Highway Safety Programs; Conforming Products List of Screening Devices to Measure Alcohol in Bodily Fluids, 4559-4560 [E7-1465]

Download as PDF Federal Register / Vol. 72, No. 20 / Wednesday, January 31, 2007 / Notices three business day comment period, or at the request of a grantee or subgrantee upon denial of a request for relief. FTA shall notify the grantee or subgrantee if it plans to reconsider a decision. FTA decision letters, either granting or denying a petition, shall be posted in the appropriate Emergency Relief Docket and shall reference the document number of the petition to which it relates. Issued in Washington, DC this 25th day of January 2007. James S. Simpson, FTA Administrator. [FR Doc. E7–1488 Filed 1–30–07; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4910–57–P DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION National Highway Traffic Safety Administration [Docket No. NHTSA–07–26922] Highway Safety Programs; Conforming Products List of Screening Devices to Measure Alcohol in Bodily Fluids National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, DOT. ACTION: Notice. AGENCY: SUMMARY: This Notice amends and updates the list of devices that conform to the Model Specifications for Screening Devices to Measure Alcohol in Bodily Fluids. EFFECTIVE DATE: January 31, 2007. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: J. De Carlo Ciccel, Impaired Driving Division (NTI–111), National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, 400 Seventh Street, SW., Washington, DC 20590; Telephone: (202) 366–1694. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: On August 2, 1994, NHTSA published Model Specifications for Screening Devices to Measure Alcohol in Bodily Fluids (59 FR 39382). These specifications established performance criteria and methods for testing alcohol screening devices to measure alcohol content. The specifications support State laws that target youthful offenders (e.g., ‘‘zero tolerance’’ laws) and the Department of Transportation’s workplace alcohol testing program. NHTSA published its first Conforming Products List (CPL) for screening devices on December 2, 1994 (59 FR 61923, with corrections on December 16, 1994 in 59 FR 65128), identifying the devices that meet NHTSA’s Model Specifications for Screening Devices to Measure Alcohol in Bodily Fluids. Five (5) devices appeared on that first list. Thereafter, NHTSA amended the CPL on August 15, 1995 (60 FR 42214) and on May 4, 2001 (66 FR 22639), adding seven (7) devices to the CPL in those two (2) actions. 4559 On September 19, 2005, NHTSA published an updated CPL (70 FR 54972), adding several devices to the list and removing several other devices. Subsequently NHTSA discovered an error regarding the name of a device listed on the CPL and republished the CPL on December 5, 2005 (70 FR 72502) to correct the error. Since the publication of the last CPL, NHTSA has evaluated additional devices at the Volpe National Transportation Systems Center (VNTSC) in Cambridge, Massachusetts, resulting in the addition of three (3) new breath alcohol screening devices to the CPL. (1) Q3 Innovations, Inc. submitted two (2) screening devices for testing. Their trade names are: AlcoHAWK Micro and AlcoHAWK Slim. These devices meet the NHTSA Model Specifications for Screening Devices to Measure Alcohol in Bodily Fluids. (2) Akers Biosciences, Inc. submitted the Breath Alcohol  .02 Detection System for testing. This device meets the NHTSA Model Specifications for Screening Devices to Measure Alcohol in Bodily Fluids. Consistent with paragraphs (1) and (2) above, NHTSA amends the Conforming Products List of Screening Devices to Measure Alcohol in Bodily Fluids to read as follows: CONFORMING PRODUCTS LIST OF ALCOHOL SCREENING DEVICES Manufacturer AK Solutions, Inc., Palisades Park, NJ 1 Device(s) .................................................................................... Alco Check International, Hudsonville, MI .................................................................................. Akers Biosciences, Inc., Thorofare, NJ ...................................................................................... Chematics, Inc., North Webster, IN ............................................................................................ Guth Laboratories, Inc., Harrisburg, PA ..................................................................................... mstockstill on PROD1PC62 with NOTICES Han International Co., Ltd., Seoul, Korea 4 ................................................................................ OraSure Technologies, Inc., Bethlehem, PA ............................................................................. PAS Systems International, Inc., Fredericksburg, VA ................................................................ Q3 Innovations, Inc., Independence, IA 5 ................................................................................... Repco Marketing, Inc., Raleigh, NC ........................................................................................... Seju Co. of Taejeon, Korea ........................................................................................................ Sound Off, Inc., Hudsonville, MI ................................................................................................. Varian, Inc., Lake Forest, CA ..................................................................................................... Alcoscan AL–2500. AlcoChecker. AlcoKey. AlcoMate. AlcoMate Pro. Alcoscan AL–5000. Alcoscan AL–6000. Alco Check 3000 D.O.T. Alco Check 9000. Breath Alcohol  .02 Detection System. 2 ALCO–SCREEN 02TM. 3 Alco Tector Mark X. Mark X Alcohol Checker. Alcotector WAT89EC–1. A.B.I. (Alcohol Breath Indicator). Q.E.D. A150 Saliva Alcohol Test. PAS Vr. AlcoHAWK Precision. AlcoHAWK Slim. AlcoHAWK Elite. AlcoHAWK ABI. AlcoHAWK Micro. AlcoHAWK PRO. Alco Tec III. Safe-Slim. Digitox D.O.T. On-Site Alcohol. 6 1 The AlcoMate was manufactured by Han International of Seoul, Korea, but marketed and sold in the U.S. by AK Solutions. Breath Alcohol  .02 Detection System consists of a single-use disposable breath tube used in conjunction with an electronic analyzer that determines the test result. The electronic analyzer and the disposable breath tubes are lot specific and manufactured to remain calibrated throughout the shelf-life of the device. This screening device cannot be used after the expiration date. 2 The VerDate Aug<31>2005 15:08 Jan 30, 2007 Jkt 211001 PO 00000 Frm 00083 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 E:\FR\FM\31JAN1.SGM 31JAN1 4560 Federal Register / Vol. 72, No. 20 / Wednesday, January 31, 2007 / Notices 3 While the ALCO–SCREEN 02 TM saliva-alcohol screening device manufactured by Chematics, Inc. passed the requirements of the Model Specifications when tested at 40 °C (104 °F), the manufacturer has indicated that the device cannot exceed storage temperatures of 27 °C (80 °F). Instructions to this effect are stated on all packaging accompanying the device. Accordingly, the device should not be stored at temperatures above 27 °C (80 °F). If the device is stored at or below 27 °C (80 °F) and used at higher temperatures (i.e., within a minute), the device meets the Model Specifications and the results persist for 10–15 minutes. If the device is stored at or below 27 °C (80 °F) and equilibrated at 40 °C (104 °F) for an hour prior to sample application, the device fails to meet the Model Specifications. Storage at temperatures above 27 °C (80 °F), for even brief periods of time, may result in false negative readings. 4 Han International does not market or sell devices directly in the U.S. market. Other devices manufactured by Han International are listed under AK Solutions, Inc. and Q–3 Innovations, Inc. 5 The AlcoHAWK ABI is the same device as that listed under Han International as the ‘‘ABI’’ and is manufactured for Q–3 Innovations by Han International. The AlcoHAWK PRO is the same device as the AlcoMate marketed and sold by AK Solutions, and also manufactured by Han International. 6 While this device passed all of the requirements of the Model Specifications, readings should be taken only after the time specified by the manufacturer. For valid readings, the user should follow the manufacturer’s instructions. Readings should be taken one (1) minute after a sample is introduced at or above 30°C (86°F); readings should be taken after two (2) minutes at 18°C–29°C (64.4°-84.2°F); and readings should be taken after five (5) minutes when testing at temperatures at or below 17°C (62.6°F). If the reading is taken before five (5) minutes has elapsed under the cold conditions, the user is likely to obtain a reading that underestimates the actual saliva-alcohol level. Issued on: January 24, 2007. Marilena Amoni, Associate Administrator for the Office of Research and Program Development. [FR Doc. E7–1465 Filed 1–30–07; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4910–59–P DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION National Highway Traffic Safety Administration [NHTSA Docket No. NHTSA–2006–26249] Brain Injury Symposium Agenda National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), DOT. ACTION: Agenda for the Meeting Notice. AGENCY: mstockstill on PROD1PC62 with NOTICES SUMMARY: The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) announced a two day Brain Injury Symposium to be held in Washington, DC (Federal Register/Vol. 71, No. 217/ Thursday, November 9, 2006/Notices). This notice supplements the agenda for the symposium (see the previous announcement for further information, NHTSA–2006–26249:1). DATES: February 26 and 27, 2007 starting at 9 a.m. on Monday, February 26 and ending at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, February 27, 2007. ADDRESSES: The meeting will be held at: L’Enfant Plaza Hotel, 480 L’Enfant Plaza, SW., Washington, DC 20024. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION: Erik Takhounts, PhD, Office of Applied Vehicle Safety Research, Human Injury Research Division, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, 400 Seventh Street, SW., Washington, DC 20590. Telephone number (202) 366– 4737; E-mail Erik.Takhounts@dot.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Program Day 1: Monday, February 26, 2007 Room—Quorum 8 a.m.–9 a.m. Refreshments. 9 a.m.–9:15 a.m. Opening Remarks. VerDate Aug<31>2005 15:08 Jan 30, 2007 Jkt 211001 R. Medford. Senior Associate Administrator, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration ‘‘Welcoming remarks.’’ 9:15 a.m.–10:15 a.m. Session I. S. Ridella, Human Injury Research Division, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration ‘‘Overview of NHTSA activities related to brain injury research.’’ E. Takhounts, Human Injury Research Division, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration ‘‘Brain injury research at NHTSA: modeling efforts.’’ T. Gennare III, Medical College of Wisconsin, ‘‘Overview of previous and current research in brain injury biomechanics.’’ 10:15 a.m.–10:35 a.m. Break. 10:35 a.m.–11:35 a.m. Session II. A. King, Wayne State University, ‘‘Overview of WSU current research: modeling, tissue level injuries.’’ R. Willinger, University of Louis Pasteur-Strasbourg, ‘‘Overview of ULP head injury criteria research and European perspectives.’’ 11:35 a.m.–1:30 p.m. Lunch [on your own] 1:30 p.m.–3 p.m. Session III. J. Melvin, Tandelta, ‘‘Brain injuries in race car drivers.’’ R. Nightingale, Duke University, ‘‘Neck as a delivery device for head; pediatric brain research.’’ S. Margulies, University of Pennsylvania, ‘‘Pediatric brain injury research; tissue level brain injuries.’’ 3 p.m.–3:20 p.m. Break. 3:20 p.m.–4:20 p.m. Session IV. S. Duma, Virginia Tech, ‘‘Brain injuries in college football players.’’ B. Morrison III, Columbia University, ‘‘Advances in cellular brain injury biomechanics.’’ 4:20 p.m.–5 p.m. Discussion and Concluding Remarks. Ridella/Takhounts: Announcements of the working groups for the next day: Injury Mechanisms and PO 00000 Frm 00084 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 Criteria, Modeling, and Dummy development; discussion of the presentations and working groups, selection of the group members and conformation of leaders. Day 2: Tuesday, February 27, 2007 Rooms—Montcalm, Lasalle, Lafayette 8 a.m.–9 a.m. Refreshments. 9 a.m.–12 p.m. Working in Breakout Groups. Discussion of the respective topics, research needs for the short-, mid-, and long-terms. 10:30 a.m.–10:50 a.m. Break. Continuing discussion of the respective topics. 12 p.m.–1:30 p.m. Lunch [on your own]. 1:30 p.m.–3 p.m. Working in Breakout Groups. Preparation of the resolution in each group. 3 p.m.–3:20 p.m. Break. 3:20 p.m.–5 p.m. Discussion and Concluding Remarks. BALL Rooms C and D. Ridella/Takhounts: Putting it all together, concluding remarks. Issued on: January 25, 2007. William T. Hollowell, Director, Office of Applied Vehicle Safety Research. [FR Doc. E7–1491 Filed 1–30–07; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4910–59–P DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Office of Foreign Assets Control Additional Designation of Individuals and Entity Pursuant to Executive Order 13224 Office of Foreign Assets Control, Treasury. ACTION: Notice. AGENCY: SUMMARY: The Treasury Department’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (‘‘OFAC’’) is publishing the names of two newly-designated individuals and one newly-designated entity whose E:\FR\FM\31JAN1.SGM 31JAN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 72, Number 20 (Wednesday, January 31, 2007)]
[Notices]
[Pages 4559-4560]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: E7-1465]


-----------------------------------------------------------------------

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION

National Highway Traffic Safety Administration

[Docket No. NHTSA-07-26922]


Highway Safety Programs; Conforming Products List of Screening 
Devices to Measure Alcohol in Bodily Fluids

AGENCY: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, DOT.

ACTION: Notice.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: This Notice amends and updates the list of devices that 
conform to the Model Specifications for Screening Devices to Measure 
Alcohol in Bodily Fluids.

EFFECTIVE DATE: January 31, 2007.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: J. De Carlo Ciccel, Impaired Driving 
Division (NTI-111), National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, 400 
Seventh Street, SW., Washington, DC 20590; Telephone: (202) 366-1694.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: On August 2, 1994, NHTSA published Model 
Specifications for Screening Devices to Measure Alcohol in Bodily 
Fluids (59 FR 39382). These specifications established performance 
criteria and methods for testing alcohol screening devices to measure 
alcohol content. The specifications support State laws that target 
youthful offenders (e.g., ``zero tolerance'' laws) and the Department 
of Transportation's workplace alcohol testing program. NHTSA published 
its first Conforming Products List (CPL) for screening devices on 
December 2, 1994 (59 FR 61923, with corrections on December 16, 1994 in 
59 FR 65128), identifying the devices that meet NHTSA's Model 
Specifications for Screening Devices to Measure Alcohol in Bodily 
Fluids. Five (5) devices appeared on that first list. Thereafter, NHTSA 
amended the CPL on August 15, 1995 (60 FR 42214) and on May 4, 2001 (66 
FR 22639), adding seven (7) devices to the CPL in those two (2) 
actions.
    On September 19, 2005, NHTSA published an updated CPL (70 FR 
54972), adding several devices to the list and removing several other 
devices. Subsequently NHTSA discovered an error regarding the name of a 
device listed on the CPL and republished the CPL on December 5, 2005 
(70 FR 72502) to correct the error.
    Since the publication of the last CPL, NHTSA has evaluated 
additional devices at the Volpe National Transportation Systems Center 
(VNTSC) in Cambridge, Massachusetts, resulting in the addition of three 
(3) new breath alcohol screening devices to the CPL.
    (1) Q3 Innovations, Inc. submitted two (2) screening devices for 
testing. Their trade names are: AlcoHAWK Micro and AlcoHAWK Slim. These 
devices meet the NHTSA Model Specifications for Screening Devices to 
Measure Alcohol in Bodily Fluids.
    (2) Akers Biosciences, Inc. submitted the Breath Alcohol [check] 
.02 Detection System for testing. This device meets the NHTSA Model 
Specifications for Screening Devices to Measure Alcohol in Bodily 
Fluids.
    Consistent with paragraphs (1) and (2) above, NHTSA amends the 
Conforming Products List of Screening Devices to Measure Alcohol in 
Bodily Fluids to read as follows:

                              Conforming Products List of Alcohol Screening Devices
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
              Manufacturer                                              Device(s)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
AK Solutions, Inc., Palisades Park, NJ   Alcoscan AL-2500.
 \1\.
                                         AlcoChecker.
                                         AlcoKey.
                                         AlcoMate.
                                         AlcoMate Pro.
                                         Alcoscan AL-5000.
                                         Alcoscan AL-6000.
Alco Check International, Hudsonville,   Alco Check 3000 D.O.T.
 MI.
                                         Alco Check 9000.
Akers Biosciences, Inc., Thorofare, NJ.  Breath Alcohol [check] .02 Detection System. \2\
Chematics, Inc., North Webster, IN.....  ALCO-SCREEN 02\TM.\ \3\
Guth Laboratories, Inc., Harrisburg, PA  Alco Tector Mark X.
                                         Mark X Alcohol Checker.
                                         Alcotector WAT89EC-1.
Han International Co., Ltd., Seoul,      A.B.I. (Alcohol Breath Indicator).
 Korea \4\.
OraSure Technologies, Inc., Bethlehem,   Q.E.D. A150 Saliva Alcohol Test.
 PA.
PAS Systems International, Inc.,         PAS Vr.
 Fredericksburg, VA.
Q3 Innovations, Inc., Independence, IA   AlcoHAWK Precision.
 \5\.
                                         AlcoHAWK Slim.
                                         AlcoHAWK Elite.
                                         AlcoHAWK ABI.
                                         AlcoHAWK Micro.
                                         AlcoHAWK PRO.
Repco Marketing, Inc., Raleigh, NC.....  Alco Tec III.
Seju Co. of Taejeon, Korea.............  Safe-Slim.
Sound Off, Inc., Hudsonville, MI.......  Digitox D.O.T.
Varian, Inc., Lake Forest, CA..........  On-Site Alcohol. \6\
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\ The AlcoMate was manufactured by Han International of Seoul, Korea, but marketed and sold in the U.S. by AK
  Solutions.
\2\ The Breath Alcohol [check] .02 Detection System consists of a single-use disposable breath tube used in
  conjunction with an electronic analyzer that determines the test result. The electronic analyzer and the
  disposable breath tubes are lot specific and manufactured to remain calibrated throughout the shelf-life of
  the device. This screening device cannot be used after the expiration date.

[[Page 4560]]

 
\3\ While the ALCO-SCREEN 02 \TM\ saliva-alcohol screening device manufactured by Chematics, Inc. passed the
  requirements of the Model Specifications when tested at 40 [deg]C (104 [deg]F), the manufacturer has indicated
  that the device cannot exceed storage temperatures of 27 [deg]C (80 [deg]F). Instructions to this effect are
  stated on all packaging accompanying the device. Accordingly, the device should not be stored at temperatures
  above 27 [deg]C (80 [deg]F). If the device is stored at or below 27 [deg]C (80 [deg]F) and used at higher
  temperatures (i.e., within a minute), the device meets the Model Specifications and the results persist for 10-
  15 minutes. If the device is stored at or below 27 [deg]C (80 [deg]F) and equilibrated at 40 [deg]C (104
  [deg]F) for an hour prior to sample application, the device fails to meet the Model Specifications. Storage at
  temperatures above 27 [deg]C (80 [deg]F), for even brief periods of time, may result in false negative
  readings.
\4\ Han International does not market or sell devices directly in the U.S. market. Other devices manufactured by
  Han International are listed under AK Solutions, Inc. and Q-3 Innovations, Inc.
\5\ The AlcoHAWK ABI is the same device as that listed under Han International as the ``ABI'' and is
  manufactured for Q-3 Innovations by Han International. The AlcoHAWK PRO is the same device as the AlcoMate
  marketed and sold by AK Solutions, and also manufactured by Han International.
\6\ While this device passed all of the requirements of the Model Specifications, readings should be taken only
  after the time specified by the manufacturer. For valid readings, the user should follow the manufacturer's
  instructions. Readings should be taken one (1) minute after a sample is introduced at or above 30[deg]C
  (86[deg]F); readings should be taken after two (2) minutes at 18[deg]C-29[deg]C (64.4[deg]-84.2[deg]F); and
  readings should be taken after five (5) minutes when testing at temperatures at or below 17[deg]C
  (62.6[deg]F). If the reading is taken before five (5) minutes has elapsed under the cold conditions, the user
  is likely to obtain a reading that underestimates the actual saliva-alcohol level.


    Issued on: January 24, 2007.
Marilena Amoni,
Associate Administrator for the Office of Research and Program 
Development.
[FR Doc. E7-1465 Filed 1-30-07; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4910-59-P