Mine Safety and Health Administration May 2006 – Federal Register Recent Federal Regulation Documents

Emergency Mine Evacuation
Document Number: 06-4825
Type: Rule
Date: 2006-05-24
Agency: Department of Labor, Mine Safety and Health Administration
The Mine Safety and Health Administration is extending the comment period for the Emergency Temporary Standard on Emergency Mine Evacuation published on March 9, 2006 (71 FR 12252). This action is in response to a request from the public.
Diesel Particulate Matter Exposure of Underground Metal and Nonmetal Miners
Document Number: 06-4494
Type: Rule
Date: 2006-05-18
Agency: Department of Labor, Mine Safety and Health Administration
This final rule revises the May 20, 2006 effective date of the diesel particulate matter (DPM) final concentration limit of 160 micrograms of total carbon (TC) per cubic meter of air (160TC [mu]g/m3) promulgated in the 2001 final rule ``Diesel Particulate Matter Exposure of Underground Metal and Nonmetal Miners,'' and published in the Federal Register on January 19, 2001 (66 FR 5706) and amended on September 19, 2005 (70 FR 55019). This final rule increases flexibility of compliance for mine operators by allowing staggered effective dates for implementation of the final DPM limit, phased-in over a two-year period, primarily based on feasibility issues which have surfaced since promulgation of the 2001 final rule. Furthermore this final rule establishes requirements for medical evaluation of miners required to wear respiratory protection and transfer of miners who are medically unable to wear a respirator; deletes the existing provision that restricts newer mines from applying for an extension of time in which to meet the final concentration limit; addresses technological and economic feasibility issues, and the costs and benefits of this rule.
Petitions for Modification
Document Number: E6-7469
Type: Notice
Date: 2006-05-17
Agency: Department of Labor, Mine Safety and Health Administration
Evaluation of International Electrotechnical Commission's Standards for Explosion-Proof Enclosures
Document Number: 06-4391
Type: Rule
Date: 2006-05-17
Agency: Department of Labor, Mine Safety and Health Administration
MSHA reviewed the requirements of the International Electrotechnical Commission's (IEC) standards for Electrical Apparatus for Explosive Gas Atmospheres to determine if they are equivalent to the Agency's applicable product approval requirements or can be modified to provide at least the same degree of protection as those requirements. MSHA has determined that the IEC's standards for explosion-proof enclosures, with modifications, provide the same degree of protection as MSHA's applicable product approval requirements. Applicants may request that MSHA grant product approval for explosion- proof (flameproof) enclosures based on compliance with the IEC standards provided MSHA's specified list of modifications is also addressed in the submitted design.
Proposed Information Collection Request Submitted for Public Comment and Recommendations; Fire Protection (Underground Coal Mines)
Document Number: E6-7001
Type: Notice
Date: 2006-05-09
Agency: Department of Labor, Mine Safety and Health Administration
The Department of Labor, as part of its continuing effort to reduce paperwork and respondent burden conducts a pre-clearance consultation program to provide the general public and Federal agencies with an opportunity to comment on proposed and/or continuing collections of information in accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (PRA95) [44 U.S.C. 3506 (c)(2)(A)]. This program helps to ensure that requested data can be provided in the desired format, reporting burden (time and financial resources) is minimized, collection instruments are clearly understood, and the impact of collection requirements on respondents can be properly assessed. Currently, the Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) is soliciting comments concerning the extension of the information collection related to the 30 CFR 75.1100-3, 75.1103-8, 75.1103-11, and 75.1501; Fire Protection (Underground Coal Mines) and Mine Emergency Evacuation.
Section 110(c) of the Federal Mine Safety and Health Act of 1977; Interpretation
Document Number: 06-4317
Type: Notice
Date: 2006-05-09
Agency: Department of Labor, Mine Safety and Health Administration
This Interpretive Bulletin sets forth a statement of the Secretary of Labor's interpretation of Section 110(c) of the Federal Mine Safety and Health Act of 1977 (Mine Act), 30 U.S.C. 820(c), as it relates to agents of Limited Liability Companies (LLCs). The Interpretive Bulletin is considered an interpretive rule and provides an explanation of the Secretary's interpretation of Section 110(c) and the rationale supporting that interpretation. For the reasons set forth below, the Secretary's interpretation is that Section 110(c) of the Mine Act is applicable to agents of LLCs. The effect of the Secretary's interpretation is that agents of LLCs may be held personally liable under Section 110(c) of the Mine Act if they knowingly authorize, order, or carry out a violation of any mandatory health or safety standard under the Act or a violation of or failure or refusal to comply with any order issued under the Act or any order incorporated in a final decision issued under certain provisions of the Act.
Proposed Information Collection Request Submitted for Public Comment and Recommendations; Ground Control Plan
Document Number: E6-6857
Type: Notice
Date: 2006-05-05
Agency: Department of Labor, Mine Safety and Health Administration
The Department of Labor, as part of its continuing effort to reduce paperwork and respondent burden conducts a pre-clearance consultation program to provide the general public and Federal agencies with an opportunity to comment on proposed and/or continuing collections of information in accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (PRA95) [44 U.S.C. 3506(c)(2)(A)]. This program helps to ensure that requested data can be provided in the desired format, reporting burden (time and financial resources) is minimized, collection instruments are clearly understood, and the impact of collection requirements on respondents can be properly assessed.