Proposed Collection; Comment Request, 7080-7081 [E6-1834]

Download as PDF 7080 Federal Register / Vol. 71, No. 28 / Friday, February 10, 2006 / Notices rmajette on PROD1PC67 with NOTICES1 Rule 15g–6, SEC File No. 270–349, OMB Control No. 3235–0395 Notice is hereby given that pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (44 U.S.C. 3501 et seq.), the Securities and Exchange Commission (‘‘Commission’’) is soliciting comments on the collection of information summarized below. The Commission plans to submit this existing collection of information to the Office of Management and Budget for extension and approval. • (Rule 15g–6—Account statements for penny stock customers. Rule 15g–6 under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 requires brokers and dealers that sell penny stocks to their customers to provide monthly account statements containing information with regard to the penny stocks held in customer accounts. The information is required to be provided to customers of broker-dealers that effect penny stock transactions in order to provide those customers with information that is not now publicly available. Without this information, investors would be less able to protect themselves from fraud and to make informed investment decisions. The staff estimates that there are approximately 240 broker-dealers that are subject to the rule. The staff estimates that the firms affected by the rule will, at any one time, have approximately 150 new customers with whom they have effected transactions in penny stocks, each of whom would receive a maximum of 12 account statements per year, for a total of 1,800 account statements annually for each firm (150 customers × 12 account statements/customer). The staff estimates that a broker-dealer would expend approximately three minutes in processing the information required for each account statement. Accordingly, the estimated average annual burden would equal 90 hours (1,800 account statements × 3 minutes/account statement ÷ 1 hour/60 minutes), and the estimated average total burden would equal 21,600 hours (90 hours × 240). Written comments are invited on: (a) Whether the proposed collection of information is necessary for the proper performance of the functions of the agency, including whether the information shall have practical utility; (b) the accuracy of the agency’s estimates of the burden of the proposed collection of information; (c) ways to enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the information to be collected; and (d) ways to minimize the burden of the collection of information on respondents, including through the use VerDate Aug<31>2005 15:10 Feb 09, 2006 Jkt 208001 of automated collection techniques or other forms of information technology. Consideration will be given to comments and suggestions submitted in writing within 60 days of this publication. Please direct your written comments to R. Corey Booth, Director/Chief Information Officer, Office of Information Technology, Securities and Exchange Commission, 100 F Street, NE., Washington, DC 20549. Dated: February 1, 2006. Jill M. Peterson, Assistant Secretary. [FR Doc. E6–1831 Filed 2–9–06; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 8010–01–P SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION Proposed Collection; Comment Request Upon Written Request, Copies Available From: Securities and Exchange Commission, Office of Filings and Information Services, Washington, DC 20549. Extension: Form N–SAR; SEC File No. 270–292; OMB Control No. 3235–0330. Notice is hereby given that pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (44 U.S.C. 3501 et seq.) (‘‘PRA’’), the Securities and Exchange Commission (the ‘‘Commission’’) is soliciting comments on the collections of information summarized below. The Commission plans to submit these existing collections of information to the Office of Management and Budget (‘‘OMB’’) for extension and approval. • Form N–SAR—Semi-Annual Report for Registered Investment Companies Form N–SAR is the form used by all registered investment companies with the exception of face amount certificate companies, to comply with the periodic filing and disclosure requirements imposed by Section 30 of the Investment Company Act of 1940 [15 U.S.C. 80a–1 et seq.], and of rules 30a1– 1 and 30b1–1 under the Act. The information required to be filed with the Commission assures the public availability of the information and permits verification of compliance with Investment Company Act requirements. Registered unit investment trusts are required to provide this information on an annual report filed with the Commission on Form N–SAR (OMB Control No. 3235–0330) pursuant to rule 30a1–1 under the Investment Company Act [17 CFR 30a1–1], and registered management investment companies PO 00000 Frm 00079 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 must submit the required information on a semi-annual report on Form N– SAR pursuant to rule 30b1–1 under the Act [17 CFR 270.30b1–1].1 The Commission estimates that the total number of respondents is 4,130 and the total annual number of responses is 7,430 ((3,300 respondents X 2 responses per year) + (830 respondents X 1 response per year)). The Commission estimates that each registrant filing a report on Form N-SAR would spend, on average, 14.43 hours in preparing and filing the Form and that the total hour burden for all Form NSAR filings would be 107,203 hours. Estimates of the burden hours are made solely for the purposes of the PRA, and are not derived from a comprehensive or even a representative survey or study of the costs of Commission rules and forms. Written comments are invited on: (a) Whether the proposed collection of information is necessary for the proper performance of the functions of the agency, including whether the information will have practical utility; (b) the accuracy of the agency’s estimate of the burden of the collection of information; (c) ways to enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the information collected; and (d) ways to minimize the burden of the collection of information on respondents, including through the use of automated collection techniques or other forms of information technology. Consideration will be given to comments and suggestions submitted in writing within 60 days of this publication. Please direct your written comments to R. Corey Booth, Director/Chief Information Officer, Office of Information Technology, Securities and Exchange Commission, 100 F Street, NE., Washington, DC 20549. February 2, 2006. Nancy M. Morris, Secretary. [FR Doc. E6–1833 Filed 2–9–06; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 8010–01–P SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION Proposed Collection; Comment Request Upon written request, copies available from: Securities and Exchange Commission, Office of Filings and Information Services, Washington, DC 20549. 1 Face amount certificate companies are required to file periodic reports pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Exchange Act [15 U.S.C. 78m, 78o(d)]. E:\FR\FM\10FEN1.SGM 10FEN1 Federal Register / Vol. 71, No. 28 / Friday, February 10, 2006 / Notices Extension: Rule 9b–1; SEC File No. 270–429; OMB Control No. 3235–0480. rmajette on PROD1PC67 with NOTICES1 Notice is hereby given that pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (44 U.S.C. 3501 et seq.) the Securities and Exchange Commission (‘‘Commission’’) is soliciting comments on the collection of information summarized below. The Commission plans to submit this existing collection of information to the Office of Management and Budget for extension and approval. Options Disclosure Document Rule 9b–1 under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (17 CFR 240.9b– 1) sets forth the categories of information required to be disclosed in an options disclosure document (‘‘ODD’’) and requires the options markets to file an ODD with the Commission 60 days prior to the date it is distributed to investors. In addition, Rule 9b–1 provides that the ODD must be amended if the information in the document becomes materially inaccurate or incomplete and that amendments must be filed with the Commission 30 days prior to the distribution to customers. Finally, Rule 9b–1 requires a broker-dealer to furnish to each customer an ODD and any amendments, prior to accepting an order to purchase or sell an option on behalf of that customer. There are 6 options markets that must comply with Rule 9b–1. These 6 respondents work together to prepare a single ODD covering options traded on each market, as well as amendments to the ODD. These respondents file no more than one amendment per year, which requires approximately 8 hours per year for each respondent. Thus, the total compliance burden for options markets per year is 48 hours. The approximate cost per hour is $100, resulting in a total cost of compliance for these respondents of $4,800 per year (48 hours @ $100). In addition, approximately 2,000 broker-dealers must comply with Rule 9b–1. Each of these respondents will process an average of three new customers for options each week and, therefore, will have to furnish approximately 156 ODDs per year. The postal mailing or electronic delivery of the ODD takes respondents no more than 30 seconds to complete for an annual compliance burden for each of these respondents of 78 minutes, or 1.3 hours. Thus, the total compliance burden per year is 2,600 hours (2,000 broker-dealers × 1.3 hours). The approximate cost per hour to these respondents is $10 per hour, resulting in VerDate Aug<31>2005 15:10 Feb 09, 2006 Jkt 208001 a total cost of compliance for these respondents of $26,000 per year (2,600 hours @ $10). The total compliance burden for all respondents under this rule (both options markets and broker-dealers) is 2648 hours per year (48 + 2,600), and total compliance costs of $30,800 ($4,800 + $26,000). Written comments are invited on: (a) Whether the proposed collection of information is necessary for the proper performance of the functions of the agency, including whether the information will have practical utility; (b) the accuracy of the agency’s estimate of the burden of the collection of information; (c) ways to enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the information collected; and (d) ways to minimize the burden of the collection of information on respondents, including through the use of automated collection techniques or other forms of information technology. Consideration will be given to comments and suggestions submitted in writing within 60 days of this publication. Please direct your written comments to R. Corey Booth, Director/Chief Information Officer, Office of Information Technology, Securities and Exchange Commission, 100 F Street, NE., Washington, DC 20549. February 1, 2006. Nancy M. Morris, Secretary. [FR Doc. E6–1834 Filed 2–9–06; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 8010–01–P SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [File No. 1–18460] Issuer Delisting; Notice of Application of Community Capital Corporation To Withdraw Its Common Stock, $1.00 Par Value, From Listing and Registration on the American Stock Exchange LLC February 2, 2006. On January 19, 2006, Community Capital Corporation, a South Carolina corporation (‘‘Issuer’’), filed an application with the Securities and Exchange Commission (‘‘Commission’’), pursuant to section 12(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (‘‘Act’’) 1 and Rule 12d2–2(d) thereunder,2 to withdraw its common stock, $1.00 par value (‘‘Security’’), from listing and registration on the American Stock Exchange LLC (‘‘Amex’’). On January 18, 2006, the Board of Directors (‘‘Board’’) of the Issuer 1 15 2 17 PO 00000 Frm 00080 Fmt 4703 unanimously approved resolutions to withdraw the Security from listing and registration on Amex and to list the Security on the Nasdaq National Market (‘‘Nasdaq’’). The Issuer stated that the following reasons factored into the Board’s decision: (i) The Board believes that listing the Security on Nasdaq will provide visibility for the Security, improve liquidity in the Security, and provide better execution quality for investors; and (ii) the Board believes that more of the Issuer’s peer financial institutions are listed on Nasdaq than listed on Amex. The Issuer stated in its application that it has met the requirements of Amex Rule 18 by complying with all applicable laws in effect in the State of South Carolina, in which it is incorporated, and provided written notice of withdrawal to Amex. The Issuer’s application relates solely to withdrawal of the Security from listing on Amex and from registration under section 12(b) of the Act,3 and shall not affect its obligation to be registered under section 12(g) of the Act.4 Any interested person may, on or before February 28, 2006, comment on the facts bearing upon whether the application has been made in accordance with the rules of Amex, and what terms, if any, should be imposed by the Commission for the protection of investors. All comment letters may be submitted by either of the following methods: Electronic Comments • Use the Commission’s Internet comment form (http://www.sec.gov/ rules/delist.shtml); or • Send an e-mail to rulecomments@sec.gov. Please include the File Number 1–18460 or; Paper Comments • Send paper comments in triplicate to Nancy M. Morris, Secretary, Securities and Exchange Commission, 100 F Street, NE., Washington, DC 20549–1090. All submissions should refer to File Number 1–18460. This file number should be included on the subject line if e-mail is used. To help us process and review your comments more efficiently, please use only one method. The Commission will post all comments on the Commission’s Internet Web site (http://www.sec.gov/rules/delist.shtml). Comments are also available for public inspection and copying in the Commission’s Public Reference Room. 3 15 U.S.C. 78l(d). CFR 240.12d2–2(d). 4 15 Sfmt 4703 7081 E:\FR\FM\10FEN1.SGM U.S.C. 78l(b). U.S.C. 78l(g). 10FEN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 71, Number 28 (Friday, February 10, 2006)]
[Notices]
[Pages 7080-7081]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: E6-1834]


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SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION


Proposed Collection; Comment Request

Upon written request, copies available from: Securities and Exchange 
Commission, Office of Filings and Information Services, Washington, DC 
20549.


[[Page 7081]]


Extension:
    Rule 9b-1; SEC File No. 270-429; OMB Control No. 3235-0480.

    Notice is hereby given that pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act 
of 1995 (44 U.S.C. 3501 et seq.) the Securities and Exchange Commission 
(``Commission'') is soliciting comments on the collection of 
information summarized below. The Commission plans to submit this 
existing collection of information to the Office of Management and 
Budget for extension and approval.

Options Disclosure Document

    Rule 9b-1 under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (17 CFR 240.9b-
1) sets forth the categories of information required to be disclosed in 
an options disclosure document (``ODD'') and requires the options 
markets to file an ODD with the Commission 60 days prior to the date it 
is distributed to investors. In addition, Rule 9b-1 provides that the 
ODD must be amended if the information in the document becomes 
materially inaccurate or incomplete and that amendments must be filed 
with the Commission 30 days prior to the distribution to customers. 
Finally, Rule 9b-1 requires a broker-dealer to furnish to each customer 
an ODD and any amendments, prior to accepting an order to purchase or 
sell an option on behalf of that customer.
    There are 6 options markets that must comply with Rule 9b-1. These 
6 respondents work together to prepare a single ODD covering options 
traded on each market, as well as amendments to the ODD. These 
respondents file no more than one amendment per year, which requires 
approximately 8 hours per year for each respondent. Thus, the total 
compliance burden for options markets per year is 48 hours. The 
approximate cost per hour is $100, resulting in a total cost of 
compliance for these respondents of $4,800 per year (48 hours @ $100).
    In addition, approximately 2,000 broker-dealers must comply with 
Rule 9b-1. Each of these respondents will process an average of three 
new customers for options each week and, therefore, will have to 
furnish approximately 156 ODDs per year. The postal mailing or 
electronic delivery of the ODD takes respondents no more than 30 
seconds to complete for an annual compliance burden for each of these 
respondents of 78 minutes, or 1.3 hours. Thus, the total compliance 
burden per year is 2,600 hours (2,000 broker-dealers x 1.3 hours). The 
approximate cost per hour to these respondents is $10 per hour, 
resulting in a total cost of compliance for these respondents of 
$26,000 per year (2,600 hours @ $10).
    The total compliance burden for all respondents under this rule 
(both options markets and broker-dealers) is 2648 hours per year (48 + 
2,600), and total compliance costs of $30,800 ($4,800 + $26,000).
    Written comments are invited on: (a) Whether the proposed 
collection of information is necessary for the proper performance of 
the functions of the agency, including whether the information will 
have practical utility; (b) the accuracy of the agency's estimate of 
the burden of the collection of information; (c) ways to enhance the 
quality, utility, and clarity of the information collected; and (d) 
ways to minimize the burden of the collection of information on 
respondents, including through the use of automated collection 
techniques or other forms of information technology. Consideration will 
be given to comments and suggestions submitted in writing within 60 
days of this publication.
    Please direct your written comments to R. Corey Booth, Director/
Chief Information Officer, Office of Information Technology, Securities 
and Exchange Commission, 100 F Street, NE., Washington, DC 20549.

    February 1, 2006.
Nancy M. Morris,
Secretary.
[FR Doc. E6-1834 Filed 2-9-06; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 8010-01-P