safety while driving with the respective vision deficiencies over the past two years indicates each applicant continues to meet the vision exemption standards. These factors provide an adequate basis for predicting each driver’s ability to continue to drive safely in interstate commerce. Therefore, FMCSA concludes that extending the exemption for each renewal applicant for a period of two years is likely to achieve a level of safety equal to that existing without the exemption. Request for Comments FMCSA will review comments received at any time concerning a particular driver’s safety record and determine if the continuation of the exemption is consistent with the requirements at 49 U.S.C. 31136(e) and 31315. However, FMCSA requests that interested parties with specific data concerning the safety records of these drivers submit comments by April 20, 2009. FMCSA believes that the requirements for a renewal of an exemption under 49 U.S.C. 31136(e) and 31315 can be satisfied by initially granting the renewal and then requesting and evaluating, if needed, subsequent comments submitted by interested parties. As indicated above, the Agency previously published notices of final disposition announcing its decision to exempt these 23 individuals from the vision requirement in 49 CFR 391.41(b)(10). The final VerDate Nov<24>2008 17:07 Mar 19, 2009 Jkt 217001 decision to grant an exemption to each of these individuals was based on the merits of each case and only after careful consideration of the comments received to its notices of applications. The notices of applications stated in detail the qualifications, experience, and medical condition of each applicant for an exemption from the vision requirements. That information is available by consulting the above cited Federal Register publications. Interested parties or organizations possessing information that would otherwise show that any, or all of these drivers, are not currently achieving the statutory level of safety should immediately notify FMCSA. The Agency will evaluate any adverse evidence submitted and, if safety is being compromised or if continuation of the exemption would not be consistent with the goals and objectives of 49 U.S.C. 31136(e) and 31315, FMCSA will take immediate steps to revoke the exemption of a driver. Issued on: March 16, 2009. Larry W. Minor, Associate Administrator for Policy and Program Development. [FR Doc. E9–6060 Filed 3–19–09; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4910–EX–P DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION National Highway Traffic Safety Administration [U.S. DOT Docket No. NHTSA–2009–0052] Reports, Forms, and Recordkeeping Requirements AGENCY: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), DOT. ACTION: Request for public comment on proposed collection of information. SUMMARY: Before a Federal agency can collect certain information from the public, it must receive approval from the Office of Management and Budget (OMB). Under the procedures established by the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, before seeking OMB approval, Federal agencies must solicit public comment on proposed collections of information, including extensions and reinstatements of previously approved collections. This document describes one collection of information for which NHTSA intends to seek OMB approval. DATES: Comments must be received on or before May 19, 2009. ADDRESSES: Direct all written comments to: U.S. Department of Transportation, Docket Management Facility, West PO 00000 Frm 00090 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 Building, 1200 New Jersey Ave, SE., Room W12–140, Washington, DC 20590. You may also submit comments electronically at http:// www.regulations.gov. All comments should refer to the docket no. NHTSA– 2009–0052. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. Eunyoung Lim, Contracting Officer’s Technical Representative, Office of Behavioral Safety Research (NTI–131), National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, 1200 New Jersey Ave, SE., Washington, DC 20590. Phone number: 202–366–2755. Email address: eunyoung.lim@dot.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Under the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, before an agency submits a proposed collection of information to OMB for approval, it must publish a document in the Federal Register providing a 60-day comment period and otherwise consult with members of the public and affected agencies concerning each proposed collection of information. The OMB has promulgated regulations describing what must be included in such a document. Under OMB’s regulations (at 5 CFR 1320.8(d)), an agency must ask for public comment on the following: (i) Whether the proposed collection of information is necessary for the proper performance of the functions of the agency, including whether the information will have practical utility; (ii) The accuracy of the agency’s estimate of the burden of the proposed collection of information, including the validity of the methodology and assumptions used; (iii) How to enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the information to be collected; and (iv) How to minimize the burden of the collection of information on those who are to respond, including the use of appropriate automated, electronic, mechanical, or other technological collection techniques or other forms of information technology, e.g., permitting electronic submissions of responses. In compliance with these requirements, NHTSA asks public comment on the following proposed collection of information: National Survey of Speeding Attitudes and Behavior: 2010 Type of Request—New information collection requirement. OMB Clearance Number—None. Form Number—This collection of information uses no standard forms. Requested Expiration Date of Approval—June 30, 2012. Summary of the Collection of Information—NHTSA proposes to E:\FR\FM\20MRN1.SGM 20MRN1 Federal Register / Vol. 74, No. 53 / Friday, March 20, 2009 / Notices conduct a National Survey of Speeding Attitudes and Behavior by telephone among a national probability sample of 6,000 drivers, age 16 and older. Participation by respondents would be voluntary. Survey topics would include the extent to which drivers speed, attitudes and perceptions about speeding, reasons and motivations for speeding, and knowledge and attitudes towards countermeasure strategies to deter speeding. In conducting the proposed survey, the interviewers would use computerassisted telephone interviewing to reduce interview length and minimize recording errors. A Spanish-language translation and bilingual interviewers would be used to minimize language barriers to participation. Interviews will be conducted with respondents using landline phones and with respondents using cell phones. The proposed survey would be anonymous; the survey would not collect any personal information that would allow anyone to identify respondents. Description of the Need for the Information and Proposed Use of the Information—The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration’s (NHTSA) mission is to save lives, prevent injuries, and reduce healthcare and other economic costs associated with motor vehicle crashes. Over thirty percent of all fatal crashes are estimated to be speed-related crashes, defined as racing, exceeding the speed limit, or driving too fast for conditions. Speedrelated crashes resulted in 13,040 lives lost in 2007 and an estimated cost of $40.4 billion in 2000. In order to plan and evaluate programs intended to reduce speed-related crashes, NHTSA periodically conducts telephone surveys to update its knowledge and understanding of the public’s attitudes and behaviors with respect to speeding issues. NHTSA has conducted two previous administrations of the National Survey of Speeding Attitudes and Behavior— once in 1997 and again in 2002. In the 2010 survey, NHTSA intends to examine the extent to which drivers speed, who the speeders are, when and why drivers speed, and what countermeasures are most acceptable and effective in reducing speeding. Furthermore, NHTSA plans to assess whether or not self-reported behaviors, attitudes, and perceptions regarding speeding and associated countermeasure strategies have changed over time, since the administration of the 1997 and 2002 national surveys. The findings from this proposed collection of information will assist NHTSA in designing, targeting, and implementing VerDate Nov<24>2008 17:07 Mar 19, 2009 Jkt 217001 programs intended to reduce speed on the roadways and to provide data to States, localities, and law enforcement agencies that will aid in their efforts to reduce speed-related crashes and injuries. Description of the Likely Respondents (Including Estimated Number, and Proposed Frequency of Response to the Collection of Information)—Under this proposed effort, the Contractor would conduct telephone interviews averaging approximately 20 minutes in length with 6,000 randomly selected members of the general driving public, age 16 and older. The respondent sample would be selected from all 50 States and the District of Columbia. Interviews would be conducted with randomly selected persons with residential phones or cell phones. Businesses are ineligible for the sample and would not be interviewed. No more than one respondent would be selected per household. Each member of the sample would complete one interview. Prior to the administration of the survey, a total of 15 pretest interviews, averaging 20 minutes in length would be administered to test the computer programming of the questionnaire, and to determine if any final adjustments to the questionnaire are needed. Following any revisions carried out as a result of the pretest, the Contractor would begin the main survey administration. Estimate of the Total Annual Reporting and Recordkeeping Burden Resulting From the Collection of Information—NHTSA estimates that respondents will spend an average of 20 minutes each to complete the survey, for a total of 2005 hours for the 15 pretest respondents and 6000 survey respondents. The respondents would not incur any reporting cost from the information collection. The respondents also would not incur any recordkeeping burden or recordkeeping cost from the information collection. Authority: 44 U.S.C. Section 3506(c)(2)(A) Jeff Michael, Associate Administrator, Research and Program Development. [FR Doc. E9–6116 Filed 3–19–09; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4910–59–P PO 00000 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION National Highway Traffic Safety Administration Corporate Average Fuel Economy Standards; Effect Upon State Laws and Regulations AGENCY: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), Department of Transportation (DOT). ACTION: Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 Notice of intent. SUMMARY: In a notice of proposed rulemaking published on May 2, 2008, proposing Corporate Average Fuel standards for model years 2011–2015, NHTSA set forth its previously stated view regarding preemption under the Energy Policy and Conservation Act of State standards regulating carbon dioxide emissions from motor vehicle tailpipes and proposed to include a summary statement of those views in the Code of Federal Regulations. However, in a January 26, 2009 memorandum requesting that NHTSA complete its rulemaking in two phases, the President further requested the agency to reconsider its views. In accordance with that request, NHTSA will re-examine the issue of preemption in the context of its forthcoming rulemaking to establish Corporate Average Fuel Economy standards for model year 2012 and later years. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Stephen P. Wood, Acting Chief Counsel, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, U.S. Department of Transportation, 1200 New Jersey Ave., SE., Washington, DC 20590. The Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) amended the Energy Policy and Conversation Act (EPCA) by mandating that the model year (MY) 2011–2020 Corporate Average Fuel (CAFE) standards be set sufficiently high to ensure that the industry-wide average of all new passenger cars and light trucks, combined, reaches not less than 35 miles per gallon by MY 2020. NHTSA published a notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM) on May 2, 2008 to begin implementing the EISA mandate by establishing CAFE standards for MYs 2011–2015.1 In the proposal, NHTSA set forth its previously stated view that State standards regulating carbon dioxide emissions from motor vehicle tailpipes are expressly and impliedly preempted and proposed to include a summary of that conclusion and the SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: 1 73 Frm 00091 11993 FR 24352. E:\FR\FM\20MRN1.SGM 20MRN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 74, Number 53 (Friday, March 20, 2009)]
[Notices]
[Pages 11992-11993]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: E9-6116]


-----------------------------------------------------------------------

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION

National Highway Traffic Safety Administration

[U.S. DOT Docket No. NHTSA-2009-0052]


Reports, Forms, and Recordkeeping Requirements

AGENCY: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), DOT.

ACTION: Request for public comment on proposed collection of 
information.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: Before a Federal agency can collect certain information from 
the public, it must receive approval from the Office of Management and 
Budget (OMB). Under the procedures established by the Paperwork 
Reduction Act of 1995, before seeking OMB approval, Federal agencies 
must solicit public comment on proposed collections of information, 
including extensions and reinstatements of previously approved 
collections. This document describes one collection of information for 
which NHTSA intends to seek OMB approval.

DATES: Comments must be received on or before May 19, 2009.

ADDRESSES: Direct all written comments to: U.S. Department of 
Transportation, Docket Management Facility, West Building, 1200 New 
Jersey Ave, SE., Room W12-140, Washington, DC 20590. You may also 
submit comments electronically at http://www.regulations.gov. All 
comments should refer to the docket no. NHTSA-2009-0052.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. Eunyoung Lim, Contracting 
Officer's Technical Representative, Office of Behavioral Safety 
Research (NTI-131), National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, 
1200 New Jersey Ave, SE., Washington, DC 20590. Phone number: 202-366-
2755. Email address: eunyoung.lim@dot.gov.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Under the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, 
before an agency submits a proposed collection of information to OMB 
for approval, it must publish a document in the Federal Register 
providing a 60-day comment period and otherwise consult with members of 
the public and affected agencies concerning each proposed collection of 
information. The OMB has promulgated regulations describing what must 
be included in such a document. Under OMB's regulations (at 5 CFR 
1320.8(d)), an agency must ask for public comment on the following:
    (i) Whether the proposed collection of information is necessary for 
the proper performance of the functions of the agency, including 
whether the information will have practical utility;
    (ii) The accuracy of the agency's estimate of the burden of the 
proposed collection of information, including the validity of the 
methodology and assumptions used;
    (iii) How to enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the 
information to be collected; and
    (iv) How to minimize the burden of the collection of information on 
those who are to respond, including the use of appropriate automated, 
electronic, mechanical, or other technological collection techniques or 
other forms of information technology, e.g., permitting electronic 
submissions of responses.
    In compliance with these requirements, NHTSA asks public comment on 
the following proposed collection of information:

National Survey of Speeding Attitudes and Behavior: 2010

    Type of Request--New information collection requirement.
    OMB Clearance Number--None.
    Form Number--This collection of information uses no standard forms.
    Requested Expiration Date of Approval--June 30, 2012.
    Summary of the Collection of Information--NHTSA proposes to

[[Page 11993]]

conduct a National Survey of Speeding Attitudes and Behavior by 
telephone among a national probability sample of 6,000 drivers, age 16 
and older. Participation by respondents would be voluntary. Survey 
topics would include the extent to which drivers speed, attitudes and 
perceptions about speeding, reasons and motivations for speeding, and 
knowledge and attitudes towards countermeasure strategies to deter 
speeding.
    In conducting the proposed survey, the interviewers would use 
computer-assisted telephone interviewing to reduce interview length and 
minimize recording errors. A Spanish-language translation and bilingual 
interviewers would be used to minimize language barriers to 
participation. Interviews will be conducted with respondents using 
landline phones and with respondents using cell phones. The proposed 
survey would be anonymous; the survey would not collect any personal 
information that would allow anyone to identify respondents.
    Description of the Need for the Information and Proposed Use of the 
Information--The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration's 
(NHTSA) mission is to save lives, prevent injuries, and reduce 
healthcare and other economic costs associated with motor vehicle 
crashes. Over thirty percent of all fatal crashes are estimated to be 
speed-related crashes, defined as racing, exceeding the speed limit, or 
driving too fast for conditions. Speed-related crashes resulted in 
13,040 lives lost in 2007 and an estimated cost of $40.4 billion in 
2000. In order to plan and evaluate programs intended to reduce speed-
related crashes, NHTSA periodically conducts telephone surveys to 
update its knowledge and understanding of the public's attitudes and 
behaviors with respect to speeding issues.
    NHTSA has conducted two previous administrations of the National 
Survey of Speeding Attitudes and Behavior--once in 1997 and again in 
2002. In the 2010 survey, NHTSA intends to examine the extent to which 
drivers speed, who the speeders are, when and why drivers speed, and 
what countermeasures are most acceptable and effective in reducing 
speeding. Furthermore, NHTSA plans to assess whether or not self-
reported behaviors, attitudes, and perceptions regarding speeding and 
associated countermeasure strategies have changed over time, since the 
administration of the 1997 and 2002 national surveys. The findings from 
this proposed collection of information will assist NHTSA in designing, 
targeting, and implementing programs intended to reduce speed on the 
roadways and to provide data to States, localities, and law enforcement 
agencies that will aid in their efforts to reduce speed-related crashes 
and injuries.
    Description of the Likely Respondents (Including Estimated Number, 
and Proposed Frequency of Response to the Collection of Information)--
Under this proposed effort, the Contractor would conduct telephone 
interviews averaging approximately 20 minutes in length with 6,000 
randomly selected members of the general driving public, age 16 and 
older. The respondent sample would be selected from all 50 States and 
the District of Columbia. Interviews would be conducted with randomly 
selected persons with residential phones or cell phones. Businesses are 
ineligible for the sample and would not be interviewed. No more than 
one respondent would be selected per household. Each member of the 
sample would complete one interview.
    Prior to the administration of the survey, a total of 15 pretest 
interviews, averaging 20 minutes in length would be administered to 
test the computer programming of the questionnaire, and to determine if 
any final adjustments to the questionnaire are needed. Following any 
revisions carried out as a result of the pretest, the Contractor would 
begin the main survey administration.
    Estimate of the Total Annual Reporting and Recordkeeping Burden 
Resulting From the Collection of Information--NHTSA estimates that 
respondents will spend an average of 20 minutes each to complete the 
survey, for a total of 2005 hours for the 15 pretest respondents and 
6000 survey respondents. The respondents would not incur any reporting 
cost from the information collection. The respondents also would not 
incur any recordkeeping burden or recordkeeping cost from the 
information collection.

    Authority: 44 U.S.C. Section 3506(c)(2)(A)

Jeff Michael,
Associate Administrator, Research and Program Development.
[FR Doc. E9-6116 Filed 3-19-09; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4910-59-P