Special Conditions: Dassault Aviation Model Falcon 6X Airplane; Electronic-System Security Protection From Unauthorized Internal Access, 16630-16632 [2022-06205]

Download as PDF khammond on DSKJM1Z7X2PROD with RULES 16630 Federal Register / Vol. 87, No. 57 / Thursday, March 24, 2022 / Rules and Regulations improbable, that degrade the structural capability below the level required by part 25, or that significantly reduce the reliability of the remaining system. As far as reasonably practicable, the flightcrew must be made aware of these failures before flight. Certain elements of the control system, such as mechanical and hydraulic components, may use special periodic inspections, and electronic components may use daily checks, in lieu of detection and indication systems, to achieve the objective of this requirement. These certification-maintenance requirements must be limited to components that are not readily detectable by normal detection-and-indication systems, and where service history shows that inspections will provide an adequate level of safety. b. The existence of any failure condition, not extremely improbable, during flight, that could significantly affect the structural capability of the airplane, and for which the associated reduction in airworthiness can be minimized by suitable flight limitations, must be signaled to the flightcrew. For example, failure conditions that result in a factor of safety between the airplane strength and the loads of part 25, subpart C, below 1.25, or flutter margins below V’’, must be signaled to the crew during flight. 4. Dispatch with known failure conditions. If the airplane is to be dispatched in a known system-failure condition that affects structural performance, or that affects the reliability of the remaining system to maintain structural performance, then the provisions of these special conditions must be met, including the provisions of special condition 1, ‘‘System Fully Operative’’ for the dispatched condition, and special condition 2, ‘‘System in the Failure Condition’’ for subsequent failures. Expected operational limitations may be taken into account in establishing Pj as the probability of failure occurrence for determining the safety margin in Figure 1. Flight limitations and expected operational limitations may be taken into account in establishing Qj as the combined probability of being in the dispatched failure condition and the subsequent failure condition for the safety margins in Figures 2 and 3. These limitations must be such that the probability of being in this combined failure state, and then subsequently encountering limit load conditions, is extremely improbable. No reduction in these safety margins is allowed if the subsequent system-failure rate is greater than 10¥3 per flight hour. VerDate Sep<11>2014 16:07 Mar 23, 2022 Jkt 256001 Issued in Kansas City, Missouri, on March 18, 2022. Patrick R. Mullen, Manager, Technical Innovation Policy Branch, Policy and Innovation Division, Aircraft Certification Service. [FR Doc. 2022–06178 Filed 3–23–22; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4910–13–P DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 25 [Docket No. FAA–2021–0896; Special Conditions No. 25–812–SC] Special Conditions: Dassault Aviation Model Falcon 6X Airplane; ElectronicSystem Security Protection From Unauthorized Internal Access Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final special conditions; request for comments. AGENCY: These special conditions are issued for the Dassault Aviation (Dassault) Model Falcon 6X airplane. This airplane will have a novel or unusual design feature when compared to the state of technology envisioned in the airworthiness standards for transport category airplanes. This design feature is a digital systems architecture for the installation of a system with wireless and hardwired network and hosted application functionality that allows access, from sources internal to the airplane, to the airplane’s internal electronic components. The applicable airworthiness regulations do not contain adequate or appropriate safety standards for this design feature. These special conditions contain the additional safety standards that the Administrator considers necessary to establish a level of safety equivalent to that established by the existing airworthiness standards. DATES: This action is effective on Dassault on March 24, 2022. Send comments on or before May 9, 2022. ADDRESSES: Send comments identified by Docket No. FAA–2021–0896 using any of the following methods: • Federal eRegulations Portal: Go to https://www.regulations.gov/ and follow the online instructions for sending your comments electronically. • Mail: Send comments to Docket Operations, M–30, U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT), 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE, Room W12–140, West Building Ground Floor, Washington, DC 20590–0001. • Hand Delivery or Courier: Take comments to Docket Operations in SUMMARY: PO 00000 Frm 00006 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 Room W12–140 of the West Building Ground Floor at 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE, Washington, DC, between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, except Federal holidays. • Fax: Fax comments to Docket Operations at 202–493–2251. Privacy: Except for Confidential Business Information (CBI) as described in the following paragraph, and other information as described in title 14, Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) 11.35, the FAA will post all comments received without change to https:// www.regulations.gov/, including any personal information you provide. The FAA will also post a report summarizing each substantive verbal contact received about these special conditions. Confidential Business Information: Confidential Business Information (CBI) is commercial or financial information that is both customarily and actually treated as private by its owner. Under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) (5 U.S.C. 552), CBI is exempt from public disclosure. If your comments responsive to these special conditions, contain commercial or financial information that is customarily treated as private, that you actually treat as private, and that is relevant or responsive to these special conditions. Notice, it is important that you clearly designate the submitted comments as CBI. Please mark each page of your submission containing CBI as ‘‘PROPIN.’’ The FAA will treat such marked submissions as confidential under the FOIA, and the indicated comments will not be placed in the public docket of these special conditions. Send submissions containing CBI to the Information Contact below. Comments the FAA receives, which are not specifically designated as CBI, will be placed in the public docket for this rulemaking. Docket: Background documents or comments received may be read at https://www.regulations.gov/ at any time. Follow the online instructions for accessing the docket or go to Docket Operations in Room W12–140 of the West Building Ground Floor at 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE, Washington, DC, between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, except Federal holidays. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Thuan T. Nguyen, Aircraft Information Systems, AIR–622, Technical Innovation Policy Branch, Policy and Innovation Division, Aircraft Certification Service, Federal Aviation Administration, 2200 South 216th Street, Des Moines, Washington 98198; telephone and fax 206–231–3365; email thuan.t.nguyen@faa.gov. E:\FR\FM\24MRR1.SGM 24MRR1 Federal Register / Vol. 87, No. 57 / Thursday, March 24, 2022 / Rules and Regulations The substance of these special conditions has been published in the Federal Register for public comment in several prior instances with no substantive comments received. Therefore, the FAA finds that, pursuant to § 11.38(b), new comments are unlikely, and public notice and comment prior to this publication are unnecessary. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Comments Invited The FAA invites interested people to take part in this rulemaking by sending written comments, data, or views. The most helpful comments reference a specific portion of the special conditions, explain the reason for any recommended change, and include supporting data. The FAA will consider all comments received by the closing date for comments. The FAA may change these special conditions based on the comments received. khammond on DSKJM1Z7X2PROD with RULES Background On July 1, 2012, Dassault Aviation applied for a type certificate for its new Model Falcon 5X airplane. However, Dassault has decided not to release an airplane under the model designation Falcon 5X, instead choosing to change that model designation to Falcon 6X. In February of 2018, due to engine supplier issues, Dassault extended the type certificate application date for its Model Falcon 5X airplane under new Model Falcon 6X. This airplane is a twin-engine business jet with seating for 19 passengers, and has a maximum takeoff weight of 77,460 pounds. Type Certification Basis Under the provisions of 14 CFR 21.17, Dassault must show that the Model Falcon 6X airplane meets the applicable provisions of part 25, as amended by amendments 25–1 through 25–146. If the Administrator finds that the applicable airworthiness regulations (e.g., 14 CFR part 25) do not contain adequate or appropriate safety standards for the Dassault Model Falcon 6X airplane because of a novel or unusual design feature, special conditions are prescribed under the provisions of § 21.16. Special conditions are initially applicable to the model for which they are issued. Should the type certificate for that model be amended later to include any other model that incorporates the same novel or unusual design feature, these special conditions would also apply to the other model under § 21.101. In addition to the applicable airworthiness regulations and special VerDate Sep<11>2014 16:07 Mar 23, 2022 Jkt 256001 conditions, the Dassault Model Falcon 6X airplane must comply with the fuelvent and exhaust-emission requirements of 14 CFR part 34, and the noisecertification requirements of 14 CFR part 36. The FAA issues special conditions, as defined in 14 CFR 11.19, in accordance with § 11.38, and they become part of the type certification basis under § 21.17(a)(2). Novel or Unusual Design Features The Dassault Model Falcon 6X airplane will incorporate the following novel or unusual design feature: A digital systems architecture for the installation of a system with wireless and hardwired network and hosted application functionality that allows access, from sources internal to the airplane, to the airplane’s internal electronic components. Discussion The digital systems architecture for the Aircraft Control Domain and the Airline Information Services Domain by unauthorized persons in the Passenger Services Domain system with wireless network and hosted application functionality on these Dassault Falcon 6X airplanes is a novel or unusual design feature for transport category airplanes because it is composed of several connected wireless and hardwired networks. This proposed network architecture is used for a diverse set of airplane functions, including: • Flight-safety related control and navigation systems, • airline business and administrative support, and • passenger entertainment. The airplane control domain and airline information-services domain of these networks perform functions required for the safe operation and maintenance of the airplane. Previously, these domains had very limited connectivity with other network sources. This network architecture creates a potential for unauthorized persons to access the aircraft control domain and airline information-services domain from sources internal to the airplane, and presents security vulnerabilities related to the introduction of computer viruses and worms, user errors, and intentional sabotage of airplane electronic assets (networks, systems, and databases) critical to the safety and maintenance of the airplane. The existing FAA regulations did not anticipate these networked airplanesystem architectures. Furthermore, these regulations and the current guidance PO 00000 Frm 00007 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 16631 material do not address potential security vulnerabilities, which could be exploited by unauthorized access to airplane networks, data buses, and servers. Therefore, these special conditions ensure that the security (i.e., confidentiality, integrity, and availability) of airplane systems will not be compromised by unauthorized hardwired or wireless electronic connections from within the airplane. These special conditions also require the applicant to provide appropriate instructions to the operator to maintain all electronic-system safeguards that have been implemented as part of the original network design so that this feature does not allow or reintroduce security threats. These special conditions contain the additional safety standards that the Administrator considers necessary to establish a level of safety equivalent to that established by the existing airworthiness standards. Applicability As discussed above, these special conditions are applicable to the Dassault Model Falcon 6X airplane. Should Dassault apply at a later date for a change to the type certificate to include another model incorporating the same novel or unusual design feature, these special conditions would apply to that model as well. Conclusion This action affects only a certain novel or unusual design feature on one model of airplane. It is not a rule of general applicability. List of Subjects in 14 CFR Part 25 Aircraft, Aviation safety, Reporting and recordkeeping requirements. Authority Citation The authority citation for these special conditions is as follows: Authority: 49 U.S.C. 106(f), 106(g), 40113, 44701, 44702, 44704. The Special Conditions Accordingly, pursuant to the authority delegated to me by the Administrator, the following special conditions are issued as part of the type certification basis for the Dassault Aviation Model Falcon 6X airplane for airplane electronic-system security protection from unauthorized internal access. 1. The applicant must ensure that the design provides isolation from, or airplane electronic-system security protection against, access by unauthorized sources internal to the airplane. The design must prevent E:\FR\FM\24MRR1.SGM 24MRR1 16632 Federal Register / Vol. 87, No. 57 / Thursday, March 24, 2022 / Rules and Regulations inadvertent and malicious changes to, and all adverse impacts upon, airplane equipment, systems, networks, and other assets required for safe flight and operations. 2. The applicant must establish appropriate procedures to allow the operator to ensure that continued airworthiness of the airplane is maintained, including all post-typecertification modifications that may have an impact on the approved electronic-system security safeguards. Issued in Kansas City, Missouri, on March 18, 2022. Patrick R. Mullen, Manager, Technical Innovation Policy Branch, Policy and Innovation Division, Aircraft Certification Service. [FR Doc. 2022–06205 Filed 3–23–22; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4910–13–P Examining the AD Docket DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 39 [Docket No. FAA–2021–0021; Project Identifier MCAI–2020–01088–R; Amendment 39–21994; AD 2021–03–16R1] RIN 2120–AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Helicopters Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of Transportation (DOT). ACTION: Final rule; removal; request for comments. AGENCY: The FAA is removing Airworthiness Directive (AD) 2021–03– 16, which applied to all Airbus Helicopters Model AS350B, AS350B1, AS350B2, AS350B3, AS350BA, AS350D, AS355E, AS355F, AS355F1, AS355F2, AS355N, and AS355NP helicopters. AD 2021–03–16 required inspecting each sliding door and replacing the upper rail or front roller or removing the front roller from service if necessary. Since the FAA issued AD 2021–03–16, inspection results and further investigation have confirmed that the in-flight loss of a sliding door, which prompted AD 2021–03–16, was an isolated case resulting from incorrect operation and maintenance error. Therefore, the FAA has determined that no unsafe condition is likely to exist or develop on the sliding doors on other helicopters in the fleet. Accordingly, AD 2021–03–16 is removed. DATES: This AD becomes effective March 24, 2022. The FAA must receive comments on this AD by May 9, 2022. khammond on DSKJM1Z7X2PROD with RULES SUMMARY: VerDate Sep<11>2014 16:07 Mar 23, 2022 You may send comments, using the procedures found in 14 CFR 11.43 and 11.45, by any of the following methods: • Federal eRulemaking Portal: Go to https://www.regulations.gov. Follow the instructions for submitting comments. • Fax: 202–493–2251. • Mail: U.S. Department of Transportation, Docket Operations, M–30, West Building Ground Floor, Room W12–140, 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE, Washington, DC 20590. • Hand Delivery: U.S. Department of Transportation, Docket Operations, M–30, West Building Ground Floor, Room W12–140, 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE, Washington, DC 20590, between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, except Federal holidays. ADDRESSES: Jkt 256001 You may examine the AD docket at https://www.regulations.gov by searching for and locating Docket No. FAA–2021–0021; or in person at Docket Operations between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, except Federal holidays. The AD docket contains this final rule, the European Union Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) AD, any comments received, and other information. The address for Docket Operations is U.S. Department of Transportation, Docket Operations, M–30, West Building Ground Floor, Room W12–140, 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE, Washington, DC 20590. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Matt Fuller, AD Program Manager, General Aviation & Rotorcraft Unit, Airworthiness Products Section, Operational Safety Branch, FAA, 10101 Hillwood Pkwy., Fort Worth, TX 76177; telephone 817–222–5110; email matthew.fuller@faa.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Comments Invited The FAA invites you to send any written data, views, or arguments about this final rule. Send your comments to an address listed under ADDRESSES. Include ‘‘Docket No. FAA–2021–0021 and Project Identifier MCAI–2020– 01088–R’’ at the beginning of your comments. The most helpful comments reference a specific portion of the final rule, explain the reason for any recommended change, and include supporting data. The FAA will consider all comments received by the closing date and may amend this final rule because of those comments. Except for Confidential Business Information (CBI) as described in the following paragraph, and other information as described in 14 CFR PO 00000 Frm 00008 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 11.35, the FAA will post all comments received, without change, to https:// www.regulations.gov, including any personal information you provide. The agency will also post a report summarizing each substantive verbal contact received about this final rule. Confidential Business Information CBI is commercial or financial information that is both customarily and actually treated as private by its owner. Under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) (5 U.S.C. 552), CBI is exempt from public disclosure. If your comments responsive to this AD contain commercial or financial information that is customarily treated as private, that you actually treat as private, and that is relevant or responsive to this AD, it is important that you clearly designate the submitted comments as CBI. Please mark each page of your submission containing CBI as ‘‘PROPIN.’’ The FAA will treat such marked submissions as confidential under the FOIA, and they will not be placed in the public docket of this AD. Submissions containing CBI should be sent to Matt Fuller, AD Program Manager, General Aviation & Rotorcraft Unit, Airworthiness Products Section, Operational Safety Branch, FAA, 10101 Hillwood Pkwy., Fort Worth, TX 76177; telephone 817–222– 5110; email matthew.fuller@faa.gov. Any commentary that the FAA receives which is not specifically designated as CBI will be placed in the public docket for this rulemaking. Background EASA, which is the Technical Agent for the Member States of the European Union, has issued EASA AD 2020– 0175–CN, dated September 13, 2021 (EASA AD 2020–0175–CN) to cancel EASA AD 2020–0175, dated August 5, 2020 (EASA AD 2020–0175) which was issued to correct an unsafe condition for all serial-numbered Airbus Helicopters Model AS 350 and AS 355 helicopters if equipped with a left-hand (LH) and/or right-hand (RH) sliding door. EASA AD 2020–0175 prompted FAA AD 2021–03–16, Amendment 39– 21419 (86 FR 9433, February 16, 2021) (AD 2021–03–16). AD 2021–03–16 applied to Airbus Helicopters Model AS350B, AS350B1, AS350B2, AS350B3, AS350BA, AS350D, AS355E, AS355F, AS355F1, AS355F2, AS355N, and AS355NP helicopters with any sliding door installed. AD 2021–03–16 required, within 30 hours time-inservice, inspecting the upper rail of each RH and LH door for parallelism, deformation, corrosion, and cracking and repairing or replacing the upper rail before further flight if necessary; and E:\FR\FM\24MRR1.SGM 24MRR1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 87, Number 57 (Thursday, March 24, 2022)]
[Rules and Regulations]
[Pages 16630-16632]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2022-06205]


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DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION

Federal Aviation Administration

14 CFR Part 25

[Docket No. FAA-2021-0896; Special Conditions No. 25-812-SC]


Special Conditions: Dassault Aviation Model Falcon 6X Airplane; 
Electronic-System Security Protection From Unauthorized Internal Access

AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT.

ACTION: Final special conditions; request for comments.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: These special conditions are issued for the Dassault Aviation 
(Dassault) Model Falcon 6X airplane. This airplane will have a novel or 
unusual design feature when compared to the state of technology 
envisioned in the airworthiness standards for transport category 
airplanes. This design feature is a digital systems architecture for 
the installation of a system with wireless and hardwired network and 
hosted application functionality that allows access, from sources 
internal to the airplane, to the airplane's internal electronic 
components. The applicable airworthiness regulations do not contain 
adequate or appropriate safety standards for this design feature. These 
special conditions contain the additional safety standards that the 
Administrator considers necessary to establish a level of safety 
equivalent to that established by the existing airworthiness standards.

DATES: This action is effective on Dassault on March 24, 2022. Send 
comments on or before May 9, 2022.

ADDRESSES: Send comments identified by Docket No. FAA-2021-0896 using 
any of the following methods:
     Federal eRegulations Portal: Go to https://www.regulations.gov/ and follow the online instructions for sending 
your comments electronically.
     Mail: Send comments to Docket Operations, M-30, U.S. 
Department of Transportation (DOT), 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE, Room 
W12-140, West Building Ground Floor, Washington, DC 20590-0001.
     Hand Delivery or Courier: Take comments to Docket 
Operations in Room W12-140 of the West Building Ground Floor at 1200 
New Jersey Avenue SE, Washington, DC, between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday 
through Friday, except Federal holidays.
     Fax: Fax comments to Docket Operations at 202-493-2251.
    Privacy: Except for Confidential Business Information (CBI) as 
described in the following paragraph, and other information as 
described in title 14, Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) 11.35, the 
FAA will post all comments received without change to https://www.regulations.gov/, including any personal information you provide. 
The FAA will also post a report summarizing each substantive verbal 
contact received about these special conditions.
    Confidential Business Information: Confidential Business 
Information (CBI) is commercial or financial information that is both 
customarily and actually treated as private by its owner. Under the 
Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) (5 U.S.C. 552), CBI is exempt from 
public disclosure. If your comments responsive to these special 
conditions, contain commercial or financial information that is 
customarily treated as private, that you actually treat as private, and 
that is relevant or responsive to these special conditions. Notice, it 
is important that you clearly designate the submitted comments as CBI. 
Please mark each page of your submission containing CBI as ``PROPIN.'' 
The FAA will treat such marked submissions as confidential under the 
FOIA, and the indicated comments will not be placed in the public 
docket of these special conditions. Send submissions containing CBI to 
the Information Contact below. Comments the FAA receives, which are not 
specifically designated as CBI, will be placed in the public docket for 
this rulemaking.
    Docket: Background documents or comments received may be read at 
https://www.regulations.gov/ at any time. Follow the online 
instructions for accessing the docket or go to Docket Operations in 
Room W12-140 of the West Building Ground Floor at 1200 New Jersey 
Avenue SE, Washington, DC, between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday through 
Friday, except Federal holidays.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Thuan T. Nguyen, Aircraft Information 
Systems, AIR-622, Technical Innovation Policy Branch, Policy and 
Innovation Division, Aircraft Certification Service, Federal Aviation 
Administration, 2200 South 216th Street, Des Moines, Washington 98198; 
telephone and fax 206-231-3365; email [email protected].

[[Page 16631]]


SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The substance of these special conditions 
has been published in the Federal Register for public comment in 
several prior instances with no substantive comments received. 
Therefore, the FAA finds that, pursuant to Sec.  11.38(b), new comments 
are unlikely, and public notice and comment prior to this publication 
are unnecessary.

Comments Invited

    The FAA invites interested people to take part in this rulemaking 
by sending written comments, data, or views. The most helpful comments 
reference a specific portion of the special conditions, explain the 
reason for any recommended change, and include supporting data.
    The FAA will consider all comments received by the closing date for 
comments. The FAA may change these special conditions based on the 
comments received.

Background

    On July 1, 2012, Dassault Aviation applied for a type certificate 
for its new Model Falcon 5X airplane. However, Dassault has decided not 
to release an airplane under the model designation Falcon 5X, instead 
choosing to change that model designation to Falcon 6X.
    In February of 2018, due to engine supplier issues, Dassault 
extended the type certificate application date for its Model Falcon 5X 
airplane under new Model Falcon 6X. This airplane is a twin-engine 
business jet with seating for 19 passengers, and has a maximum takeoff 
weight of 77,460 pounds.

Type Certification Basis

    Under the provisions of 14 CFR 21.17, Dassault must show that the 
Model Falcon 6X airplane meets the applicable provisions of part 25, as 
amended by amendments 25-1 through 25-146.
    If the Administrator finds that the applicable airworthiness 
regulations (e.g., 14 CFR part 25) do not contain adequate or 
appropriate safety standards for the Dassault Model Falcon 6X airplane 
because of a novel or unusual design feature, special conditions are 
prescribed under the provisions of Sec.  21.16.
    Special conditions are initially applicable to the model for which 
they are issued. Should the type certificate for that model be amended 
later to include any other model that incorporates the same novel or 
unusual design feature, these special conditions would also apply to 
the other model under Sec.  21.101.
    In addition to the applicable airworthiness regulations and special 
conditions, the Dassault Model Falcon 6X airplane must comply with the 
fuel-vent and exhaust-emission requirements of 14 CFR part 34, and the 
noise-certification requirements of 14 CFR part 36.
    The FAA issues special conditions, as defined in 14 CFR 11.19, in 
accordance with Sec.  11.38, and they become part of the type 
certification basis under Sec.  21.17(a)(2).

Novel or Unusual Design Features

    The Dassault Model Falcon 6X airplane will incorporate the 
following novel or unusual design feature:
    A digital systems architecture for the installation of a system 
with wireless and hardwired network and hosted application 
functionality that allows access, from sources internal to the 
airplane, to the airplane's internal electronic components.

Discussion

    The digital systems architecture for the Aircraft Control Domain 
and the Airline Information Services Domain by unauthorized persons in 
the Passenger Services Domain system with wireless network and hosted 
application functionality on these Dassault Falcon 6X airplanes is a 
novel or unusual design feature for transport category airplanes 
because it is composed of several connected wireless and hardwired 
networks. This proposed network architecture is used for a diverse set 
of airplane functions, including:
     Flight-safety related control and navigation systems,
     airline business and administrative support, and
     passenger entertainment.
    The airplane control domain and airline information-services domain 
of these networks perform functions required for the safe operation and 
maintenance of the airplane. Previously, these domains had very limited 
connectivity with other network sources. This network architecture 
creates a potential for unauthorized persons to access the aircraft 
control domain and airline information-services domain from sources 
internal to the airplane, and presents security vulnerabilities related 
to the introduction of computer viruses and worms, user errors, and 
intentional sabotage of airplane electronic assets (networks, systems, 
and databases) critical to the safety and maintenance of the airplane.
    The existing FAA regulations did not anticipate these networked 
airplane-system architectures. Furthermore, these regulations and the 
current guidance material do not address potential security 
vulnerabilities, which could be exploited by unauthorized access to 
airplane networks, data buses, and servers. Therefore, these special 
conditions ensure that the security (i.e., confidentiality, integrity, 
and availability) of airplane systems will not be compromised by 
unauthorized hardwired or wireless electronic connections from within 
the airplane. These special conditions also require the applicant to 
provide appropriate instructions to the operator to maintain all 
electronic-system safeguards that have been implemented as part of the 
original network design so that this feature does not allow or 
reintroduce security threats.
    These special conditions contain the additional safety standards 
that the Administrator considers necessary to establish a level of 
safety equivalent to that established by the existing airworthiness 
standards.

Applicability

    As discussed above, these special conditions are applicable to the 
Dassault Model Falcon 6X airplane. Should Dassault apply at a later 
date for a change to the type certificate to include another model 
incorporating the same novel or unusual design feature, these special 
conditions would apply to that model as well.

Conclusion

    This action affects only a certain novel or unusual design feature 
on one model of airplane. It is not a rule of general applicability.

List of Subjects in 14 CFR Part 25

    Aircraft, Aviation safety, Reporting and recordkeeping 
requirements.

Authority Citation

    The authority citation for these special conditions is as follows:

    Authority: 49 U.S.C. 106(f), 106(g), 40113, 44701, 44702, 44704.

The Special Conditions

    Accordingly, pursuant to the authority delegated to me by the 
Administrator, the following special conditions are issued as part of 
the type certification basis for the Dassault Aviation Model Falcon 6X 
airplane for airplane electronic-system security protection from 
unauthorized internal access.
    1. The applicant must ensure that the design provides isolation 
from, or airplane electronic-system security protection against, access 
by unauthorized sources internal to the airplane. The design must 
prevent

[[Page 16632]]

inadvertent and malicious changes to, and all adverse impacts upon, 
airplane equipment, systems, networks, and other assets required for 
safe flight and operations.
    2. The applicant must establish appropriate procedures to allow the 
operator to ensure that continued airworthiness of the airplane is 
maintained, including all post-type-certification modifications that 
may have an impact on the approved electronic-system security 
safeguards.

    Issued in Kansas City, Missouri, on March 18, 2022.
Patrick R. Mullen,
Manager, Technical Innovation Policy Branch, Policy and Innovation 
Division, Aircraft Certification Service.
[FR Doc. 2022-06205 Filed 3-23-22; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4910-13-P