Petition To Modify an Exemption of a Previously Approved Antitheft Device; General Motors Corporation, 18457-18458 [05-7199]

Download as PDF Federal Register / Vol. 70, No. 68 / Monday, April 11, 2005 / Notices OMB receives it within 30 days of publication. Issued in Washington, DC, on April 1, 2005. Marlene Markison, Associate Administrator for Injury Control Operations & Resources. [FR Doc. 05–7205 Filed 4–8–05; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4910–59–P DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION National Highway Traffic Safety Administration [Docket No. NHTSA 2005–20386] Insurance Cost Information Regulation National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of Availability. AGENCY: SUMMARY: This notice announces publication by NHTSA of the 2005 text and data for the annual insurance cost information booklet that all car dealers must make available to prospective purchasers, pursuant to 49 CFR 582.4. This information is intended to assist prospective purchasers in comparing differences in passenger vehicle collision loss experience that could affect auto insurance costs. ADDRESSES: Interested persons may obtain a copy of this booklet by contacting the U.S. Department of Transportation, Docket Management, Room PL–401, 400 Seventh Street, SW., Washington, DC 20590. [Docket hours are from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.]. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. Rosalind Proctor, Chief, Consumer Standards Division, NHTSA, 400 Seventh Street SW., Washington, DC 20590 (202–366–0846). SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Pursuant to section 201(e) of the Motor Vehicle Information and Cost Savings Act, 15 U.S.C. 1941(e), on March 5, 1993, 58 FR 12545, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) amended 49 CFR Part 582, Insurance Cost Information Regulation, to require all dealers of automobiles to distribute to prospective customers information that compares differences in insurance costs of different makes and models of passenger cars based on differences in damage susceptibility. Pursuant to 49 CFR 582.4, all automobile dealers are required to make available to prospective purchasers booklets that include this comparative information as well as certain mandatory explanatory text that is set out in section 582.5. Early each year, NHTSA produces this booklet updating VerDate jul<14>2003 17:45 Apr 08, 2005 Jkt 205001 the Highway Loss Data Institute’s (HLDI) December Insurance Collision Report. NHTSA is mailing a copy of the 2005 booklet to each dealer that the Department of Energy uses to distribute the ‘‘Gas Mileage Guide.’’ Dealers will have the responsibility of reproducing a sufficient number of copies of the booklet to assure that they are available for retention by prospective purchasers by May 11, 2005. Dealers who do not receive a copy of the booklet within 15 days of the date of this notice should contact Ms. Rosalind Proctor of NHTSA’s Office of International Policy, Fuel Economy and Consumer Programs (202) 366–0846 to receive a copy of the booklet and to be added to the mailing list. Dealers may also obtain a copy of the booklet through the NHTSA Web page at: http://www.nhtsa.dot.gov/cars/ problems/studies/InsCost. (49 U.S.C. 32302; delegation of authority at 49 CFR 1.50(f).) Issued on: April 1, 2005. Roger A. Saul, Director, Crashworthiness Standards. [FR Doc. 05–7207 Filed 4–8–05; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4910–59–P DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION National Highway Traffic Safety Administration Petition To Modify an Exemption of a Previously Approved Antitheft Device; General Motors Corporation National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) Department of Transportation (DOT). ACTION: Grant of a petition to modify an exemption from the Parts Making Requirements of a previously approved antitheft device. AGENCY: SUMMARY: This notice grants in full GM’s second petition to modify the exemption of the previously approved antitheft device for the Cadillac DeVille vehicle line beginning with model year (MY) 2006. This notice also acknowledges GM’s notification that the nameplate for the Cadillac DeVille vehicle line will be changed to Cadillac DTS beginning with the 2006 model year. NHTSA is granting GM’s petition to modify the exemption because it has determined that, based on substantial evidence provided by GM, that the modified antitheft device described in GM’s petition is likely to be as effective in reducing and deterring motor vehicle theft as compliance with the partsmaking requirements. PO 00000 Frm 00106 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 18457 The exemption granted by this notice is effective beginning with model year (MY) 2006. DATES: Ms. Rosalind Proctor, Office of International Policy, Fuel Economy and Consumer Programs, NHTSA, 400 Seventh Street, SW., Washington, DC 20590. Ms. Protctor’s telephone number is (202) 366–0846. Her fax number is (202) 493– 2290. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: On April 27, 1990, NHTSA published in the Federal Register a notice granting in part the petition from GM for an exemption from the parts-making requirements of the Theft Prevention Standard (49 CFR Part 541) for the MY 1991 Cadillac DeVille vehicle line. The DeVille was equipped with the ‘‘PASSKey’’ antitheft device (see 55 FR 17854). On June 2, 1999, NHTS published in the Federal Register a notice granting in full GM’s petition for modification of the previously approved antitheft device for the Cadillac DeVille vehicle line beginning with the 2000 model year. The DeVille was equipped with the ‘‘PASS-Key III’’ antitheft device (see 64 FR 29736). On February 15, 2005, GM submitted a second petition to modify an exemption of its existing antitheft device. GM’s submission is a complete petition, as required by 49 CFR 543.9(d), in that it meets the general requirements contained in 49 CFR 543.5 and the specific content requirements of 49 CFR 543.6 GM’s petition provides a detailed description of the identity, design and location of the components of the antitheft system proposed for installation beginning with the 2006 model year. GM’s petition also informed the agency of its planned nameplate change for the Cadillac DeVille to the Cadillac DTS nameplate beginning with the 2006 model year. GM stated that the Cadillac DeVille will continue to be built on the existing ‘‘K’’ car platform from which the Cadillac DeVille line is currently built. GM stated that the current antitheft device (‘‘PASS-Key III’’) installed on the Cadillac DeVille vehicle line provides protection against unauthorized starting and fueling of the vehicle engine. GM stated that the antitheft device is designed to be active at all times without direct intervention by the vehicle operator, and that no specific or discrete security system action is necessary to achieve protection of the device. The device is fully armed immediately after the vehicle has been turned off and the key has been removed. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: E:\FR\FM\11APN1.SGM 11APN1 18458 Federal Register / Vol. 70, No. 68 / Monday, April 11, 2005 / Notices GM stated that the PASS-Key III device utilizes a special ignition key and decoder module. The mechanic code of the key unlocks and releases the transmission lever. The vehicle can only be operated when the key’s electrical code is sensed by the key cylinder and properly decoded by the controller module. GM also states that the ignition key contains electronics in the key head that receives energy from the controller module. Upon receipt of the data from the controller module, the key transmits a unique code through low frequency transmission. The controller module translates the received signal from the key into a digital signal which is transmitted to the body control module (BCM). The received signal is compared to an internally stored value by the BCM. If the values match, the key is recognized as valid and a vehicle security password is transmitted through data link to the engine control module to enable fuel and starting of the vehicle. In GM’s petition to modify its exemption, it stated that its Cadillac DTS vehicle line will be equipped with the PASS-Key III+ theft deterrent device for MY 2006. The PASS-Key III+ device will continue to provide protection against unauthorized starting and fueling of the vehicle engine. Components of the modified antitheft device include a special ignition key and decoder module. The conventional mechanical code of the key will continue to unlock and release the transmission lever. Before the vehicle can be operated, the key’s electrical code must be sensed and properly decoded by the PASS-Kay III+ control module. The ignition key contains electronics molded into the key head. These electronics receive energy and data from the control module. Upon receipt of the data, the key will calculate a response to the data using secret information and an internal encryption algorithm, and transmit the response back to the vehicle. The controller module translates the radio frequency signal received from the key into a digital signal and compares the received response to an internally calculated value. If the values match, the key is recognized as valid, and a vehicle security password (one of 65,534), is transmitted through a serial data link to the powertrain control module to enable fuel and starting of the vehicle. If an invalid key code is received, the PASSKey III+ controller module will send a disable password to the powertrain control module through the serial data bus, and the ignition and fuel systems will be inhibited. GM also stated that VerDate jul<14>2003 17:45 Apr 08, 2005 Jkt 205001 the PASS-Key III+ device has the capability for producing billions of codes, requiring centuries to scan them to allow someone to steal a vehicle. GM also stated that although its modified antitheft device provides protection against unauthorized starting and fueling of the vehicle, it does not provide any visible or audible indication of unauthorized entry by means of flashing vehicle light or sounding of the horn. Since the system is fully operational once the vehicle has been turned off, specific visible or audible reminders beyond key removal reminders have not been provided. Based on comparison of the reduction in the theft creates of GM vehicles using a passive theft deterrent device with an audible/visible alarm system to the reduction in theft rates for GM vehicle models equipped with a passive antitheft device without an alarm, GM finds that the lack of an alarm or attention attracting device does not compromise the theft deterrent performance of a system such as PASSKey III+. The agency has previously agreed with the finding that the absence of a visible or audible alarm has not prevented these antitheft devices from being effective protection against theft. In order to ensure the reliability and durability of the device, GM conducted tests based on its own specified standards. GM provided a detailed list of tests conducted and believes that its device is reliable and durable since the device complied with its specified requirements for each test. The tests conducted included high and low temperature storage, thermal shock, humidity, frost, salt fog, flammability, altitude, drop, shock, random vibration, dust, potential contaminants, connector retention/strain relief, terminal retention, connector insertion, crush, ice, immersion and tumbling. Additionally, GM stated that the design and assembly processes of the PASSKey III+ device and components are validated for a vehicle life of 10 years and 150,000 miles of performance. GM compared its MY 2006 antitheft device with devices which NHTSA has already determined to be as effective in reducing and deterring motor vehicle theft as would compliance with the parts-marking requirements. To substantiate its beliefs as to the effectiveness of the new device, GM compared the MY 2006 modified device to its other ‘‘PASS-Key’’-like systems. GM indicated that the theft rates, as reported by the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s National Crime Information Center, are lower for GM models equipped with the ‘‘PASS-Key’’like systems which have exemptions PO 00000 Frm 00107 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 from the parts-marking requirements of 49 CFR part 541, than the theft rates for earlier models with similar appearance and construction which were partsmarked. Based on the performance of the PASS-Key, PASS-Key II, and PASSKey III systems on other GM models, and the advanced technology utilized by the modification, GM believes that the MY 2006 modified antitheft device will be more effective in deterring theft than the parts-marking requirements of 49 CFR part 541. On the basis of this comparison, GM stated that its antitheft device (PASSKey III+) for model years 2006 and later will provide essentially the same functions and features as found on its MY 1993–2005 ‘‘PASS-Key’’-like devices and therefore will provide at least the same level of theft prevention as parts-marking. GM believes that the antitheft device proposed for installation on its MY 2006 Cadillac DTS vehicle line is likely to be as effective in reducing thefts as compliance with the parts-marking requirements of part 541. The agency has evaluated GM’s MY 2006 petition to modify the exemption for the Cadillac DTS vehicle line from the parts-marking requirements of 49 CFR part 541, and has decided to grant it. It has determined that the PASS-Key III+ system is likely to be as effective as parts-marking in preventing and deterring theft of these vehicles, and therefore qualifies for an exemption under 49 CFR part 543. The agency believes that the modified device will continue to provide four of the five types of performance listed in section 543.6(b)(3): promoting activation; preventing defeat or circumventing of the device by unauthorized persons; preventing operation of the vehicle by unauthorized entrants; and ensuring the reliability and durability of the device. NHTSA suggests that if the manufacturer contemplates making any changes, the effects of which might be characterized as de minimis, it should consult the agency before preparing and submitting a petition to modify. Authority: 49 U.S.C. 33106; delegation of authority at 49 CFR 1.50. Issued on: April 1, 2005. Roger A. Saul, Director, Crashworthiness Standards. [FR Doc. 05–7199 Filed 4–8–05; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4910–59–M E:\FR\FM\11APN1.SGM 11APN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 70, Number 68 (Monday, April 11, 2005)]
[Notices]
[Pages 18457-18458]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 05-7199]


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DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION

National Highway Traffic Safety Administration


Petition To Modify an Exemption of a Previously Approved 
Antitheft Device; General Motors Corporation

AGENCY: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) 
Department of Transportation (DOT).

ACTION: Grant of a petition to modify an exemption from the Parts 
Making Requirements of a previously approved antitheft device.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: This notice grants in full GM's second petition to modify the 
exemption of the previously approved antitheft device for the Cadillac 
DeVille vehicle line beginning with model year (MY) 2006. This notice 
also acknowledges GM's notification that the nameplate for the Cadillac 
DeVille vehicle line will be changed to Cadillac DTS beginning with the 
2006 model year. NHTSA is granting GM's petition to modify the 
exemption because it has determined that, based on substantial evidence 
provided by GM, that the modified antitheft device described in GM's 
petition is likely to be as effective in reducing and deterring motor 
vehicle theft as compliance with the parts-making requirements.

DATES: The exemption granted by this notice is effective beginning with 
model year (MY) 2006.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. Rosalind Proctor, Office of 
International Policy, Fuel Economy and Consumer Programs, NHTSA, 400 
Seventh Street, SW., Washington, DC 20590. Ms. Protctor's telephone 
number is (202) 366-0846. Her fax number is (202) 493-2290.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: On April 27, 1990, NHTSA published in the 
Federal Register a notice granting in part the petition from GM for an 
exemption from the parts-making requirements of the Theft Prevention 
Standard (49 CFR Part 541) for the MY 1991 Cadillac DeVille vehicle 
line. The DeVille was equipped with the ``PASS-Key'' antitheft device 
(see 55 FR 17854). On June 2, 1999, NHTS published in the Federal 
Register a notice granting in full GM's petition for modification of 
the previously approved antitheft device for the Cadillac DeVille 
vehicle line beginning with the 2000 model year. The DeVille was 
equipped with the ``PASS-Key III'' antitheft device (see 64 FR 29736). 
On February 15, 2005, GM submitted a second petition to modify an 
exemption of its existing antitheft device. GM's submission is a 
complete petition, as required by 49 CFR 543.9(d), in that it meets the 
general requirements contained in 49 CFR 543.5 and the specific content 
requirements of 49 CFR 543.6 GM's petition provides a detailed 
description of the identity, design and location of the components of 
the antitheft system proposed for installation beginning with the 2006 
model year.
    GM's petition also informed the agency of its planned nameplate 
change for the Cadillac DeVille to the Cadillac DTS nameplate beginning 
with the 2006 model year. GM stated that the Cadillac DeVille will 
continue to be built on the existing ``K'' car platform from which the 
Cadillac DeVille line is currently built.
    GM stated that the current antitheft device (``PASS-Key III'') 
installed on the Cadillac DeVille vehicle line provides protection 
against unauthorized starting and fueling of the vehicle engine.
    GM stated that the antitheft device is designed to be active at all 
times without direct intervention by the vehicle operator, and that no 
specific or discrete security system action is necessary to achieve 
protection of the device. The device is fully armed immediately after 
the vehicle has been turned off and the key has been removed.

[[Page 18458]]

    GM stated that the PASS-Key III device utilizes a special ignition 
key and decoder module. The mechanic code of the key unlocks and 
releases the transmission lever. The vehicle can only be operated when 
the key's electrical code is sensed by the key cylinder and properly 
decoded by the controller module.
    GM also states that the ignition key contains electronics in the 
key head that receives energy from the controller module. Upon receipt 
of the data from the controller module, the key transmits a unique code 
through low frequency transmission. The controller module translates 
the received signal from the key into a digital signal which is 
transmitted to the body control module (BCM). The received signal is 
compared to an internally stored value by the BCM. If the values match, 
the key is recognized as valid and a vehicle security password is 
transmitted through data link to the engine control module to enable 
fuel and starting of the vehicle.
    In GM's petition to modify its exemption, it stated that its 
Cadillac DTS vehicle line will be equipped with the PASS-Key III+ theft 
deterrent device for MY 2006. The PASS-Key III+ device will continue to 
provide protection against unauthorized starting and fueling of the 
vehicle engine. Components of the modified antitheft device include a 
special ignition key and decoder module. The conventional mechanical 
code of the key will continue to unlock and release the transmission 
lever. Before the vehicle can be operated, the key's electrical code 
must be sensed and properly decoded by the PASS-Kay III+ control 
module. The ignition key contains electronics molded into the key head. 
These electronics receive energy and data from the control module. Upon 
receipt of the data, the key will calculate a response to the data 
using secret information and an internal encryption algorithm, and 
transmit the response back to the vehicle. The controller module 
translates the radio frequency signal received from the key into a 
digital signal and compares the received response to an internally 
calculated value. If the values match, the key is recognized as valid, 
and a vehicle security password (one of 65,534), is transmitted through 
a serial data link to the powertrain control module to enable fuel and 
starting of the vehicle. If an invalid key code is received, the PASS-
Key III+ controller module will send a disable password to the 
powertrain control module through the serial data bus, and the ignition 
and fuel systems will be inhibited. GM also stated that the PASS-Key 
III+ device has the capability for producing billions of codes, 
requiring centuries to scan them to allow someone to steal a vehicle.
    GM also stated that although its modified antitheft device provides 
protection against unauthorized starting and fueling of the vehicle, it 
does not provide any visible or audible indication of unauthorized 
entry by means of flashing vehicle light or sounding of the horn. Since 
the system is fully operational once the vehicle has been turned off, 
specific visible or audible reminders beyond key removal reminders have 
not been provided. Based on comparison of the reduction in the theft 
creates of GM vehicles using a passive theft deterrent device with an 
audible/visible alarm system to the reduction in theft rates for GM 
vehicle models equipped with a passive antitheft device without an 
alarm, GM finds that the lack of an alarm or attention attracting 
device does not compromise the theft deterrent performance of a system 
such as PASS-Key III+. The agency has previously agreed with the 
finding that the absence of a visible or audible alarm has not 
prevented these antitheft devices from being effective protection 
against theft.
    In order to ensure the reliability and durability of the device, GM 
conducted tests based on its own specified standards. GM provided a 
detailed list of tests conducted and believes that its device is 
reliable and durable since the device complied with its specified 
requirements for each test. The tests conducted included high and low 
temperature storage, thermal shock, humidity, frost, salt fog, 
flammability, altitude, drop, shock, random vibration, dust, potential 
contaminants, connector retention/strain relief, terminal retention, 
connector insertion, crush, ice, immersion and tumbling. Additionally, 
GM stated that the design and assembly processes of the PASS-Key III+ 
device and components are validated for a vehicle life of 10 years and 
150,000 miles of performance.
    GM compared its MY 2006 antitheft device with devices which NHTSA 
has already determined to be as effective in reducing and deterring 
motor vehicle theft as would compliance with the parts-marking 
requirements. To substantiate its beliefs as to the effectiveness of 
the new device, GM compared the MY 2006 modified device to its other 
``PASS-Key''-like systems. GM indicated that the theft rates, as 
reported by the Federal Bureau of Investigation's National Crime 
Information Center, are lower for GM models equipped with the ``PASS-
Key''-like systems which have exemptions from the parts-marking 
requirements of 49 CFR part 541, than the theft rates for earlier 
models with similar appearance and construction which were parts-
marked. Based on the performance of the PASS-Key, PASS-Key II, and 
PASS-Key III systems on other GM models, and the advanced technology 
utilized by the modification, GM believes that the MY 2006 modified 
antitheft device will be more effective in deterring theft than the 
parts-marking requirements of 49 CFR part 541.
    On the basis of this comparison, GM stated that its antitheft 
device (PASS-Key III+) for model years 2006 and later will provide 
essentially the same functions and features as found on its MY 1993-
2005 ``PASS-Key''-like devices and therefore will provide at least the 
same level of theft prevention as parts-marking. GM believes that the 
antitheft device proposed for installation on its MY 2006 Cadillac DTS 
vehicle line is likely to be as effective in reducing thefts as 
compliance with the parts-marking requirements of part 541.
    The agency has evaluated GM's MY 2006 petition to modify the 
exemption for the Cadillac DTS vehicle line from the parts-marking 
requirements of 49 CFR part 541, and has decided to grant it. It has 
determined that the PASS-Key III+ system is likely to be as effective 
as parts-marking in preventing and deterring theft of these vehicles, 
and therefore qualifies for an exemption under 49 CFR part 543. The 
agency believes that the modified device will continue to provide four 
of the five types of performance listed in section 543.6(b)(3): 
promoting activation; preventing defeat or circumventing of the device 
by unauthorized persons; preventing operation of the vehicle by 
unauthorized entrants; and ensuring the reliability and durability of 
the device.
    NHTSA suggests that if the manufacturer contemplates making any 
changes, the effects of which might be characterized as de minimis, it 
should consult the agency before preparing and submitting a petition to 
modify.

    Authority: 49 U.S.C. 33106; delegation of authority at 49 CFR 
1.50.

    Issued on: April 1, 2005.
Roger A. Saul,
Director, Crashworthiness Standards.
[FR Doc. 05-7199 Filed 4-8-05; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4910-59-M