Reports, Forms, and Record Keeping Requirements; Agency Information Collection Activity Under OMB Review, 24463-24464 [05-9205]

Download as PDF Federal Register / Vol. 70, No. 88 / Monday, May 9, 2005 / Notices consequence, to assure that headlamps can be correctly aimed, instructions for proper use must be part of the vehicle as a label, or optionally, in the vehicle owner’s manual. FMVSS No. 110, ‘‘Tire selection and rims.’’ This standard specifies requirements for tire selection to prevent tire overloading. The vehicle’s normal load and maximum load on the tire shall not be greater than applicable specified limits. The standard requires a permanently affixed vehicle placard specifying vehicle capacity weight, designated seating capacity, manufacturer recommended cold tire inflation pressure, and manufacturer’s recommended tire size. The standard further specifies rim construction requirements, load limits of nonpneumatic spare tires, and labeling requirements for non-pneumatic spare tires, including a required placard. Owner’s manual information is required for ‘‘Use of Spare Tire.’’ FMVSS No. 110 will require additional owner’s manual information on the revised vehicle placard and tire information label, on revised tire labeling, and on tire safety and load limits and terminology. FMVSS No. 202, ‘‘Head restraints.’’ This standard specifies requirements for head restraints. The standard, which seeks to reduce whiplash injuries in rear collisions, currently requires head restraints for front outboard designated seating positions in passenger cars and in light multipurpose passenger vehicles, trucks and buses. In a final rule published on December 14, 2004 (69 FR 74880), the standard requires that vehicle manufacturers include information in owner’s manuals for vehicles manufactured on or after September 1, 2008. The owner’s manual must clearly identify which seats are equipped with head restraints. If the head restraints are removable, the owner’s manual must provide instructions on how to remove the head restraint by a deliberate action distinct from any act necessary for adjustment, and how to reinstall head restraints. The owner’s manual must warn that all head restraints must be reinstalled to properly protect vehicle occupants. Finally, the owner’s manual must describe, in an easily understandable format, the adjustment of the head restraints and/or seat back to achieve appropriate head restraint position relative to the occupant’s head. FMVSS No. 205, ‘‘Glazing materials.’’ This standard specifies requirement for all glazing material used in windshields, windows, and interior partitions of motor vehicles. Its purpose is to reduce the likelihood of lacerations and to minimize the possibility of occupants VerDate jul<14>2003 17:20 May 06, 2005 Jkt 205001 penetrating the windshield in a crash. More detailed information regarding the care and maintenance of such glazing items, as the glass-plastic windshield, is required to be placed in the vehicle owner’s manual. FMVSS No. 208, ‘‘Occupant crash protection.’’ This standard specifies requirements for both active and passive occupant crash protection systems for passenger cars, multipurpose passenger vehicles, trucks and small buses. Certain safety features, such as air bags, or the care and maintenance of air bag systems, are required to be explained to the owner by means of the owner’s manual. For example, the owner’s manual must describe the vehicle’s air bag system and provide precautionary information about the proper positioning of the occupants, including children. The owner’s manual must also warn that no objects, such as shotguns carried in police cars, should be placed over or near the air bag covers. FMVSS No. 210, ‘‘Seat belt assembly anchorages.’’ This standard specifies requirements for seat belt assembly anchorages to ensure effective occupant restraint and to reduce the likelihood of failure in a crash. The standard requires that manufacturers place the following information in the vehicle owner’s manual: a. An explanation that child restraints are designed to be secured by means of the vehicle’s seat belts, and, b. A statement alerting vehicle owners that children are always safer in the rear seat. FMVSS No. 213, ‘‘Child restraint systems.’’ This standard specifies requirements for child restraint systems and requires that manufacturers provide consumers with detailed information relating to child safety in air bagequipped vehicles. The vehicle owner’s manual must include information about the operation and do’s and don’ts of built-in child seats. Part 575 Section 103, ‘‘Camper loading.’’ This standard requires that manufacturers of slide-in campers designed to fit into the cargo bed of pickup trucks affix a label to each camper that contains information relating to certification, identification and proper loading, and to provide more detailed loading information in the owner’s manual of the truck. Part 575 Section 105, ‘‘Utility vehicles.’’ This regulation requires manufacturers of utility vehicles to alert drivers that the particular handling and maneuvering characteristics of utility vehicles require special driving practices when these vehicles are operated on paved roads. For example, the vehicle owner’s manual is required PO 00000 Frm 00098 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 24463 to contain a discussion of vehicle design features that cause this type of vehicle to be more likely to roll over, and to include a discussion of driving practices that can reduce the risk of roll over. A statement is provided in the regulation that manufacturers shall include, in its entirety or equivalent form, in the vehicle owner’s manual. Description of the Likely Respondents (Including Estimated Number and Proposed Frequency of Response to the Collection of Information): NHTSA anticipates that no more than 21 vehicle manufacturers will be affected by the reporting requirements. Estimate of the Total Annual Reporting and Record Keeping Burden Resulting from the Collection of Information: NHTSA estimates that all manufacturers will need a total of 2,615 hours to comply with these requirements, at a total annual cost of $6,279,172. Authority: 44 U.S.C. 3506(c); delegation of authority at 49 CFR 1.50. Issued on: May 4, 2005. Stephen R. Kratzke, Associate Administrator for Rulemaking. [FR Doc. 05–9170 Filed 5–6–05; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4910–59–P DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION National Highway Traffic Safety Administration Reports, Forms, and Record Keeping Requirements; Agency Information Collection Activity Under OMB Review National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, DOT. ACTION: Notice. AGENCY: SUMMARY: In compliance with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (44 U.S.C. 3501 et seq.), this notice announces that the Information Collection Request (ICR) abstracted below has been forwarded to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for review and comment. The ICR describes the nature of the information collections and their expected burden. The Federal Register Notice with a 60-day comment period was published on August 19, 2004 (69 FR 51544–51545). DATES: Comments must be submitted on or before June 8, 2005. ADDRESSES: Send comments, within 30 days, to the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs, Office of Management and Budget, 725–17th Street, NW., Washington, DC 20503, Attention NHTSA Desk Officer. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Alan Block at the National Highway E:\FR\FM\09MYN1.SGM 09MYN1 24464 Federal Register / Vol. 70, No. 88 / Monday, May 9, 2005 / Notices Traffic Safety Administration, Office of Research and Technology (NTI–131), 202–366–6401, 400 Seventh Street, SW., Room 5119, Washington, DC 20590. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: BILLING CODE 4910–59–P National Highway Traffic Safety Administration Title: Increasing Safety Belt Use Among Children Ages 8–15. OMB Number: 2127–New. Type of Request: New information collection requirement. Abstract: Little is currently known about the context of safety belt use and non-use by 8–15 year olds. This study will gather information on attitudes, knowledge, and behavior related to safety belts among children in that age range in order to determine strategies for increasing child safety belt use. There will be 27 in-home immersion interviews with families having one or more children age 8–15 (an average of 3.5 interviews per family). In-home immersions are interviews in which researchers visit respondents’ homes and have an opportunity to speak with multiple members of the household and to observe how their interactions and environment may either motivate or serve as barriers to eliciting desired behaviors. Each of the 27 immersion sessions will last approximately two hours. Information derived from the immersion interviews will be used to develop intervention or program concepts/ideas that will be tested with children in 96 triad interviews. Each triad will be composed of three children of the same sex, race/ethnicity, and approximate age. Each of the 96 triads will last approximately 75 minutes. Affected Public: Children age 8–15 and their parents or guardians, from among the general public, who volunteer to participate in the study. Estimated Total Annual Burden: 549 hours. Comments are invited on: Whether the proposed collection of information is necessary for the proper performance of the functions of the Department, including whether the information will have practical utility; the accuracy of the Department’s estimate of the burden of the proposed information collection; ways to enhance the quality, utility and clarity of the information to be collected; and ways to minimize the burden of the collection of information on respondents, including the use of automated collection techniques or other forms of information technology. A Comment to OMB is most effective if OMB receives it within 30 days of publication. VerDate jul<14>2003 17:20 May 06, 2005 Jkt 205001 Issued on: May 4, 2005. Marilena Amoni, Associate Administrator, Program Development and Delivery. [FR Doc. 05–9205 Filed 5–6–05; 8:45 am] DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION National Highway Traffic Safety Administration [Docket No. NHTSA 2005–20545; Notice 2] IC Corporation, Grant of Petition for Decision of Inconsequential Noncompliance IC Corporation (IC) has determined that certain school buses that it manufactured in 2001 through 2004 do not comply with S5.2.3.2(a)(4) of 49 CFR 571.217, Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard (FMVSS) No. 217, ‘‘Bus emergency exits and window retention and release.’’ Pursuant to 49 U.S.C. 30118(d) and 30120(h), IC has petitioned for a determination that this noncompliance is inconsequential to motor vehicle safety and has filed an appropriate report pursuant to 49 CFR Part 573, ‘‘Defect and Noncompliance Reports.’’ Notice of receipt of a petition was published, with a 30-day comment period, on March 23, 2005, in the Federal Register (70 FR 14748). NHTSA received no comments. Affected are a total of approximately 40 school buses manufactured from August 15, 2001 to September 29, 2004. S5.2.3.2(a)(4) of FMVSS No. 217 states ‘‘No two side emergency exit doors shall be located, in whole or in part, within the same post and roof bow panel space.’’ The noncompliant vehicles have two side emergency exit doors located opposite each other within the same post and roof bow panel space. IC believes that the noncompliance is inconsequential to motor vehicle safety and that no corrective action is warranted. IC states that NHTSA’s main purpose in updating FMVSS No. 217 was, to ensure that emergency exit capability would be proportional to the maximum occupant capacity; to improve access to side emergency doors; to improve visibility of exits; and to facilitate the exiting of occupants from a bus after an accident * * *. None of these primary objectives were compromised on the 40 units covered by this petition. IC states that it reviewed comments in response to the NPRM to update FMVSS No. 217 and determined that they * * * were related to the fatigue strength of a bus body of this configuration. IC Corporation was unable to find comments PO 00000 Frm 00099 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 relating to the safe exit of occupants in the event of an accident as a result of this door arrangement. Based on this background, IC Corporation presents arguments for consideration regarding both the structural and safety aspects of the rule. Finally, we present bus customer feedback based on interviews conducted with some of the bus customers affected by this non-compliance. IC further states that it is ‘‘not aware of any research that indicates that emergency exits should not be located across from each other for safety of egress reasons alone.’’ IC say it believes the requirement for two exit doors located across from each other in the same post and roof bow appears ‘‘to all be related to the issue of the structural integrity of a bus body of this configuration.’’ IC indicates that it ‘‘has no reports of any failures of panels or the structure in the area of the left or right emergency doors’’ of the noncompliant vehicles. Nor has IC received failure reports of panels or the structure for two other types of buses it manufactures. It describes these two other types of buses. One is ‘‘commercial buses with a passenger door centered on the right side of the bus and large double bow windows on the left side within the same post and roof bow panel space.’’ Another is buses with ‘‘the combination of a left side emergency door on the left side and a wheelchair door on the right side within the same post and roof bow panel space.’’ IC further asserts that ‘‘NHTSA does not restrict other combinations of doors and windows within the same roof bow space.’’ IC states that it will extend to the owners of the noncompliant vehicles a 15-year warranty for any structural or panel failures related to the location of the doors, so that ‘‘corrections could be made long before any possible fatigue problems * * * progress into major structural issues.’’ The Agency agrees with IC that in this case the noncompliance does not compromise safety in terms of emergency exit capability in proportion to maximum occupant capacity, access to side emergency doors, visibility of the exits, or the ability of bus occupants to exit after an accident. IC has corrected the problem. In consideration of the foregoing, NHTSA has decided that the petitioner has met its burden of persuasion that the noncompliance described is inconsequential to motor vehicle safety. Accordingly, IC’s petition is granted and the petitioner is exempted from the obligation of providing notification of, and a remedy for, the noncompliance. E:\FR\FM\09MYN1.SGM 09MYN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 70, Number 88 (Monday, May 9, 2005)]
[Notices]
[Pages 24463-24464]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 05-9205]


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DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION

National Highway Traffic Safety Administration


Reports, Forms, and Record Keeping Requirements; Agency 
Information Collection Activity Under OMB Review

AGENCY: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, DOT.

ACTION: Notice.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: In compliance with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (44 
U.S.C. 3501 et seq.), this notice announces that the Information 
Collection Request (ICR) abstracted below has been forwarded to the 
Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for review and comment. The ICR 
describes the nature of the information collections and their expected 
burden. The Federal Register Notice with a 60-day comment period was 
published on August 19, 2004 (69 FR 51544-51545).

DATES: Comments must be submitted on or before June 8, 2005.

ADDRESSES: Send comments, within 30 days, to the Office of Information 
and Regulatory Affairs, Office of Management and Budget, 725-17th 
Street, NW., Washington, DC 20503, Attention NHTSA Desk Officer.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Alan Block at the National Highway

[[Page 24464]]

Traffic Safety Administration, Office of Research and Technology (NTI-
131), 202-366-6401, 400 Seventh Street, SW., Room 5119, Washington, DC 
20590.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:

National Highway Traffic Safety Administration

    Title: Increasing Safety Belt Use Among Children Ages 8-15.
    OMB Number: 2127-New.
    Type of Request: New information collection requirement.
    Abstract: Little is currently known about the context of safety 
belt use and non-use by 8-15 year olds. This study will gather 
information on attitudes, knowledge, and behavior related to safety 
belts among children in that age range in order to determine strategies 
for increasing child safety belt use. There will be 27 in-home 
immersion interviews with families having one or more children age 8-15 
(an average of 3.5 interviews per family). In-home immersions are 
interviews in which researchers visit respondents' homes and have an 
opportunity to speak with multiple members of the household and to 
observe how their interactions and environment may either motivate or 
serve as barriers to eliciting desired behaviors. Each of the 27 
immersion sessions will last approximately two hours. Information 
derived from the immersion interviews will be used to develop 
intervention or program concepts/ideas that will be tested with 
children in 96 triad interviews. Each triad will be composed of three 
children of the same sex, race/ethnicity, and approximate age. Each of 
the 96 triads will last approximately 75 minutes.
    Affected Public: Children age 8-15 and their parents or guardians, 
from among the general public, who volunteer to participate in the 
study.
    Estimated Total Annual Burden: 549 hours.
    Comments are invited on: Whether the proposed collection of 
information is necessary for the proper performance of the functions of 
the Department, including whether the information will have practical 
utility; the accuracy of the Department's estimate of the burden of the 
proposed information collection; ways to enhance the quality, utility 
and clarity of the information to be collected; and ways to minimize 
the burden of the collection of information on respondents, including 
the use of automated collection techniques or other forms of 
information technology. A Comment to OMB is most effective if OMB 
receives it within 30 days of publication.

    Issued on: May 4, 2005.
Marilena Amoni,
Associate Administrator, Program Development and Delivery.
[FR Doc. 05-9205 Filed 5-6-05; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4910-59-P