Kimberly-Clark Corporation, Kimberly-Clark Global Sales, Incorporated, a Wholly Owned Subsidiary of Kimberly-Clark Corporation Including On-Site Leased Workers From Hewlett Packard, Neenah, WI; Amended Certification Regarding Eligibility To Apply for Worker Adjustment Assistance and Alternative Trade Adjustment Assistance, 9833-9834 [E8-3216]

Download as PDF Federal Register / Vol. 73, No. 36 / Friday, February 22, 2008 / Notices Prosecutors—Benefits and Hooks: Better judgments individually and programmatically; more confidence in decision making; more information available can leverage service providers to raise capacities; help manage workload; collective accountability: everyone vested in seeing positive outcomes. Prosecutors—Issues and Challenges: Driver is collateral consequences on how cases are handled: e.g., guns, sex offenders, INS/ICE, etc. * * *; there may require more work and faith that there is no manipulation of the process; time constraints; figure out development of plea policies: changing current structure and format. Administration—Benefits and Hooks: Will help with resource management (volume and speed can help with spending more time on risk reduction); system improvement including front end to enhance risk reduction such as preventative services with juvenile and families. Administration—Issues and Challenges: Alignment of all the organizational policies, resources, evaluations * * *; need to realize that EBP is not only for the adult system but has spillover to all components of the criminal justice system. Identifying Strategies for NIC: (Meeting Objective 8) After reviewing the benefits and challenges, participants developed potential strategies to achieve project goals. mstockstill on PROD1PC66 with NOTICES Note: The following list represents a full menu of proposed strategies. Not all of which were adopted in the current Request for Proposals. Strategies to Use EBP to Reduce Risk: Find a pilot site or demonstration sites to make the case for using EBP system-wide; need to be selected for success not failure; need leadership and commitment; need to take risk; all stakeholders should be at the same level of understanding; there should not be conflicting understanding, mixed messages and agendas (consensus amongst the participants); understanding that EBP is dynamic and needs learning environment. Work with the National District Attorneys’ Association and state prosecutors’ associations at their training conferences; put together training packages; train trainers (prosecutors) at the various conferences with intent that demand for such training will spread to local jurisdictions; need to show results to convince prosecutors that this is in their best interest. National Conference of State Legislatures’ conference and other key VerDate Aug<31>2005 16:38 Feb 21, 2008 Jkt 214001 national conferences, e.g., the Conference of State Chief Justices; work with pretrial services and court administrators networks and associations; develop linkages to judges’ associations for information sharing and raising awareness and interest. Develop road show and information packets that can be done whenever the opportunities arise and need to carefully define public safety in terms of offender behavior change or reduction of risk to re offend. Funding by NIC of a major process and outcome evaluation so eventually a compelling case can be made. Does EBP decision making save money and achieve better outcomes? Target local public safety/criminal justice coordinating counsels to function as organizational models to introduce EBP. Include governors, (National Governor’s Association), Public Defender Association, American Bar Association. Develop a framework for integrating and implementing EBP—a criminal justice systems approach. The framework paper would define the mission, goals and approach; identify the issues that need to be addressed from the perspective of different stakeholders; define terms; define roles of stakeholders, and so forth. EBP helps frame what to do; the principles of EBP will need to relate to the operational level (all the players need to know what to do and what it would look like for them). Articulate the vision and core message of the project (something to rally behind). Have outside experts come to local jurisdictions to do an analysis (not an evaluation) of the local system. (Don’t start with locations that are dysfunctional.) Build a national consensus on EBP and sentencing. National symposium. Co-sponsorship by PEW, NIJ, NIC, JEHT * * * et al, to build sense of excitement and momentum, tying to reentry and jail overcrowding (target real issues and concerns that need new and effective direction). Provide opportunities to individuals and jurisdictions that have not had exposure to EBP and case decision making or collective policymaking. ‘‘Even just discussions can lead to positive change * * *’’. Develop core principles for systems change. Insist that everything is done as a team modeling the continuum of EBP. Tying this initiative to Re-entry: starts at charging and providing offenders a way to successfully re-enter society. PO 00000 Frm 00077 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 9833 Prioritize the work with pretrial and corrections/probation agencies. These are the agencies that have the data and can operationalize and demonstrate how things work. These agencies can act as system pioneers. Judges can use the information and bring along other key players such as prosecutors. Give judges concrete data on effective interventions and practices. Provide structure for judges to use data on individual offender. Needs to be national salesperson for each of the system components who can market and teach practitioners about EBP and decision making. Dated: February 14, 2008. Thomas J. Beauclair, Deputy Director. [FR Doc. E8–3264 Filed 2–21–08; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4410–36–P DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration [TA–W–60,017] Kimberly-Clark Corporation, KimberlyClark Global Sales, Incorporated, a Wholly Owned Subsidiary of KimberlyClark Corporation Including On-Site Leased Workers From Hewlett Packard, Neenah, WI; Amended Certification Regarding Eligibility To Apply for Worker Adjustment Assistance and Alternative Trade Adjustment Assistance In accordance with section 223 of the Trade Act of 1974 (19 U.S.C. 2273), and section 246 of the Trade Act of 1974 (26 U.S.C. 2813), as amended, the Department of Labor issued a Certification of Eligibility to Apply for Worker Adjustment Assistance and Alternative Trade Adjustment Assistance on September 26, 2006, applicable to workers of Kimberly-Clark Corporation, Kimberly-Clark Global Sales, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Kimberly-Clark Corporation, Neenah, Wisconsin. The notice was published in the Federal Register on October 16, 2006 (71 FR 60762). At the request of a petitioner, the Department reviewed the certification for workers of the subject firm. The workers were engaged in support activities for affiliated plants engaged in the production of disposable diapers, pull-ups and wipes. New information shows that leased workers of Hewlett Packard were employed on-site at the Neenah, Wisconsin location of Kimberly-Clark Corporation, Kimberly-Clark Global E:\FR\FM\22FEN1.SGM 22FEN1 9834 Federal Register / Vol. 73, No. 36 / Friday, February 22, 2008 / Notices Sales, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Kimberly-Clark Corporation. The Department has determined that these workers were sufficiently under the control of Kimberly-Clark Corporation, Kimberly-Clark Global Sales, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of KimberlyClark Corporation to be considered leased workers. Based on these findings, the Department is amending this certification to include leased workers of Hewlett Packard working on-site at the Neenah, Wisconsin location of the subject firm. The intent of the Department’s certification is to include all workers employed at Kimberly-Clark Corporation, Kimberly-Clark Global Sales, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Kimberly-Clark Corporation, Neenah, Wisconsin, who were adverselyimpacted by a shift in production of disposable diapers, pull-ups and wipes to Mexico. The amended notice applicable to TA–W–60,017 is hereby issued as follows: All workers of Kimberly-Clark Corporation, Kimberly-Clark Global Sales, Incorporated, a wholly owned subsidiary of Kimberly-Clark Corporation, including on-site leased workers of Hewlett Packard, Neenah, Wisconsin, who became totally or partially separated from employment on or after September 6, 2005 through September 26, 2008, are eligible to apply for adjustment assistance under section 223 of the Trade Act of 1974, and are also eligible to apply for alternative trade adjustment assistance under section 246 of the Trade Act of 1974. Signed at Washington, DC, this 8th day of February 2008. Elliott S. Kushner, Certifying Officer, Division of Trade Adjustment Assistance. [FR Doc. E8–3216 Filed 2–21–08; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4510–FN–P DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration mstockstill on PROD1PC66 with NOTICES Notice of Determinations Regarding Eligibility To Apply for Worker Adjustment Assistance and Alternative Trade Adjustment Assistance In accordance with section 223 of the Trade Act of 1974, as amended (19 U.S.C. 2273) the Department of Labor herein presents summaries of determinations regarding eligibility to apply for trade adjustment assistance for workers (TA–W) number and alternative trade adjustment assistance (ATAA) by (TA–W) number issued during the VerDate Aug<31>2005 18:08 Feb 21, 2008 Jkt 214001 period of February 4 through February 8, 2008. In order for an affirmative determination to be made for workers of a primary firm and a certification issued regarding eligibility to apply for worker adjustment assistance, each of the group eligibility requirements of section 222(a) of the Act must be met. I. Section (a)(2)(A) all of the following must be satisfied: A. A significant number or proportion of the workers in such workers’ firm, or an appropriate subdivision of the firm, have become totally or partially separated, or are threatened to become totally or partially separated; B. The sales or production, or both, of such firm or subdivision have decreased absolutely; and C. Increased imports of articles like or directly competitive with articles produced by such firm or subdivision have contributed importantly to such workers’ separation or threat of separation and to the decline in sales or production of such firm or subdivision; or II. Section (a)(2)(B) both of the following must be satisfied: A. A significant number or proportion of the workers in such workers’ firm, or an appropriate subdivision of the firm, have become totally or partially separated, or are threatened to become totally or partially separated; B. There has been a shift in production by such workers’ firm or subdivision to a foreign country of articles like or directly competitive with articles which are produced by such firm or subdivision; and C. One of the following must be satisfied: 1. The country to which the workers’ firm has shifted production of the articles is a party to a free trade agreement with the United States; 2. The country to which the workers’ firm has shifted production of the articles to a beneficiary country under the Andean Trade Preference Act, African Growth and Opportunity Act, or the Caribbean Basin Economic Recovery Act; or 3. There has been or is likely to be an increase in imports of articles that are like or directly competitive with articles which are or were produced by such firm or subdivision. Also, in order for an affirmative determination to be made for secondarily affected workers of a firm and a certification issued regarding eligibility to apply for worker adjustment assistance, each of the group eligibility requirements of Section 222(b) of the Act must be met. PO 00000 Frm 00078 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 (1) Significant number or proportion of the workers in the workers’ firm or an appropriate subdivision of the firm have become totally or partially separated, or are threatened to become totally or partially separated; (2) The workers’ firm (or subdivision) is a supplier or downstream producer to a firm (or subdivision) that employed a group of workers who received a certification of eligibility to apply for trade adjustment assistance benefits and such supply or production is related to the article that was the basis for such certification; and (3) Either— (A) The workers’ firm is a supplier and the component parts it supplied for the firm (or subdivision) described in paragraph (2) accounted for at least 20 percent of the production or sales of the workers’ firm; or (B) A loss or business by the workers’ firm with the firm (or subdivision) described in paragraph (2) contributed importantly to the workers’ separation or threat of separation. In order for the Division of Trade Adjustment Assistance to issue a certification of eligibility to apply for Alternative Trade Adjustment Assistance (ATAA) for older workers, the group eligibility requirements of section 246(a)(3)(A)(ii) of the Trade Act must be met. 1. Whether a significant number of workers in the workers’ firm are 50 years of age or older. 2. Whether the workers in the workers’ firm possess skills that are not easily transferable. 3. The competitive conditions within the workers’ industry (i.e., conditions within the industry are adverse). Affirmative Determinations for Worker Adjustment Assistance The following certifications have been issued. The date following the company name and location of each determination references the impact date for all workers of such determination. The following certifications have been issued. The requirements of section 222(a)(2)(A) (increased imports) of the Trade Act have been met. None. The following certifications have been issued. The requirements of section 222(a)(2)(B) (shift in production) of the Trade Act have been met. None. The following certifications have been issued. The requirements of section 222(b) (supplier to a firm whose workers are certified eligible to apply for TAA) of the Trade Act have been met. E:\FR\FM\22FEN1.SGM 22FEN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 73, Number 36 (Friday, February 22, 2008)]
[Notices]
[Pages 9833-9834]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: E8-3216]


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DEPARTMENT OF LABOR

Employment and Training Administration

[TA-W-60,017]


Kimberly-Clark Corporation, Kimberly-Clark Global Sales, 
Incorporated, a Wholly Owned Subsidiary of Kimberly-Clark Corporation 
Including On-Site Leased Workers From Hewlett Packard, Neenah, WI; 
Amended Certification Regarding Eligibility To Apply for Worker 
Adjustment Assistance and Alternative Trade Adjustment Assistance

    In accordance with section 223 of the Trade Act of 1974 (19 U.S.C. 
2273), and section 246 of the Trade Act of 1974 (26 U.S.C. 2813), as 
amended, the Department of Labor issued a Certification of Eligibility 
to Apply for Worker Adjustment Assistance and Alternative Trade 
Adjustment Assistance on September 26, 2006, applicable to workers of 
Kimberly-Clark Corporation, Kimberly-Clark Global Sales, Inc., a wholly 
owned subsidiary of Kimberly-Clark Corporation, Neenah, Wisconsin. The 
notice was published in the Federal Register on October 16, 2006 (71 FR 
60762).
    At the request of a petitioner, the Department reviewed the 
certification for workers of the subject firm. The workers were engaged 
in support activities for affiliated plants engaged in the production 
of disposable diapers, pull-ups and wipes.
    New information shows that leased workers of Hewlett Packard were 
employed on-site at the Neenah, Wisconsin location of Kimberly-Clark 
Corporation, Kimberly-Clark Global

[[Page 9834]]

Sales, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Kimberly-Clark Corporation. 
The Department has determined that these workers were sufficiently 
under the control of Kimberly-Clark Corporation, Kimberly-Clark Global 
Sales, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Kimberly-Clark Corporation to 
be considered leased workers.
    Based on these findings, the Department is amending this 
certification to include leased workers of Hewlett Packard working on-
site at the Neenah, Wisconsin location of the subject firm.
    The intent of the Department's certification is to include all 
workers employed at Kimberly-Clark Corporation, Kimberly-Clark Global 
Sales, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Kimberly-Clark Corporation, 
Neenah, Wisconsin, who were adversely-impacted by a shift in production 
of disposable diapers, pull-ups and wipes to Mexico.
    The amended notice applicable to TA-W-60,017 is hereby issued as 
follows:

    All workers of Kimberly-Clark Corporation, Kimberly-Clark Global 
Sales, Incorporated, a wholly owned subsidiary of Kimberly-Clark 
Corporation, including on-site leased workers of Hewlett Packard, 
Neenah, Wisconsin, who became totally or partially separated from 
employment on or after September 6, 2005 through September 26, 2008, 
are eligible to apply for adjustment assistance under section 223 of 
the Trade Act of 1974, and are also eligible to apply for 
alternative trade adjustment assistance under section 246 of the 
Trade Act of 1974.

    Signed at Washington, DC, this 8th day of February 2008.
Elliott S. Kushner,
Certifying Officer, Division of Trade Adjustment Assistance.
 [FR Doc. E8-3216 Filed 2-21-08; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4510-FN-P