Proposed Collection; Comment Request, 12501-12502 [05-4943]

Download as PDF Federal Register / Vol. 70, No. 48 / Monday, March 14, 2005 / Notices DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Antitrust Division Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993—Water Heater Industry Joint Research and Development Consortium Notice is hereby given that, on February 14, 2005, pursuant to section 6(a) of the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993, 15 U.S.C. 4301 et seq. (‘‘the Act’’), Water Heater Industry Joint Research and Development Consortium (‘‘the Consortium’’) has filed written notifications simultaneously with the Attorney General and the Federal Trade Commission disclosing a change in its nature and objective. The notifications were filed for the purpose of extending the Act’s provisions limiting the recovery of antitrust plaintiffs to actual damages under specified circumstances. Specifically, the term of the Consortium has been changed from a term of nine years beginning February 27, 1995, to a period of eleven years beginning February 27, 1995. No other changes have been made in either the membership or planned activity of the group research project. Membership in this group research project remains open, and the Consortium intends to file additional written notification disclosing all changes in membership. On February 28, 1995, the Consortium filed its original notification pursuant to section 6(a) of the Act. The Department of Justice published a notice in the Federal Register pursuant to section 6(b) of the Act on March 27, 1995 (60 FR 15789). The last notification was filed with the Department on February 26, 2004. A notice was published in the Federal Register pursuant to section 6(b) of the Act on March 25, 2004 (69 FR 15382). Dorothy B. Fountain, Deputy Director of Operations, Antitrust Division. [FR Doc. 05–4934 Filed 3–11–05; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4410–11–M DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Bureau of Labor Statistics Proposed Collection; Comment Request ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of Labor, as part of its continuing effort to reduce VerDate jul<14>2003 15:31 Mar 11, 2005 Jkt 205001 paperwork and respondent burden, conducts a pre-clearance consultation program to provide the general public and Federal agencies with an opportunity to comment on proposed and/or continuing collections of information in accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (PRA95) [44 U.S.C. 3506(c) (2)(A)]. This program helps to ensure that requested data can be provided in the desired format, reporting burden (time and financial resources) is minimized, collection instruments are clearly understood, and the impact of collection requirements on respondents can be properly assessed. Currently, the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) is soliciting comments concerning the proposed extension of the ‘‘Current Population Survey (CPS).’’ A copy of the proposed information collection request (ICR) can be obtained by contacting the individual listed below in the Addresses section of this notice. DATES: Written comments must be submitted to the office listed in the ADDRESSES section below on or before May 13, 2005. ADDRESSES: Send comments to Amy A. Hobby, BLS Clearance Officer, Division of Management Systems, Bureau of Labor Statistics, Room 4080, 2 Massachusetts Avenue, NE., Washington, DC 20212, telephone number 202–691–7628. (This is not a toll-free number.) FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Amy A. Hobby, BLS Clearance Officer, telephone number 202–691–7628. (See ADDRESSES section.) SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Background The CPS has been the principal source of the official Government statistics on employment and unemployment for over 60 years. The labor force information gathered through the survey is of paramount importance in keeping track of the economic health of the Nation. The survey is the only source of data on total employment and unemployment, with the monthly unemployment rate obtained through this survey being regarded as one of the most important economic indicators. Moreover, the survey also yields data on the basic status and characteristics of persons not in the labor force. The CPS data are used monthly, in conjunction with data from other sources, to analyze the extent to which the various components of the American population are participating in the economic life of the Nation and with what success. PO 00000 Frm 00064 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 12501 The labor force data gathered through the CPS are provided to users in the greatest detail possible, consistent with the demographic information obtained in the survey. In brief, the labor force data can be broken down by sex, age, race and ethnic origin, marital status, family composition, educational level, and other characteristics. Through such breakdowns, one can focus on the employment situation of specific population groups as well as on the general trends in employment and unemployment. Information of this type can be obtained only through demographically oriented surveys such as the CPS. The basic CPS data also are used as an important platform to base the data derived from the various supplemental questions that are administered in conjunction with the survey. By coupling the basic data from the monthly survey with the special data from the supplements, one can get valuable insights on the behavior of American workers and on the social and economic health of their families. There is wide interest in the monthly CPS data among Government policymakers, legislators, economists, the media, and the general public. While the data from the CPS are used in conjunction with data from other surveys in assessing the economic health of the Nation, they are unique in various ways. They provide a measurement of total employment (including farm work, self-employment, and unpaid family work), while the other surveys are generally restricted to the nonagricultural wage and salary sector. The CPS provides data on all jobseekers, and on all persons outside the labor force, while payroll-based surveys cannot, by definition, cover these sectors of the population. Finally, the CPS data on employment, unemployment, and on persons not in the labor force can be linked to the demographic characteristics of the many groups that make up the Nation’s population, while the data from other surveys are usually devoid of demographic information. II. Current Action Office of Management and Budget clearance is being sought for the Current Population Survey (CPS). Type of Review: Extension of a currently approved collection. Agency: Bureau of Labor Statistics. Title: Current Population Survey (CPS). OMB Number: 1220–0100. Affected Public: Households. Total Respondents: 55,000 per month. Frequency: Monthly. E:\FR\FM\14MRN1.SGM 14MRN1 12502 Federal Register / Vol. 70, No. 48 / Monday, March 14, 2005 / Notices Total Responses: 660,000. Average Time Per Response: 7 minutes. Estimated Total Burden Hours: 77,000 hours. Total Burden Cost (capital/startup): $0. Total Burden Cost (operating/ maintenance): $0. III. Desired Focus of Comments The Bureau of Labor Statistics is particularly interested in comments that: • Evaluate whether the proposed collection of information is necessary for the proper performance of the functions of the agency, including whether the information will have practical utility; • Evaluate the accuracy of the agency’s estimate of the burden of the proposed collection of information, including the validity of the methodology and assumptions used; • Enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the information to be collected; and • Minimize the burden of the collection of information on those who are to respond, including through the use of appropriate automated, electronic, mechanical, or other technological collection techniques or other forms of information technology, e.g., permitting electronic submissions of responses. Comments submitted in response to this notice will be summarized and/or included in the request for Office of Management and Budget approval of the information collection request; they also will become a matter of public record. Signed in Washington, DC, this 2nd day of March, 2005. Cathy Kazanowski, Chief, Division of Management Systems, Bureau of Labor Statistics. [FR Doc. 05–4943 Filed 3–11–05; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4510–24–P NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION Appraisal Guidelines for Federal Research and Development Records; Request for Comment National Archives and Records Administration (NARA). ACTION: Notice of availability of document; request for comment. AGENCY: SUMMARY: NARA is seeking public comment on the draft Appraisal Guidelines for Federal Research and Development Records. This document supplements NARA’s Appraisal Policy, VerDate jul<14>2003 15:31 Mar 11, 2005 Jkt 205001 which is available on the NARA Web site at https://www.archives.gov/ records_management/initiatives/ appraisal.html. For a paper copy of the Appraisal Policy, contact the person listed in FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT. DATES: Comments must be received by April 28, 2005. ADDRESSES: Please send your comments by e-mail to comments@nara.gov or by fax to 301–837–0319 or by mail to NPOL, National Archives and Records Administration, Room 4100, 8601 Adelphi Rd, College Park, MD 20740– 6001 FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Nancy Allard at 301–837–1477 or via email at nancy.allard@nara.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Strategic Plan of the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) states that NARA will ensure ready access to essential evidence that documents the rights of American citizens, the actions of Federal officials, and the national experience. The NARA Appraisal Policy (found at https:// www.archives.gov/ records_management/initiatives/ appraisal.html) sets out the strategic framework, objectives, and guidelines that the National Archives and Records Administration uses to determine whether Federal records have archival value. It also provides more specific guidelines for appraising the continuing historical value of certain categories of records. The draft guidelines at the end of this notice concern appraisal of research and development records. NARA developed these draft guidelines after conducting a series of site visits to Federal agency R&D facilities and consulting stakeholder agencies. Dated: March 8, 2005. Nancy Allard, Federal Register Liaison. Draft Appraisal Guidelines for Federal Research and Development (R&D) Records Research and development (R&D) records relate to the planning and execution of basic and applied research in engineering and the physical and natural sciences. Basic research seeks to generate new knowledge, and applied research uses the results of basic research and applies them to the design, development, and testing of new products and processes. Agency R&D programs tend to be large in scale, expending hundreds of millions of dollars annually and generating voluminous records. Records pertain to such research fields as biology, PO 00000 Frm 00065 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 chemistry, medicine, physics, materials science, aerospace technology, weapons development, computer science, energy development, and environmental protection. Appraisal of the records requires an understanding of the entire R&D business process, including the project/ product lifecycle and use of outside entities for review or support. Most R&D conducted by or for the Federal government follows a standard workflow based on the scientific method. The basic steps include formulating a hypothesis or statement of need, obtaining approval and/or funding, designing and conducting experiments and analyzing results, and disseminating findings. Records created and accumulated by these steps can be separated into the following categories: program management records covering the processes of formulation, selection, and funding; project records covering design, collection, analysis, and reporting; and dissemination of findings. Types of records found under these categories include planning records, project files, procurement and financial records, laboratory notebooks, research data, and technical reports and similar publications. The status and availability of records produced by a project often depend upon the funding arrangement. Records of projects funded by contracts generally are Federal records and, in conformance with the contract requirements, may be maintained by either the contractor or the funding agency. By contrast, the primary records of grant-funded projects usually are not considered to be Federal records and are maintained by the grantee. Recordkeeping for collaborative projects is affected by the diversity of funding sources and institutions (including non-Federal institutions) involved. Records of collaborative projects are thus generally kept by multiple institutions, often with no single one maintaining a complete project file. As a result, it may be difficult to determine which institution is responsible for the records and their disposition. Appraisal Considerations • Program management records that document the planning, policies, and priorities of research programs usually are appraised as permanent. Such records may be maintained by offices with agencywide R&D responsibilities, by individual divisions and laboratories, and by scientific and technical advisory bodies. • Technical reports, conference proceedings, and similar publications that disseminate the findings, E:\FR\FM\14MRN1.SGM 14MRN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 70, Number 48 (Monday, March 14, 2005)]
[Notices]
[Pages 12501-12502]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 05-4943]


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DEPARTMENT OF LABOR

Bureau of Labor Statistics


Proposed Collection; Comment Request

ACTION: Notice.

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SUMMARY: The Department of Labor, as part of its continuing effort to 
reduce paperwork and respondent burden, conducts a pre-clearance 
consultation program to provide the general public and Federal agencies 
with an opportunity to comment on proposed and/or continuing 
collections of information in accordance with the Paperwork Reduction 
Act of 1995 (PRA95) [44 U.S.C. 3506(c) (2)(A)]. This program helps to 
ensure that requested data can be provided in the desired format, 
reporting burden (time and financial resources) is minimized, 
collection instruments are clearly understood, and the impact of 
collection requirements on respondents can be properly assessed. 
Currently, the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) is soliciting comments 
concerning the proposed extension of the ``Current Population Survey 
(CPS).'' A copy of the proposed information collection request (ICR) 
can be obtained by contacting the individual listed below in the 
Addresses section of this notice.

DATES: Written comments must be submitted to the office listed in the 
ADDRESSES section below on or before May 13, 2005.

ADDRESSES: Send comments to Amy A. Hobby, BLS Clearance Officer, 
Division of Management Systems, Bureau of Labor Statistics, Room 4080, 
2 Massachusetts Avenue, NE., Washington, DC 20212, telephone number 
202-691-7628. (This is not a toll-free number.)

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Amy A. Hobby, BLS Clearance Officer, 
telephone number 202-691-7628. (See ADDRESSES section.)

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:

I. Background

    The CPS has been the principal source of the official Government 
statistics on employment and unemployment for over 60 years. The labor 
force information gathered through the survey is of paramount 
importance in keeping track of the economic health of the Nation. The 
survey is the only source of data on total employment and unemployment, 
with the monthly unemployment rate obtained through this survey being 
regarded as one of the most important economic indicators. Moreover, 
the survey also yields data on the basic status and characteristics of 
persons not in the labor force. The CPS data are used monthly, in 
conjunction with data from other sources, to analyze the extent to 
which the various components of the American population are 
participating in the economic life of the Nation and with what success.
    The labor force data gathered through the CPS are provided to users 
in the greatest detail possible, consistent with the demographic 
information obtained in the survey. In brief, the labor force data can 
be broken down by sex, age, race and ethnic origin, marital status, 
family composition, educational level, and other characteristics. 
Through such breakdowns, one can focus on the employment situation of 
specific population groups as well as on the general trends in 
employment and unemployment. Information of this type can be obtained 
only through demographically oriented surveys such as the CPS.
    The basic CPS data also are used as an important platform to base 
the data derived from the various supplemental questions that are 
administered in conjunction with the survey. By coupling the basic data 
from the monthly survey with the special data from the supplements, one 
can get valuable insights on the behavior of American workers and on 
the social and economic health of their families.
    There is wide interest in the monthly CPS data among Government 
policymakers, legislators, economists, the media, and the general 
public. While the data from the CPS are used in conjunction with data 
from other surveys in assessing the economic health of the Nation, they 
are unique in various ways. They provide a measurement of total 
employment (including farm work, self-employment, and unpaid family 
work), while the other surveys are generally restricted to the 
nonagricultural wage and salary sector. The CPS provides data on all 
jobseekers, and on all persons outside the labor force, while payroll-
based surveys cannot, by definition, cover these sectors of the 
population.
    Finally, the CPS data on employment, unemployment, and on persons 
not in the labor force can be linked to the demographic characteristics 
of the many groups that make up the Nation's population, while the data 
from other surveys are usually devoid of demographic information.

II. Current Action

    Office of Management and Budget clearance is being sought for the 
Current Population Survey (CPS).
    Type of Review: Extension of a currently approved collection.
    Agency: Bureau of Labor Statistics.
    Title: Current Population Survey (CPS).
    OMB Number: 1220-0100.
    Affected Public: Households.
    Total Respondents: 55,000 per month.
    Frequency: Monthly.

[[Page 12502]]

    Total Responses: 660,000.
    Average Time Per Response: 7 minutes.
    Estimated Total Burden Hours: 77,000 hours.
    Total Burden Cost (capital/startup): $0.
    Total Burden Cost (operating/maintenance): $0.

III. Desired Focus of Comments

    The Bureau of Labor Statistics is particularly interested in 
comments that:
     Evaluate whether the proposed collection of information is 
necessary for the proper performance of the functions of the agency, 
including whether the information will have practical utility;
     Evaluate the accuracy of the agency's estimate of the 
burden of the proposed collection of information, including the 
validity of the methodology and assumptions used;
     Enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the 
information to be collected; and
     Minimize the burden of the collection of information on 
those who are to respond, including through the use of appropriate 
automated, electronic, mechanical, or other technological collection 
techniques or other forms of information technology, e.g., permitting 
electronic submissions of responses.
    Comments submitted in response to this notice will be summarized 
and/or included in the request for Office of Management and Budget 
approval of the information collection request; they also will become a 
matter of public record.

    Signed in Washington, DC, this 2nd day of March, 2005.
Cathy Kazanowski,
Chief, Division of Management Systems, Bureau of Labor Statistics.
[FR Doc. 05-4943 Filed 3-11-05; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4510-24-P