Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Alabama Museums, Tuscaloosa, AL, 52995-52998 [2022-18741]

Download as PDF Federal Register / Vol. 87, No. 167 / Tuesday, August 30, 2022 / Notices with the Bears Ears Commission during each stage of the RMP/EIS process consistent with the roles and responsibilities identified in the intergovernmental cooperative agreement. The Bears Ears Commission may also assist with developing a Tribal collaboration framework. Cooperating Agencies Federal, State, and local agencies, along with Tribal Nations, may request or be asked by the BLM to participate as cooperating agencies. At this time, the BLM has identified the following potential cooperating agencies: • National Park Service, • U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, • U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, • U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, • U.S. Department of Energy, • Utah’s Public Lands Policy Coordinating Office, • SITLA, • Utah State Historic Preservation Office, • San Juan County, • Grand County, • City of Blanding, • Town of Bluff, • City of Monticello, and • All 32 affiliated Tribal Nations that wish to participate. Responsible Official The Utah State Director and the Manti-La Sal National Forest Supervisor are the deciding officials for this planning effort. khammond on DSKJM1Z7X2PROD with NOTICES Nature of Decision To Be Made The nature of the decision to be made will be the State Director’s and the Forest Supervisor’s selection of land use planning decisions for managing BLMand USDA Forest Service-administered lands, respectively, within the BENM that protect the objects and values identified in Proclamation 10285. Uses on the BENM may be allowed to the extent they are consistent with Proclamation 10285 and the protection of the objects and values within the BENM. The USDA Forest Service gives notice that it intends to use the BLM’s administrative review procedures, as provided by the USDA Forest Service 2012 Planning Rule, at 36 CFR 219.59(b). The review procedures would include a joint response from BLM and the USDA Forest Service to those who file for administrative review. If any project or site-specific decision is made in the RMP, such decision would be subject to the USDA Forest Service project-level administrative review process at 36 CFR 218. VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:24 Aug 29, 2022 Jkt 256001 Interdisciplinary Team The BLM and USDA Forest Service will use an interdisciplinary approach in developing the RMP/EIS to consider the variety of resource issues and concerns identified. Specialists with expertise in various disciplines, such as cultural resources, Native American concerns, paleontology, minerals, lands/ access, recreation, special designations, wildlife, livestock grazing, soils, water resources, vegetation, rangeland management, fisheries, fire management, woodlands/forestry, socioeconomics, environmental justice, visual resources, night sky, soundscapes, air quality, and climate change will be involved in the planning process. Additional Information The BLM and USDA Forest Service will identify, analyze, and consider mitigation to address the reasonably foreseeable impacts to resources from the proposed RMP and all analyzed alternatives and, in accordance with 40 CFR 1502.14(e), include appropriate mitigation measures not already included in the proposed plan or alternatives. Mitigation may include avoidance, minimization, rectification, reduction or elimination over time, and compensation, and may be considered at multiple scales, including the landscape scale. The BLM and USDA Forest Service will utilize and coordinate the NEPA and land use planning processes for this planning effort to help support procedural requirements under the Endangered Species Act (16 U.S.C. 1536) and section 106 of the NHPA, as provided in 36 CFR 800.2(d)(3), including the public involvement requirements of section 106. Information about historic and cultural resources and threatened and endangered species within the area potentially affected by the proposed plan will assist the BLM and USDA Forest Service in identifying and evaluating impacts to such resources. The BLM and USDA Forest Service will consult with Tribal Nations on a government-to-government basis in accordance with Executive Order 13175 and applicable Departmental policies. Tribal concerns, including impacts on American Indian trust assets and potential impacts on cultural resources, will be given due consideration. The BLM and USDA Forest Service intend to hold a series of government-togovernment consultation meetings beginning during the public scoping period. The BLM and USDA Forest Service will send invitations to PO 00000 Frm 00095 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 52995 potentially affected Tribal Nations at least 30-days prior to the meetings. The BLM and USDA Forest Service will provide additional opportunities for government-to-government consultation during the NEPA process. Before including your address, phone number, email address, or other personal identifying information in your comment, you should be aware that your entire comment—including your personal identifying information—may be made publicly available at any time. While you can ask us in your comment to withhold your personal identifying information from public review, we cannot guarantee that we will be able to do so. (Authority: 40 CFR 1501.9 and 43 CFR 1610.2) Gregory Sheehan, BLM Utah State Director. [FR Doc. 2022–18693 Filed 8–29–22; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4331–25–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [NPS–WASO–NAGPRA–NPS0034424; PPWOCRADN0–PCU00RP14.R50000] Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Alabama Museums, Tuscaloosa, AL National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: The University of Alabama Museums has completed an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects from the Moundville archeological site (1Tu500) in Hale County, AL, as well as adjacent archeological sites in Hale and Tuscaloosa Counties, AL. In consultation with the appropriate Indian Tribes, the University of Alabama Museums has determined, pursuant to NAGPRA, that there is a cultural affiliation between these human remains and associated funerary objects and the present-day Muskogeanspeaking Indian Tribes. Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request to the University of Alabama Museums. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the Indian Tribes listed in this notice may proceed. SUMMARY: E:\FR\FM\30AUN1.SGM 30AUN1 52996 Federal Register / Vol. 87, No. 167 / Tuesday, August 30, 2022 / Notices Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request with information in support of the request to the University of Alabama Museums at the address in this notice by September 29, 2022. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Dr. William Bomar, Executive Director, University of Alabama Museums, Box 870340, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487, telephone (205) 348–7551, email bbomar@ua.edu. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects under the control of the University of Alabama Museums, Tuscaloosa, AL. The human remains and associated funerary objects were removed from sites in Hale and Tuscaloosa Counties, AL. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. DATES: khammond on DSKJM1Z7X2PROD with NOTICES Consultation A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the University of Alabama Museums professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Alabama-Quassarte Tribal Town; Coushatta Tribe of Louisiana; Seminole Tribe of Florida (previously listed as Seminole Tribe of Florida (Dania, Big Cypress, Brighton, Hollywood, & Tampa Reservations)); The Chickasaw Nation; The Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma; The Muscogee (Creek) Nation; and The Seminole Nation of Oklahoma with letters of support from the AlabamaCoushatta Tribe of Texas (previously listed as Alabama-Coushatta Tribes of Texas) and the Jena Band of Choctaw Indians. History and Description of the Remains The human remains and associated funerary objects from Moundville and other sites in Hale and Tuscaloosa Counties, Alabama, that are in the possession of the University of Alabama Museums derive from various VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:24 Aug 29, 2022 Jkt 256001 investigations and private collection donations primarily dating to the period 1930 to 2008. During its Native American occupation, the Moundville site and the surrounding area were inhabited by several thousand people in a relatively dense occupancy, and over a prolonged period of time. The largescale excavations undertaken at Moundville, resulted in large numbers of human remains and associated funerary objects removed from their original burial locations, which are currently in the University’s possession. The work of subsequent investigations at Moundville contributed to this number, as did excavations at associated sites in Hale and Tuscaloosa Counties, AL. At an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, two individuals were removed from an unknown location in Hale County, AL. The collection contains no additional information as to the origin of the human remains and is simply designated as ‘‘1Ha.’’ Based on morphological characteristics identified through osteological analysis, the human remains are Native American. No known individuals are identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In the 1930s, human remains representing, at minimum, nine individuals were excavated and removed from Site 1Ha7, the White site, as part of the Black Warrior River Basin Survey conducted by Walter B. Jones of the Alabama Museum of Natural History. The site consists of a mound and associated village with Late Woodland, Miller III and Mississippian, Moundville II phase occupations. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In the 1930s, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were excavated and removed from Site 1Ha11, the Powers site, by the University of Alabama. The site includes evidence of Late Woodland, Miller III phase, and Mississippian occupations. No known individual was identified. The three associated funerary objects include bones and ceramics. Beginning in 1949, and continuing as part of the program of field work and collections research on the Protohistoric period, human remains representing, at minimum, 33 individuals were excavated and removed from Site 1Ha19, the Big Prairie Creek site, under the direction of Cailup B. Curren, Jr. The work was carried out initially through the University of Alabama Department of Anthropology and subsequently through the University of Alabama Museums. The site is attributed to the Late Mississippian/Protohistoric and PO 00000 Frm 00096 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 Moundville IV phase occupations. No known individuals were identified. The 43 lots of associated funerary objects include burial urns, ceramic vessels, ceramic sherds, lithics, faunal bones, daub, and shells. In the 1930s and again in 1997, human remains representing, at minimum, 13 individuals were excavated and removed from Site 1Tu1, the Pride Place site. The site dates from Late Woodland, West Jefferson phase to the Moundville III phase. No known individuals were identified. The three lots of associated funerary objects include ceramic vessels, ceramic sherds, lithics, red ochre, discoidals, fired clay, sandstone fragments, and a large stone. In 1932, human remains representing, at minimum, 16 individuals were excavated and removed from Site 1Tu2, the Snows Bend site, as part of the Black Warrior River Basin Survey. The site consists of a large village and is associated with an adjacent mound (Site 1Tu3). It dates to the Late Woodland West Jefferson and Mississippian Moundville II and III phases. No known individuals were identified. The eight lots of associated funerary objects include ceramic vessels and ceramic sherds. Beginning in 1932 and continuing as part of the program of field work and collections research on the Protohistoric period, human remains representing, at minimum, 81 individuals were excavated and removed from Site 1Tu4, the Moody Slough site, under the direction of Cailup B. Curren, Jr. The work was carried out initially through the University of Alabama Department of Anthropology and subsequently through the University of Alabama Museums. The site is attributed to the Late Mississippian/Protohistoric and Moundville IV phase occupations. No known individuals were identified. The 69 lots of associated funerary objects include burial urns, faunal and botanical remains, pottery sherds, incised sandstone, shell ornaments, daub, and lithics. Beginning in 1931–1932 and continuing as part of the program of field work and collections research on the Protohistoric period, human remains representing, at minimum, 26 individuals were excavated and removed from Site 1Tu5, the Lon Robertson site, under the direction of Cailup B. Curren, Jr. The work was carried out initially through the University of Alabama Department of Anthropology and subsequently through the University of Alabama Museums. Curren identified the site as 1Tu93/5, thereby combining two sites in his description. The site is attributed to the E:\FR\FM\30AUN1.SGM 30AUN1 khammond on DSKJM1Z7X2PROD with NOTICES Federal Register / Vol. 87, No. 167 / Tuesday, August 30, 2022 / Notices Late Mississippian/Protohistoric and Moundville IV phase occupations. No known individuals were identified. The one lot of associated funerary objects includes ceramic vessels, such as burial urns, and a stone axe. In 1933, human remains representing, at minimum, eight individuals were excavated and removed from Site 1Tu20, the Barger Bluff Shelter site, as part of the Black Warrior River Basin Survey. The site, consisting of a shelter above the Black Warrior River, is likely related to Site 1Tu17, a Mississippian Stage occupation located on the terrace below it. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In the 1930s, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were excavated and removed from Site 1Tu34, an unnamed site on the Black Warrior River. The site is believed to be related to the Moundville (1Tu500), Snows Bend (1Tu2), and 1Tu7 sites. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. Beginning in the 1930s and continuing as part of the program of field work and collections research on the Protohistoric period, human remains representing, at minimum, 15 individuals were excavated and removed from Site 1Tu42 (1Tu42/43), the Moon Lake site, under the direction of Cailup B. Curren, Jr. The work was carried out initially through the University of Alabama Department of Anthropology and subsequently through the University of Alabama Museums. The site consists of a Mississippian village (originally identified by Curren as the Wiggins site [1984] and denoted 1Tu43) and a mound (originally documented by Clarence B. Moore (1905) and denoted 1Tu42). Nine of the individuals were excavated and removed from the village area (1Tu43) and six were excavated and removed from the mound (1Tu42). No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. At an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, nine individuals were excavated and removed from Site 1Tu44 (also known as 1Tu346 and 1Tu45), the Jones Ferry site. This site was investigated by Clarence B. Moore in 1905 and documented by the University of Alabama in 1932. In 1979, it was reinvestigated as part of a University of Michigan survey. In the 1980s, it was further reinvestigated by Cailup B. Curren, Jr., at which time it was given the number 1Tu346. The site is comprised of a mound (1Tu44) and the associated village (1Tu45). It is VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:24 Aug 29, 2022 Jkt 256001 attributed to the Late Woodland, West Jefferson phase and the subsequent Mississippian, Moundville I phase. No known individuals were identified. The three lots of associated funerary objects include ceramics, daub, animal bones, lithic debris, shells, and soil. Beginning in 1933 and continuing as part of the program of field work and collections research on the Protohistoric period, human remains representing, at minimum, 49 individuals were excavated and removed from Site 1Tu49, the Fosters Ferry site, also known as the Baker site, under the direction of Cailup B. Curren, Jr. The work was carried out initially through the University of Alabama Department of Anthropology and subsequently through the University of Alabama Museums. The site is attributed to the Late Mississippian/Protohistoric and Moundville IV phase occupations. No known individuals were identified. The 16 lots of associated funerary objects include ceramic vessels and sherds, many of them attributable to burial urns. Beginning in the 1930s and continuing as part of the program of field work and collections research on the Protohistoric period, human remains representing, at minimum, four individuals were excavated and removed from Site 1Tu93, an unnamed site on the Black Warrior River, under the direction of Cailup B. Curren, Jr. The work was carried out initially through the University of Alabama Department of Anthropology and subsequently through the University of Alabama Museums. Curren identified the site as 1Tu93/5, thereby combining two sites in his description. The site is attributed to the Late Mississippian/Protohistoric, Moundville IV phase occupations. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In 1936, human remains representing, at minimum, two individuals were excavated and removed by a member of the Pate family from Site 1Tu103, a feature he identified in a plowed field on a bend in the North River. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. At an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual buried in a ceramic urn were discovered and removed from Site 1Tu235, a plowed field on Big Sandy Creek near Moundville (1Tu500). The site was documented by Steve Wimberly in 1948. The urn indicates a Late Mississippian/Protohistoric, Moundville IV phase occupation. No known individual was identified. The one associated funerary object is the burial urn. PO 00000 Frm 00097 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 52997 At an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from Site 1Tu267 on the University of Alabama campus. The collection includes one proximal femur with no additional provenience information. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In 1976, as part of the program of field work and collections research on the Protohistoric period, human remains representing, at minimum, 18 individuals were excavated and removed from Site 1Tu277 (also identified as 1Tu343), the Phillips site, under the direction of Cailup B. Curren, Jr. The work was carried out initially through the University of Alabama Department of Anthropology and subsequently through the University of Alabama Museums. The site is attributed to the Late Mississippian/ Protohistoric and Moundville IV phase occupations. No known individuals were identified. The two associated funerary objects are two burial urns. Sometime during the period 1977– 2003, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were excavated and removed from Site 1Tu338, an unnamed site located in Big Sandy Bottoms upstream of Moundville. The site was recorded in 1977 and investigated on multiple occasions by the University of Alabama and Panamerican Consultants until 2003. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. During a period from the 1930s to the late 1980s, human remains representing, at minimum, 9,954 individuals were excavated and removed from Site 1Tu500, the Moundville site, during various excavations, including field schools conducted by the University of Alabama, and in the course of efforts to stabilize the shoreline abutting the site. Moundville, a large mound complex on the banks of the Black Warrior River whose occupation spans the Late Woodland and the West Jefferson phase through the Moundville I, II, and III phases, and terminates in the Late Mississippian/Protohistoric Moundville IV phase, has been the subject of two centuries of archeological inquiry. No known individuals were identified. The 1,371 lots of associated funerary objects include pottery vessels, pottery sherds, greenstone celts, stone and copper discoidals, projectile points, beads, graphite, paint, and copper and stone ornaments. Of those lots, 318 lots are currently missing and 264 lots were stolen in 1980. During the 2000–2003 Black Warrior Valley Survey, human remains representing, at minimum, one E:\FR\FM\30AUN1.SGM 30AUN1 52998 Federal Register / Vol. 87, No. 167 / Tuesday, August 30, 2022 / Notices individual were excavated and removed from Site 1Tu876, the Fitts site, a small Mississippian farmstead. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. khammond on DSKJM1Z7X2PROD with NOTICES Determinations Made by the University of Alabama Museums Officials of the University of Alabama Museums have determined that: • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described in this notice represent the physical remains of 10,245 individuals of Native American ancestry. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A), the 1,520 objects described in this notice are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects and the Alabama-Coushatta Tribe of Texas (previously listed as AlabamaCoushatta Tribes of Texas); AlabamaQuassarte Tribal Town; Coushatta Tribe of Louisiana; Jena Band of Choctaw Indians; Seminole Tribe of Florida (previously listed as Seminole Tribe of Florida (Dania, Big Cypress, Brighton, Hollywood, & Tampa Reservations)); The Chickasaw Nation; The Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma; The Muscogee (Creek) Nation; and The Seminole Nation of Oklahoma (hereafter referred to as ‘‘The Tribes’’). Additional Requestors and Disposition Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request with information in support of the request to Dr. William Bomar, Executive Director, University of Alabama Museums, Box 870340, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487, telephone (205) 348–7551, email bbomar@ua.edu, by September 29, 2022. After that date, if no additional requestors have come forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to The Tribes may proceed. The University of Alabama Museums is responsible for notifying The Tribes that this notice has been published. Dated: August 24, 2022. Melanie O’Brien, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2022–18741 Filed 8–29–22; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–52–P VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:24 Aug 29, 2022 Jkt 256001 DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [NPS–WASO–NAGPRA–NPS0034428; PPWOCRADN0–PCU00RP14.R50000] Notice of Inventory Completion: Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: Michigan State University has completed an inventory of human remains, in consultation with the appropriate Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, and has determined that there is a cultural affiliation between the human remains and present-day Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations. Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains should submit a written request to Michigan State University. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of the human remains to the lineal descendants, Indian Tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed. DATES: Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains should submit a written request with information in support of the request to Michigan State University at the address in this notice by September 29, 2022. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Judith Stoddart, Associate Provost, University Arts and Collections, Michigan State University, 287 Delta Court, East Lansing, MI 48824, telephone (517) 432–2524, email stoddart@msu.edu. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains under the control of Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI. The human remains were removed from Kite Pueblo, Torrance County, NM. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains. The National SUMMARY: PO 00000 Frm 00098 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. Consultation A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by Michigan State University professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Hopi Tribe of Arizona; Pueblo of Acoma, New Mexico; and the Ysleta del Sur Pueblo of Texas. In addition, the following Indian Tribes were invited to consult but did not participate: Ohkay Owingeh, New Mexico (previously listed as Pueblo of San Juan); Pueblo of Cochiti, New Mexico; Pueblo of Jemez, New Mexico; Pueblo of Isleta, New Mexico; Pueblo of Laguna, New Mexico; Pueblo of Nambe, New Mexico; Pueblo of Picuris, New Mexico; Pueblo of Pojoaque, New Mexico; Pueblo of San Felipe, New Mexico; Pueblo of San Ildefonso, New Mexico; Pueblo of Sandia, New Mexico; Pueblo of Santa Ana, New Mexico; Pueblo of Santa Clara, New Mexico; Pueblo of Taos, New Mexico; Pueblo of Tesuque, New Mexico; Pueblo of Zia, New Mexico; Santo Domingo Pueblo (previously listed as Kewa Pueblo, New Mexico, and as Pueblo of Santo Domingo); and the Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico. Hereafter, all the Indian Tribes listed in this section are referred to as ‘‘The Tribes.’’ History and Description of the Remains In 1994, human remains representing, at minimum, three individuals were removed from Kite Pueblo (LA–199) in Torrance County, NM. Excavations were conducted by Michigan State University (MSU) under the direction of Dr. Alison Rautman. Kite Pueblo is a 50-room masonry-and-adobe pueblo organized around a central plaza that was occupied from A.D. 1250 to 1350. Excavations conducted in the northwest corner of the plaza located a fetal burial, likely around 9.5 lunar months of age. No funerary objects were found in association with the burial. In addition to the burial, isolated human remains belonging to at least two individuals— an adult and juvenile—were recovered from midden and room fill across the site. The landowner signed a letter requesting the human remains not be reinterred on their property and donating the collections from the site to MSU; however, they were not accessioned into the MSU Museum system. Kite Pueblo was occupied by Ancestral Puebloan people from approximately A.D. 1250 to 1350. All the individuals listed in this notice are reasonably believed to be Ancestral Puebloan based on the E:\FR\FM\30AUN1.SGM 30AUN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 87, Number 167 (Tuesday, August 30, 2022)]
[Notices]
[Pages 52995-52998]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2022-18741]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

[NPS-WASO-NAGPRA-NPS0034424; PPWOCRADN0-PCU00RP14.R50000]


Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Alabama Museums, 
Tuscaloosa, AL

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

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SUMMARY: The University of Alabama Museums has completed an inventory 
of human remains and associated funerary objects from the Moundville 
archeological site (1Tu500) in Hale County, AL, as well as adjacent 
archeological sites in Hale and Tuscaloosa Counties, AL. In 
consultation with the appropriate Indian Tribes, the University of 
Alabama Museums has determined, pursuant to NAGPRA, that there is a 
cultural affiliation between these human remains and associated 
funerary objects and the present-day Muskogean-speaking Indian Tribes. 
Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native 
Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to 
request transfer of control of these human remains and associated 
funerary objects should submit a written request to the University of 
Alabama Museums. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of 
control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the 
Indian Tribes listed in this notice may proceed.

[[Page 52996]]


DATES: Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or 
Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to 
request transfer of control of these human remains and associated 
funerary objects should submit a written request with information in 
support of the request to the University of Alabama Museums at the 
address in this notice by September 29, 2022.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Dr. William Bomar, Executive Director, 
University of Alabama Museums, Box 870340, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487, 
telephone (205) 348-7551, email [email protected].

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the 
Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 
U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and 
associated funerary objects under the control of the University of 
Alabama Museums, Tuscaloosa, AL. The human remains and associated 
funerary objects were removed from sites in Hale and Tuscaloosa 
Counties, AL.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The 
determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native 
American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National 
Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice.

Consultation

    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the 
University of Alabama Museums professional staff in consultation with 
representatives of the Alabama-Quassarte Tribal Town; Coushatta Tribe 
of Louisiana; Seminole Tribe of Florida (previously listed as Seminole 
Tribe of Florida (Dania, Big Cypress, Brighton, Hollywood, & Tampa 
Reservations)); The Chickasaw Nation; The Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma; 
The Muscogee (Creek) Nation; and The Seminole Nation of Oklahoma with 
letters of support from the Alabama-Coushatta Tribe of Texas 
(previously listed as Alabama-Coushatta Tribes of Texas) and the Jena 
Band of Choctaw Indians.

History and Description of the Remains

    The human remains and associated funerary objects from Moundville 
and other sites in Hale and Tuscaloosa Counties, Alabama, that are in 
the possession of the University of Alabama Museums derive from various 
investigations and private collection donations primarily dating to the 
period 1930 to 2008. During its Native American occupation, the 
Moundville site and the surrounding area were inhabited by several 
thousand people in a relatively dense occupancy, and over a prolonged 
period of time. The large-scale excavations undertaken at Moundville, 
resulted in large numbers of human remains and associated funerary 
objects removed from their original burial locations, which are 
currently in the University's possession. The work of subsequent 
investigations at Moundville contributed to this number, as did 
excavations at associated sites in Hale and Tuscaloosa Counties, AL.
    At an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, two 
individuals were removed from an unknown location in Hale County, AL. 
The collection contains no additional information as to the origin of 
the human remains and is simply designated as ``1Ha.'' Based on 
morphological characteristics identified through osteological analysis, 
the human remains are Native American. No known individuals are 
identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    In the 1930s, human remains representing, at minimum, nine 
individuals were excavated and removed from Site 1Ha7, the White site, 
as part of the Black Warrior River Basin Survey conducted by Walter B. 
Jones of the Alabama Museum of Natural History. The site consists of a 
mound and associated village with Late Woodland, Miller III and 
Mississippian, Moundville II phase occupations. No known individuals 
were identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    In the 1930s, human remains representing, at minimum, one 
individual were excavated and removed from Site 1Ha11, the Powers site, 
by the University of Alabama. The site includes evidence of Late 
Woodland, Miller III phase, and Mississippian occupations. No known 
individual was identified. The three associated funerary objects 
include bones and ceramics.
    Beginning in 1949, and continuing as part of the program of field 
work and collections research on the Protohistoric period, human 
remains representing, at minimum, 33 individuals were excavated and 
removed from Site 1Ha19, the Big Prairie Creek site, under the 
direction of Cailup B. Curren, Jr. The work was carried out initially 
through the University of Alabama Department of Anthropology and 
subsequently through the University of Alabama Museums. The site is 
attributed to the Late Mississippian/Protohistoric and Moundville IV 
phase occupations. No known individuals were identified. The 43 lots of 
associated funerary objects include burial urns, ceramic vessels, 
ceramic sherds, lithics, faunal bones, daub, and shells.
    In the 1930s and again in 1997, human remains representing, at 
minimum, 13 individuals were excavated and removed from Site 1Tu1, the 
Pride Place site. The site dates from Late Woodland, West Jefferson 
phase to the Moundville III phase. No known individuals were 
identified. The three lots of associated funerary objects include 
ceramic vessels, ceramic sherds, lithics, red ochre, discoidals, fired 
clay, sandstone fragments, and a large stone.
    In 1932, human remains representing, at minimum, 16 individuals 
were excavated and removed from Site 1Tu2, the Snows Bend site, as part 
of the Black Warrior River Basin Survey. The site consists of a large 
village and is associated with an adjacent mound (Site 1Tu3). It dates 
to the Late Woodland West Jefferson and Mississippian Moundville II and 
III phases. No known individuals were identified. The eight lots of 
associated funerary objects include ceramic vessels and ceramic sherds.
    Beginning in 1932 and continuing as part of the program of field 
work and collections research on the Protohistoric period, human 
remains representing, at minimum, 81 individuals were excavated and 
removed from Site 1Tu4, the Moody Slough site, under the direction of 
Cailup B. Curren, Jr. The work was carried out initially through the 
University of Alabama Department of Anthropology and subsequently 
through the University of Alabama Museums. The site is attributed to 
the Late Mississippian/Protohistoric and Moundville IV phase 
occupations. No known individuals were identified. The 69 lots of 
associated funerary objects include burial urns, faunal and botanical 
remains, pottery sherds, incised sandstone, shell ornaments, daub, and 
lithics.
    Beginning in 1931-1932 and continuing as part of the program of 
field work and collections research on the Protohistoric period, human 
remains representing, at minimum, 26 individuals were excavated and 
removed from Site 1Tu5, the Lon Robertson site, under the direction of 
Cailup B. Curren, Jr. The work was carried out initially through the 
University of Alabama Department of Anthropology and subsequently 
through the University of Alabama Museums. Curren identified the site 
as 1Tu93/5, thereby combining two sites in his description. The site is 
attributed to the

[[Page 52997]]

Late Mississippian/Protohistoric and Moundville IV phase occupations. 
No known individuals were identified. The one lot of associated 
funerary objects includes ceramic vessels, such as burial urns, and a 
stone axe.
    In 1933, human remains representing, at minimum, eight individuals 
were excavated and removed from Site 1Tu20, the Barger Bluff Shelter 
site, as part of the Black Warrior River Basin Survey. The site, 
consisting of a shelter above the Black Warrior River, is likely 
related to Site 1Tu17, a Mississippian Stage occupation located on the 
terrace below it. No known individuals were identified. No associated 
funerary objects are present.
    In the 1930s, human remains representing, at minimum, one 
individual were excavated and removed from Site 1Tu34, an unnamed site 
on the Black Warrior River. The site is believed to be related to the 
Moundville (1Tu500), Snows Bend (1Tu2), and 1Tu7 sites. No known 
individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    Beginning in the 1930s and continuing as part of the program of 
field work and collections research on the Protohistoric period, human 
remains representing, at minimum, 15 individuals were excavated and 
removed from Site 1Tu42 (1Tu42/43), the Moon Lake site, under the 
direction of Cailup B. Curren, Jr. The work was carried out initially 
through the University of Alabama Department of Anthropology and 
subsequently through the University of Alabama Museums. The site 
consists of a Mississippian village (originally identified by Curren as 
the Wiggins site [1984] and denoted 1Tu43) and a mound (originally 
documented by Clarence B. Moore (1905) and denoted 1Tu42). Nine of the 
individuals were excavated and removed from the village area (1Tu43) 
and six were excavated and removed from the mound (1Tu42). No known 
individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.
    At an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, nine 
individuals were excavated and removed from Site 1Tu44 (also known as 
1Tu346 and 1Tu45), the Jones Ferry site. This site was investigated by 
Clarence B. Moore in 1905 and documented by the University of Alabama 
in 1932. In 1979, it was reinvestigated as part of a University of 
Michigan survey. In the 1980s, it was further reinvestigated by Cailup 
B. Curren, Jr., at which time it was given the number 1Tu346. The site 
is comprised of a mound (1Tu44) and the associated village (1Tu45). It 
is attributed to the Late Woodland, West Jefferson phase and the 
subsequent Mississippian, Moundville I phase. No known individuals were 
identified. The three lots of associated funerary objects include 
ceramics, daub, animal bones, lithic debris, shells, and soil.
    Beginning in 1933 and continuing as part of the program of field 
work and collections research on the Protohistoric period, human 
remains representing, at minimum, 49 individuals were excavated and 
removed from Site 1Tu49, the Fosters Ferry site, also known as the 
Baker site, under the direction of Cailup B. Curren, Jr. The work was 
carried out initially through the University of Alabama Department of 
Anthropology and subsequently through the University of Alabama 
Museums. The site is attributed to the Late Mississippian/Protohistoric 
and Moundville IV phase occupations. No known individuals were 
identified. The 16 lots of associated funerary objects include ceramic 
vessels and sherds, many of them attributable to burial urns.
    Beginning in the 1930s and continuing as part of the program of 
field work and collections research on the Protohistoric period, human 
remains representing, at minimum, four individuals were excavated and 
removed from Site 1Tu93, an unnamed site on the Black Warrior River, 
under the direction of Cailup B. Curren, Jr. The work was carried out 
initially through the University of Alabama Department of Anthropology 
and subsequently through the University of Alabama Museums. Curren 
identified the site as 1Tu93/5, thereby combining two sites in his 
description. The site is attributed to the Late Mississippian/
Protohistoric, Moundville IV phase occupations. No known individuals 
were identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    In 1936, human remains representing, at minimum, two individuals 
were excavated and removed by a member of the Pate family from Site 
1Tu103, a feature he identified in a plowed field on a bend in the 
North River. No known individuals were identified. No associated 
funerary objects are present.
    At an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, one 
individual buried in a ceramic urn were discovered and removed from 
Site 1Tu235, a plowed field on Big Sandy Creek near Moundville 
(1Tu500). The site was documented by Steve Wimberly in 1948. The urn 
indicates a Late Mississippian/Protohistoric, Moundville IV phase 
occupation. No known individual was identified. The one associated 
funerary object is the burial urn.
    At an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, one 
individual were removed from Site 1Tu267 on the University of Alabama 
campus. The collection includes one proximal femur with no additional 
provenience information. No known individual was identified. No 
associated funerary objects are present.
    In 1976, as part of the program of field work and collections 
research on the Protohistoric period, human remains representing, at 
minimum, 18 individuals were excavated and removed from Site 1Tu277 
(also identified as 1Tu343), the Phillips site, under the direction of 
Cailup B. Curren, Jr. The work was carried out initially through the 
University of Alabama Department of Anthropology and subsequently 
through the University of Alabama Museums. The site is attributed to 
the Late Mississippian/Protohistoric and Moundville IV phase 
occupations. No known individuals were identified. The two associated 
funerary objects are two burial urns.
    Sometime during the period 1977-2003, human remains representing, 
at minimum, one individual were excavated and removed from Site 1Tu338, 
an unnamed site located in Big Sandy Bottoms upstream of Moundville. 
The site was recorded in 1977 and investigated on multiple occasions by 
the University of Alabama and Panamerican Consultants until 2003. No 
known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.
    During a period from the 1930s to the late 1980s, human remains 
representing, at minimum, 9,954 individuals were excavated and removed 
from Site 1Tu500, the Moundville site, during various excavations, 
including field schools conducted by the University of Alabama, and in 
the course of efforts to stabilize the shoreline abutting the site. 
Moundville, a large mound complex on the banks of the Black Warrior 
River whose occupation spans the Late Woodland and the West Jefferson 
phase through the Moundville I, II, and III phases, and terminates in 
the Late Mississippian/Protohistoric Moundville IV phase, has been the 
subject of two centuries of archeological inquiry. No known individuals 
were identified. The 1,371 lots of associated funerary objects include 
pottery vessels, pottery sherds, greenstone celts, stone and copper 
discoidals, projectile points, beads, graphite, paint, and copper and 
stone ornaments. Of those lots, 318 lots are currently missing and 264 
lots were stolen in 1980.
    During the 2000-2003 Black Warrior Valley Survey, human remains 
representing, at minimum, one

[[Page 52998]]

individual were excavated and removed from Site 1Tu876, the Fitts site, 
a small Mississippian farmstead. No known individual was identified. No 
associated funerary objects are present.

Determinations Made by the University of Alabama Museums

    Officials of the University of Alabama Museums have determined 
that:
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described 
in this notice represent the physical remains of 10,245 individuals of 
Native American ancestry.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A), the 1,520 objects 
described in this notice are reasonably believed to have been placed 
with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as 
part of the death rite or ceremony.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of 
shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native 
American human remains and associated funerary objects and the Alabama-
Coushatta Tribe of Texas (previously listed as Alabama-Coushatta Tribes 
of Texas); Alabama-Quassarte Tribal Town; Coushatta Tribe of Louisiana; 
Jena Band of Choctaw Indians; Seminole Tribe of Florida (previously 
listed as Seminole Tribe of Florida (Dania, Big Cypress, Brighton, 
Hollywood, & Tampa Reservations)); The Chickasaw Nation; The Choctaw 
Nation of Oklahoma; The Muscogee (Creek) Nation; and The Seminole 
Nation of Oklahoma (hereafter referred to as ``The Tribes'').

Additional Requestors and Disposition

    Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native 
Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to 
request transfer of control of these human remains and associated 
funerary objects should submit a written request with information in 
support of the request to Dr. William Bomar, Executive Director, 
University of Alabama Museums, Box 870340, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487, 
telephone (205) 348-7551, email [email protected], by September 29, 2022. 
After that date, if no additional requestors have come forward, 
transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary 
objects to The Tribes may proceed.
    The University of Alabama Museums is responsible for notifying The 
Tribes that this notice has been published.

    Dated: August 24, 2022.
Melanie O'Brien,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. 2022-18741 Filed 8-29-22; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-52-P