Agency Information Collection Activities: Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request, 52400-52402 [E8-20884]

Download as PDF 52400 Federal Register / Vol. 73, No. 175 / Tuesday, September 9, 2008 / Notices Contact Person: Mark Swieter, PhD, Chief, Training and Special Projects Review Branch, Office of Extramural Affairs, National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH, DHHS, 6101 Executive Boulevard, Suite 220, Bethesda, MD 20892–8401, 301–435–1389, ms80x@nih.gov. Name of Committee: National Institute on Drug Abuse Initial Review Group, Training and Career Development Subcommittee. Date: November 5–6, 2008. Time: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Agenda: To review and evaluate grant applications. Place: Melrose Hotel, 2430 Pennsylvania Ave., NW., Washington, DC 20037. Contact Person: Eliane Lazar-Wesley, PhD, Health Scientist Administrator, Office of Extramural Affairs, National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH, DHHS, 6101 Executive Boulevard, Room 220, MSC 8401, Bethesda, MD 20892–8401, 301–451–4530, el6r@nih.gov. (Catalogue of Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.279, Drug Abuse and Addiction Research Programs, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: August 29, 2008. Jennifer Spaeth, Director, Office of Federal Advisory Committee Policy. [FR Doc. E8–20648 Filed 9–8–08; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4140–01–M DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting jlentini on PROD1PC65 with NOTICES Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Fedearl Advisory Committee Act, as amended (5 U.S.C. Appendix 2), notice is hereby given of the following meeting. The meeting will be closed to the public in accordance with the provisions set forth in sections 552b(c)(4) and 552b(c)(6), Title 5 U.S.C., as amended. The grant applications and the discussions could disclose confidential trade secrets or commercial property such as patentable material, and personal information concerning individuals associated with the grant applications, the disclosure of which would constitute a clearly unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; Rejuvenating the Aged Immune System. Date: October 2–3, 2008. Time: 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Agenda: To review and evaluate grant applications. Place: Crown Plaza—Silver Spring, 8777 Georgia Avenue, Silver Spring, MD 20910. VerDate Aug<31>2005 18:17 Sep 08, 2008 Jkt 214001 Contact Person: Barney Duane Price, PhD, Scientific Review Officer, Scientific Review Program, DHHS/NIH/NIAID/DEA Room 3139, 6700B Rockledge Drive, MSC 7616, Bethesda, MD 20892–7616, 301–496–2550, pricebd@niaid.nih.gov. (Catalogue of Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.855, Allergy, Immunology, and Transplantation Research; 93.856, Microbiology and Infectious Disease Research, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: September 2, 2008. Jennifer Spaeth, Director, Office of Federal Advisory Committee Policy. [FR Doc. E8–20837 Filed 9–8–08; 8:45 am] Dated: September 2, 2008. Jennifer Spaeth, Director, Office of Federal Advisory Committee Policy. [FR Doc. E8–20836 Filed 9–8–08; 8:45 am] National Institutes of Health BILLING CODE 4140–01–M DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as amended (5 U.S.C. Appendix 2), notice is hereby given of the following meeting. The meeting will be closed to the public in accordance with the provisions set forth in sections 552b(c)(4) and 552b(c)(6), Title 5 U.S.C., as amended. The grant applications and the discussions could disclose confidential trade secrets or commercial property such as patentable material, and personal information concerning individuals associated with the grant applications, the disclosure of which would constitute a clearly unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; Cooperative Research Partnerships for Biodefense and Emerging Infectious Diseases (U01). Date: October 1, 2008. Time: 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Agenda: To review and evaluate grant applications. Place: National Institutes of Health, Rockledge 6700, 6700B Rockledge Drive, Bethesda, MD 20817, (Telephone Conference Call). Contact Person: Brenda Lange-Gustafson, PhD, Scientific Review Officer, NIAID, DEA, Scientific Review Program, Room 3122, 6700–B Rockledge Drive, MSC–7616, Bethesda, MD 20892–7616, (301) 451–3684, bgustafson@niaid.nih.gov. (Catalogue of Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.855, Allergy, Immunology, and Transplantation Research; 93.856, Microbiology and Infectious Diseases Research, National Institutes of Health, HHS) PO 00000 Frm 00140 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 BILLING CODE 4140–01–M DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institute of Mental Health; Amended Notice of Meeting Notice is hereby given of a change in the meeting of the Mental Health Services in MH Specialty Settings, October 7, 2008, 8:30 am to October 7, 2008, 5 p.m., Hilton Crystal City, 2399 Jefferson Davis Hwy, Arlington, VA 22202 which was published in the Federal Register on August 15, 2008, 73 FR 47958. The meeting location has been changed to the Fairmont Hotel, 2401 M Street, NW., Washington, DC 20037. The meeting date and times remain the same. The meeting is closed to the public. Dated: September 2, 2008. Jennifer Spaeth, Director, Office of Federal Advisory Committee Policy. [FR Doc. E8–20902 Filed 9–8–08; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4140–01–P DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration Agency Information Collection Activities: Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request Periodically, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) will publish a summary of information collection requests under OMB review, in compliance with the Paperwork Reduction Act (44 U.S.C. Chapter 35). To request a copy of these documents, call the SAMHSA Reports Clearance Officer on (240) 276–1243. Project: Toolkit Protocol for the Crisis Counseling Assistance and Training Program (CCP)—Revision The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration’s (SAMHSA) Center for Mental Health Services (CMHS) will create a toolkit to be used for the purposes of collecting data on the Crisis Counseling Assistance and Training Program (CCP). The CCP provides supplemental funding to states E:\FR\FM\09SEN1.SGM 09SEN1 52401 Federal Register / Vol. 73, No. 175 / Tuesday, September 9, 2008 / Notices and territories for individual and community crisis intervention services during a federal disaster. The CCP has provided disaster mental health services to millions of disaster survivors since its inception and, as a result of 30 years of accumulated expertise, it has become an important model for Federal response to a variety of catastrophic events. State CCPs, such as Project HOPE (after Hurricane Floyd in North Carolina), Project Heartland (in Oklahoma City after the Murrah Federal Building bombing), Project Liberty (in New York after 9/11), and Project Outreach for Recovery (after the Rhode Island nightclub fire) have primarily addressed the short-term mental health needs of communities through (a) outreach and public education, (b) individual and group counseling, and (c) referral. Outreach and public education serve primarily to normalize reactions and to engage people who might need further care. Crisis counseling assists survivors to cope with current stress and symptoms in order to return to predisaster functioning. Crisis counseling relies largely on ‘‘active listening,’’ and crisis counselors also provide psychoeducation (especially about the nature of responses to trauma) and help clients build coping skills. Crisis counseling typically continues no more than a few times. Because crisis counseling is timelimited, referral is the third important function of CCPs. Counselors are expected to refer clients to formal treatment if the person has developed more serious psychiatric problems. Data about services delivered and users of services will be collected throughout the program period. The data will be collected via the use of a toolkit that relies on standardized forms. At the program level, the data will be entered quickly and easily into a cumulative database to yield summary tables for quarterly and final reports for the program. We have confirmed the feasibility of using scanable forms for most purposes. Because the data will be collected in a consistent way from all jlentini on PROD1PC65 with NOTICES Data collection point Number of respondents Individual Crisis Counseling Services Encounter Log Form ..... Group Encounter Log Form ......................... Weekly Tally Sheet ...... Assessment & Referral Tools ......................... Participant Feedback ... VerDate Aug<31>2005 17:08 Sep 08, 2008 programs, they can be uploaded into an ongoing national database that likewise provides CMHS with a way of producing summary reports of services provided across all programs funded. The components of the toolkit are listed and described below: • Encounter logs. These forms document all services provided. Completion of these logs is required by the crisis counselors. There are three types of encounter logs: (1) Individual Crisis Counseling Services Encounter Log. Crisis counseling is defined as an interaction that lasts at least 15 minutes and involves participant disclosure. This form is completed by the crisis counselor for each service recipient, defined as the person or persons who actively participated in the session (e.g., by verbally participating), not someone who is merely present. For families, crisis counselors complete separate forms for all family members who are actively engaged in the visit. Information collected includes demographics, service characteristics, risk factors, event reactions, and referral data. (2) Group Encounter Log. This form is used to identify either a group crisis counseling encounter or a group public education encounter. A check at the top identifies the class of activities (i.e., counseling or education). Information collected includes services characteristics, group identity and characteristics, and group activities. (3) Weekly Tally Sheet. This form documents brief educational and supportive encounters not captured on any other form. Information collected includes service characteristics, daily tallies and weekly totals for brief educational or supportive contacts and material distribution with no or minimal interaction. Æ Assessment and Referral Tools. Generally, the forms are used as an interview guide with adults or children/ youth (i.e., please note that the child/ youth tool is NEW to the data toolkit) who have received individual crisis counseling on two or more occasions for Responses per respondent Total responses Hours per response those individuals that may need referral to further and more intensive services. However, these tools may be used at any time that a crisis counselor suspects that an individual is experiencing serious reactions to the disaster. Typically, these tools will be used beginning three months post-disaster and will be completed by the crisis counselor or team leader. Æ Adult Assessment and Referral Tool—This tool includes the collection of information on characteristics of the encounter, risk categories, and demographics. The tool also includes the SPRINT-E, an 11-item measure of post-disaster distress including but not limited to symptoms of post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Æ Child/Youth Assessment and Referral Tool (NEW)—This tool includes the collection of information on risk factors, demographics, and 15 items from the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) Reaction Index to assess post-disaster symptoms; additional items are also included for the parents to rate their child’s feelings and behavior. • Participant Feedback. These surveys are completed by and collected from a sample of service recipients, not every recipient. A time sampling approach (e.g., soliciting participation from all counseling encounters one week per quarter) will be used. Information collected includes satisfaction with services, perceived improvements in self-functioning, types of exposure, and event reactions. • CCP Service Provider Feedback. These surveys are completed by and collected from the CCP service providers (i.e., crisis counselors) anonymously at approximately six months and one year post-event. The items on this form relate to the training, work environment, and level of job stress experienced by the crisis counselor. The survey will be coded on several program-level and worker-level variables to be shared with program management for review. Total hour burden Hourly rate Total hour cost 1 200 2 396 79,200 .08 6,336 $20 $126,720 3 100 3 99 1 200 4 33 9,900 6,600 .04 .10 396 660 20 20 7,920 13,200 1 200 1,000 5 158 31,600 1,000 .15 .15 4,740 150 20 20 94,800 3,000 Jkt 214001 1 PO 00000 Frm 00141 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 E:\FR\FM\09SEN1.SGM 09SEN1 52402 Federal Register / Vol. 73, No. 175 / Tuesday, September 9, 2008 / Notices Data collection point Responses per respondent Number of respondents Total responses Hours per response Total hour burden Hourly rate Total hour cost CCP Service Provider Feedback .................. 6 100 1 100 .15 15 20 300 Total ...................... ........................ ........................ 128,400 ........................ 12,297 ........................ 245,940 1 200 is based on typical average of 10 (1.00 FTE) crisis counselors per grant with an approximate average of 20 grants per year (i.e., 10 × 20 = 200). 2 Average of 12 forms per week for each crisis counselor at 33 weeks that includes both Immediate Services and Regular Services Programs (i.e., 12 × 33 = 396). 3 Average of 3 forms per week for a pair of crisis counselors (i.e., 2 counselors completing 1 form = 100 crisis counselors) at 33 weeks that includes both Immediate Services and Regular Services Programs (3 × 33 = 99). 4 Average of 33 weeks for each grant that includes both Immediate Services and Regular Services Programs. 5 On average 30% of crisis encounters may result in the use of this optional tool. 6 On average 50% of service providers/crisis counselors may complete or use this optional tool. Written comments and recommendations concerning the proposed information collection should be sent by October 9, 2008 to: SAMHSA Desk Officer, Human Resources and Housing Branch, Office of Management and Budget, New Executive Office Building, Room 10235, Washington, DC 20503; due to potential delays in OMB’s receipt and processing of mail sent through the U.S. Postal Service, respondents are encouraged to submit comments by fax to: 202–395–6974. Dated: August 28, 2008. Elaine Parry, Acting Director, Office of Program Services. [FR Doc. E8–20884 Filed 9–8–08; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4162–20–P DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Agency Information Collection Activities: Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS. ACTION: Notice; 30-day notice and request for comments; Revision of a currently approved collection, OMB Number 1660–0020, No Forms. jlentini on PROD1PC65 with NOTICES AGENCY: SUMMARY: The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) has submitted the following information collection to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for review and clearance in accordance with the requirements of the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995. The submission describes the nature of the information collection, the categories of respondents, the estimated burden (i.e., the time, effort and resources used by respondents to respond) and cost, and includes the actual data collection instruments FEMA will use. VerDate Aug<31>2005 17:08 Sep 08, 2008 Jkt 214001 Collection of Information Title: Write Your Own (WYO) Program. OMB Number: 1660–0020. Abstract: Under the WYO Program, private sector insurance companies may offer flood insurance to eligible property owners. The Federal Government is grantor of flood insurance coverage for WYO Companies, issued under the WYO arrangements. In order to maintain adequate financial control over Federal funds, the NFIP requires the WYO Companies to submit a monthly financial report. The NFIP examines the data to insure that policyholder funds are accounted for and appropriately expended. Affected Public: Business or other forProfit. Number of Respondents: 91. The total number of respondents of 97 previously reported in the 60-day Federal Register Notice at 73 FR 27545, May 13, 2008 has been decreased. Estimated Time per Respondent: 35.4 minutes. Estimated Total Annual Burden Hours: 644.28 hours. The total annual burden hours of 687 previously reported in the 60-day Federal Register Notice at 73 FR 27545, May 13, 2008 has been decreased. Frequency of Response: 12. Comments: Interested persons are invited to submit written comments on the proposed information collection to the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs, Office of Management and Budget. Comments should be addressed to Desk Officer for the Department of Homeland Security, Federal Emergency Management Agency, and sent via electronic mail to oira.submission@omb.eop.gov or faxed to (202) 395–6974. Comments must be submitted on or before October 9, 2008. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Requests for additional information or copies of the information collection should be made to Director, Records PO 00000 Frm 00142 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 Management Division, 500 C Street, SW., Washington, DC 20472, Mail Drop Room 301, 1800 S. Bell Street, Arlington, VA 22202, facsimile number (202) 646–3347, or e-mail address FEMA-Information-Collections@dhs.gov. Dated: August 22, 2008. John A. Sharetts-Sullivan, Director, Records Management Division, Office of Management, Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security. [FR Doc. E8–20811 Filed 9–8–08; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 9110–11–P DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency [FEMA–1785–DR] Florida; Amendment No. 5 to Notice of a Major Disaster Declaration Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS. ACTION: Notice. AGENCY: SUMMARY: This notice amends the notice of a major disaster declaration for the State of Florida (FEMA–1785–DR), dated August 24, 2008, and related determinations. DATES: Effective Date: August 31, 2008. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Peggy Miller, Disaster Assistance Directorate, Federal Emergency Management Agency, 500 C Street, SW., Washington, DC 20472, (202) 646–3886. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The notice of a major disaster declaration for the State of Florida is hereby amended to include the following areas among those areas determined to have been adversely affected by the catastrophe declared a major disaster by the President in his declaration of August 24, 2008. Duval County for Individual Assistance (already designated for Public Assistance) E:\FR\FM\09SEN1.SGM 09SEN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 73, Number 175 (Tuesday, September 9, 2008)]
[Notices]
[Pages 52400-52402]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: E8-20884]


-----------------------------------------------------------------------

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration


Agency Information Collection Activities: Submission for OMB 
Review; Comment Request

    Periodically, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services 
Administration (SAMHSA) will publish a summary of information 
collection requests under OMB review, in compliance with the Paperwork 
Reduction Act (44 U.S.C. Chapter 35). To request a copy of these 
documents, call the SAMHSA Reports Clearance Officer on (240) 276-1243.

Project: Toolkit Protocol for the Crisis Counseling Assistance and 
Training Program (CCP)--Revision

    The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration's 
(SAMHSA) Center for Mental Health Services (CMHS) will create a toolkit 
to be used for the purposes of collecting data on the Crisis Counseling 
Assistance and Training Program (CCP). The CCP provides supplemental 
funding to states

[[Page 52401]]

and territories for individual and community crisis intervention 
services during a federal disaster.
    The CCP has provided disaster mental health services to millions of 
disaster survivors since its inception and, as a result of 30 years of 
accumulated expertise, it has become an important model for Federal 
response to a variety of catastrophic events. State CCPs, such as 
Project HOPE (after Hurricane Floyd in North Carolina), Project 
Heartland (in Oklahoma City after the Murrah Federal Building bombing), 
Project Liberty (in New York after 9/11), and Project Outreach for 
Recovery (after the Rhode Island nightclub fire) have primarily 
addressed the short-term mental health needs of communities through (a) 
outreach and public education, (b) individual and group counseling, and 
(c) referral. Outreach and public education serve primarily to 
normalize reactions and to engage people who might need further care. 
Crisis counseling assists survivors to cope with current stress and 
symptoms in order to return to predisaster functioning. Crisis 
counseling relies largely on ``active listening,'' and crisis 
counselors also provide psycho-education (especially about the nature 
of responses to trauma) and help clients build coping skills. Crisis 
counseling typically continues no more than a few times. Because crisis 
counseling is time-limited, referral is the third important function of 
CCPs. Counselors are expected to refer clients to formal treatment if 
the person has developed more serious psychiatric problems.
    Data about services delivered and users of services will be 
collected throughout the program period. The data will be collected via 
the use of a toolkit that relies on standardized forms. At the program 
level, the data will be entered quickly and easily into a cumulative 
database to yield summary tables for quarterly and final reports for 
the program. We have confirmed the feasibility of using scanable forms 
for most purposes. Because the data will be collected in a consistent 
way from all programs, they can be uploaded into an ongoing national 
database that likewise provides CMHS with a way of producing summary 
reports of services provided across all programs funded.
    The components of the toolkit are listed and described below:
     Encounter logs. These forms document all services 
provided. Completion of these logs is required by the crisis 
counselors. There are three types of encounter logs:
    (1) Individual Crisis Counseling Services Encounter Log. Crisis 
counseling is defined as an interaction that lasts at least 15 minutes 
and involves participant disclosure. This form is completed by the 
crisis counselor for each service recipient, defined as the person or 
persons who actively participated in the session (e.g., by verbally 
participating), not someone who is merely present. For families, crisis 
counselors complete separate forms for all family members who are 
actively engaged in the visit. Information collected includes 
demographics, service characteristics, risk factors, event reactions, 
and referral data.
    (2) Group Encounter Log. This form is used to identify either a 
group crisis counseling encounter or a group public education 
encounter. A check at the top identifies the class of activities (i.e., 
counseling or education). Information collected includes services 
characteristics, group identity and characteristics, and group 
activities.
    (3) Weekly Tally Sheet. This form documents brief educational and 
supportive encounters not captured on any other form. Information 
collected includes service characteristics, daily tallies and weekly 
totals for brief educational or supportive contacts and material 
distribution with no or minimal interaction.
    [cir] Assessment and Referral Tools. Generally, the forms are used 
as an interview guide with adults or children/youth (i.e., please note 
that the child/youth tool is NEW to the data toolkit) who have received 
individual crisis counseling on two or more occasions for those 
individuals that may need referral to further and more intensive 
services. However, these tools may be used at any time that a crisis 
counselor suspects that an individual is experiencing serious reactions 
to the disaster. Typically, these tools will be used beginning three 
months post-disaster and will be completed by the crisis counselor or 
team leader.
    [cir] Adult Assessment and Referral Tool--This tool includes the 
collection of information on characteristics of the encounter, risk 
categories, and demographics. The tool also includes the SPRINT-E, an 
11-item measure of post-disaster distress including but not limited to 
symptoms of post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).
    [cir] Child/Youth Assessment and Referral Tool (NEW)--This tool 
includes the collection of information on risk factors, demographics, 
and 15 items from the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) 
Reaction Index to assess post-disaster symptoms; additional items are 
also included for the parents to rate their child's feelings and 
behavior.
     Participant Feedback. These surveys are completed by and 
collected from a sample of service recipients, not every recipient. A 
time sampling approach (e.g., soliciting participation from all 
counseling encounters one week per quarter) will be used. Information 
collected includes satisfaction with services, perceived improvements 
in self-functioning, types of exposure, and event reactions.
     CCP Service Provider Feedback. These surveys are completed 
by and collected from the CCP service providers (i.e., crisis 
counselors) anonymously at approximately six months and one year post-
event. The items on this form relate to the training, work environment, 
and level of job stress experienced by the crisis counselor. The survey 
will be coded on several program-level and worker-level variables to be 
shared with program management for review.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                             Number of     Responses per       Total         Hours per      Total hour                      Total hour
          Data collection point             respondents     respondent       responses       response         burden        Hourly rate        cost
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Individual Crisis Counseling Services            \1\ 200         \2\ 396          79,200             .08           6,336             $20        $126,720
 Encounter Log Form.....................
Group Encounter Log Form................         \3\ 100          \3\ 99           9,900             .04             396              20           7,920
Weekly Tally Sheet......................         \1\ 200          \4\ 33           6,600             .10             660              20          13,200
Assessment & Referral Tools.............         \1\ 200         \5\ 158          31,600             .15           4,740              20          94,800
Participant Feedback....................           1,000               1           1,000             .15             150              20           3,000

[[Page 52402]]

 
CCP Service Provider Feedback...........         \6\ 100               1             100             .15              15              20             300
�����������������������������������������
    Total...............................  ..............  ..............         128,400  ..............          12,297  ..............         245,940
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\ 200 is based on typical average of 10 (1.00 FTE) crisis counselors per grant with an approximate average of 20 grants per year (i.e., 10 x 20 =
  200).
\2\ Average of 12 forms per week for each crisis counselor at 33 weeks that includes both Immediate Services and Regular Services Programs (i.e., 12 x
  33 = 396).
\3\ Average of 3 forms per week for a pair of crisis counselors (i.e., 2 counselors completing 1 form = 100 crisis counselors) at 33 weeks that includes
  both Immediate Services and Regular Services Programs (3 x 33 = 99).
\4\ Average of 33 weeks for each grant that includes both Immediate Services and Regular Services Programs.
\5\ On average 30% of crisis encounters may result in the use of this optional tool.
\6\ On average 50% of service providers/crisis counselors may complete or use this optional tool.

    Written comments and recommendations concerning the proposed 
information collection should be sent by October 9, 2008 to: SAMHSA 
Desk Officer, Human Resources and Housing Branch, Office of Management 
and Budget, New Executive Office Building, Room 10235, Washington, DC 
20503; due to potential delays in OMB's receipt and processing of mail 
sent through the U.S. Postal Service, respondents are encouraged to 
submit comments by fax to: 202-395-6974.

    Dated: August 28, 2008.
Elaine Parry,
Acting Director, Office of Program Services.
[FR Doc. E8-20884 Filed 9-8-08; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4162-20-P