Notice of Availability of Funds and Solicitation for Grant Applications (SGA) for Community-Based Job Training Grants, 22905-22924 [05-8772]

Download as PDF Federal Register / Vol. 70, No. 84 / Tuesday, May 3, 2005 / Notices DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration [TA–W–56,695] Tyco Electronics, Printed Circuit Group, Stafford Division, Stafford, Connecticut; Notice of Termination of Investigation Pursuant to Section 221 of the Trade Act of 1974, as amended, an investigation was initiated on March 7, 2005, in response to a petition filed by a State agency representative on behalf of workers of Tyco Electronics, Printed Circuit Group, Stafford Division, Stafford, Connecticut. The petitioner has requested that the petition be withdrawn. Consequently, the investigation has been terminated. Signed in Washington, DC this 15th day of April 2005. Linda G. Poole, Certifying Officer, Division of Trade Adjustment Assistance. [FR Doc. E5–2116 Filed 5–2–05; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4510–30–P DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration [TA–W–55,891 and TA–W–55,891A] Wilsonart International, Inc., a Subsidiary of ITW, Temple, TX, Including an Employee of Wilsonart International, Inc. Located in Atlanta, GA; Amended Certification Regarding Eligibility To Apply for Worker Adjustment Assistance and Alternative Trade Adjustment Assistance In accordance with Section 223 of the Trade Act of 1974 (19 U.S.C. 2273) the Department of Labor issued a Certification Regarding Eligibility to Apply for Worker Adjustment Assistance and Alternative Trade Adjustment Assistance on December 9, 2004, applicable to workers of Wilsonart International, Inc., a subsidiary of ITW, Temple, Texas. The notice was published in the Federal Register on January 24, 2005 (70 FR 3392). At the request of the State agency, the Department reviewed the certification for workers of the subject firm. New information shows that a worker separation occurred involving an employee of the Temple, Texas facility of Wilsonart International, Inc., a subsidiary of ITW located in Atlanta, Georgia. Ms. Miclene McGhee provided customer support services for the production of high-pressure decorative VerDate jul<14>2003 15:43 May 02, 2005 Jkt 205001 laminate used in kitchen counter tops and cabinets at the Temple, Texas location of the subject firm. Based on these findings, the Department is amending this certification to include an employee of the Temple, Texas facility of Wilsonart International, Inc., a subsidiary of ITW, located in Atlanta, Georgia and to also extend ATAA eligibility to Ms. Miclene McGhee located in Atlanta, Georgia. The intent of the Department’s certification is to include all workers of Wilsonart International, Inc., a subsidiary of ITW, Temple, Texas, who were adversely affected by a shift in production to India and Thailand. The amended notice applicable to TA–W–55,891 is hereby issued as follows: All workers of Wilsonart International, Inc., a subsidiary of ITW, Temple, Texas (TA–W–55,891), including an employee of Wilsonart International, Inc., a subsidiary of ITW, Temple, Texas, located in Atlanta, Georgia (TA–W–55,891A), who became totally or partially separated from employment on or after October 21, 2003, through December 9, 2006, are eligible to apply for adjustment assistance under Section 223 of the Trade Act of 1974, and are also eligible to apply for alternative trade adjustment assistance under Section 246 of the Trade Act of 1974, as amended. Signed at Washington, DC, this 26th day of April 2005. Linda G. Poole, Certifying Officer, Division of Trade Adjustment Assistance. [FR Doc. E5–2130 Filed 5–2–05; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4510–30–P DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration [TA–W–56,851] Xerox Corporation, Business Group Operations Workers Producing Base Finisher Module Webster, NY; Notice of Termination of Investigation Pursuant to Section 221 of the Trade Act of 1974, as amended, an investigation was initiated on March 30, 2005 in response to a worker petition filed on behalf of workers producing Base Finisher Modules at Business Group Operations of Xerox Corporation, Webster, New York. The petitioning group of workers is covered by an active certification, TA– W–53,004, which expires on October 20, 2005. Consequently, further investigation in this case would serve no purpose, and the investigation has been terminated. PO 00000 Frm 00065 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 22905 Signed at Washington, DC this 12th day of April, 2005. Elliott S. Kushner, Certifying Officer, Division of Trade Adjustment Assistance. [FR Doc. 05–8911 Filed 4–28–05; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4510–30–M DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration Notice of Availability of Funds and Solicitation for Grant Applications (SGA) for Community-Based Job Training Grants Announcement type: New. Notice of Solicitation for Grant Applications. Funding Opportunity Number: SGA/ DFA–PY–04–10. Catalog of Federal Assistance Number: 17.261. Key Dates: The closing date for receipt of applications under this announcement is July 6, 2005. Applications must be received at the address below no later than 5 p.m. (eastern time). Application and submission information is explained in detail in Section IV of this SGA. Virtual Prospective Applicant Conferences will be held for this grant competition. The dates and access information for these prospective applicant conferences will be posted on ETA’s Web site at http:// www.doleta.gov/business/CommunityBasedJobTrainingGrants.cfm. SUMMARY: The Employment and Training Administration (ETA), U.S. Department of Labor (DOL), announces the availability of approximately $125 million in grant funds for CommunityBased Job Training Grants. Community-Based Job Training Grants will be awarded through a competitive process to support workforce training for high-growth industries through the national system of community and technical colleges. The primary purpose of these grants is to build the capacity of community colleges to train workers to develop the skills required to succeed in (i) local industries and occupations that are expected to experience high growth and (ii) industries where demand for qualified workers is outstripping the supply. Funds will be awarded to community colleges to engage in a combination of capacity building and training activities targeted at highgrowth or high-demand industries in the local economy. In awarding Community-Based Job Training Grants, every effort will be made to fairly distribute grants across rural and urban areas and across the E:\FR\FM\03MYN1.SGM 03MYN1 22906 Federal Register / Vol. 70, No. 84 / Tuesday, May 3, 2005 / Notices different geographic regions of the United States. It is anticipated that individual awards will range in amount from $500,000 to $2 million. A second solicitation is anticipated for Fall/ Winter 2005. This solicitation provides background information and describes the application submission requirements, outlines the process that eligible entities must use to apply for funds covered by this solicitation, and details how grantees will be selected. ADDRESSES: Mailed applications must be addressed to the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration, Division of Federal Assistance, Attention: Eric Luetkenhaus, Grant Officer, Reference SGA/DFA–PY– 04–10, 200 Constitution Avenue, NW., Room N–4438, Washington, DC 20210. Telefacsimile (FAX) applications will not be accepted. Information about applying online can be found in Section IV (C) of this document. Applicants are advised that mail delivery in the Washington area may be delayed due to mail decontamination procedures. Hand delivered proposals will be received at the above address. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: This solicitation consists of eight parts: • Part I provides background information. • Part II describes the size and nature of the anticipated awards. • Part III describes eligible applicants and other grant specifications. • Part IV provides information on the application and submission process. • Part V describes the criteria against which applications will be reviewed and explains the proposal review process. • Part VI provides award administration information. • Part VII contains DOL agency contact information. • Part VIII lists additional resources of interest to applicants. I. Funding Opportunity Description The Community-Based Job Training Grants (CBJTGs) are designed to support workforce training for high-growth industries through the national system of community and technical colleges. The primary purpose of these grants is to build the capacity of community colleges to train workers to develop the skills required to succeed in (i) local industries and occupations that are expected to experience high growth and (ii) industries where demand for qualified workers is outstripping the supply. Part 1 of this section provides an overview of ETA’s demand-driven VerDate jul<14>2003 15:43 May 02, 2005 Jkt 205001 workforce investment strategies. Part 2 provides background information on the principles underlying the CBJTGs. Part 3 describes critical elements of the grants themselves. 1. The Employment and Training Administration’s Demand-Driven Workforce Investment Strategies Each year, the federal government invests over $15 billion in a state and local network of resources, known as the workforce investment system, to assist businesses in recruiting, training, and retaining a skilled workforce. While these investments have in the past supported a set of standard menu-driven services for employers and workers, the realities of today’s rapidly changing global economy make it imperative that the workforce investment system support customized activities that are driven by local employer demand. This demand-driven approach to workforce development is necessary to prepare workers to take advantage of new and increasing job opportunities in highgrowth/high-demand and economically vital industries and sectors of the American economy. In a demand-driven workforce investment system, state and local Workforce Investment Boards invest strategically in workforce development activities that are relevant to the requirements of local industry and have a long-term impact on the ability of the community to meet local workforce demands. To do so, they bring to the table critical collaborative partners in the development of America’s workforce: employers and education and training providers. Within the context of these strategic partnerships, communities use a solutions-based approach to workforce development planning, in which the partnering entities work through the cycle of: (1) Collecting and analyzing information about local workforce needs and critical capacity constraints; (2) incorporating a business or demanddriven perspective into issue identification and solutions development; (3) ensuring that the right strategic partners are at the table; (4) working collaboratively to explore, frame, and implement solutions; and (5) assessing how the products and outcomes of the project can be effectively deployed and replicated. The goal of this process is to ensure that the proposed project will ultimately succeed in resolving the industryidentified workforce challenge. The solutions-based approach engages each collaborative partner in its area of strength. Industry representatives and employers define workforce challenges PO 00000 Frm 00066 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 facing the industry and identify the competencies and skills required for the industry’s workforce. The workforce investment system provides access to human capital (youth, unemployed, underemployed, incumbent workers, and dislocated workers), assists with training programs, and places trained workers in jobs. Community colleges and other training providers assist in developing competency models and training curricula and train new and incumbent workers. The K–12 public education system ensures that investments at the community college are part of a continuum of education and training leading to successful skill development. ETA first modeled the power of these strategic partnerships through the President’s High Growth Job Training Initiative (High Growth Initiative). The High Growth Initiative is a strategic effort to prepare workers for new and increasing job opportunities in highgrowth/high-demand and economically vital industries and sectors of the American economy. Through the initiative, ETA identifies high-growth/ high-demand industries, evaluates their skills needs, and funds local and national partnership-based demonstration projects that provide workforce solutions to ensure that individuals can gain the skills to get good jobs in these rapidly expanding or transforming industries. The products, models and effective approaches that result from the High Growth Initiative will be broadly disseminated to employers, education and training providers, and the workforce investment system to build their capacity to respond to employer demands. 2. Background on the Community-Based Job Training Grants The Community-Based Job Training Grants (CBJTGs) continue the work of the High Growth Initiative by incorporating its focus on high-growth, high-demand industries and its emphasis on the role of strategic partnerships in workforce development. The CBJTGs build on the work of the High Growth Initiative by highlighting the critical role community colleges play as partners in the demand-driven workforce investment system, and by supporting community efforts to link training initiatives to the skill demands of local employers. As a result, CBJTG activities will lead to an increased number of high-growth firms being supported by the local workforce and education systems, and more individuals being trained and employed in high-growth sectors. E:\FR\FM\03MYN1.SGM 03MYN1 Federal Register / Vol. 70, No. 84 / Tuesday, May 3, 2005 / Notices emphasizes a workforce system driven by the needs of local employers. In order for America to remain competitive in the global economy, it is essential that ETA target its investments to support employers in high-growth/highdemand industries. Community colleges play a vital role in this effort by providing training to address the workforce needs of these industries. A high-growth/high-demand industry meets one or more of the following criteria: (1) Is projected to add substantial numbers of new jobs to the economy; (2) has a significant impact on the economy overall; (3) impacts the growth of other industries; (4) is being transformed by technology and innovation requiring new skill sets for workers; or (5) is a new and emerging business that is projected to grow. B. Strategic Partnerships. ETA believes that strategic partnerships between community colleges, the workforce investment system, business and industry, and the continuum of education, including the K–12 system, need to be in place in order to implement effective demand-driven training and capacity building strategies. These strategic partnerships may have a local, regional, or statewide focus, and may include a consortium of partners or cross-industry representatives. Specific requirements for strategic partnerships are outlined in Section III (3). These strategic partnerships should focus broadly on the workforce challenges of one or more high-growth, high-demand industries and work collaboratively to identify and implement solutions to those challenges. These solutions should include, among others, strategies to increase the capacity of local community colleges to educate and train more workers with industry-defined skills and competencies. Therefore, the 3. Critical Elements of Communityinvestment in community college Based Job Training Grants capacity building would be one of many It is ETA’s expectation that CBJTGs strategies and solutions that evolve from will contain at least six critical the partnership. While ETA welcomes elements. These elements consist of: (A) applications from newly formed Focus on skill and competency needs of strategic partnerships, applicants are local high-growth/high-demand advised that grant funds may not be industries; (B) strategic partnerships; (C) used for partnership development. industry-driven capacity building and Within the context of the broader training efforts; (D) leveraged resources; strategic partnership and as it relates to this grant, each collaborative partner (E) replication; and (F) clear and specific outcomes. These characteristics should have clearly defined roles. Each are reflected in the evaluation criteria in partner should verify their role through a letter of commitment attached to the Part V and are described in further proposal. The exact nature of these roles detail below. For examples of projects that integrate these elements, please see may vary depending on the issue areas being addressed and the scope and Appendix A. A. Focus on skill and competency nature of the activities undertaken. needs of local high-growth/high-demand However, ETA expects that each collaborative partner will, at minimum, industries. The Workforce Investment contribute in the following ways. Act of 1998 (Pub. L. 105–220) (WIA) Community colleges represent a critical 21st century training resource for workers needing to attain, retool, refine, and broaden their skills to meet industry demand. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, eighty percent of the fastest growing jobs in the United States require some level of postsecondary education. The accessibility and affordability of community college training, combined with the adaptability of community college curricula to changing skill needs, make community colleges a vital training resource for many U.S. workers. Furthermore, community colleges are closely connected to local labor markets, making them well-positioned to prepare workers for good jobs with good wages in the local economy. However, community college leaders and industry executives report that many community colleges are unable to meet local demand for training because of critical capacity constraints. These capacity constraints occur when community colleges lack sufficient resources to support training facilities and equipment, curriculum development, faculty appointments, clinical experiences, and/or other elements that are necessary to provide either the volume or quality of training that industry requires. Despite rising application rates, the reality of current state and local budgets often prevents colleges from funding the programs, faculty, and student services they need to be responsive to local workforce demands. The CBJTGs will address this critical capacity issue. Funds will be awarded to community colleges to engage in a combination of capacity building and training activities targeted at highgrowth or high-demand industries in the local economy. VerDate jul<14>2003 15:43 May 02, 2005 Jkt 205001 PO 00000 Frm 00067 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 22907 Employers should be actively engaged and participate fully in every aspect of grant activities including: defining the program strategy and goals; identifying needed skills and competencies; designing training approaches and curricula; implementing the program; contributing financial support; and, where appropriate, hiring qualified training graduates. The K–12 education system is an important foundational partner to ensure the project’s activities are tied to the broader continuum of education in the community. The workforce investment system, which may include state and local Workforce Investment Boards, State Workforce Agencies, and One-Stop Career Centers and their cooperating partners, as such terms are defined under WIA, may play a number of roles, including: identifying and assessing candidates for training; working collaboratively to leverage WIA investments; referring qualified candidates to the community college for enrollment; providing wrap-around support services, where appropriate; and referring qualified training graduates to employers with existing job openings. In order to maximize the success of the project and to keep pace with the rapid changes in the economy and the nature of the skills and competencies necessary for work in these industries, these strategic partnerships need to be substantial and sustained. ETA encourages partners to plan for sustainability of the partnership to enable ongoing assessment of industry workforce needs and collaborative development of solutions on an ongoing basis. C. Industry-driven capacity building and training efforts. All CBJTGs must develop and implement a combination of capacity building and training activities that target skills and competencies demanded by local highgrowth/high-demand industries. Applicants are not limited in the strategies and approaches they may employ to implement their capacity building and training strategies, provided the activities meet the following requirements: (1) Training. Training activities must: (a) Occur within the context of a continuum of education and training that supports long-term career growth, such as an articulated career ladder/ lattice and (b) result in college credit or other credentials that are industryrecognized and indicate a level of mastery and competence in a given field or function. The credential awarded to participants upon completion should be based on the type of training provided through the grant and the requirements E:\FR\FM\03MYN1.SGM 03MYN1 22908 Federal Register / Vol. 70, No. 84 / Tuesday, May 3, 2005 / Notices of the targeted occupation, and should be selected based on consultations with industry partners. For example: a. Customized and short-term training should result in a performance-based certification or certificate. This certification may be developed jointly by employers and the community college, based on defined knowledge and skill requirements for specific highdemand occupations/functions. Performance-based certifications may also be based on industry-recognized curriculum and standards. b. Training in information technology, allied health professions, and other fields with established professional standards and examinations should result in certification. c. In states where licensure is required for the specific occupation targeted by the training, the credentialing requirement should be set accordingly. d. In some instances, training provided under CBJTGs may lead to a degree. In these instances, the credential required will be credit for each course leading to an Associate’s or Applied Associate’s degree. (2) Capacity Building. Community colleges are encouraged to broadly assess their capacity to meet the training needs of the targeted high-growth/highdemand industry or industries. Proposed capacity building strategies are expected to address significant barriers which impede the ability of the community college to meet local industry demand for workforce training. These strategies should not simply address isolated deficits, but rather provide a comprehensive solution to identified capacity challenges as they relate to the industry or industries of focus. Examples of capacity building activities include, but are not limited to: a. The development or adaptation of competency models and curricula to support training; b. The development of innovative curricula, teaching methods and instructional design to maximize the impact of the initiative in meeting the skills needs of employers; c. Innovative strategies to ensure availability of qualified and certified instructors; d. Procurement of equipment and simulation equipment necessary to train to industry-demanded skills; or e. Support for clinical experiences required for certification or licensure. Capacity building activities must meet two criteria: (1) The proposed capacity building efforts must be directly linked to the specific training supported under the grant; and (2) grantees must use their grant funds in a manner consistent with the regulations and policies VerDate jul<14>2003 15:43 May 02, 2005 Jkt 205001 governing use of funds under 171(d) of WIA, which broadly allows the funds to be utilized to test an array of approaches to the provision of training services and support the development and replication of effective training strategies. D. Leveraged Resources. Projects funded through CBJTGs should leverage resources from key entities in the strategic partnership. Leveraging resources in the context of strategic partnerships accomplishes three goals: (1) It allows for the strategic pursuit of resources; (2) it increases stakeholder investment in the project at all levels including design and implementation phases; and (3) it broadens the impact of the project itself. Applicants are encouraged to leverage significant resources from key partners and other organizations to maximize the impact of the project on the community. ETA strongly encourages CBJTG applicants and their strategic partners to be entrepreneurial as they seek out, utilize, and sustain these resources, whether they are in-kind or cash contributions, when creating capacity building and training strategies. Businesses, faith-based and community organizations, and foundations often invest resources to support workforce development. Faith-based and community organizations may provide resources such as support services, mentoring, tutoring, and volunteers, all of which are important resources for grantees to leverage in assisting the populations targeted by these funds. In addition, other government programs, including the Department of Education, the Department of Commerce, and other ETA programs, such as registered apprenticeship and Job Corps, may have resources available that can be integrated into the proposed project. ETA also encourages applicants to integrate WIA funding at the state and local level into their proposed project. Integrating WIA funds ensures that the full spectrum of assets available from the workforce system is leveraged to support the capacity building and training activities. The wide variety of WIA programs and activities provide both breadth and depth to the proposed solution offered to both business and individuals. The use of WIA funds also serves to embed the solutions-based approach into the local or regional workforce investment system, which strengthens the system’s ability to become more demand-driven. E. Replication. CBJTGs are intended to drive the community college system and the workforce investment system to be more responsive to the workforce demands of industry by making the PO 00000 Frm 00068 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 products, models, and effective approaches that result from CBJTG investments available to both systems. To that end, grantees will develop the foundations and outcomes of CBJTG projects, including the learning and achievement resulting from the projects, into solutions-based models that can be shared with, and implemented by, other community colleges, the workforce system, and industry leaders. F. Outcomes. The CBJTGs will be fundamentally results-oriented. Therefore, clear and specific outcomes that are appropriate to the nature of the proposed activities and the size of the project are vital components of CBJTG projects. Because CBJTGs invest in customized strategies to address local workforce and skills shortages, ETA recognizes that specific outcomes will vary from project to project based on the specific activities proposed. Training outcomes should include those tracked by the Common Measures, the OMBapproved uniform evaluation metrics for job training and employment programs. A detailed description of ETA’s policy on the Common Measures can be found in the Training and Employment Guidance Letter (TEGL) No. 28–04 (http://wdr.doleta.gov/directives/attach/ TEGL28–04.pdf). A basic list of Common Measures is provided as attachment B to the TEGL (http:// wdr.doleta.gov/directives/attach/ TEGL28–04_AttachB.pdf). Capacity building outcomes should include products, models, and activities that increase the capacity of the community college to provide training as well as the impact each outcome has on the number of individuals the community college can train and/or the quality of that training. Outcomes and impacts of the proposed project should satisfactorily address the industry-identified workforce need and the community college capacity constraint identified by the partnership. II. Award Information 1. Award Amount ETA intends to fund approximately seventy-five (75) projects through grants ranging from $500,000 to $2 million through this competition; however, this does not preclude ETA from funding grants at either a lower or higher amount, or funding a smaller or larger number of projects, based on the type and the number of quality submissions. Applicants are encouraged to submit budgets for quality projects at whatever funding level is appropriate to the project. Nevertheless, applicants should recognize that the funds available through this SGA are intended to E:\FR\FM\03MYN1.SGM 03MYN1 Federal Register / Vol. 70, No. 84 / Tuesday, May 3, 2005 / Notices complement additional leveraged resources rather than be the sole source of funds for the proposal. A second competition planned for Fall/Winter 2005 will request applications for the funding of additional projects. 2. Period of Performance ETA intends that the initial period of grant performance will fall within a range of 24 to 36 months from the date of execution of the grant documents. However, ETA will determine an appropriate period of performance on a per-award basis that will allow for the completion of capacity building and training efforts, and allow time for posttraining participant tracking in the workplace. III. Eligibility Information 1. Eligible Applicants In order to be eligible for consideration under this solicitation, the applicant must be a publicly funded institution of higher education that grants associate degrees. Therefore, applicants must demonstrate that they comply with the definition of a community college in 20 U.S.C. 2371: The term ‘‘community college’’—(A) means an institution of higher education [as defined in 20 U.S.C. 1001] that provides not less than a 2-year program that is acceptable for full credit towards a bachelor’s degree; and (B) includes tribally controlled colleges and universities. Applicants that fail to meet this eligibility requirement will be removed from consideration prior to the technical review process. Please note: (1) The applicant and fiscal agent for this grant initiative must be the same entity; and (2) in accordance with Section 18 of the Lobbying Disclosure Act of 1995 (Pub. L. 104–65) (2 U.S.C. 1611), non-profit entities incorporated under Internal Revenue Service Code section 501(c)(4) that engage in lobbying activities are not eligible to receive Federal funds and grants. 2. Cost Sharing or Matching Cost sharing, matching, or cost participation is not required for eligibility; however, applicants are encouraged to leverage the resources of the partnership whenever possible. 3. Other Grant Specifications (1) Demonstrated Partnerships. To be considered for funding under this SGA, the applicant must demonstrate that the proposed project will be implemented by a strategic partnership that includes at least one entity from each of the following categories: (1) The publiclyfunded Workforce Investment System, VerDate jul<14>2003 15:43 May 02, 2005 Jkt 205001 which may include state and local Workforce Investment Boards, State Workforce Agencies, and One Stop Career Centers and their partners; (2) the community college system; (3) employers and industry-related organizations such as associations and unions; and (4) the continuum of education, including the K–12 public education system. The strategic partnership may be a legally organized partnership or joint venture, or a more informal collaboration. As discussed above in Section III(1), the applicant itself, for the purpose of being bound in the grant application and any resulting award, must be a publicly funded community college. (2) Required Capacity Building and Training Activities. To be considered for funding under this SGA, proposed grant activities must include a combination of capacity building and training activities that target skills and competencies demanded by local high-growth/highdemand industries. Training activities must result in college credit or other credentials that are industry-recognized and indicate a level of mastery and competence in a given field or function. Proposed capacity building activities must address barriers that impede the ability of the community college to meet local industry demand for workforce training and must be directly linked to the specific training supported under the grant. Applicants may propose a cross-cutting capacity building and training strategy that will support training in more than one high growth/ high demand industry if the applicant can demonstrate that skill needs in the identified industries are shared. (3) Participants Eligible to Receive Training. Generally, the scope of potential trainees is very broad. WIA Sec. 171(d) authorizes demonstration programs to serve dislocated workers, incumbent workers, and new entrants to the workforce. This authorization supports a broad range of training for a variety of populations, including: Incumbent workers who need new skills for jobs in demand up the career ladder or because the skill needs for their current job have changed; untapped labor pools such as immigrant workers, individuals with disabilities, veterans, older workers, youth, etc; or entry level workers who need basic skills and/or specific occupational skill training. The identification of targeted and qualified trainees should be part of the larger project planning process undertaken by the required partnership and should relate to the workforce issue that is being addressed by the training. (4) Training Providers. The community college applicant must offer PO 00000 Frm 00069 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 22909 appropriate credentials for all proposed training. Generally, it is assumed that the applicant will also be the training provider. However, ETA encourages applicants to be creative in integrating partner resources into the training plan. For example: A business partner may provide a qualified instructor to the community college; the community college may provide on-site training for workers to take advantage of businessloaned equipment; the training may be provided jointly; or some of the training may utilize distance learning alternatives. (5) Veterans Priority. In circumstances where a grant recipient must choose between two equally qualified candidates for training, one of whom is a veteran, the Jobs for Veterans Act (Pub. L. 107–288) requires that grant recipients give the veteran priority of service by admitting him or her. The Jobs for Veterans Act provides priority of service to veterans and spouses of certain veterans for the receipt of employment, training, and placement services in any job training program directly funded, in whole or in part, by the Department of Labor. Please note that, to obtain priority of service, a veteran must meet the program’s eligibility requirements. ETA Training and Employment Guidance Letter (TEGL) No. 5–03 (September 16, 2003) provides general guidance on the scope of the Job for Veterans Act and its effect on current employment and training programs. TEGL No. 5–03, along with additional guidance, is available at the ‘‘Jobs for Veterans Priority of Service’’ Web site (http://www.doleta.gov/ programs/vets). IV. Application and Submission Information 1. Address To Request Application Package This SGA contains all of the information and forms needed to apply for grant funding. 2. Content and Form of Application Submission The proposal must consist of two (2) separate and distinct parts, Parts I and II. Applications that fail to adhere to the instructions in this section will be considered non-responsive and may not be given further consideration. Part I of the proposal is the Cost Proposal and must include the following three items. • The Standard Form (SF) 424, ‘‘Application for Federal Assistance’’ (Appendix B) (available at http:// www.whitehouse.gov/omb/grants/ sf424.pdf). The SF 424 must clearly E:\FR\FM\03MYN1.SGM 03MYN1 22910 Federal Register / Vol. 70, No. 84 / Tuesday, May 3, 2005 / Notices identify the applicant and be signed by an individual with authority to enter into a grant agreement. Upon confirmation of an award, the individual signing the SF 424 on behalf of the applicant shall be considered the representative of the applicant. • All applicants for federal grant and funding opportunities are required to have a Dun and Bradstreet (DUNS) number. See Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Notice of Final Policy Issuance, 68 FR 38402 (June 27, 2003). Applicants must supply their DUNS number in item #5 of the new SF 424 issued by OMB (Rev. 9–2003). The DUNS number is a nine-digit identification number that uniquely identifies business entities. Obtaining a DUNS number is easy and there is no charge. To obtain a DUNS number, access this Web site: http://www.dunandbradstreet.com or call 1–866–705–5711. • SF 424A, the Budget Information Form (Appendix C) (available at http://www.whitehouse.gov/omb/grants/ sf424a.pdf). In preparing the Budget Information Form, the applicant must provide a concise narrative explanation to support the request. The budget narrative should break down the budget and leveraged resources by deliverable, should discuss cost per-participant, and should discuss precisely how the administrative costs support the project goals. Please note that applicants that fail to provide a SF 424, SF 424A and/or a budget narrative will be removed from consideration prior to the technical review process. Applicants are also encouraged, but not required, to submit OMB Survey N. 1890–0014: Survey on Ensuring Equal Opportunity for Applicants, which can be found in Attachment D. Part II of the application is the Technical Proposal, which demonstrates the applicant’s capabilities to plan and implement the CBJTG in accordance with the provisions of this solicitation. The Technical Proposal is limited to twenty (20) double-spaced, single-sided, 8.5 inch x 11 inch pages with 12 point text font and one-inch margins. In addition, in attachments which may not exceed ten (10) pages, the applicant may provide resumes, a list of staff positions to be funded by the grant, statistical information and other related material. The required letters of commitment from partners must be submitted as additional attachments, which will not count against the allowable 10-page limit on attachments. The applicant must reference any partners in the text of the Technical Proposal. No cost data or reference to prices should be VerDate jul<14>2003 15:43 May 02, 2005 Jkt 205001 included in the Technical Proposal. The following information is required: • A two-page abstract summarizing the proposed project and applicant profile information including: Applicant name, project title, industry focus, partnership members, proposed training and capacity building activities, funding level requested, and the amount of leveraged resources; • A table of contents listing the application sections; • A time line outlining project activities and an anticipated schedule for deliverables; and • A project description as described in the Evaluation Criteria section at Part V(1) of this solicitation. Please note that the abstract, table of contents, and time line are not included in the twenty page limit. Applications that do not provide Part II of the application will be removed from consideration prior to the technical review process. Applications may be submitted electronically on Grants.gov or in hardcopy via mail or hand delivery. These processes are described in further detail in section IV(3). Applicants submitting proposals in hard-copy must submit an original signed application (including the SF 424) and one (1) ‘‘copy-ready’’ version free of bindings, staples or protruding tabs to ease in the reproduction of the proposal by DOL. Applicants submitting proposals in hard-copy are also requested, though not required, to provide an electronic copy of the proposal on CD–ROM. 3. Submission Date, Times, and Addresses The closing date for receipt of applications under this announcement is July 6, 2005. Applications must be received at the address below no later than 5 p.m. (Eastern Time). Applications sent by e-mail, telegram, or facsimile (fax) will not be accepted. Applications that do not meet the conditions set forth in this notice will not be honored. No exceptions to the mailing and delivery requirements set forth in this notice will be granted. ETA will host CHJTG Virtual Prospective Applicant Conferences for this grant competition. The dates and access information for these prospective applicant conferences will be posted on ETA’s Web site at http:// www.doleta.gov/business/CommunityBasedJobTrainingGrants.cfm. Mailed applications must be addressed to the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration, Division of Federal Assistance, Attention: Eric Luetkenhaus, Grant Officer, Reference SGA/DFA–PY– PO 00000 Frm 00070 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 04–10, 200 Constitution Avenue, NW., Room N–4438, Washington, DC 20210. Applicants are advised that mail delivery in the Washington area may be delayed due to mail decontamination procedures. Hand delivered proposals will be received at the above address. All overnight mail will be considered to be hand-delivered and must be received at the designated place by the specified closing date. Applicants may apply online through Grants.gov (http://www.grants.gov). It is strongly recommended that applicants using Grants.gov immediately initiate and complete the ‘‘Get Started’’ registration steps at http:// www.grants.gov/GetStarted. These steps may take multiple days to complete, and this time should be factored into plans for electronic application submission in order to avoid facing unexpected delays that could result in the rejection of an application. If submitting electronically through grants.gov, it would be appreciated if the application submitted is saved as .doc, .pdf or .txt files Late Applications: Any application received after the exact date and time specified for receipt at the office designated in this notice will not be considered, unless it is received before awards are made and it (a) was sent by U.S. Postal Service registered or certified mail not later than the fifth calendar day before the date specified for receipt of applications (e.g., an application required to be received by the 20th of the month must be post marked by the 15th of that month) or (b) was sent by U.S. Postal Service Express Mail or Grants.gov to the addressee not later than 5 p.m. at the place of mailing or electronic submission one working day prior to the date specified for receipt of applications. It is highly recommended that online submissions be completed one working day prior to the date specified for receipt of applications to ensure that the applicant still has the option to submit by U.S. Postal Service Express Mail in the event of any electronic submission problems. ‘‘Post marked’’ means a printed, stamped or otherwise placed impression (exclusive of a postage meter machine impression) that is readily identifiable, without further action, as having been supplied or affixed on the date of mailing by an employee of the U.S. Postal Service. Therefore, applicants should request the postal clerk to place a legible hand cancellation ‘‘bull’s eye’’ postmark on both the receipt and the package. Failure to adhere to the above instructions will be a basis for a determination of nonresponsiveness. E:\FR\FM\03MYN1.SGM 03MYN1 Federal Register / Vol. 70, No. 84 / Tuesday, May 3, 2005 / Notices 22911 distribute such products worldwide by any means, electronically or otherwise. Legal Rules Pertaining to Inherently Religious Activities by Organizations that Receive Federal Financial Assistance. The government is prohibited from providing direct support to religious activity 1. See 29 CFR part 2, subpart D. Funds from these grants may not be used to directly support religious instruction, worship, prayer, proselytizing or other inherently religious practices. Neutral, secular criteria that neither favor nor disfavor religion must be employed in the selection of grant and sub-grant recipients. In addition, under the WIA and DOL regulations implementing the Workforce Investment Act, a recipient may not use direct Federal assistance to train a participant in religious activities or employ participants to construct, operate, or maintain any part of a facility that is used or to be used for religious instruction or worship. See 29 CFR 37.6(f). Under WIA, ‘‘no individual shall be excluded from participation in, denied the benefits of, subjected to discrimination under, or denied employment in the administration of or in connection with, any such program or activity because of race, color, religion, sex (except as otherwise permitted under Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972), national origin, age, disability, or political affiliation or belief’’. Points 4. Intergovernmental Review This funding opportunity is not subject to Executive Order (EO) 12372, ‘‘Intergovernmental Review of Federal Programs.’’ 5. Funding Restrictions Determinations of allowable costs will be made in accordance with the applicable Federal cost principles, e.g., Educational Institution—OMB Circular A–21. Disallowed costs are those charges to a grant that the grantor agency or its representative determines not to be allowed in accordance with the applicable Federal Cost Principles or other conditions contained in the grant. Applicants will not be entitled to reimbursement of pre-award costs. Limitations on Cost Per-Participant. Because the costs of training may vary considerably depending on the skills and competencies required in different occupations in different industries, flexibility will be provided on cost perparticipant. However, applications for funding will be reviewed to determine if the cost of the training is appropriate and will produce the outcomes identified. Applicants should demonstrate that the proposed cost perparticipant is aligned with existing price structures for similar training in the local area, if available, or with the community college’s existing price structures for the type of program offered. Administrative Costs. An entity that receives a CBJTG to carry out a project or program may not use more than 5 percent of the total amount of the grant to pay administrative costs associated with the program or project. The Grant Officer reserves the right to negotiate administrative cost levels prior to award. Administrative costs are defined at 20 CFR 667.220. Although there will be administrative costs associated with the management of the partnership as it relates to specific grant activity, the primary use of funding should be to support the capacity building and training activities. ETA Intellectual Property Rights. Applicants should note that grantees must agree to provide DOL/ETA a paidup, nonexclusive and irrevocable license to reproduce, publish, or otherwise use for federal purposes all products developed, or for which ownership was purchased, under an award, including, but not limited to, curricula, training models, technical assistance products, and any related materials, and to authorize them to do so. Such uses include, but are not limited to, the right to modify and VerDate jul<14>2003 15:43 May 02, 2005 Jkt 205001 6. Withdrawal of Applications Applications may be withdrawn by written notice or telegram (including mailgram) received at any time before an award is made. Applications may be withdrawn in person by the applicant or by an authorized representative thereof, if the representative’s identity is made known and the representative signs a receipt for the proposal. V. Application Review Information 1. Evaluation Criteria This section identifies and describes the criteria that will be used to evaluate proposals for a Community-Based Job Training Grant. These criteria and point values are: Criterion Points A. Statement of Need ....................... 15 1 The term ‘‘direct’’ support is used to describe funds or other support that are provided ‘‘directly’’ by a governmental entity or an intermediate organization with the same duties as a governmental entity, as opposed to funds that an organization receives ‘‘indirectly’’ as the result of the genuine and independent private choice of a beneficiary within the meaning of the Establishment Clause of the U.S. Constitution. PO 00000 Frm 00071 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 Criterion B. Linkages to Key Partners ............ C. Training and Capacity Building Plan ............................................... D. Outcomes, Benefits, and Impact E. Program Management and Organization Capacity ........................... 20 25 30 Total Possible Points ................. 100 10 A. Statement of Need (15 Points) Scoring on this criterion will be based on the extent to which the applicant demonstrates a clear and specific need for Federal investment in the proposed activities. Applicants must demonstrate this need by: (a) Identifying the industry or industries of focus; (b) establishing that the identified industry satisfies ETA’s criteria for a high-growth/highdemand industry in the local economy as described in Part I(1) of this solicitation; (c) providing evidence of industry demand for training in the local economy; and (d) describing in detail the capacity challenges the community college faces that limit its ability to provide sufficient quantity or quality of training to meet the identified industry’s demand. In addition, applicants should provide evidence that the capacity challenge to be addressed by the grant was identified in the context of the strategic partnership. Applicants may draw from a variety of resources for supporting data, including: traditional labor market information, such as projections; industry data, such as from trade associations or direct information from the local industry; and information on the local economy and other transactional data, such as job vacancies, that are available locally. Additional important factors for evaluation include: • The extent to which the targeted industry is high-growth or high-demand in the context of the local economy; • Identification of local workforce or skills shortages within the targeted industry; • Demonstrated existence of the identified capacity constraint at the community college at which the grant activity will take place; • Identification of the sources of the data used in the analysis; and • If appropriate, the nature of larger strategic economic development or workforce investment projects with which the proposed project is aligned. B. Linkages to Key Partners (20 Points) The applicant must demonstrate that the proposed project will be implemented by a strategic partnership that includes at least one entity from each of four categories: (1) The E:\FR\FM\03MYN1.SGM 03MYN1 22912 Federal Register / Vol. 70, No. 84 / Tuesday, May 3, 2005 / Notices workforce investment system, which may include state and local Workforce Investment Boards, State Workforce Agencies, and One Stop Career Centers and their partners, as such terms are defined under WIA; (2) community colleges; (3) employers and industryrelated organizations such as associations and unions; and (4) the continuum of education, including the K–12 public education system. The applicant must identify the partners, explain the meaningful role each partner will play in the project, and document the resources leveraged from each partner. Collaborating partners must verify their role through a letter of commitment attached to the proposal. Applicants should also identify resources leveraged from other organizations, including other workforce investment system partners. ETA encourages, and will be looking for, applications that go beyond the minimum level of partnership and demonstrate broader, substantive and sustainable partnerships. If appropriate, applicants should also demonstrate the existence of a sustainability plan for the strategic partnership beyond the funding period. Scoring on this criterion will be based on: (1) Evidence that the partnership contains each of the required entities; (2) the degree to which each partner plays a committed role, either financial or non-financial, in the proposed project; and (3) the robustness of the applicant’s plan for sustaining the partnership beyond the funding period. Applications that do not have each of the four required entities represented in the partnership cannot receive full points in this section. The following elements will also be considered: • The overall completeness of the strategic partnership, including its ability to manage all aspects and stages of the project and to coordinate individual activities with the partnership as a whole; • The scope of each partner’s contribution, their knowledge and experience concerning the proposed grant activities, and their ability to impact the success of the project; • Evidence, including letters of support, that key partners have expressed a clear commitment to the project and understand their areas of responsibility; • Evidence of a plan for interaction between partners at each stage of the project, from planning to execution; and • Evidence that the partnership has the capacity to achieve the outcomes of the proposed project. VerDate jul<14>2003 15:43 May 02, 2005 Jkt 205001 C. Training and Capacity Building Plan (25 Points) D. Outcomes, Benefits, and Impact (30 Points) The applicant must describe its proposed capacity building and training strategies in full. The description should demonstrate: (1) That the proposed project will address identified industry workforce or skills shortages and identified capacity constraints at the community college level; (2) that the proposed project clearly integrates industry-driven capacity building and training activities; (3) that proposed capacity building solutions are broad based and include an appropriate range of activities; (4) that proposed training activities occur within the context of a continuum of education and training that supports long-term career growth, such as an articulated career ladder/ lattice; (5) that proposed training activities lead to appropriate credentialing; and (6) that the applicant has a clear understanding of the tasks required to successfully meet the objectives of the grant. Scoring on this criterion will be based on evidence that the applicant has developed effective, innovative training and capacity building strategies and a plan of implementation that will satisfy the six conditions described above. Additional factors that will be considered include: • The existence of a work plan that is responsive to the applicant’s statement of need and includes specific goals, objectives, activities, implementation strategies, and a timeline; • The demonstrated link between the proposed project and the identified industry workforce or skills shortages and identified capacity constraints at the community college level. • The extent to which the work plan provides an understanding of the entire project’s intended implementation; • The feasibility and sensibility of the timeframes for the accomplishment of tasks; • The extent to which the budget is justified with respect to the adequacy and reasonableness of resources requested; • The extent to which budget line items are consistent with and tied to the work plan objectives; • Evidence that the proposed cost per-participant is aligned with existing price structures for similar training; and • Evidence of a robust outreach strategy that includes the dissemination of information regarding the project to others who would benefit most, and if appropriate, recruitment of eligible participants. Applicants must describe fully the predicted outcomes and products resulting from the project. Applicants should particularly highlight the benefits and impact of the outcomes and products on the larger capacity constraint described in the statement of need. Scoring on this criterion will be based on two broad elements: 1. The expected project outcomes are clearly identified, measurable, realistic, and consistent with the objectives of the project. Key elements for training and capacity building aspects of the proposal are below. a. Training: Applicants must track training outcome measures, including all appropriate adult or youth Common Measures, such as employment placement numbers and/or earnings gains and retention. Other outcome measures that should be tracked include the number of individuals awarded credentials or degrees, and outcome measures specific to the proposed training project. Applications must also identify the credential that participants will earn as a result of the proposed training, and the employer-, industry-, vendor-, or state-defined standards associated with the credential. If the credential targeted by the training project is a certificate or performancebased certification, applicants should either (a) demonstrate employer engagement in the curriculum development process, or (b) indicate that the certification will translate into concrete job advancement opportunities with an employer. b. Capacity Building: Applicants must clearly describe all products, models, curricula, etc. that will be developed or acquired with federal funds through the grant and indicate the number of participants or entities who will benefit from the proposed activities. Applicants must describe the data measures that will be used to measure how the proposed capacity building activities impact the ability of the community college to train workers for skills in demand by the targeted industry. Applicants should indicate the longterm impact of the proposed project on the ability of the community college to meet local workforce demands. 2. The proposed outcomes will translate into the successful alleviation of the community college’s identified capacity challenges. Additional factors that will be considered in the scoring of this criterion include: PO 00000 Frm 00072 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 E:\FR\FM\03MYN1.SGM 03MYN1 Federal Register / Vol. 70, No. 84 / Tuesday, May 3, 2005 / Notices • The ability of the applicant to achieve the stated outcomes within the time frame of the grant; and • The appropriateness of the outcomes with respect to the requested level of funding. E. Program Management and Organization Capacity (10 Points) To satisfy this criterion, applicants must describe their proposed project management structure including, where appropriate, the identification of a proposed project manager, and discuss the proposed staffing pattern and the qualifications and experience of key staff members. Applicants should also give evidence of the use of data systems to track outcomes in a timely and accurate manner. The applicant should include a description of organizational capacity and the organization’s track record in projects similar to that described in the proposal and/or related activities of the primary partners. Scoring under this criterion will be based on the extent to which applicants provide evidence of the following: • The time commitment of the proposed staff is sufficient to ensure proper direction, management, and timely completion of the project; • The roles and contribution of staff, consultants, and collaborative organizations are clearly defined and linked to specific objectives and tasks; • The background, experience, and other qualifications of the staff are sufficient to carry out their designated roles; and • The applicant organization has significant capacity to accomplish the goals and outcomes of the project, including the ability to collect and manage data in a way that allows consistent, accurate, and expedient reporting. 2. Review and Selection Process Applications for the CommunityBased Job Training Grants will be accepted after the publication of this announcement until the closing date. A technical review panel will make a careful evaluation of applications against the criteria set forth in Section V(A) of this document. These criteria are based on the policy goals, priorities, and emphases set forth in this SGA. Up to 100 points may be awarded to an application, based on the required information described in Section V(1). The ranked scores will serve as the primary basis for selection of applications for funding, in conjunction with other factors such as urban, rural, and geographic balance; the availability of funds; and which proposals are most advantageous to the Government. The VerDate jul<14>2003 15:43 May 02, 2005 Jkt 205001 panel results are advisory in nature and not binding on the Grant Officer, who may consider any information that comes to his attention. DOL may elect to award the grant(s) with or without discussions with the applicants. Should a grant be awarded without discussions, the award will be based on the applicant’s signature on the SF 424, which constitutes a binding offer. VI. Award Administration Information 1. Award Notices All award notifications will be posted on the ETA Homepage (http:// www.doleta.gov). Non-selected applicants will be notified by mail. 2. Administrative and National Policy Requirements A. Administrative Program Requirements All grantees will be subject to all applicable Federal laws, regulations, and the applicable OMB Circulars. The grant(s) awarded under this SGA will be subject to the following administrative standards and provisions, if applicable: 1. Workforce Investment Boards—20 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 667.220. (Administrative Costs). 2. Non-Profit Organizations—OMB Circulars A–122 (Cost Principles) and 29 CFR Part 95 (Administrative Requirements). 3. Educational Institutions—OMB Circulars A–21 (Cost Principles) and 29 CFR Part 95 (Administrative Requirements). 4. State and Local Governments— OMB Circulars A–87 (Cost Principles) and 29 CFR Part 97 (Administrative Requirements). 5. Profit Making Commercial Firms— Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR)— 48 CFR Part 31 (Cost Principles), and 29 CFR Part 95 (Administrative Requirements). 6. All entities must comply with 29 CFR Parts 93 and 98, and, where applicable, 29 CFR Parts 96 and 99. 7. The following administrative standards and provisions may also be applicable: a. 29 CFR part 2, subpart D—Equal Treatment in Department of Labor Programs for Religious Organizations, Protection of Religious Liberty of Department of Labor Social Service Providers and Beneficiaries; b. 29 CFR part 30—Equal Employment Opportunity in Apprenticeship and Training; c. 29 CFR part 31—Nondiscrimination in Federally Assisted Programs of the Department of Labor—Effectuation of Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964; d. 29 CFR part 32— Nondiscrimination on the Basis of PO 00000 Frm 00073 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 22913 Handicap in Programs and Activities Receiving or Benefiting from Federal Financial Assistance; e. 29 CFR part 33—Enforcement of Nondiscrimination on the Basis of Handicap in Programs or Activities Conducted by the Department of Labor; f. 29 CFR part 35—Nondiscrimination on the Basis of Age in Programs or Activities Receiving Federal Financial Assistance from the Department of Labor; g. 29 CFR part 36—Nondiscrimination on the Basis of Sex in Education Programs or Activities Receiving Federal Financial Assistance; h. 29 CFR part 37—Implementation of the Nondiscrimination and Equal Opportunity Provisions of the Workforce Investment Act of 1998 (WIA). 8. In accordance with Section 18 of the Lobbying Disclosure Act of 1995 (Pub. L. 104–65) (2 U.S.C. 1611) nonprofit entities incorporated under Internal Revenue Service Code section 501(c) (4) that engage in lobbying activities are not eligible to receive Federal funds and grants. Note: Except as specifically provided in this Notice, DOL/ETA’s acceptance of a proposal and an award of Federal funds to sponsor any program(s) does not provide a waiver of any grant requirements and/or procedures. For example, OMB Circulars require that an entity’s procurement procedures must ensure that all procurement transactions are conducted, as much as practical, to provide open and free competition. If a proposal identifies a specific entity to provide services, the DOL/ ETA’s award does not provide the justification or basis to sole source the procurement, i.e., avoid competition, unless the activity is regarded as the primary work of an official partner to the application. B. Special Program Requirements Evaluation. DOL may require that the program or project participate in an evaluation of overall performance of CBJTGs. To measure the impact of the CBJTGs, ETA may arrange for or conduct an independent evaluation of the outcomes and benefits of the projects. Grantees must agree to make records on participants, employers and funding available, and to provide access to program operating personnel and participants, as specified by the evaluator(s) under the direction of ETA, including after the expiration date of the grant. C. Reporting The grantee is required to provide the reports and documents listed below: Quarterly Financial Reports. A Quarterly Financial Status Report (SF 269) is required until such time as all E:\FR\FM\03MYN1.SGM 03MYN1 22914 Federal Register / Vol. 70, No. 84 / Tuesday, May 3, 2005 / Notices funds have been expended or the grant period has expired. Quarterly reports are due 30 days after the end of each calendar year quarter. Grantees must use ETA’s On-Line Electronic Reporting System. Quarterly Progress Reports. The grantee must submit a quarterly progress report to the designated Federal Project Officer within 30 days after the end of each calendar year quarter. Two copies are to be submitted providing a detailed account of activities undertaken during that quarter. DOL may require additional data elements to be collected and reported on either a regular basis or special request basis. Grantees must agree to meet DOL reporting requirements. The quarterly progress report should be in narrative form and should include: 1. General grant information, including: a general overview of project progress, new developments and resolution of previous issues and challenges; a discussion of planned grant activities and any other grantrelated events; an explanation of any issues/challenges encountered and the proposed strategies to overcome them; a description of major accomplishments, innovations, or promising approaches and processes; product deliverables and outcomes resulting from the project; and a status update on leveraged resources; 2. Information on all training, employer, and grant deliverable outcomes as well as the anticipated impact of these outcomes on the community college, industry partners, and the broader community; 3. Summary of the status of grant deliverables and dissemination activities; 4. Highlights of promising approaches and success stories; and 5. Description of technical assistance needs. Final Report. A draft final report must be submitted no later than 60 days prior to the expiration date of the grant. This report must summarize project activities, employment outcomes, and related results of the training project, and should thoroughly document capacity building and training approaches. After responding to DOL questions and comments on the draft report, three copies of the final report must be submitted no later than the grant expiration date. Grantees must agree to use a designated format specified by DOL for preparing the final report. VII. Agency Contacts Any questions regarding this SGA should be faxed to Kevin Brumback, Grants Management Specialist, Division VerDate jul<14>2003 15:43 May 02, 2005 Jkt 205001 of Federal Assistance, FAX number (202) 693–2705. (This is not a toll-free number). You must specifically address your FAX to the attention of Kevin Brumback and should include SGA/ DFA–PY–04–10, a contact name, fax and phone number. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Please contact Kevin Brumback, Grants Management Specialist, Division of Federal Assistance, at (202) 693–3381. (This is not a toll-free number). This announcement is also being made available on the ETA Web site at http://www.doleta.gov/sga/sga.cfm and http://www.grants.gov. VIII. Other Information Resources for the Applicant DOL maintains a number of webbased resources that may be of assistance to applicants. • The Web page for the Employment and Training Administration’s Business Relations Group (http://www.doleta.gov/ BRG) is a valuable source for background information on the President’s High Growth Job Training Initiative, the predecessor to the Community-Based Job Training Grants. • For additional information on the workforce investment system, please see the ‘‘Community Based Organization Information Booklet’’ at (http:// www.dol.gov/cfbci/ cbobook.htm#investmentact). • America’s Service Locator (http:// www.servicelocator.org) provides a directory of our nation’s One-Stop Career Centers. • Applicants are encouraged to review ‘‘Help with Solicitation for Grant Applications’’ (http://www.dol.gov/ cfbci/sgabrochure.htm). • For a basic understanding of the grants process and basic responsibilities of receiving Federal grant support, please see ‘‘Guidance for Faith-Based and Community Organizations on Partnering with the Federal Government’’ (http:// www.whitehouse.gov/government/fbci/ guidance/index.html). Signed at Washington, DC, this 28th day of April, 2005. Eric D. Luetkenhaus, Employment and Training Administration, Grant Officer. Appendix A: Examples of Demand-Driven Community College Capacity Building and Training Programs Appendix B: SF 424—Application Form Appendix C: SF 424A—Budget Information Form Appendix D: OMB Survey N. 1890–0014: Survey on Ensuring Equal Opportunity for Applicants PO 00000 Frm 00074 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 Appendix A: Examples of Demand-Driven Community College Capacity Building and Training Programs Example 1: Rural Community Needs Health Care Workers Need: A rural community in the Midwest is experiencing a critical shortage of health care workers despite a high unemployment rate in the region due to the closing of several manufacturing plants, as well as a significant number of returning veterans. The local community college has several training programs to prepare health care workers, however, the equipment used by the college is out of date and local health care providers do not believe that the college’s graduates are adequately prepared for the workplace. Partnership: Executives from the community’s major health care providers have approached the college with ideas for improving the health care curriculum, in particular the laboratory and clinical experiences required for graduation. The college president convened an Advisory Panel to evaluate the current curriculum and the industry’s proposal, and to develop a recommend course of action for improving the college’s health care training programs. The Advisory Panel includes: Physicians; nurses, health care administrators; the chairs of the local workforce investment board and economic development agency; the One-Stop operator; the dedicated veterans representative; representatives from the local school district; adult education providers, and the state university system; and representatives for senior citizens, dislocated workers, and youth. Proposed Project: The Advisory Panel developed recommendations for improving the college’s capacity to train new health care workers, as well as the type of training and clinical experiences provided. The new curriculum aligns with national standards for accreditation, and graduates will be prepared to take certification exams offered by national health care professional organizations. In addition, the Advisory Panel recommended that the college take immediate steps to revamp the existing laboratory space used by the health care training programs. A local hospital has agreed to donate half the equipment needed to modernize the labs, dependent on the college’s ability to leverage resources for the remaining equipment needs. The Advisory Panel noted that many of the region’s workers who were dislocated due to plant closings lack a high school diploma, a prerequisite of the health care training programs. The Advisory Panel recommended that the college work with local adult basic education providers to link GED preparation courses with the introductory coursework required in the first semester of the health care training programs, allowing students to earn their GED while developing new occupational skills. The Advisory Panel also recommended convening a working group to crosswalk the skill sets of returning veterans with the new curriculum and local health care provider needs and to develop and outreach strategy to the veterans community. The college anticipates graduating fifty additional health care workers each year as a result of the proposed curriculum changes, E:\FR\FM\03MYN1.SGM 03MYN1 Federal Register / Vol. 70, No. 84 / Tuesday, May 3, 2005 / Notices connections with adult basic education and veterans community, and laboratory upgrades. Example 2: Native American Community Needs IT Workers Need: A tribal college has recently implemented vendor-based IT certification programs in response to the demand by local business leaders for credential system administrators and other IT professionals. While the college has up-to-date equipment and numerous student applications, it has been unable to attract qualified faculty to fully staff the programs. Partnership: Several years ago, local business and education leaders identified IT skills as an essential need in the community. They formed a group to spearhead several technology initiatives, including expanding the technology curriculum at the local high school and opening a new computer laboratory for vendor-based certification programs at the tribal college. The group included: Tribal, business, and education leaders; parents; and representatives from the local economic development and workforce investment systems. The tribal college has recently approached the group for help in solving the staffing problem. Proposed Project: The group explored several options and developed a proposal for attracting qualified faculty, including a competitive wage scale and expanded benefits. The plan also includes incentives for helping qualified tribal members attain the professional credentials and experiences needed to join the faculty. The college VerDate jul<14>2003 15:43 May 02, 2005 Jkt 205001 anticipates that these plans will succeed in filling four faculty positions, which will allow the programs to graduate an additional one hundred certified IT professionals per year. Example 3: Connections to Youth Programs Need: The local IT industry has identified a problem with garnering interest among young people to pursue careers in network and systems administration. Through collaborations with the local One-Stop Career Center, several employers have recently learned about the region’s Job Corps center which trains at-risk youth for careers, including IT careers. The employers interviewed several Job Corps graduates and determined that while the Job Corps students have good basic computer skills, they are not quite ready for the network and systems administration positions that employers are trying to fill. Partnerships: At the next WIA Youth Council meeting, the employers bring their concerns to the table and ask the council to help them develop solutions to the problem. The head of the local community college sits on the Youth Council and suggests that the college’s IT vendor certification programs may be an appropriate next training step for the Job Corps graduates and for other youth enrolled in the local WIA Youth program. The employers are familiar with the competencies developed through the vendor certification programs and agree that these are the skills they are seeking. Proposed Project: In subsequent Youth Council meetings, representatives for the PO 00000 Frm 00075 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 22915 employers, Job Corps, WIA Youth programs, and the community college work to develop a plan for: 1. Identifying youth who might be successful network or systems administration candidates; 2. Referring youth to the community college’s vendor certification programs; 3. Training youth in the skills and competencies the employers require; and 4. Connecting program graduates with existing openings in the field through the local One-Stop Career Center. The program is successfully implemented after several months of planning, and the employers are pleased with the advanced skills of the youth that are referred by the local One-Stop Career Center. Unfortunately, there is now more demand for the community college’s IT training programs than there are slots for student enrollment due to computer laboratory and faculty constraints. Working with representatives of the local IT industry, the partners have identified several highly experienced and qualified executives who are interested in teaching IT courses at the community college part-time. This solution will address part of the capacity constraint issue; however, the college still needs to resolve the problem of computer lab space. The local Workforce Investment Board Chair suggests that the partners prepare a proposal for a CommunityBased Job Training Grant to help support the needed computer laboratory expansion. BILLING CODE 4510–30–P E:\FR\FM\03MYN1.SGM 03MYN1 VerDate jul<14>2003 Federal Register / Vol. 70, No. 84 / Tuesday, May 3, 2005 / Notices 15:43 May 02, 2005 Jkt 205001 PO 00000 Frm 00076 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4725 E:\FR\FM\03MYN1.SGM 03MYN1 EN03MY05.000</GPH> 22916 VerDate jul<14>2003 15:43 May 02, 2005 Jkt 205001 PO 00000 Frm 00077 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4725 E:\FR\FM\03MYN1.SGM 03MYN1 22917 EN03MY05.001</GPH> Federal Register / Vol. 70, No. 84 / Tuesday, May 3, 2005 / Notices VerDate jul<14>2003 Federal Register / Vol. 70, No. 84 / Tuesday, May 3, 2005 / Notices 15:43 May 02, 2005 Jkt 205001 PO 00000 Frm 00078 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4725 E:\FR\FM\03MYN1.SGM 03MYN1 EN03MY05.002</GPH> 22918 VerDate jul<14>2003 15:43 May 02, 2005 Jkt 205001 PO 00000 Frm 00079 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4725 E:\FR\FM\03MYN1.SGM 03MYN1 22919 EN03MY05.003</GPH> Federal Register / Vol. 70, No. 84 / Tuesday, May 3, 2005 / Notices VerDate jul<14>2003 Federal Register / Vol. 70, No. 84 / Tuesday, May 3, 2005 / Notices 15:43 May 02, 2005 Jkt 205001 PO 00000 Frm 00080 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4725 E:\FR\FM\03MYN1.SGM 03MYN1 EN03MY05.004</GPH> 22920 VerDate jul<14>2003 15:43 May 02, 2005 Jkt 205001 PO 00000 Frm 00081 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4725 E:\FR\FM\03MYN1.SGM 03MYN1 22921 EN03MY05.005</GPH> Federal Register / Vol. 70, No. 84 / Tuesday, May 3, 2005 / Notices VerDate jul<14>2003 Federal Register / Vol. 70, No. 84 / Tuesday, May 3, 2005 / Notices 15:43 May 02, 2005 Jkt 205001 PO 00000 Frm 00082 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4725 E:\FR\FM\03MYN1.SGM 03MYN1 EN03MY05.006</GPH> 22922 VerDate jul<14>2003 15:43 May 02, 2005 Jkt 205001 PO 00000 Frm 00083 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 E:\FR\FM\03MYN1.SGM 03MYN1 22923 EN03MY05.007</GPH> Federal Register / Vol. 70, No. 84 / Tuesday, May 3, 2005 / Notices 22924 Federal Register / Vol. 70, No. 84 / Tuesday, May 3, 2005 / Notices and transported to the meeting location, if seating is available. Please provide the requested information, by the appropriate date, via FAX to (301) 286– 1715, to the attention of Kathy Palmer, noting at the top: ‘‘PUBLIC ADMISSION TO THE FINANCIAL AUDIT COMMITTEE MEETING @ GSFC.’’ Faxes not addressed as required will not be processed. For security questions, please contact Kathy Palmer at (301) 286–0569. [FR Doc. 05–8772 Filed 5–2–05; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4510–30–C NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice 05–083] NASA Advisory Council, Financial Audit Committee, Meeting National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION: Notice of meeting. AGENCY: SUMMARY: In accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act (FACA), Pub. L. 92–463, as amended, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration announce a forthcoming meeting of the NASA Advisory Council (NAC), Financial Audit Committee (NFAC). DATES: Friday, May 20, 2005, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Goddard Space Flight Center, 8463 Greenbelt Road, Bldg. 8, Room 429, Greenbelt, MD 20770. (301) 286–0569. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. Ermerdene Lee, of the Chief Financial Officer’s Office, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC 20546. (202) 358–4529, e-mail elee1@hq.nasa.gov. ADDRESSES: The meeting will be open to the public up to the capacity of the room. The agenda for the meeting includes the following topics: • Overview of the Goddard Space Flight Center • Goddard Office of the Chief Financial Officer Summary • Financial Management Material Weakness • Corrective Action Tracking System U.S. Citizens desiring to attend the NASA Financial Audit Committee meeting at the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) must provide their full name, citizenship, company affiliation (if applicable), place of birth, and date of birth and Foreign nationals who desire to attend the meeting must provide their passport or naturalization papers to the GSFC Security Office no less than 3 working days prior to the meeting. If the above information is not received by the noted date, attendees should expect a delay in entering the Goddard Space Flight Center. All visitors to this meeting should go to the GSFC Security Office, accessible from Greenbelt Road, where they will be cleared, given an identification badge, SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: VerDate jul<14>2003 15:43 May 02, 2005 Jkt 205001 Dated: April 27, 2005. P. Diane Rausch, Advisory Committee Management Officer, National Aeronautics and Space Administration. [FR Doc. 05–8809 Filed 5–2–05; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 7510–13–P NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION Records Schedules; Availability and Request for Comments National Archives and Records Administration (NARA). ACTION: Notice of availability of proposed records schedules; request for comments. AGENCY: SUMMARY: The National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) publishes notice at least once monthly of certain Federal agency requests for records disposition authority (records schedules). Once approved by NARA, records schedules provide mandatory instructions on what happens to records when no longer needed for current Government business. They authorize the preservation of records of continuing value in the National Archives of the United States and the destruction, after a specified period, of records lacking administrative, legal, research, or other value. Notice is published for records schedules in which agencies propose to destroy records not previously authorized for disposal or reduce the retention period of records already authorized for disposal. NARA invites public comments on such records schedules, as required by 44 U.S.C. 3303a(a). DATES: Requests for copies must be received in writing on or before June 17, 2005. Once the appraisal of the records is completed, NARA will send a copy of the schedule. NARA staff usually prepare appraisal memorandums that contain additional information concerning the records covered by a proposed schedule. These, too, may be requested and will be provided once the appraisal is completed. Requesters will be given 30 days to submit comments. PO 00000 Frm 00084 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 You may request a copy of any records schedule identified in this notice by contacting the Life Cycle Management Division (NWML) using one of the following means: Mail: NARA (NWML), 8601 Adelphi Road, College Park, MD 20740–6001. E-mail: records.mgt@nara.gov. FAX: 301–837–3698. Requesters must cite the control number, which appears in parentheses after the name of the agency which submitted the schedule, and must provide a mailing address. Those who desire appraisal reports should so indicate in their request. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Paul M. Wester, Jr., Director, Life Cycle Management Division (NWML), National Archives and Records Administration, 8601 Adelphi Road, College Park, MD 20740–6001. Telephone: 301–837–3120. E-mail: records.mgt@nara.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Each year Federal agencies create billions of records on paper, film, magnetic tape, and other media. To control this accumulation, agency records managers prepare schedules proposing retention periods for records and submit these schedules for NARA’s approval, using the Standard Form (SF) 115, Request for Records Disposition Authority. These schedules provide for the timely transfer into the National Archives of historically valuable records and authorize the disposal of all other records after the agency no longer needs them to conduct its business. Some schedules are comprehensive and cover all the records of an agency or one of its major subdivisions. Most schedules, however, cover records of only one office or program or a few series of records. Many of these update previously approved schedules, and some include records proposed as permanent. No Federal records are authorized for destruction without the approval of the Archivist of the United States. This approval is granted only after a thorough consideration of their administrative use by the agency of origin, the rights of the Government and of private persons directly affected by the Government’s activities, and whether or not they have historical or other value. Besides identifying the Federal agencies and any subdivisions requesting disposition authority, this public notice lists the organizational unit(s) accumulating the records or indicates agency-wide applicability in the case of schedules that cover records that may be accumulated throughout an ADDRESSES: E:\FR\FM\03MYN1.SGM 03MYN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 70, Number 84 (Tuesday, May 3, 2005)]
[Notices]
[Pages 22905-22924]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 05-8772]


-----------------------------------------------------------------------

DEPARTMENT OF LABOR

Employment and Training Administration


Notice of Availability of Funds and Solicitation for Grant 
Applications (SGA) for Community-Based Job Training Grants

    Announcement type: New. Notice of Solicitation for Grant 
Applications.
    Funding Opportunity Number: SGA/DFA-PY-04-10.
    Catalog of Federal Assistance Number: 17.261.
    Key Dates: The closing date for receipt of applications under this 
announcement is July 6, 2005. Applications must be received at the 
address below no later than 5 p.m. (eastern time). Application and 
submission information is explained in detail in Section IV of this 
SGA. Virtual Prospective Applicant Conferences will be held for this 
grant competition. The dates and access information for these 
prospective applicant conferences will be posted on ETA's Web site at 
http://www.doleta.gov/business/Community-BasedJobTrainingGrants.cfm.
SUMMARY: The Employment and Training Administration (ETA), U.S. 
Department of Labor (DOL), announces the availability of approximately 
$125 million in grant funds for Community-Based Job Training Grants.
    Community-Based Job Training Grants will be awarded through a 
competitive process to support workforce training for high-growth 
industries through the national system of community and technical 
colleges. The primary purpose of these grants is to build the capacity 
of community colleges to train workers to develop the skills required 
to succeed in (i) local industries and occupations that are expected to 
experience high growth and (ii) industries where demand for qualified 
workers is outstripping the supply. Funds will be awarded to community 
colleges to engage in a combination of capacity building and training 
activities targeted at high-growth or high-demand industries in the 
local economy.
    In awarding Community-Based Job Training Grants, every effort will 
be made to fairly distribute grants across rural and urban areas and 
across the

[[Page 22906]]

different geographic regions of the United States. It is anticipated 
that individual awards will range in amount from $500,000 to $2 
million. A second solicitation is anticipated for Fall/Winter 2005.
    This solicitation provides background information and describes the 
application submission requirements, outlines the process that eligible 
entities must use to apply for funds covered by this solicitation, and 
details how grantees will be selected.

ADDRESSES: Mailed applications must be addressed to the U.S. Department 
of Labor, Employment and Training Administration, Division of Federal 
Assistance, Attention: Eric Luetkenhaus, Grant Officer, Reference SGA/
DFA-PY-04-10, 200 Constitution Avenue, NW., Room N-4438, Washington, DC 
20210. Telefacsimile (FAX) applications will not be accepted. 
Information about applying online can be found in Section IV (C) of 
this document. Applicants are advised that mail delivery in the 
Washington area may be delayed due to mail decontamination procedures. 
Hand delivered proposals will be received at the above address.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:
    This solicitation consists of eight parts:
     Part I provides background information.
     Part II describes the size and nature of the anticipated 
awards.
     Part III describes eligible applicants and other grant 
specifications.
     Part IV provides information on the application and 
submission process.
     Part V describes the criteria against which applications 
will be reviewed and explains the proposal review process.
     Part VI provides award administration information.
     Part VII contains DOL agency contact information.
     Part VIII lists additional resources of interest to 
applicants.

I. Funding Opportunity Description

    The Community-Based Job Training Grants (CBJTGs) are designed to 
support workforce training for high-growth industries through the 
national system of community and technical colleges. The primary 
purpose of these grants is to build the capacity of community colleges 
to train workers to develop the skills required to succeed in (i) local 
industries and occupations that are expected to experience high growth 
and (ii) industries where demand for qualified workers is outstripping 
the supply. Part 1 of this section provides an overview of ETA's 
demand-driven workforce investment strategies. Part 2 provides 
background information on the principles underlying the CBJTGs. Part 3 
describes critical elements of the grants themselves.

1. The Employment and Training Administration's Demand-Driven Workforce 
Investment Strategies

    Each year, the federal government invests over $15 billion in a 
state and local network of resources, known as the workforce investment 
system, to assist businesses in recruiting, training, and retaining a 
skilled workforce. While these investments have in the past supported a 
set of standard menu-driven services for employers and workers, the 
realities of today's rapidly changing global economy make it imperative 
that the workforce investment system support customized activities that 
are driven by local employer demand. This demand-driven approach to 
workforce development is necessary to prepare workers to take advantage 
of new and increasing job opportunities in high-growth/high-demand and 
economically vital industries and sectors of the American economy.
    In a demand-driven workforce investment system, state and local 
Workforce Investment Boards invest strategically in workforce 
development activities that are relevant to the requirements of local 
industry and have a long-term impact on the ability of the community to 
meet local workforce demands. To do so, they bring to the table 
critical collaborative partners in the development of America's 
workforce: employers and education and training providers.
    Within the context of these strategic partnerships, communities use 
a solutions-based approach to workforce development planning, in which 
the partnering entities work through the cycle of: (1) Collecting and 
analyzing information about local workforce needs and critical capacity 
constraints; (2) incorporating a business or demand-driven perspective 
into issue identification and solutions development; (3) ensuring that 
the right strategic partners are at the table; (4) working 
collaboratively to explore, frame, and implement solutions; and (5) 
assessing how the products and outcomes of the project can be 
effectively deployed and replicated. The goal of this process is to 
ensure that the proposed project will ultimately succeed in resolving 
the industry-identified workforce challenge.
    The solutions-based approach engages each collaborative partner in 
its area of strength. Industry representatives and employers define 
workforce challenges facing the industry and identify the competencies 
and skills required for the industry's workforce. The workforce 
investment system provides access to human capital (youth, unemployed, 
underemployed, incumbent workers, and dislocated workers), assists with 
training programs, and places trained workers in jobs. Community 
colleges and other training providers assist in developing competency 
models and training curricula and train new and incumbent workers. The 
K-12 public education system ensures that investments at the community 
college are part of a continuum of education and training leading to 
successful skill development.
    ETA first modeled the power of these strategic partnerships through 
the President's High Growth Job Training Initiative (High Growth 
Initiative). The High Growth Initiative is a strategic effort to 
prepare workers for new and increasing job opportunities in high-
growth/high-demand and economically vital industries and sectors of the 
American economy. Through the initiative, ETA identifies high-growth/
high-demand industries, evaluates their skills needs, and funds local 
and national partnership-based demonstration projects that provide 
workforce solutions to ensure that individuals can gain the skills to 
get good jobs in these rapidly expanding or transforming industries. 
The products, models and effective approaches that result from the High 
Growth Initiative will be broadly disseminated to employers, education 
and training providers, and the workforce investment system to build 
their capacity to respond to employer demands.

2. Background on the Community-Based Job Training Grants

    The Community-Based Job Training Grants (CBJTGs) continue the work 
of the High Growth Initiative by incorporating its focus on high-
growth, high-demand industries and its emphasis on the role of 
strategic partnerships in workforce development. The CBJTGs build on 
the work of the High Growth Initiative by highlighting the critical 
role community colleges play as partners in the demand-driven workforce 
investment system, and by supporting community efforts to link training 
initiatives to the skill demands of local employers. As a result, CBJTG 
activities will lead to an increased number of high-growth firms being 
supported by the local workforce and education systems, and more 
individuals being trained and employed in high-growth sectors.

[[Page 22907]]

    Community colleges represent a critical 21st century training 
resource for workers needing to attain, retool, refine, and broaden 
their skills to meet industry demand. According to the Bureau of Labor 
Statistics, eighty percent of the fastest growing jobs in the United 
States require some level of post-secondary education. The 
accessibility and affordability of community college training, combined 
with the adaptability of community college curricula to changing skill 
needs, make community colleges a vital training resource for many U.S. 
workers. Furthermore, community colleges are closely connected to local 
labor markets, making them well-positioned to prepare workers for good 
jobs with good wages in the local economy.
    However, community college leaders and industry executives report 
that many community colleges are unable to meet local demand for 
training because of critical capacity constraints. These capacity 
constraints occur when community colleges lack sufficient resources to 
support training facilities and equipment, curriculum development, 
faculty appointments, clinical experiences, and/or other elements that 
are necessary to provide either the volume or quality of training that 
industry requires. Despite rising application rates, the reality of 
current state and local budgets often prevents colleges from funding 
the programs, faculty, and student services they need to be responsive 
to local workforce demands.
    The CBJTGs will address this critical capacity issue. Funds will be 
awarded to community colleges to engage in a combination of capacity 
building and training activities targeted at high-growth or high-demand 
industries in the local economy.

3. Critical Elements of Community-Based Job Training Grants

    It is ETA's expectation that CBJTGs will contain at least six 
critical elements. These elements consist of: (A) Focus on skill and 
competency needs of local high-growth/high-demand industries; (B) 
strategic partnerships; (C) industry-driven capacity building and 
training efforts; (D) leveraged resources; (E) replication; and (F) 
clear and specific outcomes. These characteristics are reflected in the 
evaluation criteria in Part V and are described in further detail 
below. For examples of projects that integrate these elements, please 
see Appendix A.
    A. Focus on skill and competency needs of local high-growth/high-
demand industries. The Workforce Investment Act of 1998 (Pub. L. 105-
220) (WIA) emphasizes a workforce system driven by the needs of local 
employers. In order for America to remain competitive in the global 
economy, it is essential that ETA target its investments to support 
employers in high-growth/high-demand industries. Community colleges 
play a vital role in this effort by providing training to address the 
workforce needs of these industries. A high-growth/high-demand industry 
meets one or more of the following criteria: (1) Is projected to add 
substantial numbers of new jobs to the economy; (2) has a significant 
impact on the economy overall; (3) impacts the growth of other 
industries; (4) is being transformed by technology and innovation 
requiring new skill sets for workers; or (5) is a new and emerging 
business that is projected to grow.
    B. Strategic Partnerships. ETA believes that strategic partnerships 
between community colleges, the workforce investment system, business 
and industry, and the continuum of education, including the K-12 
system, need to be in place in order to implement effective demand-
driven training and capacity building strategies. These strategic 
partnerships may have a local, regional, or statewide focus, and may 
include a consortium of partners or cross-industry representatives. 
Specific requirements for strategic partnerships are outlined in 
Section III (3). These strategic partnerships should focus broadly on 
the workforce challenges of one or more high-growth, high-demand 
industries and work collaboratively to identify and implement solutions 
to those challenges. These solutions should include, among others, 
strategies to increase the capacity of local community colleges to 
educate and train more workers with industry-defined skills and 
competencies. Therefore, the investment in community college capacity 
building would be one of many strategies and solutions that evolve from 
the partnership. While ETA welcomes applications from newly formed 
strategic partnerships, applicants are advised that grant funds may not 
be used for partnership development.
    Within the context of the broader strategic partnership and as it 
relates to this grant, each collaborative partner should have clearly 
defined roles. Each partner should verify their role through a letter 
of commitment attached to the proposal. The exact nature of these roles 
may vary depending on the issue areas being addressed and the scope and 
nature of the activities undertaken. However, ETA expects that each 
collaborative partner will, at minimum, contribute in the following 
ways. Employers should be actively engaged and participate fully in 
every aspect of grant activities including: defining the program 
strategy and goals; identifying needed skills and competencies; 
designing training approaches and curricula; implementing the program; 
contributing financial support; and, where appropriate, hiring 
qualified training graduates. The K-12 education system is an important 
foundational partner to ensure the project's activities are tied to the 
broader continuum of education in the community. The workforce 
investment system, which may include state and local Workforce 
Investment Boards, State Workforce Agencies, and One-Stop Career 
Centers and their cooperating partners, as such terms are defined under 
WIA, may play a number of roles, including: identifying and assessing 
candidates for training; working collaboratively to leverage WIA 
investments; referring qualified candidates to the community college 
for enrollment; providing wrap-around support services, where 
appropriate; and referring qualified training graduates to employers 
with existing job openings.
    In order to maximize the success of the project and to keep pace 
with the rapid changes in the economy and the nature of the skills and 
competencies necessary for work in these industries, these strategic 
partnerships need to be substantial and sustained. ETA encourages 
partners to plan for sustainability of the partnership to enable 
ongoing assessment of industry workforce needs and collaborative 
development of solutions on an ongoing basis.
    C. Industry-driven capacity building and training efforts. All 
CBJTGs must develop and implement a combination of capacity building 
and training activities that target skills and competencies demanded by 
local high-growth/high-demand industries. Applicants are not limited in 
the strategies and approaches they may employ to implement their 
capacity building and training strategies, provided the activities meet 
the following requirements:
    (1) Training. Training activities must: (a) Occur within the 
context of a continuum of education and training that supports long-
term career growth, such as an articulated career ladder/lattice and 
(b) result in college credit or other credentials that are industry-
recognized and indicate a level of mastery and competence in a given 
field or function. The credential awarded to participants upon 
completion should be based on the type of training provided through the 
grant and the requirements

[[Page 22908]]

of the targeted occupation, and should be selected based on 
consultations with industry partners. For example:
    a. Customized and short-term training should result in a 
performance-based certification or certificate. This certification may 
be developed jointly by employers and the community college, based on 
defined knowledge and skill requirements for specific high-demand 
occupations/functions. Performance-based certifications may also be 
based on industry-recognized curriculum and standards.
    b. Training in information technology, allied health professions, 
and other fields with established professional standards and 
examinations should result in certification.
    c. In states where licensure is required for the specific 
occupation targeted by the training, the credentialing requirement 
should be set accordingly.
    d. In some instances, training provided under CBJTGs may lead to a 
degree. In these instances, the credential required will be credit for 
each course leading to an Associate's or Applied Associate's degree.
    (2) Capacity Building. Community colleges are encouraged to broadly 
assess their capacity to meet the training needs of the targeted high-
growth/high-demand industry or industries. Proposed capacity building 
strategies are expected to address significant barriers which impede 
the ability of the community college to meet local industry demand for 
workforce training. These strategies should not simply address isolated 
deficits, but rather provide a comprehensive solution to identified 
capacity challenges as they relate to the industry or industries of 
focus. Examples of capacity building activities include, but are not 
limited to:
    a. The development or adaptation of competency models and curricula 
to support training;
    b. The development of innovative curricula, teaching methods and 
instructional design to maximize the impact of the initiative in 
meeting the skills needs of employers;
    c. Innovative strategies to ensure availability of qualified and 
certified instructors;
    d. Procurement of equipment and simulation equipment necessary to 
train to industry-demanded skills; or
    e. Support for clinical experiences required for certification or 
licensure.
    Capacity building activities must meet two criteria: (1) The 
proposed capacity building efforts must be directly linked to the 
specific training supported under the grant; and (2) grantees must use 
their grant funds in a manner consistent with the regulations and 
policies governing use of funds under 171(d) of WIA, which broadly 
allows the funds to be utilized to test an array of approaches to the 
provision of training services and support the development and 
replication of effective training strategies.
    D. Leveraged Resources. Projects funded through CBJTGs should 
leverage resources from key entities in the strategic partnership. 
Leveraging resources in the context of strategic partnerships 
accomplishes three goals: (1) It allows for the strategic pursuit of 
resources; (2) it increases stakeholder investment in the project at 
all levels including design and implementation phases; and (3) it 
broadens the impact of the project itself. Applicants are encouraged to 
leverage significant resources from key partners and other 
organizations to maximize the impact of the project on the community.
    ETA strongly encourages CBJTG applicants and their strategic 
partners to be entrepreneurial as they seek out, utilize, and sustain 
these resources, whether they are in-kind or cash contributions, when 
creating capacity building and training strategies. Businesses, faith-
based and community organizations, and foundations often invest 
resources to support workforce development. Faith-based and community 
organizations may provide resources such as support services, 
mentoring, tutoring, and volunteers, all of which are important 
resources for grantees to leverage in assisting the populations 
targeted by these funds. In addition, other government programs, 
including the Department of Education, the Department of Commerce, and 
other ETA programs, such as registered apprenticeship and Job Corps, 
may have resources available that can be integrated into the proposed 
project.
    ETA also encourages applicants to integrate WIA funding at the 
state and local level into their proposed project. Integrating WIA 
funds ensures that the full spectrum of assets available from the 
workforce system is leveraged to support the capacity building and 
training activities. The wide variety of WIA programs and activities 
provide both breadth and depth to the proposed solution offered to both 
business and individuals. The use of WIA funds also serves to embed the 
solutions-based approach into the local or regional workforce 
investment system, which strengthens the system's ability to become 
more demand-driven.
    E. Replication. CBJTGs are intended to drive the community college 
system and the workforce investment system to be more responsive to the 
workforce demands of industry by making the products, models, and 
effective approaches that result from CBJTG investments available to 
both systems. To that end, grantees will develop the foundations and 
outcomes of CBJTG projects, including the learning and achievement 
resulting from the projects, into solutions-based models that can be 
shared with, and implemented by, other community colleges, the 
workforce system, and industry leaders.
    F. Outcomes. The CBJTGs will be fundamentally results-oriented. 
Therefore, clear and specific outcomes that are appropriate to the 
nature of the proposed activities and the size of the project are vital 
components of CBJTG projects. Because CBJTGs invest in customized 
strategies to address local workforce and skills shortages, ETA 
recognizes that specific outcomes will vary from project to project 
based on the specific activities proposed. Training outcomes should 
include those tracked by the Common Measures, the OMB-approved uniform 
evaluation metrics for job training and employment programs. A detailed 
description of ETA's policy on the Common Measures can be found in the 
Training and Employment Guidance Letter (TEGL) No. 28-04 (http://
wdr.doleta.gov/directives/attach/TEGL28-04.pdf). A basic list of Common 
Measures is provided as attachment B to the TEGL (http://
wdr.doleta.gov/directives/attach/TEGL28-04_AttachB.pdf). Capacity 
building outcomes should include products, models, and activities that 
increase the capacity of the community college to provide training as 
well as the impact each outcome has on the number of individuals the 
community college can train and/or the quality of that training. 
Outcomes and impacts of the proposed project should satisfactorily 
address the industry-identified workforce need and the community 
college capacity constraint identified by the partnership.

II. Award Information

1. Award Amount

    ETA intends to fund approximately seventy-five (75) projects 
through grants ranging from $500,000 to $2 million through this 
competition; however, this does not preclude ETA from funding grants at 
either a lower or higher amount, or funding a smaller or larger number 
of projects, based on the type and the number of quality submissions. 
Applicants are encouraged to submit budgets for quality projects at 
whatever funding level is appropriate to the project. Nevertheless, 
applicants should recognize that the funds available through this SGA 
are intended to

[[Page 22909]]

complement additional leveraged resources rather than be the sole 
source of funds for the proposal. A second competition planned for 
Fall/Winter 2005 will request applications for the funding of 
additional projects.

2. Period of Performance

    ETA intends that the initial period of grant performance will fall 
within a range of 24 to 36 months from the date of execution of the 
grant documents. However, ETA will determine an appropriate period of 
performance on a per-award basis that will allow for the completion of 
capacity building and training efforts, and allow time for post-
training participant tracking in the workplace.

III. Eligibility Information

1. Eligible Applicants

    In order to be eligible for consideration under this solicitation, 
the applicant must be a publicly funded institution of higher education 
that grants associate degrees. Therefore, applicants must demonstrate 
that they comply with the definition of a community college in 20 
U.S.C. 2371:

    The term ``community college''--(A) means an institution of 
higher education [as defined in 20 U.S.C. 1001] that provides not 
less than a 2-year program that is acceptable for full credit 
towards a bachelor's degree; and (B) includes tribally controlled 
colleges and universities.

    Applicants that fail to meet this eligibility requirement will be 
removed from consideration prior to the technical review process. 
Please note: (1) The applicant and fiscal agent for this grant 
initiative must be the same entity; and (2) in accordance with Section 
18 of the Lobbying Disclosure Act of 1995 (Pub. L. 104-65) (2 U.S.C. 
1611), non-profit entities incorporated under Internal Revenue Service 
Code section 501(c)(4) that engage in lobbying activities are not 
eligible to receive Federal funds and grants.

2. Cost Sharing or Matching

    Cost sharing, matching, or cost participation is not required for 
eligibility; however, applicants are encouraged to leverage the 
resources of the partnership whenever possible.

3. Other Grant Specifications

    (1) Demonstrated Partnerships. To be considered for funding under 
this SGA, the applicant must demonstrate that the proposed project will 
be implemented by a strategic partnership that includes at least one 
entity from each of the following categories: (1) The publicly-funded 
Workforce Investment System, which may include state and local 
Workforce Investment Boards, State Workforce Agencies, and One Stop 
Career Centers and their partners; (2) the community college system; 
(3) employers and industry-related organizations such as associations 
and unions; and (4) the continuum of education, including the K-12 
public education system. The strategic partnership may be a legally 
organized partnership or joint venture, or a more informal 
collaboration. As discussed above in Section III(1), the applicant 
itself, for the purpose of being bound in the grant application and any 
resulting award, must be a publicly funded community college.
    (2) Required Capacity Building and Training Activities. To be 
considered for funding under this SGA, proposed grant activities must 
include a combination of capacity building and training activities that 
target skills and competencies demanded by local high-growth/high-
demand industries. Training activities must result in college credit or 
other credentials that are industry-recognized and indicate a level of 
mastery and competence in a given field or function. Proposed capacity 
building activities must address barriers that impede the ability of 
the community college to meet local industry demand for workforce 
training and must be directly linked to the specific training supported 
under the grant. Applicants may propose a cross-cutting capacity 
building and training strategy that will support training in more than 
one high growth/high demand industry if the applicant can demonstrate 
that skill needs in the identified industries are shared.
    (3) Participants Eligible to Receive Training. Generally, the scope 
of potential trainees is very broad. WIA Sec. 171(d) authorizes 
demonstration programs to serve dislocated workers, incumbent workers, 
and new entrants to the workforce. This authorization supports a broad 
range of training for a variety of populations, including: Incumbent 
workers who need new skills for jobs in demand up the career ladder or 
because the skill needs for their current job have changed; untapped 
labor pools such as immigrant workers, individuals with disabilities, 
veterans, older workers, youth, etc; or entry level workers who need 
basic skills and/or specific occupational skill training. The 
identification of targeted and qualified trainees should be part of the 
larger project planning process undertaken by the required partnership 
and should relate to the workforce issue that is being addressed by the 
training.
    (4) Training Providers. The community college applicant must offer 
appropriate credentials for all proposed training. Generally, it is 
assumed that the applicant will also be the training provider. However, 
ETA encourages applicants to be creative in integrating partner 
resources into the training plan. For example: A business partner may 
provide a qualified instructor to the community college; the community 
college may provide on-site training for workers to take advantage of 
business-loaned equipment; the training may be provided jointly; or 
some of the training may utilize distance learning alternatives.
    (5) Veterans Priority. In circumstances where a grant recipient 
must choose between two equally qualified candidates for training, one 
of whom is a veteran, the Jobs for Veterans Act (Pub. L. 107-288) 
requires that grant recipients give the veteran priority of service by 
admitting him or her. The Jobs for Veterans Act provides priority of 
service to veterans and spouses of certain veterans for the receipt of 
employment, training, and placement services in any job training 
program directly funded, in whole or in part, by the Department of 
Labor. Please note that, to obtain priority of service, a veteran must 
meet the program's eligibility requirements. ETA Training and 
Employment Guidance Letter (TEGL) No. 5-03 (September 16, 2003) 
provides general guidance on the scope of the Job for Veterans Act and 
its effect on current employment and training programs. TEGL No. 5-03, 
along with additional guidance, is available at the ``Jobs for Veterans 
Priority of Service'' Web site (http://www.doleta.gov/programs/vets).

IV. Application and Submission Information

1. Address To Request Application Package

    This SGA contains all of the information and forms needed to apply 
for grant funding.

2. Content and Form of Application Submission

    The proposal must consist of two (2) separate and distinct parts, 
Parts I and II. Applications that fail to adhere to the instructions in 
this section will be considered non-responsive and may not be given 
further consideration.
    Part I of the proposal is the Cost Proposal and must include the 
following three items.
     The Standard Form (SF) 424, ``Application for Federal 
Assistance'' (Appendix B) (available at http://www.whitehouse.gov/omb/
grants/sf424.pdf). The SF 424 must clearly

[[Page 22910]]

identify the applicant and be signed by an individual with authority to 
enter into a grant agreement. Upon confirmation of an award, the 
individual signing the SF 424 on behalf of the applicant shall be 
considered the representative of the applicant.
     All applicants for federal grant and funding opportunities 
are required to have a Dun and Bradstreet (DUNS) number. See Office of 
Management and Budget (OMB) Notice of Final Policy Issuance, 68 FR 
38402 (June 27, 2003). Applicants must supply their DUNS number in item 
5 of the new SF 424 issued by OMB (Rev. 9-2003). The DUNS 
number is a nine-digit identification number that uniquely identifies 
business entities. Obtaining a DUNS number is easy and there is no 
charge. To obtain a DUNS number, access this Web site: http://
www.dunandbradstreet.com or call 1-866-705-5711.
     SF 424A, the Budget Information Form (Appendix C) 
(available at http://www.whitehouse.gov/omb/grants/sf424a.pdf). In 
preparing the Budget Information Form, the applicant must provide a 
concise narrative explanation to support the request. The budget 
narrative should break down the budget and leveraged resources by 
deliverable, should discuss cost per-participant, and should discuss 
precisely how the administrative costs support the project goals.
    Please note that applicants that fail to provide a SF 424, SF 424A 
and/or a budget narrative will be removed from consideration prior to 
the technical review process. Applicants are also encouraged, but not 
required, to submit OMB Survey N. 1890-0014: Survey on Ensuring Equal 
Opportunity for Applicants, which can be found in Attachment D.
    Part II of the application is the Technical Proposal, which 
demonstrates the applicant's capabilities to plan and implement the 
CBJTG in accordance with the provisions of this solicitation. The 
Technical Proposal is limited to twenty (20) double-spaced, single-
sided, 8.5 inch x 11 inch pages with 12 point text font and one-inch 
margins. In addition, in attachments which may not exceed ten (10) 
pages, the applicant may provide resumes, a list of staff positions to 
be funded by the grant, statistical information and other related 
material. The required letters of commitment from partners must be 
submitted as additional attachments, which will not count against the 
allowable 10-page limit on attachments. The applicant must reference 
any partners in the text of the Technical Proposal. No cost data or 
reference to prices should be included in the Technical Proposal. The 
following information is required:
     A two-page abstract summarizing the proposed project and 
applicant profile information including: Applicant name, project title, 
industry focus, partnership members, proposed training and capacity 
building activities, funding level requested, and the amount of 
leveraged resources;
     A table of contents listing the application sections;
     A time line outlining project activities and an 
anticipated schedule for deliverables; and
     A project description as described in the Evaluation 
Criteria section at Part V(1) of this solicitation.
    Please note that the abstract, table of contents, and time line are 
not included in the twenty page limit. Applications that do not provide 
Part II of the application will be removed from consideration prior to 
the technical review process.
    Applications may be submitted electronically on Grants.gov or in 
hard-copy via mail or hand delivery. These processes are described in 
further detail in section IV(3). Applicants submitting proposals in 
hard-copy must submit an original signed application (including the SF 
424) and one (1) ``copy-ready'' version free of bindings, staples or 
protruding tabs to ease in the reproduction of the proposal by DOL. 
Applicants submitting proposals in hard-copy are also requested, though 
not required, to provide an electronic copy of the proposal on CD-ROM.

3. Submission Date, Times, and Addresses

    The closing date for receipt of applications under this 
announcement is July 6, 2005. Applications must be received at the 
address below no later than 5 p.m. (Eastern Time). Applications sent by 
e-mail, telegram, or facsimile (fax) will not be accepted. Applications 
that do not meet the conditions set forth in this notice will not be 
honored. No exceptions to the mailing and delivery requirements set 
forth in this notice will be granted.
    ETA will host CHJTG Virtual Prospective Applicant Conferences for 
this grant competition. The dates and access information for these 
prospective applicant conferences will be posted on ETA's Web site at 
http://www.doleta.gov/business/Community-BasedJobTrainingGrants.cfm.
    Mailed applications must be addressed to the U.S. Department of 
Labor, Employment and Training Administration, Division of Federal 
Assistance, Attention: Eric Luetkenhaus, Grant Officer, Reference SGA/
DFA-PY-04-10, 200 Constitution Avenue, NW., Room N-4438, Washington, DC 
20210. Applicants are advised that mail delivery in the Washington area 
may be delayed due to mail decontamination procedures. Hand delivered 
proposals will be received at the above address. All overnight mail 
will be considered to be hand-delivered and must be received at the 
designated place by the specified closing date.
    Applicants may apply online through Grants.gov (http://
www.grants.gov). It is strongly recommended that applicants using 
Grants.gov immediately initiate and complete the ``Get Started'' 
registration steps at http://www.grants.gov/GetStarted. These steps may 
take multiple days to complete, and this time should be factored into 
plans for electronic application submission in order to avoid facing 
unexpected delays that could result in the rejection of an application. 
If submitting electronically through grants.gov, it would be 
appreciated if the application submitted is saved as .doc, .pdf or .txt 
files
    Late Applications: Any application received after the exact date 
and time specified for receipt at the office designated in this notice 
will not be considered, unless it is received before awards are made 
and it (a) was sent by U.S. Postal Service registered or certified mail 
not later than the fifth calendar day before the date specified for 
receipt of applications (e.g., an application required to be received 
by the 20th of the month must be post marked by the 15th of that month) 
or (b) was sent by U.S. Postal Service Express Mail or Grants.gov to 
the addressee not later than 5 p.m. at the place of mailing or 
electronic submission one working day prior to the date specified for 
receipt of applications. It is highly recommended that online 
submissions be completed one working day prior to the date specified 
for receipt of applications to ensure that the applicant still has the 
option to submit by U.S. Postal Service Express Mail in the event of 
any electronic submission problems. ``Post marked'' means a printed, 
stamped or otherwise placed impression (exclusive of a postage meter 
machine impression) that is readily identifiable, without further 
action, as having been supplied or affixed on the date of mailing by an 
employee of the U.S. Postal Service. Therefore, applicants should 
request the postal clerk to place a legible hand cancellation ``bull's 
eye'' postmark on both the receipt and the package. Failure to adhere 
to the above instructions will be a basis for a determination of 
nonresponsiveness.

[[Page 22911]]

4. Intergovernmental Review

    This funding opportunity is not subject to Executive Order (EO) 
12372, ``Intergovernmental Review of Federal Programs.''

5. Funding Restrictions

    Determinations of allowable costs will be made in accordance with 
the applicable Federal cost principles, e.g., Educational Institution--
OMB Circular A-21. Disallowed costs are those charges to a grant that 
the grantor agency or its representative determines not to be allowed 
in accordance with the applicable Federal Cost Principles or other 
conditions contained in the grant. Applicants will not be entitled to 
reimbursement of pre-award costs.
    Limitations on Cost Per-Participant. Because the costs of training 
may vary considerably depending on the skills and competencies required 
in different occupations in different industries, flexibility will be 
provided on cost per-participant. However, applications for funding 
will be reviewed to determine if the cost of the training is 
appropriate and will produce the outcomes identified. Applicants should 
demonstrate that the proposed cost per-participant is aligned with 
existing price structures for similar training in the local area, if 
available, or with the community college's existing price structures 
for the type of program offered.
    Administrative Costs. An entity that receives a CBJTG to carry out 
a project or program may not use more than 5 percent of the total 
amount of the grant to pay administrative costs associated with the 
program or project. The Grant Officer reserves the right to negotiate 
administrative cost levels prior to award. Administrative costs are 
defined at 20 CFR 667.220. Although there will be administrative costs 
associated with the management of the partnership as it relates to 
specific grant activity, the primary use of funding should be to 
support the capacity building and training activities.
    ETA Intellectual Property Rights. Applicants should note that 
grantees must agree to provide DOL/ETA a paid-up, nonexclusive and 
irrevocable license to reproduce, publish, or otherwise use for federal 
purposes all products developed, or for which ownership was purchased, 
under an award, including, but not limited to, curricula, training 
models, technical assistance products, and any related materials, and 
to authorize them to do so. Such uses include, but are not limited to, 
the right to modify and distribute such products worldwide by any 
means, electronically or otherwise.
    Legal Rules Pertaining to Inherently Religious Activities by 
Organizations that Receive Federal Financial Assistance. The government 
is prohibited from providing direct support to religious activity \1\. 
See 29 CFR part 2, subpart D. Funds from these grants may not be used 
to directly support religious instruction, worship, prayer, 
proselytizing or other inherently religious practices. Neutral, secular 
criteria that neither favor nor disfavor religion must be employed in 
the selection of grant and sub-grant recipients. In addition, under the 
WIA and DOL regulations implementing the Workforce Investment Act, a 
recipient may not use direct Federal assistance to train a participant 
in religious activities or employ participants to construct, operate, 
or maintain any part of a facility that is used or to be used for 
religious instruction or worship. See 29 CFR 37.6(f). Under WIA, ``no 
individual shall be excluded from participation in, denied the benefits 
of, subjected to discrimination under, or denied employment in the 
administration of or in connection with, any such program or activity 
because of race, color, religion, sex (except as otherwise permitted 
under Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972), national origin, 
age, disability, or political affiliation or belief''.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \1\ The term ``direct'' support is used to describe funds or 
other support that are provided ``directly'' by a governmental 
entity or an intermediate organization with the same duties as a 
governmental entity, as opposed to funds that an organization 
receives ``indirectly'' as the result of the genuine and independent 
private choice of a beneficiary within the meaning of the 
Establishment Clause of the U.S. Constitution.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

6. Withdrawal of Applications

    Applications may be withdrawn by written notice or telegram 
(including mailgram) received at any time before an award is made. 
Applications may be withdrawn in person by the applicant or by an 
authorized representative thereof, if the representative's identity is 
made known and the representative signs a receipt for the proposal.

V. Application Review Information

1. Evaluation Criteria

    This section identifies and describes the criteria that will be 
used to evaluate proposals for a Community-Based Job Training Grant. 
These criteria and point values are:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                           Criterion                              Points
------------------------------------------------------------------------
A. Statement of Need...........................................       15
B. Linkages to Key Partners....................................       20
C. Training and Capacity Building Plan.........................       25
D. Outcomes, Benefits, and Impact..............................       30
E. Program Management and Organization Capacity................       10
                                                                --------
    Total Possible Points......................................      100
------------------------------------------------------------------------

A. Statement of Need (15 Points)
    Scoring on this criterion will be based on the extent to which the 
applicant demonstrates a clear and specific need for Federal investment 
in the proposed activities. Applicants must demonstrate this need by: 
(a) Identifying the industry or industries of focus; (b) establishing 
that the identified industry satisfies ETA's criteria for a high-
growth/high-demand industry in the local economy as described in Part 
I(1) of this solicitation; (c) providing evidence of industry demand 
for training in the local economy; and (d) describing in detail the 
capacity challenges the community college faces that limit its ability 
to provide sufficient quantity or quality of training to meet the 
identified industry's demand. In addition, applicants should provide 
evidence that the capacity challenge to be addressed by the grant was 
identified in the context of the strategic partnership. Applicants may 
draw from a variety of resources for supporting data, including: 
traditional labor market information, such as projections; industry 
data, such as from trade associations or direct information from the 
local industry; and information on the local economy and other 
transactional data, such as job vacancies, that are available locally.
    Additional important factors for evaluation include:
     The extent to which the targeted industry is high-growth 
or high-demand in the context of the local economy;
     Identification of local workforce or skills shortages 
within the targeted industry;
     Demonstrated existence of the identified capacity 
constraint at the community college at which the grant activity will 
take place;
     Identification of the sources of the data used in the 
analysis; and
     If appropriate, the nature of larger strategic economic 
development or workforce investment projects with which the proposed 
project is aligned.
B. Linkages to Key Partners (20 Points)
    The applicant must demonstrate that the proposed project will be 
implemented by a strategic partnership that includes at least one 
entity from each of four categories: (1) The

[[Page 22912]]

workforce investment system, which may include state and local 
Workforce Investment Boards, State Workforce Agencies, and One Stop 
Career Centers and their partners, as such terms are defined under WIA; 
(2) community colleges; (3) employers and industry-related 
organizations such as associations and unions; and (4) the continuum of 
education, including the K-12 public education system. The applicant 
must identify the partners, explain the meaningful role each partner 
will play in the project, and document the resources leveraged from 
each partner. Collaborating partners must verify their role through a 
letter of commitment attached to the proposal. Applicants should also 
identify resources leveraged from other organizations, including other 
workforce investment system partners.
    ETA encourages, and will be looking for, applications that go 
beyond the minimum level of partnership and demonstrate broader, 
substantive and sustainable partnerships. If appropriate, applicants 
should also demonstrate the existence of a sustainability plan for the 
strategic partnership beyond the funding period.
    Scoring on this criterion will be based on: (1) Evidence that the 
partnership contains each of the required entities; (2) the degree to 
which each partner plays a committed role, either financial or non-
financial, in the proposed project; and (3) the robustness of the 
applicant's plan for sustaining the partnership beyond the funding 
period. Applications that do not have each of the four required 
entities represented in the partnership cannot receive full points in 
this section. The following elements will also be considered:
     The overall completeness of the strategic partnership, 
including its ability to manage all aspects and stages of the project 
and to coordinate individual activities with the partnership as a 
whole;
     The scope of each partner's contribution, their knowledge 
and experience concerning the proposed grant activities, and their 
ability to impact the success of the project;
     Evidence, including letters of support, that key partners 
have expressed a clear commitment to the project and understand their 
areas of responsibility;
     Evidence of a plan for interaction between partners at 
each stage of the project, from planning to execution; and
     Evidence that the partnership has the capacity to achieve 
the outcomes of the proposed project.
C. Training and Capacity Building Plan (25 Points)
    The applicant must describe its proposed capacity building and 
training strategies in full. The description should demonstrate: (1) 
That the proposed project will address identified industry workforce or 
skills shortages and identified capacity constraints at the community 
college level; (2) that the proposed project clearly integrates 
industry-driven capacity building and training activities; (3) that 
proposed capacity building solutions are broad based and include an 
appropriate range of activities; (4) that proposed training activities 
occur within the context of a continuum of education and training that 
supports long-term career growth, such as an articulated career ladder/
lattice; (5) that proposed training activities lead to appropriate 
credentialing; and (6) that the applicant has a clear understanding of 
the tasks required to successfully meet the objectives of the grant.
    Scoring on this criterion will be based on evidence that the 
applicant has developed effective, innovative training and capacity 
building strategies and a plan of implementation that will satisfy the 
six conditions described above. Additional factors that will be 
considered include:
     The existence of a work plan that is responsive to the 
applicant's statement of need and includes specific goals, objectives, 
activities, implementation strategies, and a timeline;
     The demonstrated link between the proposed project and the 
identified industry workforce or skills shortages and identified 
capacity constraints at the community college level.
     The extent to which the work plan provides an 
understanding of the entire project's intended implementation;
     The feasibility and sensibility of the timeframes for the 
accomplishment of tasks;
     The extent to which the budget is justified with respect 
to the adequacy and reasonableness of resources requested;
     The extent to which budget line items are consistent with 
and tied to the work plan objectives;
     Evidence that the proposed cost per-participant is aligned 
with existing price structures for similar training; and
     Evidence of a robust outreach strategy that includes the 
dissemination of information regarding the project to others who would 
benefit most, and if appropriate, recruitment of eligible participants.
D. Outcomes, Benefits, and Impact (30 Points)
    Applicants must describe fully the predicted outcomes and products 
resulting from the project. Applicants should particularly highlight 
the benefits and impact of the outcomes and products on the larger 
capacity constraint described in the statement of need. Scoring on this 
criterion will be based on two broad elements:
    1. The expected project outcomes are clearly identified, 
measurable, realistic, and consistent with the objectives of the 
project. Key elements for training and capacity building aspects of the 
proposal are below.
    a. Training: Applicants must track training outcome measures, 
including all appropriate adult or youth Common Measures, such as 
employment placement numbers and/or earnings gains and retention. Other 
outcome measures that should be tracked include the number of 
individuals awarded credentials or degrees, and outcome measures 
specific to the proposed training project. Applications must also 
identify the credential that participants will earn as a result of the 
proposed training, and the employer-, industry-, vendor-, or state-
defined standards associated with the credential. If the credential 
targeted by the training project is a certificate or performance-based 
certification, applicants should either (a) demonstrate employer 
engagement in the curriculum development process, or (b) indicate that 
the certification will translate into concrete job advancement 
opportunities with an employer.
    b. Capacity Building: Applicants must clearly describe all 
products, models, curricula, etc. that will be developed or acquired 
with federal funds through the grant and indicate the number of 
participants or entities who will benefit from the proposed activities. 
Applicants must describe the data measures that will be used to measure 
how the proposed capacity building activities impact the ability of the 
community college to train workers for skills in demand by the targeted 
industry. Applicants should indicate the long-term impact of the 
proposed project on the ability of the community college to meet local 
workforce demands.
    2. The proposed outcomes will translate into the successful 
alleviation of the community college's identified capacity challenges.
    Additional factors that will be considered in the scoring of this 
criterion include:

[[Page 22913]]

     The ability of the applicant to achieve the stated 
outcomes within the time frame of the grant; and
     The appropriateness of the outcomes with respect to the 
requested level of funding.
E. Program Management and Organization Capacity (10 Points)
    To satisfy this criterion, applicants must describe their proposed 
project management structure including, where appropriate, the 
identification of a proposed project manager, and discuss the proposed 
staffing pattern and the qualifications and experience of key staff 
members. Applicants should also give evidence of the use of data 
systems to track outcomes in a timely and accurate manner. The 
applicant should include a description of organizational capacity and 
the organization's track record in projects similar to that described 
in the proposal and/or related activities of the primary partners.
    Scoring under this criterion will be based on the extent to which 
applicants provide evidence of the following:
     The time commitment of the proposed staff is sufficient to 
ensure proper direction, management, and timely completion of the 
project;
     The roles and contribution of staff, consultants, and 
collaborative organizations are clearly defined and linked to specific 
objectives and tasks;
     The background, experience, and other qualifications of 
the staff are sufficient to carry out their designated roles; and
     The applicant organization has significant capacity to 
accomplish the goals and outcomes of the project, including the ability 
to collect and manage data in a way that allows consistent, accurate, 
and expedient reporting.
2. Review and Selection Process
    Applications for the Community-Based Job Training Grants will be 
accepted after the publication of this announcement until the closing 
date. A technical review panel will make a careful evaluation of 
applications against the criteria set forth in Section V(A) of this 
document. These criteria are based on the policy goals, priorities, and 
emphases set forth in this SGA. Up to 100 points may be awarded to an 
application, based on the required information described in Section 
V(1). The ranked scores will serve as the primary basis for selection 
of applications for funding, in conjunction with other factors such as 
urban, rural, and geographic balance; the availability of funds; and 
which proposals are most advantageous to the Government. The panel 
results are advisory in nature and not binding on the Grant Officer, 
who may consider any information that comes to his attention. DOL may 
elect to award the grant(s) with or without discussions with the 
applicants. Should a grant be awarded without discussions, the award 
will be based on the applicant's signature on the SF 424, which 
constitutes a binding offer.

VI. Award Administration Information

1. Award Notices

    All award notifications will be posted on the ETA Homepage (http://
www.doleta.gov). Non-selected applicants will be notified by mail.

2. Administrative and National Policy Requirements

A. Administrative Program Requirements
    All grantees will be subject to all applicable Federal laws, 
regulations, and the applicable OMB Circulars. The grant(s) awarded 
under this SGA will be subject to the following administrative 
standards and provisions, if applicable:
    1. Workforce Investment Boards--20 Code of Federal Regulations 
(CFR) Part 667.220. (Administrative Costs).
    2. Non-Profit Organizations--OMB Circulars A-122 (Cost Principles) 
and 29 CFR Part 95 (Administrative Requirements).
    3. Educational Institutions--OMB Circulars A-21 (Cost Principles) 
and 29 CFR Part 95 (Administrative Requirements).
    4. State and Local Governments--OMB Circulars A-87 (Cost 
Principles) and 29 CFR Part 97 (Administrative Requirements).
    5. Profit Making Commercial Firms--Federal Acquisition Regulation 
(FAR)--48 CFR Part 31 (Cost Principles), and 29 CFR Part 95 
(Administrative Requirements).
    6. All entities must comply with 29 CFR Parts 93 and 98, and, where 
applicable, 29 CFR Parts 96 and 99.
    7. The following administrative standards and provisions may also 
be applicable:
    a. 29 CFR part 2, subpart D--Equal Treatment in Department of Labor 
Programs for Religious Organizations, Protection of Religious Liberty 
of Department of Labor Social Service Providers and Beneficiaries;
    b. 29 CFR part 30--Equal Employment Opportunity in Apprenticeship 
and Training;
    c. 29 CFR part 31--Nondiscrimination in Federally Assisted Programs 
of the Department of Labor--Effectuation of Title VI of the Civil 
Rights Act of 1964;
    d. 29 CFR part 32--Nondiscrimination on the Basis of Handicap in 
Programs and Activities Receiving or Benefiting from Federal Financial 
Assistance;
    e. 29 CFR part 33--Enforcement of Nondiscrimination on the Basis of 
Handicap in Programs or Activities Conducted by the Department of 
Labor;
    f. 29 CFR part 35--Nondiscrimination on the Basis of Age in 
Programs or Activities Receiving Federal Financial Assistance from the 
Department of Labor;
    g. 29 CFR part 36--Nondiscrimination on the Basis of Sex in 
Education Programs or Activities Receiving Federal Financial 
Assistance;
    h. 29 CFR part 37--Implementation of the Nondiscrimination and 
Equal Opportunity Provisions of the Workforce Investment Act of 1998 
(WIA).
    8. In accordance with Section 18 of the Lobbying Disclosure Act of 
1995 (Pub. L. 104-65) (2 U.S.C. 1611) non-profit entities incorporated 
under Internal Revenue Service Code section 501(c) (4) that engage in 
lobbying activities are not eligible to receive Federal funds and 
grants.

    Note: Except as specifically provided in this Notice, DOL/ETA's 
acceptance of a proposal and an award of Federal funds to sponsor 
any program(s) does not provide a waiver of any grant requirements 
and/or procedures. For example, OMB Circulars require that an 
entity's procurement procedures must ensure that all procurement 
transactions are conducted, as much as practical, to provide open 
and free competition. If a proposal identifies a specific entity to 
provide services, the DOL/ETA's award does not provide the 
justification or basis to sole source the procurement, i.e., avoid 
competition, unless the activity is regarded as the primary work of 
an official partner to the application.

B. Special Program Requirements
    Evaluation. DOL may require that the program or project participate 
in an evaluation of overall performance of CBJTGs. To measure the 
impact of the CBJTGs, ETA may arrange for or conduct an independent 
evaluation of the outcomes and benefits of the projects. Grantees must 
agree to make records on participants, employers and funding available, 
and to provide access to program operating personnel and participants, 
as specified by the evaluator(s) under the direction of ETA, including 
after the expiration date of the grant.
C. Reporting
    The grantee is required to provide the reports and documents listed 
below:
    Quarterly Financial Reports. A Quarterly Financial Status Report 
(SF 269) is required until such time as all

[[Page 22914]]

funds have been expended or the grant period has expired. Quarterly 
reports are due 30 days after the end of each calendar year quarter. 
Grantees must use ETA's On-Line Electronic Reporting System.
    Quarterly Progress Reports. The grantee must submit a quarterly 
progress report to the designated Federal Project Officer within 30 
days after the end of each calendar year quarter. Two copies are to be 
submitted providing a detailed account of activities undertaken during 
that quarter. DOL may require additional data elements to be collected 
and reported on either a regular basis or special request basis. 
Grantees must agree to meet DOL reporting requirements. The quarterly 
progress report should be in narrative form and should include:
    1. General grant information, including: a general overview of 
project progress, new developments and resolution of previous issues 
and challenges; a discussion of planned grant activities and any other 
grant-related events; an explanation of any issues/challenges 
encountered and the proposed strategies to overcome them; a description 
of major accomplishments, innovations, or promising approaches and 
processes; product deliverables and outcomes resulting from the 
project; and a status update on leveraged resources;
    2. Information on all training, employer, and grant deliverable 
outcomes as well as the anticipated impact of these outcomes on the 
community college, industry partners, and the broader community;
    3. Summary of the status of grant deliverables and dissemination 
activities;
    4. Highlights of promising approaches and success stories; and
    5. Description of technical assistance needs.
    Final Report. A draft final report must be submitted no later than 
60 days prior to the expiration date of the grant. This report must 
summarize project activities, employment outcomes, and related results 
of the training project, and should thoroughly document capacity 
building and training approaches. After responding to DOL questions and 
comments on the draft report, three copies of the final report must be 
submitted no later than the grant expiration date. Grantees must agree 
to use a designated format specified by DOL for preparing the final 
report.

VII. Agency Contacts

    Any questions regarding this SGA should be faxed to Kevin Brumback, 
Grants Management Specialist, Division of Federal Assistance, FAX 
number (202) 693-2705. (This