Oregon Administrative Rules
584 - Teacher Standards and Practices Commission
Division 420 - STATE STANDARDS FOR LICENSURE, ENDORSEMENT AND SPECIALIZATION PROGRAMS
584-420-0630 - Dual Language Specialization: Program Standards

Universal Citation: OR Admin Rules 584-420-0630
Teacher Standards and Practices Commission Chapter 584 Division 420
STATE STANDARDS FOR LICENSURE,
 ENDORSEMENT AND SPECIALIZATION PROGRAMS

584-420-0630
Dual Language Specialization: Program Standards

(1) Candidates who are prepared for the Dual Language specialization will demonstrate the knowledge, skills, professional dispositions and cultural competencies necessary to promote the academic, career, personal and social development of students in dual language learning environments.

(2) The Commission may provide approval to a Dual Language Specialization program only if it includes:

(a) Content that will enable candidates to meet the competency standards set forth in this rule and the TSPC Program Review and Standards Handbook;

(b) Field experiences that include supervised teaching or internships in classrooms with dual language learners;

(c) A requirement for candidates to receive a passing score on the Commission-approved language proficiency exam as provided in the TSPC Program Review and Standards Handbook.

(d) Integration of principles of cultural competency and equitable practice in each competency standard through the entire Dual Language Specialization program.

(3) Standard 1: Language: The dual language teacher knows, understands, and applies theories of first and second language acquisition to their practice and communicates in two languages at a highly proficiency level. The candidate demonstrates the ability to:

(a) Know two or more languages and is professionally proficient in at least two languages;

(b) Understand societal perceptions of languages and its impact on cultural and academic identity;

(c) Know first (L1) and second language (L2) acquisition and development theory and the interrelatedness and interdependence between L1 and L2 that results in a high level of multilingualism and multi-literacy;

(d) Understand how the student’s first language proficiency (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) transfers to an additional language; and

(e) Know the similarities and differences between aspects of L1 and L2 structures including: phonology (the sound system), morphology (word formation), syntax (phrase and sentence structure), semantics (meaning), and pragmatics (context and function).

(4) Standard 2: Culture: The dual language teacher knows, understands, and uses major concepts, principles, theories, and research related to the role of culture, cultural groups, and identity to construct a supportive learning environment for all dual language students. The candidate demonstrates the ability to:

(a) Know the benefits of multilingualism and multiculturalism in a global society;

(b) Understand that systemic, institutional, and individual socio-cultural and historical forces affect cross-cultural interaction;

(c) Understand the impact of social injustice on the lives of students and families;

(d) Know the importance of the socio-cultural and historical context of diverse students, families, schools and communities; and

(e) Understand the importance of student cultural and academic identity development and how development will vary depending on the individual student’s background and experiences.

(5) Standard 3: Planning, Implementing, and Managing Instruction: The dual language teacher knows, understands, and uses evidence-based practices and strategies related to planning, implementing, and managing instruction in dual language classrooms. The candidate demonstrates the ability to:

(a) Know the benefits of multilingualism and multiculturalism in a global society;

(b) Understand that systemic, institutional, and individual socio-cultural and historical forces affect cross-cultural interaction;

(c) Understand the impact of social injustice on the lives of students and families;

(d) Know the importance of the socio-cultural and historical context of diverse students, families, schools and communities; and

(e) Understand the importance of student cultural and academic identity development and how development will vary depending on the individual student’s background and experiences.

(6) Standard 4: Assessment: The dual language teacher should understand the complexity of assessment to inform instruction for students’ learning in multiple languages. Dual language teachers know how to assess language skills, literacy and content in both languages of instruction. The candidate demonstrates the ability to:

(a) Know how to assess learners’ prior knowledge to facilitate their acquisition of language and literacy in the second language;

(b) Understand the necessity to use multiple measures to assess language, literacy and content in L1 and L2;

(c) Understand the role of formative assessments in literacy and the content areas in both L1 and L2, and how to use results to design and differentiate instruction; and

(d) Know the potential linguistic and cultural biases of assessment instruments.

(7) Standard 5: Professionalism: The dual language teacher knows and understands current and emerging trends in educational research. The dual language teacher acts as a resource and advocate for multilingualism and collaborates with students, their families, the school community and educational professionals in order to meet the needs of multilingual students. The candidate demonstrates the ability to:

(a) Know and understand that advocacy requires knowledge of one’s own cultural background and self-reflection;

(b) Know how to access the most relevant dual language resources for the benefit of students and families;

(c) Understand the importance of leadership within the school, district, and community;

(d) Recognize their role as an advocate in elevating the benefits and status of multilingualism; and

(e) Understand the history and policies of multilingual education and the dual language field.

(8) Standard 6: Community and Family Engagement: The dual language teacher knows, understands and uses principles, theories, research and applications related to the role of family and community engagement to construct a supportive and inclusive learning environment for all students. The candidate demonstrates the ability to:

(a) Understand the value of engaging students, families, and community members in contributing to an inclusive learning environment;

(b) Know that students, families, and communities bring multiple funds of knowledge and assets;

(c) Understand that all families bring cultural and linguistic variations and the importance of the teachers’ role in being culturally and linguistically responsive; and

(d) Understand their role and responsibility to create alliances for the empowerment of families and communities.

Statutory/Other Authority: ORS 342
Statutes/Other Implemented: ORS 342.120 – 342.430; 342.455-342.495 & 342.553
History:
TSPC 11-2018, amend filed 12/04/2018, effective 12/04/2018
TSPC 1-2017, f. & cert. ef. 2-1-17
TSPC 1-2016, f. & cert. ef. 2-10-16
TSPC 13-2015(Temp), f. 11-13-15, cert. ef. 1-1-16 thru 6-28-16

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