Federal Aviation Administration June 29, 2009 – Federal Register Recent Federal Regulation Documents

Notice of Proposed Release and Closure of Michael Airfield, Cicero, NY From Its Grant Assurance Obligations, Request for Comments
Document Number: E9-15317
Type: Notice
Date: 2009-06-29
Agency: Federal Aviation Administration, Department of Transportation
The Federal Aviation Administration is requesting public comment on Michael Airfield (1G6), Cicero, New York notice of proposed closure and release from aeronautical use of the entire airport. The airport consists of approximately 34.19 acres of airport property, including runway 10-28, taxiways, aprons, airside and landside facilities to allow for possible non-aeronautical development. It has been determined, by closing Michael Airfield, the flying public would best benefit from using Syracuse Suburban Airport (6NK), Syracuse, New York. The sponsor who owns and operates both Michael Airfield and Syracuse Suburban Airport, plans to close 1G6 airport and dispose of the property. Michael Airfield, a privately owned public use reliever airport last accepted an airport capital development grant in 1991 for a runway rehabilitation project, thus, not obligated under the 1996 revenue use policy. The revenue generated from the sale of the closed airport would not be reinvested into 6NK. Proposals from the sponsor determined that land constituting Michael Airfield has no aeronautical use and should be closed. Documents reflecting the sponsor's request are available, by appointment only, for inspection at the Airport Sponsor's office and the FAA Airports District Office.
Airworthiness Directives; International Aero Engines AG (IAE) V2500-A1, V2527E-A5, V2530-A5, and V2528-D5 Turbofan Engines
Document Number: E9-15250
Type: Proposed Rule
Date: 2009-06-29
Agency: Federal Aviation Administration, Department of Transportation
The FAA proposes to adopt a new airworthiness directive (AD) for International Aero Engines AG (IAE) V2500-A1, V2527E-A5, V2530-A5, and V2528-D5 turbofan engines. This proposed AD would require reducing the published life limit of certain high-pressure compressor (HPC) stage 9-12 disc assemblies. This proposed AD would also remove from service those HPC stage 9-12 disc assemblies using a drawdown schedule. This proposed AD results from IAE updating the low-cycle-fatigue (LCF) life analysis for certain HPC stage 9-12 disc assemblies. We are proposing this AD to prevent an uncontained failure of the HPC stage 9- 12 disc assembly, resulting in an in-flight engine shutdown and possible damage to the airplane.
Airworthiness Directives; Turbomeca S.A. Arrius 2F Turboshaft Engines
Document Number: E9-15099
Type: Rule
Date: 2009-06-29
Agency: Federal Aviation Administration, Department of Transportation
The FAA is superseding an existing airworthiness directive (AD) for Turbomeca S.A. Arrius 2F turboshaft engines that have not incorporated Turbomeca Modification Tf75. That AD currently requires replacing the O-ring on the check valve piston in the lubrication unit at repetitive intervals. This AD requires the same repetitive replacements and would require incorporating Modification Tf75 as terminating action to the repetitive O-ring replacements. Modification Tf75 replaces the check valve piston with a piston design not requiring an O-ring. This AD results from the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) and Turbomeca S.A. mandating the incorporation of Modification Tf75. We are issuing this AD to prevent an uncommanded in-flight shutdown of the engine, which could result in a forced autorotation landing and damage to the helicopter.
Airworthiness Directives; Boeing Model 747 Airplanes
Document Number: E9-15085
Type: Rule
Date: 2009-06-29
Agency: Federal Aviation Administration, Department of Transportation
The FAA is superseding an existing airworthiness directive (AD), which applies to certain Boeing Model 747 airplanes. That AD currently requires repetitive inspections to detect evidence of wear damage in the area at the interface between the vertical stabilizer seal and fuselage skin, and corrective actions, if necessary. The existing AD also provides for an optional terminating action for the repetitive inspections. For all Boeing Model 747-100, 747-100B, 747- 100B SUD, 747-200B, 747-200C, 747-200F, 747-300, 747-400, 747-400D, 747-400F, 747SR, and 747SP series airplanes, this new AD requires repetitive inspections for wear damage and cracks of the fuselage skin in the interface area of the vertical stabilizer seal and fuselage skin, a detailed inspection for wear damage and cracks of the surface of any skin repair doubler in the area, and corrective actions if necessary. For airplanes on which the fuselage skin has been blended to remove wear damage, this new AD requires repetitive external detailed inspections or high frequency eddy current inspections for cracks of the blended area of the fuselage skin, and corrective actions if necessary. This AD results from reports of wear damage on airplanes with fewer than 8,000 total flight cycles. In addition, there have been three reports of skin wear damage on airplanes that applied Boeing Material Specifications 10-86 Teflon-filled coating (terminating action per the existing AD). We are issuing this AD to detect and correct wear damage and cracks of the fuselage skin in the interface area of the vertical stabilizer seal and fuselage skin in sections 46 and 48, which could cause in-flight depressurization of the airplane.
Airworthiness Directives; Microturbo SA Saphir 2 Model 016 Auxiliary Power Units
Document Number: E9-14809
Type: Rule
Date: 2009-06-29
Agency: Federal Aviation Administration, Department of Transportation
We are adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) for the products listed above, on which the exhaust thermal insulation has been replaced since January 1, 1995. This AD results from mandatory continuing airworthiness information (MCAI) issued by an aviation authority of another country to identify and correct an unsafe condition on an aviation product. The MCAI describes the unsafe condition as:
Airworthiness Directives; McDonnell Douglas Model MD-90-30 Airplanes
Document Number: E9-14680
Type: Rule
Date: 2009-06-29
Agency: Federal Aviation Administration, Department of Transportation
We are adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) for all McDonnell Douglas Model MD-90-30 airplanes. This AD requires repetitive inspections for cracks of the upper aft skin panels on the horizontal stabilizer, and related investigative and corrective actions if necessary. This AD results from a report of cracks found in the aft skin panels on the upper right side of the horizontal stabilizer at the aft inboard corner. We are issuing this AD to detect and correct cracks in the fail-safe structure that may not be able to sustain limit load, which could result in the loss of overall structural integrity of the horizontal stabilizer.
Airworthiness Directives; Fokker Model F.28 Mark 0100 Airplanes
Document Number: E9-14676
Type: Rule
Date: 2009-06-29
Agency: Federal Aviation Administration, Department of Transportation
The FAA is superseding an existing airworthiness directive (AD), which applies to certain Fokker Model F.28 Mark 0100 airplanes. That AD currently requires revisions to the airplane flight manual (AFM) to include procedures to prohibit use of reverse engine thrust power settings between idle and emergency maximum and to prohibit stabilized engine operation in a certain engine speed range on the ground. This new AD continues to require revising the AFM to include certain procedures. This AD also requires removing the normal maximum (second) detent for the reverse-thrust control. In addition, this AD requires revising the AFM to prohibit use of reverse thrust in flight and to limit operation of Max Reverse thrust. This AD results from issuance of mandatory continuing airworthiness information (MCAI) originated by an aviation authority of another country to identify and correct an unsafe condition on an aviation product. We are issuing this AD to prevent inadvertent operation in the prohibited stabilized engine speed range on the ground, which could result in uncontained engine fan blade failure due to high cycle fatigue cracking.